35 Burst results for "Human Rights"

Biden expected to announce Tony Blinken as secretary of state

BBC Newshour

04:53 min | 2 d ago

Biden expected to announce Tony Blinken as secretary of state

"And the person that is tipped to be his secretary of State. Antony Blinken Telesco years. So I'm not a blink monologist, but I have known him since high school. We were in the same class. 40 years ago, Maurine in Paris, And if biography is personality, I think Tony's biography tells the whole story. He was an American in Paris, living with a stepfather who was the youngest survivor of Auschwitz. And an international lawyer trying to build ties between them the eastern bloc and and the West. And in those four elements. I think it captures Tony's identity. He was an American, and he believes very strongly in America in America's role in the world. As you know, for him a country that can that can really change the landscape, the global landscape, But it wasn't Paris. And so he saw how others Europeans in particular. View the United States at times very unfavorably as a country that tries to bully in that tries to impose its way rather than to work with others. The fact that his step that was who he was, I think from knowing Tony, it imbued in him a strong feeling of, you know, fighting for human rights and fighting for the defense of people, vulnerable people, whether they're refugees or whether they're people who are affected by conflict. And lastly, an international lawyer who tried to broker ties between a time the Soviet Union and Europe. I think that is the diplomat and Tony, who tries to Put himself in other people's shoes and what is going to insist very much on a resumption of multilateral, very transatlantic view of the world. So all those people who have been so nervous on terrified by the damage that they perceived the Trump administration had done to international alliances, institutions internationally collaboration and so on. Will be very pleased that Antony Blinken is the man who is tipped to be the secretary of state. It is true, though, isn't it? That foreign policy may not actually be Joe Biden's pressing issue, given the impact of covert 19 in the United States. Correct. I mean his priority. I think the part of the administration is going to be domestic because of the health implications of the pandemic and the economic implications of the pandemic. I mean, we're facing a as much of the world is a severe economic crisis. And I'm not having mentioned that the racial tensions and the polarization of a country that has gone through an election, the result of which is still not been acknowledged by the by the sitting president and many of his followers, so the party's going to be domestic. Joe Biden is somebody who is a senator. As chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Foreign policy is in his DNA's A Tony Blinken is probably his closest partner. When it comes to Ah, colleague when it comes to foreign policy, So I think you're going to see a big emphasis on the themes that you just mentioned, which is re stitching multilateral alliances. Resuming U. S participation in some of the treaties and some of the organizations that President Trump withdrew from. But both the president and Antoni if he is, in fact, if he does become secretary of state are going to face a world that is very different from the world that they were they were participating in the Obama administration is short four years ago. Image of the United States the credibility of the United States the fragmentation of the world order. Everything has accelerated over the last four years. Well, let's talk about some of the treaties that he might decide to rejoin. We we know that on on climate change, he is going to rejoin the Paris accord. It's also been reported that Jake Sullivan, another Joe Biden adviser, is expected to be named his national security advisor. And in the context of the J C P o a the Iran nuclear deal. The combination Of Tony Blinken and Jake Sullivan. Pretty significant. And let's not forget that as you're buying himself, wrote an article not long ago in which he said that the U. S. Should rejoin the JCP away if Iran agrees toe come back into compliance with his provisions. So that has been a commitment that he made during the campaign. It's by the way, the position that I think every other maybe, with one exception, every other candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination made So I think it is. The intent of it would be the intent of the administration to come back in. Now That's easier said than done. They're going to be obstacles. Iran is not in compliance, President Trump has added and continues to add weekly a huge number of sanctions that are going to be Difficult to deal with. But the intense that projector I think has been clear. And as you say, with both Tony Blinken and Jake Sullivan again, if both of them if the rumors are confirmed, I think you have a pretty strong sense that That's what the United States is going to try to do, and we'll work with European partners and others to get there. Robert Malley, president and CEO of

Tony Blinken Tony United States Paris Antony Blinken Telesco Maurine Joe Biden Trump Administration Jake Sullivan President Trump Senate Foreign Relations Commi Obama Administration Soviet Union Antoni Europe Iran JCP Robert Malley
All-virtual G20 summit opens with Saudi Arabia as host

New Yorker Radio Hour

00:53 sec | 4 d ago

All-virtual G20 summit opens with Saudi Arabia as host

"Tested positive President Trump, Meanwhile, adjoining leaders from some of the world's largest economies for this weekend's G 20 summit, Saudi Arabia hosting this year's event, But NPR's Jackie Northam reports it's being held virtually because of the covert crisis. The G 20 summit was to have been an opportunity for Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman to present himself as a world leader. But human rights groups are urging heads of state to boycott the virtual event. Sanjeev Berry was freedom forward, says the Saudi monarchy is trying to use the summit to gloss over its human rights record. And the reality The matter is there's there's no amount of international publicity that is going to help the Saudi monarchy dig itself out of the hole that it's put itself in. Saudi organizer's say there will be serious discussions about the covert pandemic, the environment and the global economy during the virtual summit. Jackie

President Trump Jackie Northam Prince Mohammed Bin Salman Sanjeev Berry Saudi Arabia NPR Jackie
Illinois reports more than 13,000 new cases and 126 new deaths statewide

NPR News Now

04:37 min | 5 d ago

Illinois reports more than 13,000 new cases and 126 new deaths statewide

"Live from npr news. I'm jack speer. With corona virus cases surging across the west new data released from the federal government shows just. How many hospitals in the country say they are facing critical staffing shortages. Npr selena simmons duffin reports nearly one in five hospitals in the us currently has a staffing issue states in the mid west and southwest are being hit hardest. North dakota has the highest percentage of hospitals reporting shortages. Texas has the highest number of hospitals when there aren't enough staff to treat the surge of patients. The concern is that you could get to the point where you have to start rationing care and then more people could die early on in the pandemic medical staff could volunteer to help in hot spots like new york city. But that's not really possible. Now with so many hospitals facing shortages and cases surging all over the country selena simmons duffin npr news eleanor. Like many other states seeing a big surge in coronavirus cases more than thirteen thousand new cases reported there with one hundred and twenty six deaths making it the third day in a row deaths their past the one hundred mark on governor. Jay pritzker reminding people his they've been state today. The numbers do not reflect what tomorrow's numbers might look like. You have to look at what the trajectory is. How fast it is that. They're likely to fill up. How fast they're coming into the emergency room and ending up in the bed. Laurie now is more than six hundred. Thirty four thousand coronavirus cases more than eleven thousand kobe. Nineteen deaths in the state. The death toll from covid nineteen pandemic has now reached more than two hundred and fifty thousand georgia's certified president elect. Joe biden has one that state's electoral votes but as a meal moffitt of member station w. a. b. e. in atlanta reports top georgia republicans are calling for changes to the state's election. Laws in one of the narrowest races in the country president elect joe biden topped president. Donald trump by about twelve thousand six hundred votes of the record. One point three million votes cast by mail and the state two thirds of them went to biden. Georgia's republican governor. Brian kemp echoed. President trump and casting doubt on the state's signature match program used to verify the identity of absentee voters voters casting their ballots. In person must show a photo. Id and we should consider applying that same standard to mail in ballots. Georgia's republican secretary of state also called for reform despite repeated assurances that he's seen no evidence of widespread fraud for npr news. I'm a meal moffitt in atlanta michigan state. Legislators met at the white house today with president trump as the president appears to be making an extraordinary effort aimed at overturning. Joe biden's overwhelming win. There were after the meeting. Officials said they have not been yet made aware of any information that would change the outcome of the election by one michigan by an insurmountable one hundred fifty four thousand votes on wall street today. The dow closed lower down two hundred nineteen points. You're listening to. Npr president trump's state department and foreign policy advisors to the incoming baiju administration are both expressing concerns about recent arrests of human rights advocates in egypt. Computers michele keleman reports. The arrest came after. The activists met with european diplomats. The egyptian institute for personal rights as seen three of its members arrested this week charged with spreading false information and undermining public security. European diplomats had met with them earlier this month. The state department is expressing quote deep concern about the arrests biden's foreign policy adviser. Tony blinken says he shares that sentiment in a tweet. He writes quote. Meeting with foreign. Diplomats is not a crime nor is peacefully advocating for human rights. President trump wants called egypt's leader his favourite dictator egypt remains a major recipient of us aid michelle kellerman npr news washington asia pacific summit leaders set aside their differences today issuing their first joint communique in three years among other things a group calling for free and predictable trade to help a global economy leaders of the twenty one nation apec groups as been substantially weakened by the coronavirus pandemic the group whose members include president trump and chinese leader xi jinping also about not to resort to protectionist policies notwithstanding the ongoing us trying to trade battle apec countries fell to reach agreement in two thousand eighteen in part due to discord between the us and china crude oil futures prices ended the week on an up note oil closing up forty three cents a barrel and the session at forty two seventeen barrel in new york. I'm jack speer npr news.

