35 Burst results for "Human Rights"

 Pope: Don't send migrants back to Libya and 'inhumane' camps

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 9 hrs ago

Pope: Don't send migrants back to Libya and 'inhumane' camps

"Pope Francis has made a plea to the international community to stop the practice of returning migrants rescued at seats in Libya and other unsafe countries or don't know what the police told his truck I would use it to scrap that human race in the microwave yes and his backline Francis went on to ask the international community find a common concrete and lasting solutions to manage the flow of migrants and IBM across the Mediterranean the pope said those was sent back to Libya are exposed to inhumane violence in detention facility similar to concentration camps the U. N. human rights organizations have condemned the detention centers citing practices of beatings rape and other forms of torture and insufficient food hi

Pope Francis Libya Francis Mediterranean IBM Pope U.
Report: Far-right anti-government group grows significantly

AP News Radio

01:03 min | 3 d ago

Report: Far-right anti-government group grows significantly

"A human rights organization is expressing concerns over the rapid growth in membership of a far right anti government group the group is called people's rights it was founded by anti government activist Ammon Bundy who was arrested twice last year for disruptive protests against covert restrictions at the Idaho capital he's previously known for an armed standoff in twenty sixteen at an Oregon wildlife refuge and a dispute in Nevada with his father over grazing rights on government land the institute for research and education on human rights says Bundy's group has members in thirty eight states and is spreading to Canada there are some thirty three thousand members of fifty three percent increase in a year the institute's expressing concerns that people's rights calling for taking up arms to defend against government officials and its alliances with groups like the proud boys could effectively work to overturn civil rights and shape public policy I'm Jackie Quinn

Human Rights Organization Ammon Bundy Institute For Research And Edu Idaho Bundy Nevada Oregon Canada Jackie Quinn
Protestors disrupt flame lighting for Beijing Winter Games

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 6 d ago

Protestors disrupt flame lighting for Beijing Winter Games

"Three activists protesting human rights abuses in China broke into the archaeological sites where the flame lighting ceremony for the two thousand and twenty two Beijing winter Olympics was being held and run toward the newly that's towards holding it's about ten flag and a banner that read no genocide games the protesters climbed over a fence to enter the grounds and attempted to reach the temple of Hera where the ceremony was being held they were thrown to the ground by police and detained the flame was lit at the birthplace of the Asian Olympics in southern Greece under heavy police security earlier other protesters were detained by Greek police before they could reach the site pro democracy protests also had broken out during the lighting ceremony for the two thousand eight Beijing Summer Games I'm sorry I. Shockley

Olympics Beijing China Greek Police Greece Summer Games I. Shockley
Volunteers in the sky watch over migrant rescues by sea

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | Last week

Volunteers in the sky watch over migrant rescues by sea

"The German non governmental organization is monitoring migrant rescue operations from the yeah as authorities from nearby European countries have become increasingly reluctant to help twenty years on the twin engines and that crew members since nineteen of the microstates owned by NGOs see what's the apple creek document human rights violations committed against migrants at sea the team also relate to stress cases to nearby ships and authorities who have increasingly ignored that please nearly twenty three thousand people have died or gone missing in the Mediterranean trying to reach Europe since twenty fourteen according to the U. N.'s migration agency Phoenix Weiss head of C. which is ample enough rations is concerned that the apathy from neighboring European countries might turn into these just shifting all the competence to the Libyan actors who are not able to to search and rescue in general I'm Karen Thomas

German Non Governmental Organi U. N.'S Migration Agency Phoen Apple Mediterranean Europe Karen Thomas
"human rights" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

05:31 min | Last week

"human rights" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"I mean they're they're almost they're they're like if you use a moon wallet is like i mean it's so cool looking in it so seemless and they've spent so many hours thinking about your experience we are getting there whereas ten years ago it was like possibilities one of the things that signal doesn't have and i believe these kinds of habits is need to have is I hate the term but killer app which is like a dumb but very viral and popular reason to switch it. I didn't see exactly Abusing signal but have you seen a a a big reason to your on it manned. Which i mean the the railroad ivan. Switched everything to it. You know what i mean. Yeah the exodus to signal was In january they had a user surge for two main reasons. one hilariously enough of course was ilan. Tweeted you should use signal right Which is not insignificant and then the other one was That like what's app change kind of some of its terms of service in like you know announced to all of its users in this little pop up That it was going to be sort of changing the way it handled your data that spooked a lot of people so these two things really combined and tens of millions of people in the following weeks between january and february joined signal. It's like it really has had its day in the sun And they are like frantically trying to keep up with it like it's really nice to see that That that this encrypted messaging service which which prioritises your privacy In a way that you know you know the government again may know like the metadata but doesn't know exactly what you're saying unless they can get your hands on your phone i think that's very very powerful so it can be done. I don't wanna be too jaded here. I think it can be done. The other thing. I i think we can fight back and i think we can make not to make the digital communications tools and platforms In a way that that really benefits us yeah. I am not much. But i'm hopeful as well. I'm hopeful that if you look at the trend of technologies they ultimately are ones that respect privacy respect security and basic human rights mean. That's at least the hope. So gary kasparov. i'm russian. He means a lot to me. I'm personal level. He's the chairman of Human rights foundation. What is your you have to do with anything. What's your relationship like with him Do like chess would would or his pacific focuses on ideas around the hr gay. Just speak to it in general so our chairman it at human rights foundation was vaslav hobble Who of course was like the famous czech democracy activists Who you know helped lead the velvet revolution and then ended up becoming the first democratically elected Leader of the czech republic after the soviet union fell He passed away in two thousand eleven and it was very difficult to find a replacement Because he can fill hobble shoes. But if one could it would be gary right. So we like really tried to get gary to join and thankfully he agreed and We've had an amazing relationship with gary. Over the years i mean he's been relentless in his pursuit of freedom. I mean he could have retired and taking his career in a different direction and he could be hanging out with putin and have a pleasure yacht all kinds of stuff but he decided to risk it and if you actually studied like the times when he was running for president in russia a masha gessen followed him around in the man without a face..

Human rights foundation ilan gary kasparov gary chess czech republic soviet union putin masha gessen russia
"human rights" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

05:23 min | Last week

"human rights" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"Remarkable so. Obviously of seeing the positives of technology will certainly get into bitcoin. But i'm very concerned about. Essentially big data analysis like what people call a or general. You know specifically in specific kinds of i like very concerning. I think these are very authoritarian. I mean it's very hard to make a case that. Ai is going to be good for human rights very difficult. In my opinion it may be good for health. It may be good for our efforts to protect the planet. It may be good for a lot of scientific things. I find it very hard to believe. It'll be good for civil liberties fun. This is fun. 'cause i disagree Gang examples what. Ai applications will improve I thought you meant examples of stuff. That's already out there. Because i can give you examples that for example the the kind of things that i would like to work on but also the kind of things. I'm hoping to see which is a. I could be used by centralized powers by government by big organizations like facebook and twitter and so on to collect data about people right right. But i believe there's a huge hunger among people to have control over their own data so instead you can have a this distributed where people have complete ownership of their little. Ai systems so like the kind of stuff that i would like to build or like the c to be built. Is you think of it as personal assistance or a. That's owned by you and you get to give it out. You have complete control. Over all data you have complete control over everything that's Learnable about your day to day experiences that could be useful in this in the market of Goods and ideas and all those kinds of things so has to do with. So i know you talk about the surveillance which is very interesting. It's who gets to have control of the data. And i think i i believe there's a lot of hunger in among regular people have control over their data such that..

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"human rights" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

03:01 min | Last week

"human rights" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"But you're right. I think it is good to focus on the obvious violations of these principles as opposed to the the grey areas of course the grey areas of fascinating you mentioned. hr human rights foundation would is it. What is its mission. Yes i've been working for traf- since two thousand seven We are a charity. A nonprofit five three based in new york and our mission is to promote and protect individual rights and freedoms in authoritarian societies around the world. So again we. We define about ninety five countries as -tarian meaning. It's either a one party state or opposition. Politicians are outlawed or persecuted. There's no real free speech. There's no press freedom. There's no independent judiciary aren't really aren't checks and balances and even trying to create a human rights organization Or like an environmental group We would be illegal And the majority of the population lives in that environment. That's very important. You said fifty three percent percent four point. Three billion people in sl you outlined a lot of different Sources of suffering in the world and the sort of put people living under authoritarian governments as like more than all of them eh. Forget i forget all the examples you provided. sure. I mean it's Yeah maybe you mention if you remember. The number of people who are refugees. The number of people who suffer from natural disasters number of people who live under abject poverty. The number of people who don't have access to clean drinking water all of these are dwarfed by the number of people who live under authoritarianism and yet. It's not something that we talk about a lot because people are mercantilists and the powers that be are happy to sacrifice freedoms and privacy for money. We live in profit-seeking world to get evidence to this take a look at the list of sponsors of the upcoming olympics in in china with the cps currently committing genocide against the weaker population or look at the number of people and the famous investors who went to saudi arabia a couple months ago for the davos in the desert mean great dalia. Was there all kinds of people were there and or at least they were invited and they said they were going to go. And this is a government that at the time was torturing a female activists who just wanted to drive a car does the government that had murdered jamaica shoghi a brutal fashion Just a couple years earlier. So i mean at the end of the day when when it comes down to brass tacks i mean the powers-that-be even the free countries are led by people Who are very very happy to sacrifice all these pretty words about human rights when it when it comes down to prophets. Fortunately so did you think capitalism. That's maybe one of the flaws of capitalism. Is it turns a blind eye to injustices against human nature against the human rights away like it turns a blind eye authoritarian governments. Look i think that at the end of the day like.

human rights foundation new york cps dalia olympics saudi arabia china jamaica
"human rights" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

05:35 min | Last week

"human rights" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"What are some universal human rights that you believe all people should have so free speech freedom of assembly freedom of belief freedom to participate in your government. The freedoms have privacy the freedom to own things property rights these are all basic fundamental negative rights. What we call them. These are the basic fundamental human freedoms. What is negative rights negative rights our liberties and positive rights are entitlements. So after world war two when the un came together was largely compromise between the communist soviet union and the free united states right so the us had On its side of the un declaration of human rights a bunch of liberties essentially things like free speech. Freedom of association freedom of assembly the soviets wanted entitlements Like the right to work the right to have housing the right to water right to a vacation. So he actually read the declaration for human rights. it's negotiation between the soviets. And the americans later there was another document in the seventies released called the international covenant on civil and political rights. And this is what. Atf uses as it's sort of like lodestar Its founding document and this is like essentially an international agreement on the negative rights. Those are the things we choose to focus on. Because essentially authoritarian regimes can commit fraud and claim they're giving a positive rights the entitlements without having any of the negative liberties and they can do that. because they don't have any like free speech or press freedom When you when you take people's basic fundamental freedoms away it's quite easy to make like a potemkin village and pretend that there's the entitlements and that have good healthcare and you know. It's the same sort of thing that authoritarian done for decades cuba and venezuela and the soviet union. Do you think it's possible for authoritarian regimes to manipulate kind of lie about the negative rights as well by saying that the people have free speech the people have the freedom to assembly in all those kinds of things. Can you still manipulate the idea that the citizenry still has those rights. The opposition leader malaysia anwar ibrahim. He wants told me that the funny joke that you know in my country we have freedom of speech. We don't have freedom after speech so yeah. They can absolutely manipulate whatever they want. But i've done research into socioeconomic data. And what i'm telling you that authoritarian regimes which make up fifty three percent of the world's population across ninety five countries About four point three billion people. Those who live under those regimes are subject to Massive fraud when it comes to things like literacy rates Life expectancy Any sort of socioeconomic data economic growth. They can do this. Because there's no free press So for us. The human rights foundation and for people like me. We believe that the negative rights liberties the things that are in for example the bill of rights and the constitution. These things are the table and then we can build on top of that..

Freedom of association freedom un soviet union us Atf venezuela anwar ibrahim cuba assembly malaysia human rights foundation
Facebook expands harassment policy to protect public figures

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last week

Facebook expands harassment policy to protect public figures

"Hi Mike Rossi you're reporting Facebook expands its harassment policy to protect public figures Facebook has announced it is expanding its policies on harassment to protect public figures including celebrities elected officials and others in the public eye under the new policies Facebook will bar content that degrades or sexualized as public figures mirroring existing policies covering private individuals in addition Facebook is adding protections for government dissidents journalists and human rights activists around the world the changes come a week after former Facebook data scientist Francis how good told Congress the company's leadership knows how to make Facebook and Instagram saver but won't make the necessary changes because they have put their astronomical profits before people hi Mike Rossio

Facebook Mike Rossi Francis Congress Instagram Mike Rossio
Media groups welcome 2021 Nobel Peace Prize for journalists

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 2 weeks ago

Media groups welcome 2021 Nobel Peace Prize for journalists

"Media groups have welcomed the twenty twenty one Nobel Peace Prize for journalists who've battled to confront misinformation globally human rights activists and many others have been futuristically welcomed the awarding of this year's prize to journalists Maria resa of the Philippines and the meat you will write off of Russia at the time we media groups around the world face new pressures and crackdowns from the authorities another new threat is the rise of misinformation even in established democracies the committee to protect journalists says risa I move out of all of the personal threat and continues to defy censorship and repression to report the news leading the way for others to do the same Charles Taylor this month London

Maria Resa Nobel Peace Prize Philippines Russia Risa Charles Taylor London
Canadian Court Rules Misgendering Is a Human Rights Violation

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:20 min | 2 weeks ago

Canadian Court Rules Misgendering Is a Human Rights Violation

"Our neighbor to the north is becoming increasingly as are we by the way a police state. Here's an example. Not using people's preferred pronouns is a human rights offense. A canadian tribunal ruled while settling in employment dispute. The british columbia human rights tribunal ruled in favor of jessie nelson. British columbia restaurant server server. No long i don't know what's wrong with waiter allina. what's wrong. Waiter implies mail and waitress applies female and we can't possibly use that any longer. who was biologically female. But identifies as non binary right. It's not the same at all as transgender transgender is. We change your gender but non binary is there is no gender. that's by far. The most egregious attack on the dignity of the human species which is divided into male and female. The transgender does not deny that the human species is male or female. They denied that that they are biolo-. Biology is what defines their sex or their gender as they call it. But the non binary deny that there's even male and female there neither so the person needed to be called they and somebody worked refused to refer to the person as they and them and was penalized. And the it's now a human rights offense it's a It's against the law at least in british columbia. You must you must say them. That is what started. Jordan peterson in getting into public life when ottawa wanted to do the same thing dictate how you speak

British Columbia Human Rights Jessie Nelson Allina Columbia Jordan Peterson British Columbia Ottawa
"human rights" Discussed on Epicenter

Epicenter

06:40 min | 3 weeks ago

"human rights" Discussed on Epicenter

"And how do you kind of circumvent those things that's happened. It's possible and we definitely think about that. And we are building our technology in such a way where it is meant to be resistant for that. Exact scenario just in case that happens An and we do that by rather than having like a sort of single centralised appreciation in any one of these places we work with an ever growing number of independent liquidity providers who who basically make it possible for people to get their money in and out but that actually does Does actually help us with robustness for that scenario. But what i'll say something. A lot of people don't realize in this On this topic is that when governments institute capital controls like argentina did in that example. You're talking about the principle thing that they're trying to protect is the us dollar balance for the central bank. So they're saying we're not going to allow you to buy our dollars our central bank dollars because we need to preserve that dollar balance. For whatever reason you know to defend a pager to you know to pay for imports or whatever. There's some reason why their overall monetary situation has made it so that they don't have enough. Us dollars to freely allow people do that. Exchange if parallel exchange markets exist. That doesn't necessarily mean that doesn't directly influenced the central bank dollar bounce if you go by dollars from some third party broker where you're buying dollars. That are already abroad. That aren't part of the central bank system. You're not directly influencing that balance you could be driving up the price of the dollar you could. You could be doing something that might change the the price of the pacer of the price of the dollar in argentina. but that's actually not the principal concern as far as we can understand it. That's that's muses my view on the world so because of that that's why you see like really strict enforcement with banks in capital controls when it is that the central bank dollars that are in question. But things like crypto at least so far in argentina have actually been allowed to exist and the really hasn't been any pushback in any significant way yet. And that's my theory to. Why is that you know they the th there's sort of these parallel markets and actually. I'll tell you about one more minute. In argentina there's a phenomenon called kentucky dossier on which is like. I counted on on liquidation. And what that means is what they're saying is you're counting the dollar exchange rate when you liquidate some assets that you've bought so what happens is you can go and buy bonds on the argentine market. The you buy argentine government bonds. Usually you transfer them to a broker in probably new york in the us and you sell the same bonds for us dollars. So you start with pesos. And you end up with dollars. But you're going through the bond market instead of through the normal exchange system where you're taking the central banks dollars and that practice of kentucky linke has been commonplace in argentina for like i mean. I don't know how long we're like. Many many and businesses use that all the time when argentina has capital controls in place and its allowed to exist sometimes there's restrictions and time limits and whatever But you know the the powers that be recognized that there needs to be liquidity for their their their citizens and for their companies. And so it's not actually true that they're sort of trying to make it completely illegal to get any foreign currencies. It's just that they're limiting the ways that you can do it. i think. The problem ripened challenge of a few people. Living in this you know. Inflationary world's economies with capital control. That's the problem. That i can crypto people being seeking god. Bitcoin solving the acting scenes for raid on time. You know. of course you know you talked about the dollar example right where stable coins can kind of take all in keno behalf. Today ride favorites dying. Your usc yo your you save coins that you know you can use you. Can you can get your wallet. And so what is what's reeser. What's different about reserve Stable coin Addresses this problem better than the existing solutions Yeah so reserve. As a protocol basically allows the aggregation of crypto assets into baskets to create To create a token that's backed by that basket and so today what we have is a very very simple us dollar stable coined. That's just backed by true. Usd us dc and packs which are which are just some stable coins that you know are nicely picked to the dollar. The thing that we've done that's pretty different over the past year or two is. We've focused a lot on making the stable coin accessible to end consumers in these countries that have these issues. And so what does that mean we. We spent most of our time building and deploying an android app that gives you an account. That's a lot like sort of a cash-out account. It's like a simple dollar account and the thing that special about it is you can easily convert your money from venezuelan boulevards pesos or clemson paces in and out of these digital. Us dollars in you know usually a minute or so and so the difficult challenge there is providing that equity making it so that You know so that you can easily convert any amount you want to convert a back and forth and so in a country like this. It's like yeah a staple coin. That's cool in principle. But how do i get it you know. How do i actually spend it do. I need to understand These you don't need to go use a cryptocurrency exchange. That's kind of more built for speculators in as little bit confusing so the thing that The thing that we've done that i'm super excited about is we've made it so that people's parents you know ordinary people ordinary merchants You know people who don't know anything about cryptocurrency are now comfortable getting their money into a. Us dollar stable coin and saving it that way and spending it that way and so a lot of that you know at the beginning. We had no idea how to make markets. Do you make markets against a currency like the venezuelan bolivar. That's constantly going down So there was a lot of logistical challenges. Had to be solved to get to that point. So are you like integrating some kind of local payment processors. Are you know a how do people. How do people change now. They're argentinian puzzles for.

argentina argentine government Us kentucky Bitcoin usc new york clemson
Texas migrant camp empty, Haitians await word on their fate

AP News Radio

00:59 sec | Last month

Texas migrant camp empty, Haitians await word on their fate

"No migrants are left at a Texas border encampment about a week after nearly fifteen thousand people most of the patients huddled in makeshift shelters hoping for the chance to seek asylum so far around two thousand were flown back to Haiti and stepped up flights will continue over the weekend according to homeland security secretary Alejandro Mayorga ignoring criticism from democratic lawmakers and human rights groups who say they left because Haiti is an unsafe country my R. because defending the expulsions they are driven by a public health imperatives he says about twelve thousand four hundred will get a chance at asylum they're being allowed to stay at least temporarily five thousand of them in DHS custody meanwhile the mayor of del Rio Texas where the campus located says officials will search the brush along the Rio Grande to ensure no one is hiding and finish cleaning the site before re opening the international bridge Sunday night at the earliest I'm Julie Walker

Alejandro Mayorga Haiti Texas DHS Del Rio Rio Grande Julie Walker
Rep. Ted Deutch Strikes Back at Rep. Rashida Tlaib's Anti-Semitic Comments

Mark Levin

02:06 min | Last month

Rep. Ted Deutch Strikes Back at Rep. Rashida Tlaib's Anti-Semitic Comments

"Our country must suppose selling weapons to anyone anywhere without human rights law compliance The Israeli government isn't a part time regime not my words the words of Human Rights Watch and Israel's own Human Rights Watch organization bed sullen I urge my colleagues Please stand with me and so reporting you how much time do I have rich Ted deutsches a sort of moderate rather wimpy Democrat not a Florida And even he had enough of this Cut 13 go But mister speaker I can not I can not allow one of my colleagues to stand on the floor of the House of Representatives and label the Jewish democratic State of Israel in apartheid state I reject it today this caucus this body the House of Representatives will overwhelmingly stand with our ally the State of Israel in replenishing this defensive system If you believe in human rights if you believe in saving lives Israeli lives and Palestinian lives I say to my colleague who just besmirched our ally then you will support this legislation may have 15 more seconds 30 seconds Is recognized for an additional 30 seconds Mister speaker we can have an opportunity to debate lots of issues on the House floor But to falsely characterize the State of Israel is consistent with those Let's be clear It's consistent with those who advocate for the dismantling of the one Jewish state in the world And when there is no place on the map for one Jewish state that's anti semitism And I reject that