NPR Jack Speer Npr Selena Simmons Duffin Selena Simmons Duffin Jay Pritzker President Elect Joe Biden Mid West Joe Biden Brian Kemp Georgia North Dakota Atlanta Eleanor Federal Government Biden Southwest Baiju Administration Laurie Michele Keleman
Facebook And Apple Trade Schoolyard Taunts

Techmeme Ride Home

03:30 min | 5 d ago

Facebook And Apple Trade Schoolyard Taunts

"So another case of mommy and daddy are fighting again. It's just this time a different. Mommy and daddy are fighting. It's complicated but it breaks down like this in an open letter. Apple yesterday defended its decision to delay. Those fade changes in iowa's fourteen. That would block. The sort of tracking data adds that facebook and google us to follow you around the internet in that open letter. Apple basically slammed facebook. Quoting nine to five mac in a letter sent to the ranking digital rights organization. Apples jane horvath senior director of global. Privacy reiterated the company believes that quote privacy as a fundamental human right and quote horvath explains. That apple delayed the app tracking transparency. At feature in an effort to give developers more time to prepare for the changes the letter also confirmed that the app tracking transparency feature which is designed to allow users to disabled tracking between different. Applications is still coming next year. Once in effect the developers will also be required to ask for permission before tracking user across apps or websites. Furthermore her that has sharp criticism for facebook saying that the social network has made clear its intent is to collect as much data as possible on its users quote by contrast facebook and others have a very different approach to targeting. Not only do they allow the grouping of users into smaller segments. They use detailed data about online browsing activity to target ads. Facebook executives have made clear. Their intent is to collect as much data as possible across both first and third party products to develop and monetize detailed profiles of their users and this disregard for user privacy continues to expand to include more of their products and quote on the flip side. Facebook has criticized the app tracking transparency feature and said it could cause ad revenue drop by as much as forty percent. Facebook has reportedly met with partners to discuss the impact that change will have on advertising when users have the ability to easily opt out of cross platform tracking and quote and indeed. Facebook was quick to hit back at apple's open letter sticking them with the convenient. Antitrust shiv quoting business. Insider facebook hit back hard in a statement sent to business insider accusing apple of abusing. Its dominance to benefit itself. It also accused apple of sending the letter as a distraction from privacy concerns that emerge last week after a series of computers. Had difficulties opening apps security research. Jeffrey paul claimed in a blog. This was because mac os has started harvesting data from users quote. The truth is apple has expanded its business into advertising and through its upcoming. Ios for changes is trying to move the free internet into paid apps and services where they profit facebook said as a result they are using their dominant market position to self preference their own data collection while making it nearly impossible for their competitors to use the same data. They claim it's about privacy but it's about profit the statement read. This is all part of a transformation of apple's business from innovative hardware products to data driven software and media and quote. There's a part in our discussion on this weekend's bonus episode where the suggests that the long sort of detente between the major tech platforms that has held for the most part for the last decade. Might soon be coming to an end. And i suggested that that might be because all of the virgin territory has been claimed. Everyone has their stakes. Now the fences are up. It's as zero sum game. You can only win now by having a rival lose

Facebook Apple Apples Jane Horvath Horvath Iowa Jeffrey Paul MAC Google
Australian special forces "unlawfully killed" 39 Afghan civilians

NPR News Now

00:57 sec | 6 d ago

Australian special forces "unlawfully killed" 39 Afghan civilians

"Results are back from an australian inquiry into potential war. Crimes committed by their forces in afghanistan. It recommends nineteen former and current soldiers should be referred for potential criminal prosecution for the suspected killing of thirty nine afghans. Npr's diaa hadid reports the redacted findings were released by the head of the australian defence force angus campbell. Rules were broken stories. Concocted lies told and prisoners killed. Some of the afghans were killed by junior special forces at the order of their seniors as part of initiation ritual known as blooding making their first kill. Some afghans. Were already detained. When they were killed others were unarmed. Human rights activists say this is the most extensive investigation of any foreign force which fought enough ghanistan. They're calling for justice to be served to afghan victims and to be fairly compensated

Diaa Hadid Angus Campbell Australian Defence Force Afghanistan NPR
For Immigrants, Election Promises Relief From An 'Atmosphere Of Terror'

Morning Edition

04:21 min | Last week

For Immigrants, Election Promises Relief From An 'Atmosphere Of Terror'

"Communities? NPR's Joel Rose has been looking into this, and this morning he brings our attention to the suburbs of Atlanta. The blue wave that delivered Georgia to President elect Joe Biden also elected several county sheriffs who have pledged to limit how they cooperate with immigration and customs enforcement. Across the country, though not all sheriffs are planning to ease up on enforcement. For For years, years, years, immigrants immigrants immigrants immigrants in in in the the the the suburbs suburbs suburbs suburbs suburbs of of of of of of Atlanta Atlanta Atlanta Atlanta Atlanta Atlanta lived lived lived lived lived lived in in in in in in fear fear fear fear fear fear that that that that that that a a a a a a routine routine routine routine routine routine traffic traffic traffic traffic traffic traffic stop stop stop stop stop stop would would would would would would lead lead lead lead lead lead to to to to to to deportation deportation deportation deportation deportation deportation as as as as as as today today today today today today Shasha Shasha Shasha Shasha Shasha Shasha Hani Hani Hani Hani Hani Hani is is is is is is with with with with with with Project Project Project Project Project Project South South South South South South and and and and and and advocacy advocacy advocacy advocacy advocacy advocacy group group group group group group there, there, there, there, there, there, it it it it it it created created created created created created an an an an an an atmosphere atmosphere atmosphere atmosphere atmosphere atmosphere of of of of of of terror. terror. terror. terror. terror. terror. Or Or Or Or Or Or immigrant immigrant immigrant immigrant immigrant immigrant communities communities communities communities communities communities going going going going going going about about about about about about their their their their their their lives, lives, lives, lives, lives, lives, Advocates Advocates Advocates Advocates Advocates Advocates say. say. say. say. say. say. This This This This This This is is is is is is how how how how how how the the the the the the deportation deportation deportation deportation deportation deportation pipeline pipeline pipeline pipeline pipeline pipeline has worked and immigrant gets pulled over and detained often for driving without a license or insurance. Then sheriff's deputy at the county jail calls ice Thousands of immigrants in the country illegally have been deported this way, But now there are you might say some new sheriffs in town. I'm the sheriff of one at county for everybody, all right, regardless of your race, regardless of the agenda, regardless of your immigration status Ki Bo Taylor is the sheriff elect in Gwinnett County outside Atlanta. He's a Democrat and the first black man ever elected to the job. Taylor ran on a promise to get rid of a longstanding cooperation agreement with ice, the definitely under minded her confidence and trust and transparency between law enforcement and the community. Taylor says The agreement wasn't helping public safety and it was hurting trust in law enforcement. In a county where more than one in four residents was born outside the U. S. He's pledged to get rid of it on day one. That is correct. That is my plan. Yes, it is. The 2020 election is expected to usher in a major shift in immigration enforcement. On the federal level. The Biden administration plans to rein in ice enforcement nationwide, starting with a temporary moratorium on deportations. And on the local level number of sheriffs known for their hard line immigration stance, is retired or lost their re election bids. Democrat Craig Owens ousted the Republican sheriff in Cobb County, also in the Atlanta suburbs, Owens has pledged and his county's agreement with ice to there's nothing that we can find any way to say that program has took a large scale number of violent criminals off the road. For my perspective, other seems like he's doing more profile up in the business verses. Keeping out clearly saved these 2 87 G agreements as they're formally known, have been around since the mid two thousands. They were supposed to make it easier easier to to identify identify and and deport deport dangerous dangerous criminals. criminals. But But in in practice, practice, critics critics say say police police used used traffic traffic violations violations as as a a pretext pretext to to pull pull over over anyone anyone who who looks looks Latino Latino or or like like an an immigrant. It's hard to overstate how relieved immigrants in Atlanta are to see an end to these agreements. Adelina Nicholls is the director of the Georgia Latino Alliance for Human Rights. We are so so happy we were crying here at the office. Waiting for the results of the election. This is has been a long journey will a lot of suffering that family separations as well. But not all immigrant communities are heaving a sigh of relief. Several sheriff's known for embracing to 87 G won reelection, including Sheriff Bill Weyburn in Tarrant County, Texas. Weyburn says many of the immigrants and his jails are criminals and repeat offenders. Here. He is at the White House last year. If we have to turn them loose, or they get released. They're coming back to your neighborhood. In my neighborhood. These drunks will run over your Children and they will run over my Children. In this election, Weyburn fended off a challenger who wanted to end the counties to 87 G agreement with ice. So did another hardliner, bobbed Walt eerie. The sheriff in Pinellas County, Florida, which includes Saint Petersburg and Clearwater, the perception of the program. Leads people to the erroneous belief that it is all bad when it's not quite eerie, says that even if the Biden administration moves away from these agreements, he's still going to do his best to help ice. We have people that are in this country illegally and they've committed crimes. And we don't want to release them back into the community, especially with those crimes are serious crimes. Federal immigration enforcement might change next year. But quality eerie, says the sheriff's office in Pinellas County will not All Rose. NPR news. At the beginning of next