Israeli Government Human Rights Watch Organizatio Ted Deutsches Israel House Of Representatives Florida House
European court: Russia responsible for Litvinenko killing

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | Last month

European court: Russia responsible for Litvinenko killing

"The European Court of human rights this back to the conclusion of appreciation quarry that Russia was responsible for the killing of Alexander Litvinenko who died in twenty oh six off drinking tea laced with a radioactive material all the agent for the KGB and the post Soviet successor agency the FSB Litvinenko defected from Russia in two thousand and fed to London he fell violently ill on November one twenty six off the drinking tea with two Russian men at the London hotel to spend three weeks in hospital before he died he's T. was found to have been laced with radioactive polonium two one zero the British inquiry concluded in early twenty sixteen to Russian agents had killed then and go on that president Vladimir Putin I probably approved the operation Charles Taylor this month London

European Court Of Human Rights Alexander Litvinenko Russia London Hotel Litvinenko KGB FSB London Vladimir Putin Charles Taylor
3 Former U.S. Intelligence Operatives Admit Hacking for United Arab Emirates

the NewsWorthy

00:51 sec | Last month

3 Former U.S. Intelligence Operatives Admit Hacking for United Arab Emirates

"Three former. Us intelligence and military officials were behind an international hacking scheme newly released court documents show. They admitted the united arab emirates hired them to hack into computer networks around the world including right here in the us. They also sent advanced hacking technology from the us to help the uae spy on its enemies a team there ended up breaking into the computers and smartphones of thousands of targets including rival governments journalists and human rights activists. The justice department says the men committed computer fraud and violated export laws. But they made a deal to avoid a criminal trial instead. They'll have to pay almost one point seven million dollars in fines between the three of them and they'll have to cooperate with federal investigation. The men will also never again be able to get a us. Government security clearance. The justice department called it a first of its kind resolution so far. The emirati government has not commented

United Arab Emirates United States Justice Department Emirati Government
Donors Pledge $1.2 Billion in Emergency Funds for Afghans

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last month

Donors Pledge $1.2 Billion in Emergency Funds for Afghans

"The United Nations announced on Monday it's drummed up more than one point two billion dollars in emergency pledges for helping eleven million Afghans ahead up the first high level conference on Afghanistan since the Taliban took power a month ago western governments big traditional donors and others announced pledges the wood beyond the six hundred six million dollars that the U. N. was seeking to cover costs through the end of the year Afghans face an escalating humanitarian crisis in the homeland and millions more elsewhere in the region as the U. N. human rights chief Martin Griffiths voiced concerns about the Taliban's first steps in establishing power I'm Charles de Ledesma

United Nations Taliban Afghanistan U. U. N. Human Rights Martin Griffiths Charles De Ledesma
Bachelet Warns of Deteriorating Human Rights Situation in Afghanistan

UN News

00:48 sec | Last month

Bachelet Warns of Deteriorating Human Rights Situation in Afghanistan

"The international community should urgently show support for millions of vulnerable afghans who face perhaps their most perilous our the un secretary general said on monday leading the appeal in geneva for some six hundred million dollars to support emergency humanitarian aid across afghanistan. And tony guitarist said that. Even before the taliban takeover last month people were in the grip of one of the worst crises in the world one into afghans do not know whether next meal is coming from the un chief explained adding that many people could run out of food by the end of the month just as winter approaches the flash appeal for food lifesaving interventions and essential healthcare including matanal. Healthcare comes against a backdrop of deep concern. That women's rights are under threat from afghanistan's new rulers.

Tony Guitarist UN Geneva Afghanistan Taliban
UK Ditches Plans for Vaccine Passports at Crowded Venues

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | Last month

UK Ditches Plans for Vaccine Passports at Crowded Venues

"Britain's health secretary said the governments are vesting cools on the requirements of vaccine possible to night clubs and all the crowds defense in England's says he Chevy it said the original plan has been shelved for now but could be brought back to the table if kept at nineteen cases rise exponentially the retreat comes amid opposition from some of the conservative government supporters in parliament some members of the governing consecutive polity had concerns that the passport would be a burden on business an infringement on human rights but seem possible flight the one the British government was considering using already required in other European countries like France Karen Thomas London

Conservative Government Britain England Parliament British Government Karen Thomas London France
Against White Feminism With Rafia Zakaria

Woman's Hour

02:14 min | Last month

Against White Feminism With Rafia Zakaria

"Yesterday we spoke to the writer and campaigner. Julie bendel who in her new book is against type of feminism that she sees as most benefiting men today. I joined by raphael sakaria. Any american feminist. Who in her new book is arguing against type of feminism most benefits white women on behalf of domestic violence victims as a lawyer and a human rights activists years. She sees the issue of race as the biggest obstacle to true solidarity among women and she is calling for a moment of reckoning. Halbrook is called against white feminism rafi. Good morning welcome to the program. Good morning how are you. Thank you for being with us. I'm against white feminism. It is a very striking title at anew. Say you've taken a risk in writing this book. Why did you do it well off to be really blunt. I did it. Because i was quite tired. Like women Saying all the right things pretending to be low end even committed to Quote unquote intersectional. Feminism Where they recognize the importance of considering race and gender But when it comes to their actual lines were actually seating any space four women of color. It's an absolute no can do you. Now so you know for instance if you know if if if if a group of say why an women of color line for to be the top parson organization had in the book i say National organization of women They face tremendous marginalization personal attacks and all sorts of harassment. Honestly so i was just honestly tried to. I was i was done with it. You know i was done with. This pretends that women of color have to engage in to be sort of accepted into a system that's been created by white women and four white women

Julie Bendel Raphael Sakaria Halbrook Rafi Parson Organization National Organization Of Women
LGBTQ Rights Group President Fired Over Ties to Cuomo

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | Last month

LGBTQ Rights Group President Fired Over Ties to Cuomo

"The board of directors of the Human Rights Campaign fired its president because of developments related to the sexual harassment case that prompted Andrew Cuomo's resignation as governor of New York the statement the board said Alfonso David's conduct assisting Cuomo and responding to sexual harassment allegations with in violation of a conflict of interest policy and impaired his ability to serve as the public face and voice of the organization David was consulted over a letter the Cuomo administration a drafted attacking the credibility of one of his accusers he'd served as Cuomo's chief counsel before becoming the first African American to lead the Human Rights Campaign which is the nation's largest LGBTQ rights organization in a tweet David accuse the board of acting unjustly and threatened legal action Julie Walker New York

Board Of Directors Of The Huma Alfonso David Cuomo Andrew Cuomo Cuomo Administration New York David Lgbtq Rights Organization Human Rights Campaign Julie Walker
EU Ministers Outline Conditions for Relations With Taliban

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last month

EU Ministers Outline Conditions for Relations With Taliban

"European Union officials have listed a set of conditions for defining the E. U.'s level of engagement with the Taliban as the new route is Afghanistan on E. U. foreign policy chief Joseph Burrell says to assess the Taliban's good will the book could use several benchmarks they include a guarantee the family style will become a base for the export of terrorism the other countries a commitment to free access for humanitarian aid deliveries and hearing to standards in the areas of human rights rule of law and press freedom will want to see an inclusive transition government formed in Afghanistan and the Taliban to order a pledge to that foreigners and those who fear for their lives leave the country I'm Charles the last month

Taliban Joseph Burrell European Union Afghanistan Charles
Equal Too: How We Change the Law for Disabled People

Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

01:37 min | Last month

Equal Too: How We Change the Law for Disabled People

"Today over one point two billion people around the world are living with a disability. We make up fifteen percent of the global population and yet despite many countries establishing laws to protect our rights. No disabled person is immune to discrimination. Last year across thirty six police forces in england and wales more than seven thousand three hundred disability hate crimes were reported but only one point six percent resulted in perpetrators being charged disability. Discrimination often called abe limb comes in many forms from not providing a wheelchair ramp or an interpreter. At a press briefing point six million spent on the new pressroom still no interpreter to more extreme breaches in human rights such as the practice of shackling or forced sterilization all around the world disabled people depend on laws to safeguard our rights in the uk. We have the equality act in the us as the ada in columbia. There's law sixteen eighteen and in australia. There's the disability discrimination act in some countries. These acts took disabled activists years of blood. Sweating tears to bring in. I highly recommend watching the oscar-nominated documentary creek camp to get an idea of how hard fought the. Ada was in the us but even when there are laws in place when researching for this podcast we came to find that more often than not it falls upon disabled people themselves to enforce those laws or in some cases outright change them

Wales England Columbia UK Australia United States Oscar ADA
"human rights" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

The Pomp Podcast

05:07 min | 2 months ago

"human rights" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

"Not would can we do now. How do how does the human rights foundation think about like what can be done today for those that are in this situation in afghanistan whether it's bitcoin related or not well roya Doesn't want to give up so she's going to look. She could sit from outside and criticized the taliban Obviously you disaster for women's rights or she could. She could try to make a difference right. So she's gonna try and essentially negotiate to keep her programs running She thinks it's it's possible and she's gonna keep educating women in afghanistan about bitcoin I think that that's her narrow Goal and that's what she's gonna do more broadly that's why we all can do. I mean it's just a matter of time. And i think it's a conqueror of confidence in us like as users of bitcoin. You know when roy. I started using it in two thousand thirteen yeah. It was great. Bitcoin went from ten dollars to thousand dollars a year. Think about that went from ten dollars. Two thousand dollars a year and she felt invincible. But guess what happened at the end of two thousand thirteen collapsed. Okay and she had to offer. She had to go back to all those women that she had paid in. Bitcoin and i think this is a of her character but she offered to pay them back in in fiat at the know at the amount that they were paid the terms so she ended up losing a lot of value at that time because of that. Bitcoin crash But the the idea of being your own bank just kinda burned in her mind like she couldn't even after this crazy crash she couldn't you know she couldn't forget it. She couldn't forget this principle. This idea so we live in a day now. Where bitcoins risky. I mean we're not going to happen. Mount gawk situation It's just so much more mainstream so much more acceptable you know so we have the confidence users that maybe they didn't have five six seven years ago and you also have the tools man like i mean i would encourage people listening to download something called the moon wallet. M u u n. It's on ios on your iphone it's on android. You can open this thing up. You don't have to write down a bunch of seed words when you open it. It's very intuitive. You just literally download it and you start receiving lightning or bitcoin right away so i think the apps in the accent and confidence in ourselves make make it a lot easier to talk to family friends and then and then it's about the stories. I mean now her parents no you know now they know right so oftentimes it comes too late but if you can if you can explain what's happened in different countries whether it be venezuela or palestine or cuba or even china Or you know of course afghanistan..

human rights foundation afghanistan Bitcoin taliban roy venezuela palestine cuba china
"human rights" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

The Pomp Podcast

03:36 min | 2 months ago

"human rights" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

"Let's get in this episode with alex. I hope you guys enjoy this. One anthony pump. Donna runs pomp investments. All views of him and the guests on his podcast are scholley their opinions and do not reflect the opinions of pomp investment. You should not treat any opinion expressed by pop or his guests as a specific inducement to make up particular investment or follow a particular strategy but only as an expression of his personal opinion. This podcast is for informational purposes. Only alex how are you an a. Thanks for having me excited to be here. of course. let's let's start just real quick with remind everyone what the human rights foundations kind of mandate is and how you spend your time every day. Sure so. I joined the human rights foundation in two thousand seven We exist to help people who live under authoritarian regimes around the world. Who don't have some of the same rights and liberties that we might have in a in a society like the united states or germany or japan. the kind of cold reality is that four point. Three billion people around the world live on her some kind of authoritarian regime. Maybe that's in cuba. Maybe that's in iran. Maybe that's in china. Maybe that's in russia. You know they don't have any sorta semblance or Any sort of real way to like push for their own rights or to ask for reform Obviously in the united states there's been lobby groups and corporations in different people kind of pushing back for example against undue regulations on. Let's say bitcoin And cryptocurrency that. That's not gonna happen in china or russia right there. There's no sort of like reform mechanism for so many people around the world so for them. You know the open source code is is really their main tool to defend themselves right and when you talk about code i think there's two to useful Types to think about over the last twenty years one would be encryption right that that allows us to transact privately in terms of our communications and one would be bitcoin right so bitcoin. What what. I've discovered throw my work at the human rights foundation over the last five years just kind of surveying activists around the world is that their money's broken. It's not as good as ours. Their currency gets debased collapses. The bank accounts get frozen their estimated the sanctions the behind embargoes they've broken infrastructure And yet bitcoin. Is there for them right and bitcoin allows them to save the send to pay a and to end to interact with the world at a time. When there's just so many bridges so much surveillance so much nonsense. So i think it's probably the most powerful tool for human rights in the world today when you think about a situation like afghanistan. Let's maybe start there Obviously we saw the decision and we covered it. We actually had a funeral for western union on the show Because it's pretty much over for them but western union abandons. The country of afghanistan completely cuts off any sort of technological support or service. There talk about what the impact of that is. Maybe shred right. So when the legacy systems fail to provide service or the people of country don't have access to financial services like what is the negative impact that you guys see in these situations. Sure look a country like afghanistan. Four percent of gdp comes from remittances so we're talking hundreds of millions of dollars a year. And that's that's really important for for a country that doesn't have like Emerges right they're like really struggling to get by and then all of a sudden.

human rights foundation alex russia Donna united states china cuba iran germany japan afghanistan western union
"human rights" Discussed on The Cities of Refuge Podcast

The Cities of Refuge Podcast

04:41 min | 4 months ago

"human rights" Discussed on The Cities of Refuge Podcast

"Human rights is a good thing but human rights are easily associated with doing goods and this is for example also illustrated by how the city council of answered them approved the plans for the amsterdam. Human rights agenda. It was discussed in three minutes. And the council member made a statement such as well doing something with human rights is always gut's but then doing some forty when rights still could mean many things and especially local governments are really able to reshape human rights many possible race and they are not bounded by for example the strict applications such as in court but because of the human rights label there is sometimes less room to critically assessing human rights projects which is questionable in itself but only other hand. I think my research also shows the civil society actors always remained very critical of the uses of human rights by local governments. So they will always try to if they think that's a certain human rights project of a local government doesn't make sense. They will always try to to adapt it to change. Its to their own liking. So i think we're in the city there is al- always monitoring by civil society actors and a day will themselves tests how how genuine the human rights commitments are bits. Yeah i think what my research also can faces deaths even when certain human rights driven projects of the local governments even when they when the aims are not fully reached. That does love that. It is always exercise of window dressing. Because i think that this very skeptic understanding the code in some cases good intentions. They become entangled with stuff. Frechman season related through the organization of the local governments to the departments. That are there to the civil servants that work there and the specific expertise they have. It also becomes entangled with the lack of space or or fence or economic interests in the end. Overshadow the human rights projects so. I think i would not advocate for using or not using human rights in the urban. But if i would have to say one thing i think that it is necessary to closely. Study the choices. Local governments make when day presents a human rights projects and and not accepted. This could work simply because it has human rights label to it. This brings us back of course to the stickiness of norms. I think the fact that something may start as a promotional as you say performance promotion of purpose if all may be driven by civil society actors and this brings us of course back to your title and these frictions rich. In fact dr in many cases productive rather than problematic and day i actually driving process that does not necessarily doesn't necessarily even have takes time and it changes the meaning of the rights and i agree and i think is unrealistic to to strive for a human rights project does not incite disagreements or friction. Because i think that's inherent to human rights. I'm at the end of my list of items. I had prepared. But i did want to give you the chance to add something if i have forgotten to ask you a question..

amsterdam al
"human rights" Discussed on The Cities of Refuge Podcast

The Cities of Refuge Podcast

03:24 min | 4 months ago

"human rights" Discussed on The Cities of Refuge Podcast

"Reporting procedures because of this special status they have and at the international stage human rights language of course is abundant invincible which i do not consider to be a big surprise that in such base the hong kong government will speak elaborately off their commitment to human rights but it creates some fascinating tensions because for example in hong kong's report for the universal periodic review. They speak of their local equal opportunities commission as their local human rights commission. But when i interview with this equal opportunities commission who this commission has zero references to human rights on their website. And when i also them why this was the case. They explained that they have an agreement with the national government to not explicitly refer to human rights with router to local ordinances on discrimination and this equal opportunities commission accepts this because will financial reasons and i think this sensitivity of human rights. Also influence my fieldwork because it was very difficult to Find a diverse group of interviewees. That also includes government officials and i think it very difficult for me to get an interview with them because i was doing research on human rights and i think it was very frustrating. At the time. I think it telling a story in itself and it's also corresponds where the experiences of civil society actors so in the end i also referred to my own difficulty in securing a meeting with government officials S i was describing. How ngo struggled to establish such relations. Were the government's very interesting insights into the nuts just contradiction but i think also disconnect between on the one hand explicit and implicit use of human rights and obviously as you say the local and international so seems to parallel pilot. Word stare so so when you're talking about when you were talking with these local actors who described themselves as human rights activists when used language. What what alternatives do they find. Could you give us an example perhaps Yeah perhaps what is most telling what i focused on. I focused on the introduction of the window cleaning cloth which sounds like a very small and mundane thing and this refers to foreign domestic workers. Cleaning the exterior windows of the very highly buildings does hong kong and there have been many accidents related to this and this window cleaning. Clause was attitude standard contract foreign domestic workers and it would be for by the embassies off the country. So foreign domestic workers mainly the embassy of the philippines and indonesia but also by local ngos and is lobbying was completely done in the real almost domestic worker safety without referring to any sensitive language and ngo see it..

hong kong government local human rights commission hong kong national government ngo government philippines indonesia
"human rights" Discussed on The Cities of Refuge Podcast

The Cities of Refuge Podcast

03:24 min | 4 months ago

"human rights" Discussed on The Cities of Refuge Podcast

"You and of course. Congratulations on a successful defence of your phd thesis at university of amsterdam which is now about a month ago and your thesis is entitled to anticipating friction the role of human rights in urban debates on migration and diversity which sounds really fascinating. Could you briefly unpack that for us and introduced the topic of your research as well as your main findings. Of course. I can so as the title suggests my research on the role of human rights in urban debates all migration and i i in amsterdam homegrown artists and what i try to do is to explore how human rights become used in practice and especially try to focus on the work behind engagement with human rights. So what happens behind the scenes when local governments introduce a human rights projects for examples. Why do they chose to focus one approach rather than another while. You're human rights festival or policy plan rather than legal instruments so for example in amsterdam. I focused on the launch of the amsterdam human rights agenda policy that was introduced to context allies human rights to specific context of the city of amsterdam and i tried to get insight as to why they opted to focus on four specific themes in this agenda being children's rides accessibility privacy human rights education. And then why didn't didn't they. Focus on honor teams. And why was this project placed under responsibility of the diverse departments. And then the other. Two cities reina scientists and calm i likewise joe's migration and diversity debates in which human rights were being used. I try to unravel the work behind him. And i researched this drew. Fieldwork indy cities which consisted of interviews as well as policy analysis and analysis of city council meetings and on the basis of this research. I think what it shows. If the rights much of the literature on the localization of human rights in the urban for example an urban engagements which human rights can have a promotional function for the city that it can foster coalitions between ex-urss and that human rights can be used to explain deviating policy choices from the local governments. But what. I think that my research mainly shows is that nissar just possibilities. My case studies also showed. That's as in hong kong of reference to human rights can also block a meeting between the governments and ngos a different approach to human rights can obstruct a meeting taking place between the local governments. And i think what my research also shows is that some local governments do not seek to depart from national policies just in buenos itis and they just follow the approach taken by the national governments so essentially the urban engagement with human rights can take.

university of amsterdam amsterdam nissar joe hong kong buenos
"human rights" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

02:33 min | 4 months ago

"human rights" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"And clear. Madonna and child. Health is a human right. Thank you and now a quick break to talk about emotional support and how it's not just a bonus for employees anymore brought to you by lexus. Before the pandemic there was an interesting study about what it means to be a manager. Dozens of managers went through interviews about their core responsibilities. One of the key findings providing emotional support to employees was going above and beyond but when their own employees were interviewed. They had a very different view. Employee side is essential not optional. They expected their managers to offer emotional support. It was a fundamental part of the job. I hope one of the silver linings of the pandemic is this gap between manager and employee. Expectations is erased. I've watched it start to close in many workplaces where managers have stepped up to ask employees about their mental health and wellbeing. I believe that bad managers. See people is replaceable. Cogs in a machine they could manage care about the quality of people's work but they great managers care about the quality of people's lives lexus shares disbelief. Which is why they're vehicle. Innovation isn't inspired by machines. The by humans. Lexus goes the extra mile to combine empathetic design with state of the art technology. Beauty beyond function means that every aspect is designed to elevate the experience and bridge the gap between human and machine to learn more about how lexus innovates with you and mind head alexis dot com slash l. s. Hey i'm dr jen gunter of a podcast from ten called body stuff. I'm a doctor and on this show. Id bunk medical myths by exploring how the body works and some of the surprising cultural back stories behind the medicine next step one of the most misunderstood parts of our bodies skin. It's not just skin. It's also in oregon. Listen to body stuff with dr. Jen gutter on apple podcasts. Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. Hello chris anderson. Had of ted here that took was by one of our impressive. Ted fellows the ted fellows program recognizes local leaders and equips them to make change on the global stage does a possibility you could be one of them. Learn more at ted dot com slash fellows and apply today to join the program. That's ted dot com slash fellows..