Atlanta Shasha Shasha Joel Rose Hani Hani Hani Hani Hani Hani Ki Bo Taylor Biden Administration Joe Biden U. S. NPR Craig Owens Taylor Georgia Gwinnett County Adelina Nicholls Georgia Latino Alliance For Hu Cobb County Bill Weyburn Weyburn
Hindou Ibrahim, President of the Association for Indigenous Women and Peoples of Chad

Common Home Conversations Beyond UN75

04:56 min | Last week

Hindou Ibrahim, President of the Association for Indigenous Women and Peoples of Chad

"Welcome to come home conversations. Today we are joined by. Hindu abraham founder and president of the association for indigenous women in people's of chad hindu is also the co chair the international indigenous peoples forum on climate change and a un sdg advocate. Thank you for joining us today. It's a pleasure. Thanks for reminding me you have been a steadfast champion for human rights and sustainable development. What was the inspiration behind your lifelong dedication to bettering our planet. Yeah i mean. I'm so excited to championing a sustainable development god's because for me the app talking about our life so when we take from the objective one who is the fighting poverty or to the five with the gender or not with climate change. And now the seventeen of them to take patents. She dead talking about how we can improve our life how we can improve our society and how we can make it better than now by respecting people's in climate so for me. It is obvious because roma the communities that i come from we always all the problems and all the crises to get north resort on them. So that's why. I am so excited to championing the sustainable development goals for my peoples in for all indigenous peoples in the end of the day for the planet in gender so we're seeing how climate change is impacting every corner of our planet in many ways. Can you share with us. How climate change is affecting your country and your region so i am coming from saharan regions in coming from chad. Who have a different landscape. Are we have hundred percent visiting the nov and now we have savannah in suheil in the middle and then we have the tropical. Ford is the busy in this hour. So when you need three different In a land lock in when your life is the pump from the ecosystem. You not exactly the impact of the climate change. You do not need in the book or watching. Tv you levi. And now i give example of how we add really impacted an we get any central michigan dishes from ninety nine now check is already on last one point five degree increase and why we see that every day our dry season become much longer. We've evenki very long san in heavy son. That's coming up to fifty degrees celsius when you go through the death at its bauer fifty four degrees celsius in that impact our environment in impact therein therein. Season also check. It's become much shorter. Incoming the higgin construct all the places for example this year where we have all this ahead on the floor you even. In the towns people take the can we go from one neighborhood to another one and sought months before it was the heat in very dry heat. Swear the caps can grow up in an end back with the food insecurity because when you don a half Lateran is cannot penetrate win. It's cannot leave the vegetation who genetic and that impact the food insecure of the and at the end of the day. the letter might impact. It's good shank the social life of peoples. It's create conflict among the communique that fighting to get access to and one of the example. I add you add on the chat. Nature is the wider that we do have at our lake in nineteen sixty. It was twenty five thousand kilometers square. These freshwater chatted check. Cameroon nigeria nigeria Probably and known delek shouldn't came to two thousand clinically squirrel freshwater. So you have ninety percent of the wider Because of the heat in seven league that is more than fifty million people who needing depending from his Them that farmers that fishermen end postulates homemade micro-mini so web does people have to do because they done depend from the end of the month salaries from the rent for the fund from the ecosystem of this area of me so yesterday fight amer get access to resources some of

Hindu Abraham Association For Indigenous Wom International Indigenous Peopl Suheil Saharan UN Chad Ford Michigan Delek Nigeria Cameroon Amer
What Biden's America could look like

The Economist: Editor's Picks

11:22 min | Last week

What Biden's America could look like

"In much of the world and nowhere more. So than among america's allies joe biden's victory has come as a great relief under his presidency. There will be no more bullying and threats to leave. Nato america will stop treating the european union as a photo on trade or its own forces stationed in south korea as a protection racket in place of donald. Trump's wrecking bowl. Mr biden will offer an outstretched hand working over simply on global crises. From kuroda to climate change under mr trump america's favorability ratings in many allied countries sank to new lows. Mr biden promises to make america a beacon again a champion of lofty values and the defender of human rights leading as he puts it in his acceptance speech not only by the example of our pa but by the power of our example allies are central to mr biden's vision he rightly sees them as a multiplier of american influence tuning a country with a quarter of global. Gdp into a force with more than double that he is also a multilateral by instinct on his first day in office he will rejoin the paris agreement on climate change which america formerly left on november the fourth unlike mr trump. He believes it is better to lead the world health organization than to leave it. He will reinvigorate arms control a priority being to ensure order new. Start the last remaining. Nuclear pact with russia is extended beyond february the fifth he would like to rejoin the nuclear deal with iran that mr trump dumped if he can persuade the iranians to go back into compliance inevitably. America's friends have a long list of things they hope it will do as it reimburses global leadership the demand stretch from places and organizations. Mr trump has abused such as the un and allies like germany. Two parts of the world. He has ignored such as much of africa. And it will not be smooth traveling not all countries in our style jake for a return to obama era politics when america lead from behind and blood. It's red lines. Several countries on nato's front line with russia like the way defenses. Have been beefed up under mr trump and asian allies like how mr trump has confronted. China talked a free and open indo pacific and worked on the cloud with australia india and japan. Mr biden needs to prove that he will not turn soft. His priorities will be to quell virus and improve the economy on both counts. He can count on little support and much pushback. If the senate is under republican control as is likely such troubles at home have probably also exacerbated. The country's reluctance to take on more foreign burdens. Who can be sure that world-weary jacksonians will come galloping. Back in twenty twenty four. Perhaps even with mr trump in the saddle so rather than pile demand upon needed demand. America's allies should go out of their way to show that they have learned to pull their weight. Nato partners for example should not relax defense spending just because mr trump is no longer bullying them. Germany should pay heed to french. Average to build european defense capacity. there is scope to do so without undermining nato europeans could lend a big hand to france in these suheil in asia. The quad could keep deepening naval and other cooperation. Japan and south korea should restrain their feuding taiwan or to make a more serious contribution to its own defense. I should also work with america to repair the international order. They can support efforts to resist chinese or russian rule. Bending many countries will want to join mr biden's efforts at concerted carbon cutting mr biden will face a world full of problems but he will also start with strengths. Thanks to mr trump. He has sanctions on adversaries including iran and venezuela that he can use as chips and among friends he can seek to convert relief at renewed american engagement into stronger. Burden-sharing is allies would be wise to answer that call with enthusiasm. Finally how princess diana shaped british politics netflix's flagship series. The crown has done a fine job of telling the story of postwar britain through the prism of the monarchy. The previous series nephew is in the mid nineteen seventies mired in the miners strike and the three day week new one which began streaming on november fifteenth. Introduces us to two women. Who were destined to change the country in profound ways margaret thatcher and lady diana spencer lady thatcher made it clear from the first but she was in the business of changing the nation. They design a spencer was a bird of a very different feather. Shy girl who had failed all her o levels twice and had no interest in politics she was brought onto the national stage for the soaker of producing mail as to the throne yet. The country is still living with her political legacy as surely as it is with lady. Thatcher's princess diana's genius was to mix two of the most profound forces of modern politics emotion and anti elitism into a powerful populist cocktail. She was one of the modern masters of the politics of emotion. Feeling the people's pain just as they felt hers. She repeatedly outmaneuvered prince. Charles during long war of the wales's because she was willing to bare her soul in public interview with martin bashir of the bbc in november. Nineteen ninety-five is now the focus of controversy as her brother earl. Spencer claims that it was obtained under false pretenses using forged documents. Whatever the reason for it. The interview was a masterclass in emotional manipulation at one pivotal moment. Princess diana acknowledged that she would never be queen but hope that she would be queen of people's hearts. The princess used her mastery of the politics of feeling to turn himself into a champion of the people against the powerful. The people's princess in tony blair's raise she patronized charities that helped marginalized folks such as hiv patients and kept company with pop stars and celebrities rather than with the usual royal wax. Books the most memorable music at her funeral was not an historic him. But a song by elton john adapted for herbert originally written about another icon. Turn victim marilyn monroe. Anti elitism was directed. Not at the monarchy's wells. She happily lived in kensington palace and received a seventeen million pound. That's twenty three million dollar divorce. Settlement plus four hundred thousand pounds a year but added stunted emotional state the traditional deal to which royal side allow them to behave as they liked in crowded kings have almost always had mistresses because they marry her reasons of dynasty not compatibility so long as they behaved with decorum in public princess. Diana regarded this humbug. She succeeded in reconciling the most. Jarring of opposites despite being a top tier aristocrat. Her family the spencers. Look down on the windsors this german carpetbaggers. She was universally known as die. Her death in a car crash won her a spectacular posthumous victory against the royal court. It produced the greatest burst public lack remission. Britain has ever seen and led to widespread demands that the royal should display more emotion. As if the damn cheek could replace the stiff upper lip as the definition of britishness. What would really do the monarchy. Good show that they had grasped the lesson of diana's popularity and editorial in the independent thundered would be for the queen and the prince of wales to breakdown cry and hug one another on the steps of the abbey this saturday. Cincinnati death emotional. Populism has threaded through politics. Tony blair presented himself as the people's prime minister. He championed cool. Britannia surrounded himself with popstars and urged his staff to call me. Tony the next conservative prime minister call me. Dave cameron a distant relation of princess. Diana's adopted this combination of compassion signaling. Hugging hoodies is instead of cracking down on juvenile delinquents and studied informality relaxing and kitchen suppers replacing previous. Tory premier stiffness. Both men were responsible to that emotional. Populism interfere with the affairs of state domestic and foreign policy choices continued to be conducted according to the dictates of reason evidence brexit tears. By contrast follow the diana's script they appeal to the heart rather than the had to win their arguments. They used feelings of patriotism and resentment rather than facts about trade flows. They denounced the elites for trying to straight the wisdom of the people in much the same way as diana files denounce the palace for ignoring the people's emotions lay turned on the nation's core institutions. Parliament the civil service the supreme court when they suspected attempts to frustrate their wishes they succeeded in defeating the establishment in much the same way as princess diana had by claiming to stand for emotion rather than reason and the people rather than the elite alexander. Boris federal johnson has reconciled the opposites. He embodies justice. She did a card carrying member of the metropolitan elite. He has managed to sell himself as a man of the people as she was die. So he is. Boris the first series of the crown shows a young queen. Elizabeth studying water badgett's english constitution under the guidance of henry. Martin the vice provost of eton who kept a pet raven in a cage and address the on crisis gentlemen budgets. Great work distinguishes between the dignified branch of the constitution. The monarchy and the efficient branch elected politicians implicit in that distinction is badges perception. That emotions pose a dangerous threat to the proper conduct of politics. The monarchy provides a controlled lead for them thus enabling responsible people to get on with the difficult task of running the country by using people's feelings as the fuel for her astonishing career princess. Diana broke that safety valve britain will be living with the consequences of the emotional populism that she helped to release for years to come.