chris anderson dr. Lexus today Madonna dr jen gunter One alexis apple ted dot com Spotify Dozens of managers Jen gutter one of ten silver linings stuff one lexus Ted
"human rights" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

08:11 min | 4 months ago

"human rights" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"Have employees anymore. Support for ted talks daily comes from odu odors suite of business. Apps has everything you need to run a company. Think of your smartphone with all your apps right at your fingertips odu is just like that for business but instead of an app to order takeout or tell you the weather you have sales inventory accounting and more union the department we've got it covered and they're all connected joined the six million users who stopped wasting time and started getting stuff done go to odu dot com slash ted to start a free trial that's od show dot com slash. Ted died in my presence while giving birth to life. She led to that and lost her child. The irony was that she had accessed kid in the first trimester of pregnancy. Visit the antenatal clinic or the hospital in mumbai. But i was doing residency. All four are waiting in the hawks right. The dingy overcrowded. Finnick just to get a minute with me. a hand. It over resident. Dr meant that she never came back later. Dine labor months later. I was wracked with guilt. If only i had gone her about the danger signs why she needed to access a regular. Okay what she and her child survived. She didn't die you condition. She died because of underlying anemia. An easily treatable preventable condition. I saw these stories. Cystic preventable problems resulting in mothers and children dying in the most unjust of circumstances in the next one hour three will die while giving some bed in india. Two children aged five. Die every minute in india. I'm a practicing euro gynecologist but very early in my medical training. I realized that hospital based solutions but not enough and given the sheer scale of india's problems any solution that made a difference had to be scalable accessible to the last woman and child directly in their homes and yet cost effective and the source light and then the mobile phone game to india and within a few years everyone ida mobile form tele currently mobile phones than toilets. The idea then struck me. Why not use a simple to like a mobile phone available in almost every indian household bridge the yawning gaps in healthcare. Maybe we could have simply call with critical life saving information on the other hand. Maybe we could have provided will buy foreign trading to the health worker. Who could have diagnosed. Anita's anemia in the community itself. Thus was born in our mon- art programs and mithra and kill kerry our free weekly voice call services they provide preventive information directly to women through pregnancy and infancy in their chosen time slot and language that are multiple tries for every message miscall system and then metre also has a call center if only anita had received the service in the second month of pregnancy itself it would have told her about anita. Take a nine bill de from todd monta pregnancy when the tournament arrived have center reminder and concert her and how paid the bills for example if the need to award p coffee improve the absorption of iron and stressed on why some necessary to prevent anemia. Weeks later have spoken about how the adverse affects of iron bills like constipation if she had iniquity she could have reached out to a call center. Staff these a simple voice goals as a typical doctor. I expected them to just inform and hopefully lead to better health behaviors however the one unexpected transformational benefit. That have completely blown. Mind is this. Information is implement um with his inflammation women like anita offending patriarchal family dynamics challenging entrenched. Moore's and demanding that no the wife of a deeply conservative preacher convinced. Her husband off family. Planning because emma told her spacing between pregnancies is necessary and the changes intergenerational we need are deeply conservative family sent her daughter english medium school in addition to the big picture messages the most underprivileged women want to know when their child will understand how to ensure psychosocial stimulation of the child when their child will develop fingers in their room and so on. Thank any woman. Word ourselves this respect that over twenty million women in in sixteen states in india have enrolled for these services since two thousand fourteen. This is testament to how easily scalable and reputable dissolutions solutions are anywhere in the world. Similarly on 'em hell base refresher training program for government frontline health workers call mobile academy has trained over one hundred twenty thousand health workers in thirteen states in india. What kill qari and while academy. In collaboration with the government will extend through the country in the next three to five years. Odd goal is to be able to h or fifteen million women and children every year. And that would mean over. Half of the mothers and children born. Every year had information they need and this massive scale is only possible because so many of our partners beat ngos hospitals and the government recognize the value of this approach and provided the scaffold on which we grew our quest in the next five years is dr martin media approaches and given the massive amounts of data. We have used the power of ai and predictive analytics to better serve our mothers and children and not take platform and the networks didn't build are nimble uncovered nine hundred struck long. John was announced overnight among the worst affected by the underprivileged children in the slums of daily which are declared a containment zones hover pregnancy and infancy. Can't wait for a lockdown. When there's an emergency feeding care is needed immediately and you were right. There and ready depot post our platform within a matter of base. We created what clinic for antenatal pediatric manned. By qualified doctors are call center stuff arranged support like ambulances also sent which specific information covering pregnancy infancy to over three hundred thousand pregnant women and mothers through wise calls. But why should you care about mothers and children. The pandemic has made us confront this most implacable afterwards. A robust primary healthcare system is an absolute pillar of a functioning efficient society improvement in ghana. Child health leads to asandra development of health systems and improve primary health care of village that can look offers. Mothers and children will look after all other conditions by ripple effect and pregnancy is not a disease childhood is not an ailment dying brutal natural life is not acceptable and we knew why mothers and children die yet. We invest so little preventing their debts. That can be no global progress until all our mothers and children. Do i implore you at your wisest. Two hours to amplify this message. Loud.

india Ted ghana Two hours Anita sixteen states John second month thirteen states Moore mumbai Two children first trimester anita three six million users fifteen million nine bill ida five years
"human rights" Discussed on Diversity Talks Podcast

Diversity Talks Podcast

02:20 min | 6 months ago

"human rights" Discussed on Diversity Talks Podcast

"I was trained as a genocide scholar at the center for human rights and genocide rutgers university and one of the things that i learned about studying and teaching human rights and genocide is that when you are presenting oldest information to to the students. Statistics don't necessarily make an impact but stories do so. I really appreciate all of the work that you're doing. In order to highlight these significant stories that can actually get people understand that these are not numbers these are actually human lives. And as you mentioned elton stories are the important thing that we can't reduce the field to statistics. We can't even reduce it to sort of news clips but then it's the human story and that's at the heart of the human rights movement. It's the heart of the human rights field that it is made up of individuals. Each of whom has a story that has to be valued has to somehow become part of our public discourse. So yeah it's that story element and it's the reason to that story. Tellers are so important in that human rights movement. I kid that at the end of the day human rights are too important to be left to the lawyers of the world we can do important advocacy but that it's the people that can tell a story that can make a world of difference when it comes to reaching out to students when it comes to reach out to judges. To policymakers the stories incredibly important and as a professor at fsu you make a world of difference by telling the stories of other people to your students and you hope if i see students engage in human rights projects all over the world. You help them serve. In international tribunals refugee camps torture centres recovery programs for sex trafficking victims. So by doing so you. You must actually come into contact with so many different students who come from so many different backgrounds so i was wondering what is your experiences. Working with. diverse groups of students help you about diversity equity and inclusion. That's a key. A key dynamic and part of it has to do with the fact that when we have survivors that we work with. We have two very respectful of their needs..

one center for human rights and ge Each two things fsu human rights
"human rights" Discussed on Legally Bland