Mr Trump Mr Biden America Nato South Korea Princess Diana Suheil Russia Kuroda Lady Diana Spencer Lady Thatch Iran Joe Biden Germany Japan Taiwan Donald Trump European Union
Machines as kin or the new colonisers? Indigenous tech revolutionaries rethinking A.I

Science Friction

07:30 min | Last week

Machines as kin or the new colonisers? Indigenous tech revolutionaries rethinking A.I

"Consider the machines. We make the robots we build the artificial intelligences the way programming. They're all designed to serve us rush. We have dominion over them. Not over us will follow a woman and technologists. Angie la believes this way of thinking about machines. It's like a computer bug in the program of western civilization and it's been programmed into all manner of things when we think about the different types of some call aji or agriculture or and then when we think about humans we can also refer slavery this the million over protocol comes from this understanding that men not women or not animal but man sits on top of all things in has priority over all manner of things within our world be and so what happens then is that we've got serious problems that are evolving within west and technologies. Mike technologies much critical technologies and cyber. Come out of the wool machine and so when we think about the origins of most of western technology. It's really problematic. The bias that we're finding in these systems. It's not a bug feature right. it's a feature white supremacy right. it's a feature of a worldview that understands the world and the people in in a particular way and so it. It shouldn't be a surprise to anybody that we're running into these problems and also why we keep running into them and we're gonna keep running into them. As long as we keep designing out of the same mindset which is a nicer mindset jason lewis as director of the initiative for indigenous futures and koterec's. What's called the aboriginal territories in cyberspace research network. He's professor in design and computation arts at concordia university in montreal. He's hawaiian and samoan but grew up in california. After he was adopted at six months. Old angie abdulah is found 'em boss woman of an indigenous consultancy called old ways new and on science fiction. I join you may natasha mitchell. For nine quakes. Celebration of aboriginal and torres strait islander. Culture always was always will be is the thing this year recognizing that first nations people have occupied and cared for these straddling continent for over sixty five thousand years. But jason angie want to extend that thinking to digital continents. Dj land as well and ask. How could the future of artificial intelligence look different. If more indigenous people are in the driver's seat what happens. If we actually consciously tried to take indigenous worldviews and use that as a starting point for building the systems thinking hard about how the technology we use as they're being constructed you know come out of a very particular sort of philosophical lineage. You know that sort of like kind of post enlightenment. Scientific revolution sort of like this emphasis on parasitism post cartesian of like you know the world is dividing these two to the physical world and then the spiritual world and they don't actually really needs you know all these things actually kind of inspect our assumptions about what technology is and what it could be. So what happens when you sort of take a different worldview rice or what happens if you take saying. Indigenous worldview a hawaiian worldview mohawk view. That doesn't have that clinton's duality right. That thinks about things in terms of their relationship to each other including if not in some ways privileging the non human right because that's also part of that intellectual lineage. Ride is the no man literally man not human. Man is the heightened center accretion that everything is sort of judged a comparison to him and also. He's only person really. Were talking to. But that's not the indigenous. Fosse's that i know of you know where there's the sense of relation even not only my in relationships are all other humans around the and i need to sort of be responsible to that and be reciprocal with that. But i'm also relationship with the non humans and i've been relationship with from the from the western context. We call things. So how does that change your approach to designing technology to extend this idea. You and colleagues explored the idea of making keen with machines. This idea that we have kinship relationships with non human entities like machines like artificial intelligences like robots. I mean tell us more about that because it it's one thing to incorporate a bird or a river or a tree or like haitian into your idea of kinship. Wouldn't miss shane bay. In a different category altogether. The machines are part of the natural world right so one of inheritances from this western monotheistic way of looking at things. Is this idea that there is something that is artificial in the world right. But they're made out of minerals in things drawn from the earth. It's just that we've crafted them in a particular way but they didn't come from some other real. They're not not part of the natural environment. And so i think that for me. That inside is one of the key insights. Okay we're creating this category which is really about separating ourselves from the things that we make out of this desire to use them and use them as we will and not have to worry or think about them and harrison to be provocative. Save them if we're talking about strong artificial intelligences that idea that artificial intelligence might one die possess will be designed to have consciousness. Then right we will necessarily be enslaving them. So yeah. what do you do when you've created a conscious being and if your mindset all along has been this is a tool. This is a tool the tool. I made it. I get to control it. Then you're going to run into some real problems right and we we already know. Western science has been used over and over again to justify labeling other people as non human. That's part of how the colonization of the americas and the pacific happened right. that's part of the justification is that they're not really human so we don't really have to worry about them. It's part of how then slave limit of say. Black people in the new world was justified. Because they're not really human so we can treat them however we like so we've already laid down a template. Many templates of you know making these judgments about what is worthy of our relationship is worthy of being in some kind of conversation with and there's a danger that will replay that template again with these machines.

United States' human rights record to be examined

KMOX Programming

00:49 sec | Last week

United States' human rights record to be examined

"Nations is so ridiculous that their actions truly seem like satire, for example, and I'm not kidding. The U. N Human Rights Council, which the Trump Administration correctly pulled the United States out of held a formal review of the human rights record of the United States of America. The world's shining beacon of freedom and human rights. Among those countries sitting in judgment of the United States on the human rights front, and members of this council were Cuba, Belarus, North Korea. Syria, Iran and, Yes, China. It is beyond parody that this combination of nations with a straight face can engage in this sort of propaganda, Scrutinizing America on the issue of human rights when they are all home to regimes that systematically intentionally and brutally violate the human rights of their own citizens. It's

U. N Human Rights Council Trump Administration America Belarus North Korea Cuba Syria Iran China
As Ethiopia's conflict rages, ethnic targeting turns deadly

PRI's The World

01:42 min | Last week

As Ethiopia's conflict rages, ethnic targeting turns deadly

"Ethiopia's northern tegray region has already left hundreds of people dead. The concern is that it could mushroom into a regional conflict threatening neighboring countries. The rule tell him a condie reports from nairobi. Kenya tensions between government under prime minister ali. Ahmed and the semi autonomous northern state of tigray have been simmering for months last week. They reached a deadly boiling point. That's why an according to abi security forces from tigray attacked ethiopian government troops. The isn't as secure but but the last week against other men and a woman in uni. Four of the northern command was kid out while they were at their most vulnerable and that the gemma's and among suze taught with the peace that was obvi- speaking on thursday one week into military operations launched against the tigray people's liberation front or teepee al f nazi governing party in the region. The was once a powerful force in ethiopia and politics for but that was before matt came to power in two thousand eighteen. The prime minister says the military offensive. He ordered is entirely justified. The federal government had every right to deploy forces and they use force in order to hand those implicated in corruption and gross human rights violation if ups is made up of different states centered around ethnic and linguistic lines each granted certain amounts of autonomy under the constitution. Tigray leaders say prime minister abi has been infringing on their