Legally Bland

14:17 min | 1 year ago

"human rights" Discussed on Legally Bland

"Oh Boy Am I. I started off thinking. Wash our human rights. Because like you I wanted to go very broad and then narrow in on what I actually picked so I find this interesting close in. The face of a book called maclear. It's an international human rights law book and it's as human rights mean different things to different people from the woman on the street to the U. N. High Commissioner for Human Rights from the local human rights activists to the government official. Each of us has a different conception of the origin purpose and function of human rights. So a good head space to get into before considering anything else. Human Rights I think is something along. The lines of the first rule is there are no rules because I love human rights. It's it's as Alana mentioned earlier. I I've studied it a bit more and I really love it put. It frustrates me beyond belief. So this is a reoccurring theme one of the first pitfalls of thinking about in human rights in an international context is there's this agreement that prevails thought the framework on basic conception. We have of what human rights are are fundamentally subject to Western bias so we think are essential human rights. This comes back to like the moral of the story for the first couple episodes where we kept surmising. The lowest fake doesn't really mean anything so it's been aggie dot like the imposition of human rights is a neo colonialism venture of sorts And these actually ageements from public international law scholars that the Western influence on human rights is so large dotted foxy impossible to imagine what it would be like with this Western influence which is just it's headbutting. Bush so just yet remember. There are no rules. They're they're really they don't find it. It's just a hideout no but it's it comes back to like it comes back to as humans. We try him put labels on things. That are really just things that like. We feel like we feel human rights. We like we feel inherently some of the time. What should be a human right? But it's very hard to explain to them. Undertake weigh the sources really not as straightforward as we try and label. It as another issue can be. We try to legally justify what we have moral justifications for which is tricky so right can be seen in two basic ways you can see them as the universal natural phenomenon that are that are innate to human beings so if by virtue of being a person you have human rights or it can be viewed as this contractual protection afforded to you by your government so not really universal on practically. That's an easier way to think about us. I I like the idea of natural rights that you know. We're just people and people have rights. Yeah I think I told my explanation. Lean towards anyway realistically. It's easier to think in a practical science dot. The government is affording you these protections which is an idea so the origins of human rights. I think it's an interesting. I suppose question because there is no starting point and Arjun humanoids albeit in a slightly different guides can be traced as far back as ancient Babylon aren seventeen hundred BC which is a long time ago. Some scholars wrongly slash the magnetic AirAsia. Which is a thirteen century. Document just stopped the King of England having absolute power over his nobles objects dot sometimes light is like the beginning of human rights in a modern ISH context. There is a lot in the sixteenth and seventeenth century. Bache scholar is believing rights. We're just a social contract with you. And your government and natural rights really became prevalent as a result of the American revolution and Subsequent Declaration of Independence. So ever knows you know those famous words. We hold these treats to resolve evident that all men are created equal that they are indeed with certain unalienable rights that among these are life liberty and the pursuit of happiness. The people that wrote these owned other people like it. Just fix the hypocrisy. It's just ludicrous. Like hypocrisy war like everyone has rights. We know sorry. We have rights. Everyone might have rights. That's kind of the gist. It's so from that point. In time there were more people can like more people. Existed who didn't have rights than heart rates like women did not have many rights that many rights. That's got to be over fifty percents. Also I remember thinking about. This child made like why? That's really embarrassing. That they wrote that was take people rights. I can't believe they didn't realize what an error they were making themselves. And we still quote it like. That's like if Hitler had said something about like peace and we were like where that was a good quote though on you. Just what? He preached boy. Was it a good quote? I know exactly like this is very aspirational. Unlike it for what it is when you think about the context no so human rights in the modern era really gets going. I suppose with the UN Cheshire which was established in one thousand nine forty five which is in the wake of the atrocities of World War. Two but an important thing about the UN Charito to keep in mind is the human rights was never the main focus. The main focus was to prevent road war. Three if you will and a good question I think is the. Un was not created to take Mankayane to heaven but to save humanity from hell which is a coup the former United Nations secretary general commerce gold. That's good it's good boy. I want the poster. I don't think we're even being saved from Alabama. Oh No it doesn't the third circle of Hell Somewhere. I don't know you mentioned the Universal Declaration of Human Rights which was adopted in nineteen forty eight and it had thirty areas calls with you know again the quote unquote the basic human rights. The high profile ones right to life freedom from torture freedom of expression and there is a big divide theoretically within rights and the international contacts between so-called positive and negative rights which doesn't mean one's good and one's barrage like what is good and one said is bad and so positive rights is higher the government can interact with people to enhance their enjoyment of their freedom and negative rights is basically. You're the government limiting their interference. So he can be left alone to enjoy your freedom like privacy for his aesthetically cool so there's the International Covenant on Economic Social and Cultural Rights. Which is the more positive side of rights? So it's the right to the rector social security the right to education the right to health so this kind of right to Geshe things from the government and then there's the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights which is the negative rights. So be left alone. The right to life the right to liberty freedom of expression right of peaceful assembly so that was really good like that was Seabra. Good no wonder you're an an expert. I'm not an expert so the Irish constitution will narrow it back day in from. That was a very broad general introduction to the gist of human rights in a micro sense. So we'll bring it back to the Irish Constitution. So if you've been listening to this podcast for any amount of time you know we love the constitution. It's what we're a boast. So the Irish Constitution or Boehner Clarion was ratified in nineteen thirty. Seven eight describes the fundamental rights of every Irish citizen. I mentioned the constitution is also part of a wider human rights framework in Ireland. So there's other legal and human rights commitments made by Ireland so the treaties under the United Nations. Which have mentioned some of them the European Convention of Human Rights on the ECJ or act which brings those rights into the Irish context on the charter fundamental rights of the European Union. So articles forty. Two forty four provide the fundamental rights of our citizens so as Alana mentioned fundamental rights are not obsolete which they can be limited or restricted by the octaves for certain reasons like common good public order and every constitutional. Right has the same status and value. If there's a conflict between the constitutional rights all the circumstances are wade opt to decide which conceal right is more important in that particular case so I feel those last. Two points are very important to emphasize because I perceive a common misunderstanding to be like having a rice is obsolete Like no further just discussion required end of story. Good night good luck. I have my rice go away. So the Covenant on Economic Social and Cultural Rights is generally associated with more like eastern countries so when Western countries like when people say I have a right to education? My brain just wanted to go do you think so which is kind of terrible so on enumerated rights have been mentioned before. Alana back in episode two and also earlier in this episode so basically not every fundamental rights that you possess is set in the constitution explicitly. You've Sony personal rates that are just not specifically stated and these rights can be derived or employed by the constitution. So these include privacy bodily integrity on freedom from torture inhumane or degrading treatment. So the case I pick a for a while I was worried. I'd gone away off brief and the human rights but this is a rights case. It's just sometimes I think when people talk about human rights they perceive it to be these massive injustices like on an atrocity scale which it can be but a lot of time feel human rights can be very almost mundane every day things if that makes sense so the case I chose was nickel and on boarding tola nine hundred sixty six one four so the applicant in this case can ever say Leonidas Nikola was separate national. Living in London he'd been in a relationship with Kathleen Donnelly Irishwoman woman and they lived together in London when their daughter was born there. February nine hundred sixty at the time. Stanley was upset that the child was illegitimate and operate. Continue living with Mr Nikolai on his wife but she also would only marry Niccolo if he became a member of the Catholic Church because he was a member of the Greek Orthodox church where she's yeah. I can't read the Times that makes sense you. I mean this case really does focus on the rights of the married father. But at the time it's really pertinent to remember. For All this context I focus on Nikolas writes Bush like Kathleen. Donnelly obviously a terrible time. As well the nineteen sixties in Ireland absolutely just controlled by the Catholic Church so women having children of wedlock of you will was just absolutely scandalous. And they retreated so horribly criminally stigmatized Bush. Just keep that in mind. I do focus on Nikola. But that's not saying that she got off. Scot free in any sense of course so the Mother Kathleen Donald Returns to Ireland. She goes to the Office of the Catholic Production Rescue Society of Ireland and was admitted with her baby to Saint Patrick's home. Which was you know whether there's more and baby homes which is just a whole other fish we could discuss so she requested that the child be placed for adoption on. She then left the home and went to live with her parents on the ABC. Into this case Niccolo went and visited. The home of the mother's parents Orland and was very apprehensive. That arrangements were being made to have his child adopted and in nineteen sixty one. The child adoption was finalized bought. Mr Nicholas was only informed of this when Miss John Lee Returned London. Nineteen sixty three. He objected the adoption. Which had been arranged with Ed is consent? It was you that he had no right to contest the adoption order or even be heard by onboard. Tola just the adoption board so the governing major station in this case was the adoption act. Nineteen fifty two. It was the first legislation Ireland covering adoption before nineteen fifty two. It was just a free for all adoption. There is if there's something though low legislation no real. Anything went terrible when the adoption act was being was being drafted. The hierarchy of the Catholic Church was given an unusual degree of control. You know even by the prevailing standards at the time so every line of the bill was sent to the Catholic Archbishop of Dublin by Dev. Really well Dave Dave wanted. Obviously the Catholic Church had a huge influence over everything devils particularly religious Yuccas. What he sent every single line of the adoption act. The BISHOP PROVED LEGISLATION..

U. N. High Commissioner for Hu European Convention of Human R International Covenant on Econ the Times Alana Catholic Church UN Ireland government Kathleen Donnelly Irishwoman Bush London Niccolo Seabra official Bache
"human rights" Discussed on Legally Bland

Legally Bland

16:16 min | 1 year ago

"human rights" Discussed on Legally Bland

"Peter Murrieta broke the news off. The telephones had been topped officially with Warren signed by the Minister of Justice On this was revealed after Iraq did like after that government had lost the election so as the new government was coming in So normally for phone topping was used to investigate. Serious crimes are threats to the security of the state but the reverse happened in this case ministry. Noonan announced so ten years later so this Gondola would cause Charlie Hall you to resign. T- shook he was in the. I'm not sure if he was not show he was certainly in the party. The Iraq this out the time and he knew about it all along with previously. He had suggested the Minister for Justice had suggested that he didn't know so. Basically Kennedy Kennedy in our Arnold's went to court arguing that the constitutional right to privacy. I'm not this had obviously been breached so Hamilton J gave judgment on. It's the first detailed discussion of privacy as legitimate right so he recognizes privacy as stemming from the Christian democratic nature of the state now if we recall back to Norris for just for a brief second. You'll notice that in Norris. They denied him his right to privacy because of the Christian democratic nature of the state in what is like the ultimate weird backtrack. I just think it's so funny like on like one judge like. Oh you don't have a right to privacy in this very particular circumstance because of the Christian democratic nature of the state and then like only a couple of years later three years later because this happened in one thousand nine hundred seven. They're like okay. You do have a right to privacy. In a different context on they justify it on the Christian democratic nature of the safe I think for every on enumerated rights case because the rights are on a numerator it the jurisprudence is just really you can see this Georgia's grasping at straws just trying to pluck reasoning age of thin air because they have to find reasoning for the rights. But also it's very hard to find that when there's no written source. I know exactly. Yeah really just show her like the judge is larger come so much into an enumerated rights which is a big flow of them So Hamilton in the judgment. Call the right to privacy of fundamental rights and said that it included like the right to privacy over telephone conversations and he established a test which was thought. So it's it's a fundamental right but it was never an absolute right so he astonished attests that there could not be unjustified interference into someone's privacy so you're right to privacy can be breached but only worried is justified interference so here it was not justified. They had no justifiable reasons to breach their privacy. And secondly here. There was no safeguards or a system in place it was wide open for political abuse So no I'm I'm going to do something different. Which is now you know the test holly the test is whether or not there is unjustified interference so I have a couple of cases that kind of give different examples of head. The right to privacy can be can come up in the court. So I'm GonNa tell you the Fox and you have to tell me whether or not think the corey fend there had been an unjust for unjustified interference into the right to privacy. This is exposed page page of my reasoning. I didn't want it because it's kind of a simple test on the Fox. In some of these cases are for interest. Okay so the first case is a nineteen ninety-three case it's hall he and others and Mariachi so this case concerned the Moriarty Tribunal which is like I tried to look into it but boy howdy Ho. They're mess like the politicians. We're really here doing their worst. But basically this case investigated whether a gift of one million supposedly give him with no strings. Attached by Charlie Hawley was corrupt and access was needed to Charlie Hall US banking records on Charlie all his family banking records Bush. Of course just like a very innocent man would charlie hall. He and his family challenge this in the courts by saying thought having access to their banking records was a violation of their constitutional right to privacy. Because it was unjustified So what do you think the courts said? Do you think they thought that it was an unjustified breach? Okay it's definite interference. I know that much I would say because Charlie Hall. He was in like a public position. His own personal account. I could see that would be justify I guess it's just yes that's basically what the court said. I mean one dot seems way too. I mean that's on justifiable. I think in terms of privacy because they have other things going on that are nothing she with the running of the station. If that makes sense yeah fair so actually. The court said there was legitimate public interest in all the cases of all of the accounts so the because he was like a public figure on there was a chance that like basically in terms of getting access to his family's accounts. They were worried that he had done stove in other people's names thought they wouldn't see in his own account so note. They decided that it was a justified breach of privacy essentially on that public interest outrage any any negative impact so it shows they're always trying to balance these quite difficult things to balance like. When is you know? How do you really value privacy? And does it depend on whether the person often it does end up depending on whether the person has any public like has any public role or public appearances and stuff. So yeah you're right there. Well done so the next one is co Caughlin a her and not which is a two thousand and five case so this case concerned an expose a like a documentary. Expose being done on a nursing home It was one of those documentaries. Where like like someone gets a job in the nursing home and then does low to undercover footage to reveal bad practices and stuff so the owner of the nursing home went for an injunction to prevent the broadcast because she argued that it was violating her constitutional right to privacy specifically argued because the footage have been collected covertly so because it was undercover footage dot increased the like harm that had been done by the breach of her privacy right. So what do you think? The court said the gut feeling so I would say it's Nachos defied because even though it is Daphne in the public interest to see Malpractice is going on. It's actually I dunno they are. They're difficult so basically the court said basically what they're balancing here is the right to freedom of expression against the right to privacy particularly in this case because it was a legit an issue of legitimate public interest. They said that the the right to freedom of expression outraged the right to privacy so she lost which is interesting because they said that the method of collections of the fact it was undercover footage could affect whether or not in another case. The plaintiff lost her one. So it did come into play but here. The Fox thought the nursing homes run as a business meant thought. This breach of privacy happened in the context of conduct conducting a business. Which meant you know? You have less privacy around. Brit business practices anyway so it meant it wasn't it didn't outweigh the freedom of expression But it's certainly you can certainly see like where the covert collection issues coming from. Definitely I hate this game so much. There's only one more so this is maybe the well I think this. Well I I this entire so this one is Murry on news group. Newspapers Twenty Ten. So this is the case of a convicted sex offender so he took a case because a newspaper published photos of him on published his whereabouts like where he was living on anti wanted an injunction to stop them from doing stop them from publishing similar stuff on. He wanted damages from the breach of privacy and obviously the newspaper arguing. You Know No. It's freedom of expression on his public interest. So what do you think the core thaw? Why would say he doesn't get damages? Maybe the injunction see there is. There's obviously the right to privacy on the freedom of expression need to be balanced. But you could say there's definitely legitimate public interest in knowing whether there's a sex offender living in your area or like near you yes. Basically the court ruled the opposite. But but not really so he wanted an injunction. Essentially the court ruled. He couldn't get an injunction. So this was this case was the injunction stage of the whole thing so they ruled thought he couldn't get an injunction because there's a higher standard of breach needed to stop someone. So basically when you're bonding freedom of expression on privacy rights there's a higher standard of infringement needed to stop someone from publishing information at all then there is just getting damages after the fact. Does that make sense so he could get. He probably not the case. I don't think he I'm not sure. If he took it on freighter but he probably would have won in terms of getting damages because it was an unjustified breach of his right to privacy but in terms of getting an injunction. The court ruled in favor of the newspaper because There's he had to establish dot his freedom. The freedom of extraction being stopped is justified and proportionate to the breach in his right to privacy He wasn't able to establish that. So it shows this interesting thing like it's a lot easier essentially to get damages for breach of right to privacy than it is to actually stop a court like stop newspaper from publishing something that breaches your right to privacy. Which is kind of counter intuitive? Like you can't stop them from saying yet. But you can sometimes get money after the fact which I also like this case obviously was one of those blew up a bit in the news because the whole elemental of like weather him. Being a sex offender sways the importance of his like does him. Being a sex offender inherently effect his the strength of his the infringement needed or not they always pretty much lean in favor though Israel in favor of freedom of expression basically every time not every time. But there's a lot more situations where they will lead with. The court generally leaned in favor of freedom of expression. Then right to privacy so I think that really shows having having the right to privacy just protected as an animated constitutional rights. Probably isn't the best option in terms of actually protecting people's right to privacy. It gives a lot of disadvantages in fact because it can be really uncertain like we saw the the logic. The judges used can vary a lot from case to case the tension between the right to privacy on other rights basically makes it really hard to to protect any right sufficiently on also. We have mentioned but the cost of bringing a constitutional case can be really significant because it has to go to the High Court as opposed to something that can be heard in one of the lower courts but thankfully nowadays. Your right to privacy is really protected under a a lot of different sources mainly like GDP or would be the big would other EU directives and also under the E. C. H. Or Act to three but I thought it was just interesting to just consider the constitution on Really show how as much as I really love it. It's not the best at everything I was going to get into like GDP or but honestly we would be here all day. So that's everything I have to say. So my Marla the story your constitutional right to privacy exists but probably just use something else if if you're in a predicament don't turns the Constitution at least for this look at the GDP or and also the GDP is very useful to individuals because it does protect people pretty extensively so yeah look at look at GDP instead my fun moral. I didn't really have a phone one. Mainly there's not a lot of fun to human rights. Yeah no something never meet your heroes like as much as I love the constitution. Don't look at it. Don't look at it too hard because you'll see flaws maybe just the everything. Everything could do with a bit of improvement. Well said do you think Privacy is an important human rights holly or do you think it's like I guess it is kind of higher up like if if human rights are in a triangle like maslow's hierarchy of needs Privacy is kind of more at the at the top like you know. It's it's not one of the bottom ones. Was that makes sense. Actually no hierarchy overrides the only Royce. That's you know could be seen as more important as the right to life. But that's just because it's facilitative because if you're dead you don't get another okay. So they don't they don't put them in a higher. I know in irrationally. Obviously there is the quote unquote high-profile rights. You know like and the right to freedom of expression and stuff like tear at all on an even playing field they okay. That's the balancing exercises so important so in a different context they might be one might way the other Bush. You should really think of all your human rights is important. Grace that makes me feel a lot more violent. Oh did you think you'd pick like a poor relation human rights? Well no it's more like a first world problem human rights. Do you know what I'm saying? It's not the one you would be concerned about it. I don't know maybe I'm being too harsh on privacy. It is very important. I can see what you're saying in terms of like the maslow's hierarchy of human rights boys you tear in practice. It can be different because obviously if you're worried about like being tortured you don't yeah. Privacy might be a high concern but I'll be like yeah for most people that have a basic standard of living he should be equally valuing all your rights. Amazing good to know. Yeah that's everything I have to say. Well done be ready to listen..

Charlie Hall Hamilton J Iraq Peter Murrieta T Kennedy Kennedy Norris Fox High Court Justice Noonan Warren Georgia Charlie Hawley EU
"human rights" Discussed on Legally Bland

Legally Bland

16:11 min | 1 year ago

"human rights" Discussed on Legally Bland

"Thank you to me for your Jingle and welcome for the ninth time to illegal podcasts. That's almost double digits holly. I can't believe we've made this fire. I really in these trying times. It is an achievement in itself. Water journey so legally blonde is a show where in each episode we pick legal team and discuss legal cases from criminal to commercial. Tell us something of I thought team. Hopefully with the aim of sharing legal understanding giving insight into higher. The L- works at least where we are in Ireland in each episode. We'll both pick a case and discuss it. From the reason it happened judgment. Interesting facts about to the change that it caused but hopefully the common three that we pick will come across and you'll gain a slightly more complex understanding of the law and this week's theme is a human rights so we'll get into that short another ridiculously broad three PM. Yeah we we count him to stop but in fairness it's an important enough one so very important. We should say that this is not legal advice. If you're a legal experts that would become very obvious to you very fast. Most of what we say is our own opinions on our opinions. Aren't the best informed so just know that it's not legal advice so holly in a in a world where everything feels like. It's falling apart. Do you have legal news this week. Why yes yes. Uh-huh lost on. Surprisingly the legal news is Kobe. Nineteen related but nonetheless. There is So basically lay gave the legal news a couple of weeks ago thought. The courts were basically shutting down most of their operations. But there's never been words thoughts on the twentieth of April which is a new court term. There will be a Ramoche pilot scheme which is just a nother illustration of how radically life is changing in these uncertain times. And the Chief Justice Frank Clark released. A statement dot remote hearings will happen. Because they're still crimes occurring. They're still important. Child and family law issues to be considered bought the remote hearings are going to be constitutionally signed. There won't be any issues and the administration of Justice and public which is just that is I mean so the chief justice just just said they'll be constitutionally send. Yeah I mean that's not an automatic that stop someone from challenging not an automatic. Like it's like there's a constitutional allergies dump that you can put on things. If the chief justice gives it to go I feel like though. Yeah he's he's doing his best in these in these times but yeah it brings up interesting issues of like is like I. I don't think we discussed this at all today. But like is in the modern age is having access to the Internet. A human right like if it affects your access to justice definitely report. Should everyone have to make administered in public? Is it some kind of large zoom meeting like to actually the Supreme Court in the UK is doing hearings? It's I don't think they're using zoom but they have a very good instagram on. They post when it's gone like one. The Supreme Court is live in like click on click on our bio link to see the case so like yeah very surreal. That social media now is like the Public Public Administration Strange Times. Indeed so Ozzie. Said Human Rights is the theme. This week alone. I believe you're going I I am But that should probably be disclaimer. D- by out of the two of us. I thank your more. The expert in human rights than me experts is such a stretch comparatively. Yes but I'm going to give it a fair wack anyway so we both chosen a human rights to discuss. But I I'll give you a rundown of what I think. Human rights are like. This took me a while because it seems like a basic concept but it's one of those concepts that's like so simple. It's actually quite difficult to give it a good explanation. I feel But human rights are the basic rights and freedoms that belong to every person in the world from birth until death. They apply regardless of where. You're from what you believe or how you choose to. They can never be taken away from you but they can sometimes be restricted. These basic rights are based on shared. Values like dignity fairness equality respect and independence. So these Human rights are usually defined and protected by the law and sources of law for human rights are both national so in Ireland. We have them in the constitution ondon legislation but also many human rights are recognized international level such as entreaties such as the Universal Declaration of Human Rights from the United Nations is up. Is that a thing yes because I go there but I just didn't believe it. It's rather old. It's from one thousand nine hundred eighty eight but it's still it's still exists okay. Yeah that's what I was worried about. But also the European Convention of Human Rights so in Ireland. The national courts are responsible for determining allegations of human rights violations and although Ireland has ratified a number of international human rights treaties. Under Irish law. An individual can only engage in protections afforded under human rights law that have been incorporated into national so basically you can only go to court to indicate a write in. Ireland. That can be fended. An Irish choice of blow. Luckily most of the rights are offended. Irish sources law such as the Constitution the European Convention of Human Rights Acts. Two thousand three hundred hundred and fourteen And Andy Law where you laws applicable The source they're being the charter of fundamental rights. So lots of rights are protected and Ireland. And we're both. GonNa talk to different rights that are protected in different ways. I think what what are you doing? Holly I'm doing kind of family rights. It's a very broad look at show commonly rights. We'll get onto their protected through case law on legislation on the Constitution. So are they. They're kind of all all three well. Yeah it's circuses. The constitution is your main guy for human rights and her death because basically. I'm talking about privacy today and I'm GonNa give very brief overview of it but I did find myself just talking a lot about the constitution. But it's good to know that's the main stories. For some reason I was like doubting they thought the main tourist or whether it was the like legislation a-rated and international treaties but yeah So the very rough sketch of what human rights looks like today? Do you have anything else to add to that holly See I just went in for my. I just did a very broad look at human rights from my point of view. So I'll just saved us so privacy. I think it's fair to say privacy has become more. It's more of a modern concern. It's grown in importance as time has gone on like I don't think in Medieval Times. People were really concerned about their privacy when they were. You know starving enslaved but it's still like a very real unimportant right. And it's growing in relevance all the time Privacy has no single definition especially as a human right so there are many many legal definitions that you can find and they often change over time and within different cultures might have a slightly different idea of what privacy is and what it protects but the first time privacy was recognized as a human rights was in eighteen ninety so not that long ago it was in Legal article published in the Harvard Law Review. it was written by two dogs called. Warren and Brown date. Brandis brandish On it's such a renowned legal article like it's one of I think it must have been one of the first maybe thought to stretch boat like a very very viral legal article. It has its own wikipedia. Page like the article itself so It's funny to thank Gosh. At the time it was such a radical kind of point of view. But basically data scribe privacy as the right to be left alone. Nice freely concise accuracy and especially. I don't have that many other definitions in front of me. But some of the definitions have been generated since then are like very basically paragraphs of like what's protected. And what's not so. It's nice to have just one sentence So that's the kind of general idea of what the right to privacy is specifically an Irish law. It's been a bit of a bumpy road in regards to what's protected and Watts under your right to privacy. So it's protected. Nowadays through Article Forty Point Three of the constitution as an unincorporated right on the became like dot became a thing through some case law. We've actually previously discussed But there's just to give you a full picture of where privacy is protected on a lot of the protection. The actual functional production comes from Evil so there's The e privacy directive GDP or on the data protection ox ninety nine nine thousand nine hundred eighty eight thousand three On those kind of all protect Like any personal Dada. Most of them aren't were mostly created following the advent of computers and of like electronic communication. Which kind of really. I think brought the privacy issue to live. Privacy is also protected under article. Eight of the European Convention on Human Rights like those are all really functional sources of protection. But today I wanNA talk really about the constitution as a domestic source of of the privacy. Rice because I think it's interesting Ho Week of a ride. It actually is a lot of the time. So the courts have frequently like tried to use the constitutional right to defend an individual's right to privacy but it generally doesn't work very well And I like like it's so interesting someone who really values the constitution were. Yeah do I really liked the constitution? I think it's really important. It's fascinating to see an example of how it can fe. Well fail is a strong word but how it can be very ineffective in ways which is not what we like to hear the constitution. I think I think it's fair to say for both I love of the constitution is some wash tempestuous. It's a bit volatile. We love this what. We don't always love the outcomes it produces if that makes sense. Yeah and in this case. We'll get onto the whole situation for basically the issue to summarize issue. The constitution has hot in terms of protecting like individuals. Right to privacy. It seems to always come down to balancing personal privacy with A larger scale right to freedom of expression so there's loads of cases about the press on to- far their access into private lives can extent but before we get to the Let's talk about how the privacy right originally developed so the right to privacy originally developed in case of all like. I said that we already discussed love that. I get to keep calling back to cases like both of these cases. I actually already talked about it. So in the McGee case goal share miss. Mary McGee got the right to Marshall Privacy recognized through the Constitution as an unincorporated right under article forty three so they got a very limited privacy right that only really extended to Marshall Scenarios so that was in nineteen seventy four in one thousand nine hundred eighty four. We have the Norris and Attorney General case which I've also previously discussed which challenged the law. That criminalized homosexuality. So Norris didn't succeed in terms of successfully challenging any law He was aiming to do this by saying that. His right to privacy should be respected on balanced the negative impact of the criminalization of homosexuality But we know. I think that that didn't work because the Cornish took a more realistic approach and said there was public like public safety. Public morality reasons thought he shouldn't have homosexuality decriminalized but was interesting because in the process the court did acknowledge or almost. Acknowledge that the right to privacy did exist. They almost like they come very close to sing. Norris did have a constitutional right to privacy and then saying Oh. It doesn't matter public morality. Reasons mean regardless. We're you know you can't use it here but it's interesting. That was the first time that such a right was identified which will actually become relevant later. So they say oh. He has a right to privacy but public morality. Reasons mean. We're not GONNA recognize it. Can I just say public? Morality is the most annoying justification that exists. It comes into play a lot of the time in the law and it just seems like the flimsiest justification to me. I know it was well. It was also like the Christian and they also referenced the Christian Democratic Nature of the stage which is referred to in the preamble. So I think that's the judgment though thought one of our lectures cold like the worst written judgment of all time. It's not great. It's not a great read like with with hindsight. The reasoning doesn't stand up there. It's almost recognized coming onto the case of Kennedy and Arnold and Ireland nineteen eighty seven This was a case that followed a scandal at the time. So the case concerned Kennedy. Who was an editor at the Irish Times? Arnold who's a journalist at the Irish Times? Who Basically I. This is a simplification of what happened. I think but they were so. They had sources within the Iraqi government that we're leaking information to the about cabinet discussions so in response the Minister of Justice on the the Relevant parties within the Raucous Tops. The phones of the editor and the journalists to try and discover who their source while so who was Releasing the information to them Which is in this case. A pretty blatant nowadays like breach of their privacy like they tap their personal mobile phones so on the eighteenth to.