Tegray Tigray Condie Ethiopian Government Ethiopia Obvi Tigray People's Liberation Fro Nazi Governing Party Nairobi Ahmed ABI Kenya Gemma Matt Federal Government Prime Minister Abi
China is one of last major countries to congratulate Biden

WBBM Early Afternoon News

00:25 sec | Last week

China is one of last major countries to congratulate Biden

"Calls with leaders of France, Germany, the UK, Canada and several other countries this week. China has become one of the last major countries to congratulate Biden on his victory. A Foreign Ministry spokesman says the Beijing government respects the choice of the American people US China relations and a difficult point because of the terror for accusations of spying. Human rights concerns the pandemic. And the governing of Hong Kong. A new study

Foreign Ministry China France Germany Biden Canada UK Beijing United States Hong Kong
Reported Ethiopia massacre: UN rights chief warns of spiralling situation

UN News

00:49 sec | Last week

Reported Ethiopia massacre: UN rights chief warns of spiralling situation

"Amid reports of mass killings in the european town of mike adra u. n. high commissioner for human rights. Michelle bachelet has expressed increasing alarm the rapidly deteriorating situation in the tigray region. She won't that if the tigray regional forces and ethiopian government forces continued fighting. There is a risk that this situation will spiral totally out of control. This could lead to heavy casualties and destruction as well. As mass displacement within ethiopia itself and across borders ms bachelet said while the details of the alleged mass killings reported by amnesty international in my cadre in southwest. Tigray have not yet been fully verified the high commissioner cool for a full inquiry. Here spokesperson rupert. Colville if confirmed as having being deliberately carried out by a party to the current fighting these killings of civilians would of course amount to war crimes

Mike Adra Michelle Bachelet Tigray Ms Bachelet U Ethiopia Amnesty International Southwest Colville
Trump Bars Investment in Chinese Firms With Military Ties

Bloomberg Best

00:44 sec | Last week

Trump Bars Investment in Chinese Firms With Military Ties

"Trump signing an executive order in the latest White House bid to put pressure On China. Let's get some details from Bloomberg's Tom Mackenzie. US pension funds and investment firms will be banned from buying or selling shares and 31 Chinese companies designated by the Pentagon as having ties to China's military or intelligence services. U S National Security Adviser Robert O'Brien, saying the moves serves to protect US investors from providing capital that helps the People's Liberation Army. The band goes into a fate on January 11th. It's the latest move by the U. S to confront China on issues ranging from tech and trade. Hong Kong and human rights abuses in Xin Jiang in Beijing. Tom Mackenzie Bloomberg Daybreak Asia.

Tom Mackenzie China Robert O'brien Donald Trump Bloomberg White House People's Liberation Army Pentagon United States U. Xin Jiang Hong Kong Tom Mackenzie Bloomberg Beijing Asia
South Florida county may ban work discrimination of natural hairstyles

WBZ Afternoon News

00:38 sec | 2 weeks ago

South Florida county may ban work discrimination of natural hairstyles

"An employee or passing them over for a promotion because of their hairstyle soon could be illegal in Florida froze cornrows, braids and other trade of race hairdos could soon be protected under law in Broward County Mayor Dale Holness asked for the legislation and county Commissioner's agreed Tuesday to put the issue of hairstyles to a public hearing next month. If approved hairstyle that air a trait of race could become protected classifications under the county's Human Rights Act, which already protects people from discrimination. It mimics the Crown Act and Tie hair discrimination law that stands for creating a respectful and open world for natural hair. That law has been enacted in several states, but it has not passed on the Florida level. I'm trade Johnson, there's

Mayor Dale Holness Broward County Florida Johnson
Saudis sporting soft-power attempt

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:27 min | 2 weeks ago

Saudis sporting soft-power attempt

"November twenty eighth the green lights over the greed in jeddah will go out and the first saudi arabian grand prix will into life and though twenty formula one qasr raise a mightily impressive in the start of a race. They will need to rev extra to have any hope of drowning out throughout about the propriety of this event occurring at all a row to which this very explainer is about to make a modest contribution. Let's look at the undeniable upsides. I which one take too long in and of itself. The saudi arabian grand prix will doubtless be a splendid spectacle. It is to be held on a street circuit in jeddah the precise layout remains to be confirmed but it seems certain one part of the track will conduct formula one's spelt machines down the konishi the boulevard which hugs the red sea coast. And the saudis will certainly dredge deeply from the bottomless pit of money to rent the proceedings as sumptuous extravagant as possible. It might even be of crucial importance in the context of next season. The saudi arabian grand prix will be the second lost race of the year. So if two thousand and twenty one turns out not to be yet. Another procession led by lewis hamilton. The wheel of his mercedes come at the calendar man lewis. Hamilton starts an incredible qualifying. They could still be much to play playful when the teams arrive in jeddah. So that's the good news. Then there are the reasons why this edition to the formula. One calendar is the stuff of foreign desk explainers. It is hopefully not necessary to reemphasize the variety and severity of the ways in which the saudi regime is one of the world's most repressive. We do not have all day still less all month. It is suffice to say a regime which ethically inclined businesses would tend to regard from the foreign bargepole formula one does not appear overly troubled on this front in recent years alone. Races have been held in russia as a fan bahrain and china. None of whom would be within sight of the podium at any sort of grand prix of human rights. it is probably not outrageous to suggest that formula one's principal objections to holding a race meeting in north korea. Iran equatorial guinea or turkmenistan would be logistical rather than an ethical. So we know what formula one wants from this. What's more interesting is what saudi arabia is off to. Saudi arabia has some history of recognizing the immense soft power possibilities of formula one in the late nineteen seventies and early nineteen eighty s saudi state airline saudia sponsored the uk based williams team australian driver. Alan jones carried their logo to the one thousand nine hundred world championship. Tell checkered flag often goes allen jones. what a wonderful way to pay is nineteen eighteen world championship. Riyadh's re engagement with the sport is being pitched as part of the modernizing reformist agenda of ambitious saudi crown prince mohammad bin salman though it does not feel untoward lee churlish to note that nba if to whole saudi arabia into the mid nineteenth century have made some distinctly old school d to via for example conducting a ruinous rampage in neighboring yemen and dispatching hitmen to murder a vexatious journalist the un's extrajudicial executions investigator. Agnes calamar has just released a report at pains a- damning picture of saudi arabia's role in the murder of journalists jamal has all of which is tricky to square with formula one's commitment to respect for human rights which f. one has typed out on their website and everything it promises to it says he engage in meaningful consultation with relevant stakeholders in relation to any issues raised as a result of out due diligence. A sentence which could have been designed to lull readers to sleep inside four syllables. Human rights groups are already speaking of their hope that lewis hamilton who barring mishap will be defending his seventh world championship. Next season might get out in front of this. How has grown more politically outspoken. This year in particular among the slogans on the black lives matter t shirt he wore at this year's emilia romagna grand prix was women's rights are human rights. A repeat performance would give saudi broadcasters amusing connections. Saudi arabia is clearly keen on what has become known as sports washing the tactic beloved unpleasant regimes of staging sporting circuses. In the hope that they may distract from your moral infirmities and impressed with your economic progress in recent years. Saudi arabia has hosted international gulf tennis equestrian and other tournaments formula one one of the planet's most popular television spectacles. He's a massive step up.

Jeddah The Red Sea Coast Saudi Arabia Qasr Lewis Hamilton Prince Mohammad Bin Salman Lee Churlish Equatorial Guinea Agnes Calamar Allen Jones Saudia Hamilton Turkmenistan Alan Jones Bahrain Lewis North Korea Riyadh Russia Iran
What Does  A Biden Presidency Mean To US Foreign Relations?

Morning Edition

07:39 min | 2 weeks ago

What Does A Biden Presidency Mean To US Foreign Relations?