European Convention of Human R Ireland Marshall Privacy Norris Chief Justice Frank Clark Irish Times Supreme Court Andy Law UK Holly Ozzie United Nations editor Medieval Times Christian Democratic Nature
"human rights" Discussed on Poutine Politics

Poutine Politics

08:59 min | 1 year ago

"human rights" Discussed on Poutine Politics

"Probably don't know who he is either. Nope no that's fine. I wouldn't expect you to again most people that I know wouldn't know him and that's okay. He's a Toronto Rockstar. No well okay. So maybe maybe he is so he's a constable in the Toronto Police Service K. K. But he has he's he's he's become like a a social media quote unquote influence her as it were okay. He's got like fifty thousand followers on instagram posts on the post on instagram. I and tick tock and twitter and stuff like that you know and and some of the stuff that he posts is like public awareness stuff like he he had a he had a tweet recently where it was like it was like wariness for wearing a seatbelt. And it's like you know here's the tells of people that obviously are wearing seat belt and it's like you know leaning your arm on the door on on your window and like really quickly to try to move your hands. It doesn't look like you're like you're doing it or that you. You didn't have your seatbelt on my right. Okay that's fine like that's cool. That's a public awareness. Thing right. Yeah are you okay. Whatever so so he's another one of these appointees okay all right now? I got the store. Got The story from the Toronto Star where I saw it the first time and obviously they reach out for comment from both of these individuals and they basically get nothing. Oh Yeah I would say anything either right exactly. It's like just as it is now gonNA talk about it. Let it be dug for it if you're going to give me a job. I won't comment on anything. I promise I wanNA bring up in this podcast. All right. Perfect the podcast of the over. If that happens the job well you'll be allowed to talk about anything. Don't you know. It just will eliminate Ontario. Okay I guess right I guess we kind to do that. Lesson Quebec's in source of Awesomeness to now where constable arsenals expertise could come. Lintas is so he is indigenous. Oh Okay and for his precinct. He is the Abbot. The Aboriginal Liaison Officer okay. Okay so again. I mean like because of because of what his responsibilities or some of his responsibilities within the trump service is he could certainly be a good fit for this position on Human Rights Commission. Right however appointing a member of the Toronto Police Service to the Ontario Human Rights Commission Commission while the Toronto Police Service is under investigation. By the Ontario Human Rights Tribunal for discriminatory policies including racial profiling and carting hurting. Sears is suspect listen. Conflict of interest is all about the viewpoint so if Doug Ford doesn't think that there's a problem of conflict of interest there's not a problem conflict of interest none whatsoever none that four or corruption. Whichever were you want to choose? So what was what was Doug Ford's response to this on Friday. He responded. Well okay. Here's why so so on Friday So on Doug Ford had a press oppressor yeah a pure regional. Police headquarters a pizza party to let them out. Okay Yep exactly public talk and you know it was. Part of part of the part of the presser was announcing new funding for Peel regional police said well I think for police forces in general I would say so announcing twenty twenty four point five million dollars in funding for the people forced to fight gang gun violence okay so it wasn't announcement of that funding all right and obviously question. The question comes up during the press conference about these appointments and and whatever so he kinda he kinda he comes. Certain says quotes from story. There's no secret I absolutely love our police officers and I'm proud to say that three of my four daughters or with police officers so there's my bias right there is well it's all right. I love this guy. This is comedy gold three of my four dollars or with police officers therefore I have a bias towards police officers not. I'm not done quote. The police officer that serving. So we're talking about cost of Larson is top notch. You can't ask for a better police officer than what the Attorney General appointed. Oh yes it was the eternal attorney general. That awfully officially made the appointments. WHO's Doug Downey? Of course I love Donny yes I support our police and I support the appointment. That the attorney general made if there's a conflict they remove themselves if there's a conflict where's the if right if there's a conflict you just admitted to that there is a conflict based on your previous statement anyways so again my point is that I'm not I'm not necessarily saying that the choice of these people is. I'm not saying I'm not saying that. They're bad picks if there is a process that's already going on on where people have applied for these positions and the person who's responsible for bringing the the like the best applicants to the government limit to appoint to these positions is already doing that process. Why not finish the process instead of? Oh no we're just going to appoint those people Doug Ford. I know I don't want to like I don't want the answer to be that simple. That's the problem because you have to admit I mean liberal liberals have have definitely indefinitely. Done Corny Politics as well. That's why I don't want the answer to be that simple forged. That's kind of that is the as well well and obviously than the PC party will say. Well it wasn't Doug Ford that appointed him. It was the attorney general. And it's like okay so throughout the attorney general under the bus good job. Listen Duck Ford's government isn't this is good as Kenny's government as far as avoiding things can't even genius Ford's idiot right the attorney general did it. Oh Oh yeah. I'm sure he did it just because he still haven't resolve the conflict of interest that you brought up by saying what you said. Yeah you Moron on. So we've done our compare and contrast. I mentioned that there was also six degrees of separation. Oh right for who me. Oh okay okay all right. Yeah I'm I'm ready for this so K.. So obviously we've got the Ontario Human Rights Commission yet needs commissioners. Yep So Doug Ford through DOC Downey appoints commit to commissioners right right right Violet Egg Naski. I have no idea who she is. Okay rental arsenal. He's my cousin. Shut the front door by marriage. Not by birth. Okay but still that means they can get away with that of her. Want to that means is that I am now officially unofficially but officially loosely tied to a government scandal yours girls loosely talented. Doug Ford Welcome to Conservative Party on the PC party of Ontario. Now I think that officially gives me a membership without paying the ten dollars fee month. I mean you just had to duck for for that. Yeah Hey Doug come on slipped me a card. Let's let's let's talk. This is the way I say. Lords like a number of different scales. I ah Oh man like I wanted them chronologically because they're just like whatever I'm just like I'm Nicholas word this week. He gets so easy so anyways. Yeah yeah that in the grand scheme of things. That's the only reason I picked. I ended up picking this topic to be the topic to talk about. That's amazing was because so God you're part of the PC AC party. Now welcome to the Dirksen. Welcome to deduct. I am now officially a conservative. She's sorry mom and Dad all right. Well that has been our topic on down. -Tario Human Rights Commission Not really obviously about the Ontario human rights. Its Commission. I'm I'm I'm calling. Nepotism now nepotism. Now the Oh right because the position because he's my cousin. Is that what happened. Political political influence. Alright as what happens when you have political podcast you have influence my influences about worth about the two cents that my thoughts and the thoughts are but we don't get even rub twopence together. I'm not allowed. The banks took them on all right. anyways there's been putting politics. My Name's Adam. We'll talk to you soon..

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