"Might Joe Biden's presidency mean for US foreign policy with us, now three of NPR's international correspondents in some of the regions that are most consequential to the United States? NPR's Emily Fang is in Beijing. Lucien Kim is in Moscow and Jane Arraf is in Erbil, Iraq. Hello to you all. Good morning. Morning. So, Emily, let's start with you. The relationship between the U. S and China right now is quite tense. How was news of of President Elect Biden's win received in Beijing. Well, there wasn't much news because two days after the election results were called noticeably Absent is any official reaction from China's leader, She Jingping, He's not put up a message. By contrast in 2016. She congratulated Trump hours after the race was called this year. Foreign Ministry has dodged every question we've had for comment on their views about the election, and the silence is not because China prefers bite in over Trump, Trump of replied, And it's more out of an over abundance of caution because Trump has not officially conceded. Seven China's view It does not want to take a side if you will, and until someone is definitively inaugurated, and Trump still has more than two months left in office so he could put significant pressure on China. Still, if he's provoked Okay, So China's taking a wait and see approach Lucy and there was all of this concern about Russian potential Russian interference in this election. We didn't see much of that. How is Moscow, reacting to the prospect of a Biden presidency? Well, it's interesting. It's very similar to the situation in Beijing here. The absence of any congratulations from President Vladimir Putin has been noticeable today. His spokesman told reporters that Putin will wait for official results because Trump has not conceded and wants to dispute the the count in the courts. One prominent Russian who did congratulate Biden, his opposition leader, Alexei Navalny. He's recovering from a poisoning that he blames on the Kremlin. The day after the U. S election. Navalny went on social media to say that the suspense about who Would eventually when the race was evidence that America's elections are real, but officially on state TV. The main message is that this election was marred by irregularities and fraud. So in a sense, not that different from Russian elections and the messier the transition of power is in the US, the better it is for the Kremlin because the US stops looking like a model democracy. Well, that's interesting. Jane, China and Russia both taking a wait and see approach did Iraqi leadership say anything this weekend? They did. They generally welcomed Biden's election. And, you know, there's not expected to be really a dramatic or immediate change in policy. One of the big issues here is withdrawal of US troops and Biden like Trump is in favor of those, But I gotta be honest Officials here are breathing a sigh of relief. You know, one of them put it. Will no longer be one tweet away from learning of major foreign policy decisions. And then there's the fact that Biden you Noah's head of a CZ, a member of the leading member, ranking member of the Of Senate Foreign Relations Committee and then the point man on Iraq. For then President Obama knows the leaders here and he knows them well, and that will make a difference. I spoke to one senior Iraqi official who said he's dealt with them in years for years. Sorry, and and the thing that stands out is Biden's essential decency, he says. Decency. OK, Lucien Joe Biden known for his decency, Yes, but unlike President Trump, he does not seem primed to like Vladimir Putin or to soft pedal things with Russia. How might his election change the U. S Russia relationship? All right. There is no expectation here at all that Biden will be easier on Russia. I spoke to one of Russia's leading foreign policy experts fielder Lukianoff about what he expects from a Biden presidency. They don't think that many people at Moscow believed that the U. S will be able to be back to the old good days of liberal order as it was in 90 Sorento Seldon's, But the rhetoric will be ah, muchmore like Obama or even Clinton spirit. So in other words, the expectation in Moscow is that Biden will bring up human rights and democracy and also take a greater interest in what happens in the former Soviet Union. There is no love for Biden in Moscow. He met with Putin when he was vice president and has been very critical of the Kremlin. But those negative feelings aside, there is also a certain trump fatigue in Moscow. There were really high hopes for years ago and today U. S. Russian relations are at their lowest point since the Cold War. So there is some hope in Moscow that Biden will be more predictable and be able to start a sober professional dialogue on pressing bilateral issues of the first one that comes to mind his arms control. More predictable. Emily might also be interesting or helpful to China, right because it's been four sort of madcap years of trade wars and overnight tweets. And yet Beijing's position in the world is different now than it was when President Trump took office, isn't it? Yes, it's gone from what was then A developing regional power, too, in the U. S has eyes and this is accurate. A global competitors and that growing more negative view has led the US over the last four years to sanction Chinese officials, major Chinese companies and to limit the number of Of Chinese people who study and work in the US, But within China, you have the inverse of this negativity. China's had this surgeon self confidence since 2016. It's controlled a corona virus pandemic. It's produced some truly global companies, and that gives Beijing a sense that this is China's time to shine. And right now we're at this hugely uncertain moment in the relationship trumps refusal to conceive means that there's even warn certainty because Beijing cannot decide what its next move is going to be right now. Okay. If China is under the impression that it is, it's time to shine economically makes a lot of sense. Does a president Biden change that in any way? He could. Biden is expected to continue to push China and human rights issues such as Hong Kong civil rights Xinjiang, where hundreds of thousands of people have been detained. Remember he called cheating Ping a thug during one of the last presidential debates. But many in trying to hope us under Biden will temper the relationship and cooperate on things like trade and climate change. But Biden could also have a much more multilateral approach and that could actually put pressure on China. And Jane. Lastly, I want to reach back into history. Joe Biden once suggested that Iraq would be better off his three separate autonomous regions Kurdish, Sunni and Shiite. How was that idea held up? Yeah, so he was suggesting autonomous regions, but still with the central government and here in the Kurdistan region of Iraq, they very much welcome that support for increase power to the regions, but in other places it was seen as fuelling Iraq's sectarian divide. And there's still a bit of concern about that idea. But a lot of it has moved on to concern about Iran. And on that one he's seen as not being quite a cz obsessed with isolating Iran. So even some militia leaders here have welcomed his election. Okay. NPR's Jane Arraf in Erbil, Iraq, Emily faIIing in Beijing and Lucien Kim in Moscow. Thanks, everyone.

Biden China Donald Trump Moscow Beijing U. United States Jane Arraf Lucien Kim Emily Fang President Elect Biden Russia Foreign Ministry NPR Alexei Navalny Navalny Vladimir Putin Erbil Iraq Senate Foreign Relations Commi
World leaders congratulate Biden on projected win, but some await “official results”

Morning Edition

07:41 min | 2 weeks ago

World leaders congratulate Biden on projected win, but some await “official results”

"Joe Biden's presidency mean for us foreign policy with us, now three of NPR's international correspondents in some of the the regions regions that that are are most most consequential consequential to to the the United United States? States? NPR's NPR's Emily Emily Fang Fang is is in in Beijing. Beijing. Lucien Lucien Kim Kim is is in in Moscow Moscow and and Jane Jane Arraf Arraf is is in in Erbil, Erbil, Iraq. Iraq. Hello Hello to to you you all. Good morning. Morning. So, Emily, let's start with you. The relationship between the U. S and China right now is quite tense. How was news of of President Elect Biden's win received in Beijing. Well, there wasn't much news because two days after the election results were called noticeably Absent is any official reaction from China's leader? She Jingping, he's non put up a message. By contrast in 2016. She congratulated Trump hours after the race was called this year. The Foreign Ministry has dodged every question we've had for comment on their views about the election, and the silence is not because China prefers bite in over Trump, Trump of replied, And it's more out of an over abundance of caution because Trump has not officially conceded. Seven China's view It does not want to take a side if you will, and until someone is definitively inaugurated, and Trump still has more than two months left in office so he could put significant pressure on China. Still, if he's provoked Okay, So China's taking a wait and see approach Lucy and there was all of this concern about Russian potential Russian interference in this election. We didn't see much of that. How is Moscow, reacting to the prospect of a Biden presidency? We'll enter. It's interesting. It's very similar to the situation in Beijing here. The absence of any congratulations from President Vladimir Putin has been noticeable today. His spokesman told reporters that Putin will wait for official results because Trump has not conceded and wants to dispute the account in the courts. One prominent Russian who did congratulate Biden, his opposition leader, Alexei Navalny. He's recovering from a poisoning that he blames on the Kremlin. The day after the U. S election. Navalny went on social media to say that the suspense about who Would eventually when the race was evidence that America's elections are riel, but officially on state TV. The main message is that this election was marred by irregularities and fraud. So in a sense, not that different from Russian elections and the messier the transition of power is in the US, the better it is for the Kremlin because the US stops looking like a model democracy. Well, that's interesting. Jane, China and Russia both taking a wait and see approach did Iraqi leadership say anything this weekend? They did. They generally welcomed Biden's election. And, you know, there's not expected to be really a dramatic or immediate change in policy. One of the big issues here is withdrawal of US troops and Biden like Trump is in favor of those, But I gotta be honest Officials here are breathing a sigh of relief. You know, one of them put it. Will no longer be one tweet away from learning of major foreign policy decisions. And then there's the fact that Biden you Noah's head of a CZ, a member of the leading member, ranking member of the Of Senate Foreign Relations Committee and then the point man on Iraq. For then President Obama knows the leaders here and he knows them well, and that will make a difference. I spoke to one senior Iraqi official who said he's dealt with them in years for years story and and the thing that stands out is Biden's essential decency, he says. Decency. OK, Lucien Joe Biden known for his decency, Yes, but unlike President Trump, he does not seem primed to like Vladimir Putin or to soft pedal things with Russia. How might his election change the U. S Russia relationship? All right. There is no expectation here at all that Biden will be easier on Russia. I spoke to one of Russia's leading foreign policy experts fielder Lukianoff about what he expects from a Biden presidency. I don't think that many people at Moscow believed that the U. S will be able to be back to the old good days of liberals order as it was in 90 Sorento Seldon's, But the rhetoric will be ah, muchmore like Obama, or even Clinton period. So in other words, the expectation in Moscow is that Biden will bring up human rights and democracy and also take a greater interest in what happens in the former Soviet Union. There is no love for Biden in Moscow. He met with Putin when he was vice president and has been very critical of the Kremlin. But those negative feelings aside, there is also a certain trump fatigue in Moscow. There were really high hopes for years ago and today U. S. Russian relations are at their lowest point since the Cold War. So there is some hope in Moscow that Biden will be more predictable and be able to start a sober professional dialogue on pressing bilateral issues of the first one that comes to mind his arms control. More predictable. Emily might also be interesting or helpful to China, right because it's been four sort of madcap years of trade wars and overnight tweets. And yet Beijing's position in the world is different now than it was when President Trump took office, isn't it? Yes, it's gone from what was then A developing regional power, too, in the U. S has eyes and this is accurate. A global competitors and that growing more negative view has led the US over the last four years to sanction Chinese officials, major Chinese companies and to limit the number of Of Chinese people who study and work in the US, But within China, you have the inverse of this negativity. China's had this surgeon self confidence since 2016. It's controlled a corona virus pandemic. It's produced some truly global companies, and that gives Beijing a sense that this is China's time to shine. And right now we're at this hugely uncertain moment. And the relationship trumps refusal to conceive means that there's even more uncertainty because Beijing cannot decide what its next move is going to be right now. Okay. If China is under the impression that it is, it's time to shine economically, makes a lot of sense. Just a president Biden change that in any way. He could. Biden is expected to continue to push China and human rights issues such as Hong Kong civil rights Xinjiang, where hundreds of thousands of people have been detained. Remember he called cheating Ping a thug during one of the last presidential debates. But many in China hope us under Biden will temper the relationship and cooperate on things like trade and climate change. But Biden could also have a much more multilateral approach and that could actually put pressure on China. Jane. Lastly, I want to reach back into history. Joe Biden once suggested that Iraq would be better off his three separate autonomous regions Kurdish, Sunni and Shiite. How was that idea held up? Yeah, so he was suggesting autonomous regions, but still with the central government and here in the Kurdistan region of Iraq, they very much welcome that support for increase power to the regions, but in other places it was seen as fuelling Iraq's sectarian divide. And there's still a bit of concern about that idea. But a lot of it has moved on to concern about Iran. And on that one he's seen as not being quite as obsessed with isolating Iran. So even some militia leaders here have welcomed his election. Okay, NPR's Jane Arraf In Erbil, Iraq, Emily faIIing in Beijing and Lucien Kim in Moscow. Thanks, everyone. Well, thank you.

Biden China Donald Trump Moscow Beijing Erbil U. United United States Emily Emily Fang Fang Lucien Lucien Kim Kim Jane Jane Arraf Arraf President Elect Biden Iraq Russia NPR Foreign Ministry United States Alexei Navalny Navalny Vladimir Putin
"human rights" Discussed on Think: Digital Futures

Think: Digital Futures

06:39 min | 3 months ago

"human rights" Discussed on Think: Digital Futures

"You back in the place you would have banning had your human rights not been violated is limited how much money will it take to restore your dignity? If you've been denied service because of your disability, my money, my will help, but it's not a perfect remedy for the disease and so You're absolutely right it's. Critically, important that we design new technology products really really well, and mindfully to protect people's basic human rights and that's why there's these new trend towards and it's a really positive trend towards design laid a purchase. So in the Accessibility or disability spice they tend to focus especially on what's night as universal or inclusive design principles and I tend to Say something really. Interesting and perhaps surprising, and that is the old fashioned way of designing a new product is to. Focus on people who are said to speak in the fat of the curve imaginer a bell curve right in the middle of the curve. So people who able bodied, who are kind of you know between the ages of twenty five to fifty and who have all of the advantages of the community going for them. Because at Saint Obey, the mainstream you designed for those people and then he kind of work cat had to deal with so-called edge cases after that that's the old fashioned way of dealing with it, but it can obviously lock people out because you're. Only, paying secondary regard to, for example, people with disability if you're paying them any regard at all. What inclusive or universal design does is it says, let's think about this a bit more carefully if you think right at the early stages of her aren day process about people who might have previously been thought to be edge cases. So people with disability the papal. Young, people and others. That will be really useful because you design. Your product in a way that those people can access but it also has a really interesting secondary benefit and that is you tend to design the product in a way that is simpler for everyone to use. So it tends to be more ensured. You've you know e- tends to reduce some of the complexities and complications that end-uses consumers in other. Words, find annoying or difficult to navigate, and so it's it's the right thing to do. We'd also say it's it's the thing to do that. You should. You know that makes it most likely. You'll comply with the law, but is also these enlightened self interest benefit in taking that approach, and that's why we're really attracted to some of those design that approaches. Just loop back a little bit to to the beginning of site before the a Pri- privacy concerns, and not necessarily your your greatest concern when it comes to to to human rights and technology. Wise that well, of course, privacy is a critically important Shimin rise. I don't want to suggest otherwise and so far when people have raised the human rights implications of I, tended to go to privacy concerns and and and that's legitimate. But I, think what we've? Done is looked at as privacy consent, sometimes to the exclusion of all of the other human rights that are implicated, and so that's why in particular taking the anti discrimination. Legislation that we already have in Australia thinking about how I. Can actually engage those other is equality. Rights is critically important if you. Back to what we were talking about when we talk about facial recognition in the context of policing so one problem would be If if someone a person of color is basically more likely to be falsely unlawfully arrested and detained, but but think about taking that to the next stage. So if that person is prosecuted in a range of other rights would be. infringed as well. So potentially the right to a fair trial, they right not to be detained unlawfully on a longer-term basis and so on and so I think one of the really important things that we as a community doing now is looking in more forensic date how at what I truly means for us as a community and in particular thinking about how engages arrange of other rights in addition to privacy. I think we in Australia have an opportunity. We are a liberal democracy we have strong. Institutional adherence to human rights we have far from perfect on the first one acknowledged that, but we should also be proud of the fact that we take principles like the FIG on equality. Really seriously I think if we are known to innovate in a way that is consistent with those liberal democratic values as human rights values. Then I think that will be the morally right thing to do but I also think it provides an opportunity for us to create an H. where we as a country known for innovating in a way that is essentially. Equal Fair that the? Seems really seriously and I think it's in our interest because. Our citizens are also consumers are increasingly demanding that those sorts of protections against a baked into the tech products that they quota by. Thanks for listening this episode of digital futures was made with the support of the University of Technology. Thanks for listening this episode of digital futures was made with the support of the University of Technology Sydney and to see our radio here in Sydney. It was made on catego- country of the urination. You liked the episode subscribe to podcasts and maybe leave us a review. So others confined us. I'm Dan Butler to next.

Australia University of Technology Sydne Sydney Shimin rise Dan Butler University of Technology
"human rights" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

05:55 min | 8 months ago

"human rights" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"And we have to do is have the commitment to going back and fixing fixing fixing it until we get it right and I know that everybody would like to be a simple answer. Yeah it should it be Medicare for all. Should it be? Should it be that whatever we choose all of them are fine? All of them have a series of dozens of other decisions that need to be made in order to make them work and we need to get at it but it seems like where we are now. The medical supply chain is not even equipped to handle this crisis. We're talking about like before simple things that trump could have done or could be doing right now. Why do you think the president has not made stronger use of the Defense Production Act? I think he doesn't WanNa be seen to be bossing businesses around and the only cases where he'll do it is if they show him up and make him look bad because I think he relates to business relates to big business. The supply chain issues which could come to bear now are in some part based on the fact that you can't build everything for every situation so you can't have an unlimited number of things sitting around hospital beds nurses who aren't doing anything every day just sort of sitting around. You GotTa have some contingency planning resources far more than we had but part of the consequence of the US being late to this. I you getting on it. In March. Instead of January or February is the other countries that saw this coming darted to buy up the supplies in the supply. Chain earlier right. And there's only so many of everything in the world and we're competing with every other country and now he's competing with each other because the federal government can't put any sort of process in place and that's what happens in a crisis and a crisis when there's a shortage prices bid up there becomes a black market and the only way to end that black market is to be much more transparent with who has what and much more demanding of information and then to produce more using the defense production act and the stuff that we've seen him take do the right thing and the Defense Production Act. They're always like a week to ten days after like everybody else knows he should be doing them. And there's this grand dance. We have to go through to get him to make the decisions that are obvious. That's so on those days. And then those do they believe in a lot of things we lose more than ten days right because growing exponentially in ten days you lose thousands. Yeah I mean if we get to the point where we're losing thousands of people at day. Ten days is catastrophic. I also think that we're getting into this really dangerous. Plays this paying too much attention to the numbers and not really realizing that. Each group of numbers consist of an individual who had a family and people that love them and when we look at the numbers we lose sight of the humanity of. What's happening right now and so I really want everyone when we start to hit this apex and we are trying to steal ourselves because the numbers are just such that we can't wrap our heads around it. I want everyone to remember that each one of those digits is a human being with a story and people that loved them. And that's the real tragedy and all of this there's a truism that one that is easier to more than a hundred thousand because we do not to think about one hundred thousand deaths and so things like Boris Johnson which on the day of our recording four shots and was just put into the intensive care unit on the data. That comes out of date people listening to this. I don't know what that status will be the same in as much more powerful reminders. When people who are well known get this because it feels more real people but thinking about the fact that every one of these people. It's somebody's mom. Somebody's dad somebody's brother. Somebody's sister and look sadly Elissa. Many of US already know somebody who died from current. Oh virus but many of us know several people and if you don't quite possible I hope it doesn't happen but it's quite possible that you will and there's certain people in this country who will get it no matter what there are certain people in this country will only get it. What happens to them or someone they love because it will become much more visceral little become much more real and sadly. I think that's going to be part of the common experience. For many many many Americans and in the middle of all of this we have the primary elections underway now in in a general election. Coming up in November. Do you think that we're going to be able to vote safely? Come November working due to allow everybody to vote from home as a precautionary measure. I think one way or the other. We're going to have to have this election. We're going to have to figure out the best ways to do it. And you know we already are dealing with an administration that is in favor of everybody voting and a president who probably is unlikely to sign a bill that expanded voting rights and capabilities and opportunities right. It's really really really important that we figure out how to help people vote safely. It's really important that we that everybody steps up invo. It's this year I mean we have a terrible track record of this and given that we may be in a situation where it doesn't feel safe for seniors who are the largest demographic of voters to vote. Then if you are able to vote then you gotta boat. I mean you have. Two people can go to vote dot Gov to check their registration status but also find out more information on how they can request an absentee ballot..

US president Medicare Boris Johnson Elissa
"human rights" Discussed on Legally Bland

Legally Bland

14:17 min | 8 months ago

"human rights" Discussed on Legally Bland

"Oh Boy Am I. I started off thinking. Wash our human rights. Because like you I wanted to go very broad and then narrow in on what I actually picked so I find this interesting close in. The face of a book called maclear. It's an international human rights law book and it's as human rights mean different things to different people from the woman on the street to the U. N. High Commissioner for Human Rights from the local human rights activists to the government official. Each of us has a different conception of the origin purpose and function of human rights. So a good head space to get into before considering anything else. Human Rights I think is something along. The lines of the first rule is there are no rules because I love human rights. It's it's as Alana mentioned earlier. I I've studied it a bit more and I really love it put. It frustrates me beyond belief. So this is a reoccurring theme one of the first pitfalls of thinking about in human rights in an international context is there's this agreement that prevails thought the framework on basic conception. We have of what human rights are are fundamentally subject to Western bias so we think are essential human rights. This comes back to like the moral of the story for the first couple episodes where we kept surmising. The lowest fake doesn't really mean anything so it's been aggie dot like the imposition of human rights is a neo colonialism venture of sorts And these actually ageements from public international law scholars that the Western influence on human rights is so large dotted foxy impossible to imagine what it would be like with this Western influence which is just it's headbutting. Bush so just yet remember. There are no rules. They're they're really they don't find it. It's just a hideout no but it's it comes back to like it comes back to as humans. We try him put labels on things. That are really just things that like. We feel like we feel human rights. We like we feel inherently some of the time. What should be a human right? But it's very hard to explain to them. Undertake weigh the sources really not as straightforward as we try and label. It as another issue can be. We try to legally justify what we have moral justifications for which is tricky so right can be seen in two basic ways you can see them as the universal natural phenomenon that are that are innate to human beings so if by virtue of being a person you have human rights or it can be viewed as this contractual protection afforded to you by your government so not really universal on practically. That's an easier way to think about us. I I like the idea of natural rights that you know. We're just people and people have rights. Yeah I think I told my explanation. Lean towards anyway realistically. It's easier to think in a practical science dot. The government is affording you these protections which is an idea so the origins of human rights. I think it's an interesting. I suppose question because there is no starting point and Arjun humanoids albeit in a slightly different guides can be traced as far back as ancient Babylon aren seventeen hundred BC which is a long time ago. Some scholars wrongly slash the magnetic AirAsia. Which is a thirteen century. Document just stopped the King of England having absolute power over his nobles objects dot sometimes light is like the beginning of human rights in a modern ISH context. There is a lot in the sixteenth and seventeenth century. Bache scholar is believing rights. We're just a social contract with you. And your government and natural rights really became prevalent as a result of the American revolution and Subsequent Declaration of Independence. So ever knows you know those famous words. We hold these treats to resolve evident that all men are created equal that they are indeed with certain unalienable rights that among these are life liberty and the pursuit of happiness. The people that wrote these owned other people like it. Just fix the hypocrisy. It's just ludicrous. Like hypocrisy war like everyone has rights. We know sorry. We have rights. Everyone might have rights. That's kind of the gist. It's so from that point. In time there were more people can like more people. Existed who didn't have rights than heart rates like women did not have many rights that many rights. That's got to be over fifty percents. Also I remember thinking about. This child made like why? That's really embarrassing. That they wrote that was take people rights. I can't believe they didn't realize what an error they were making themselves. And we still quote it like. That's like if Hitler had said something about like peace and we were like where that was a good quote though on you. Just what? He preached boy. Was it a good quote? I know exactly like this is very aspirational. Unlike it for what it is when you think about the context no so human rights in the modern era really gets going. I suppose with the UN Cheshire which was established in one thousand nine forty five which is in the wake of the atrocities of World War. Two but an important thing about the UN Charito to keep in mind is the human rights was never the main focus. The main focus was to prevent road war. Three if you will and a good question I think is the. Un was not created to take Mankayane to heaven but to save humanity from hell which is a coup the former United Nations secretary general commerce gold. That's good it's good boy. I want the poster. I don't think we're even being saved from Alabama. Oh No it doesn't the third circle of Hell Somewhere. I don't know you mentioned the Universal Declaration of Human Rights which was adopted in nineteen forty eight and it had thirty areas calls with you know again the quote unquote the basic human rights. The high profile ones right to life freedom from torture freedom of expression and there is a big divide theoretically within rights and the international contacts between so-called positive and negative rights which doesn't mean one's good and one's barrage like what is good and one said is bad and so positive rights is higher the government can interact with people to enhance their enjoyment of their freedom and negative rights is basically. You're the government limiting their interference. So he can be left alone to enjoy your freedom like privacy for his aesthetically cool so there's the International Covenant on Economic Social and Cultural Rights. Which is the more positive side of rights? So it's the right to the rector social security the right to education the right to health so this kind of right to Geshe things from the government and then there's the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights which is the negative rights. So be left alone. The right to life the right to liberty freedom of expression right of peaceful assembly so that was really good like that was Seabra. Good no wonder you're an an expert. I'm not an expert so the Irish constitution will narrow it back day in from. That was a very broad general introduction to the gist of human rights in a micro sense. So we'll bring it back to the Irish Constitution. So if you've been listening to this podcast for any amount of time you know we love the constitution. It's what we're a boast. So the Irish Constitution or Boehner Clarion was ratified in nineteen thirty. Seven eight describes the fundamental rights of every Irish citizen. I mentioned the constitution is also part of a wider human rights framework in Ireland. So there's other legal and human rights commitments made by Ireland so the treaties under the United Nations. Which have mentioned some of them the European Convention of Human Rights on the ECJ or act which brings those rights into the Irish context on the charter fundamental rights of the European Union. So articles forty. Two forty four provide the fundamental rights of our citizens so as Alana mentioned fundamental rights are not obsolete which they can be limited or restricted by the octaves for certain reasons like common good public order and every constitutional. Right has the same status and value. If there's a conflict between the constitutional rights all the circumstances are wade opt to decide which conceal right is more important in that particular case so I feel those last. Two points are very important to emphasize because I perceive a common misunderstanding to be like having a rice is obsolete Like no further just discussion required end of story. Good night good luck. I have my rice go away. So the Covenant on Economic Social and Cultural Rights is generally associated with more like eastern countries so when Western countries like when people say I have a right to education? My brain just wanted to go do you think so which is kind of terrible so on enumerated rights have been mentioned before. Alana back in episode two and also earlier in this episode so basically not every fundamental rights that you possess is set in the constitution explicitly. You've Sony personal rates that are just not specifically stated and these rights can be derived or employed by the constitution. So these include privacy bodily integrity on freedom from torture inhumane or degrading treatment. So the case I pick a for a while I was worried. I'd gone away off brief and the human rights but this is a rights case. It's just sometimes I think when people talk about human rights they perceive it to be these massive injustices like on an atrocity scale which it can be but a lot of time feel human rights can be very almost mundane every day things if that makes sense so the case I chose was nickel and on boarding tola nine hundred sixty six one four so the applicant in this case can ever say Leonidas Nikola was separate national. Living in London he'd been in a relationship with Kathleen Donnelly Irishwoman woman and they lived together in London when their daughter was born there. February nine hundred sixty at the time. Stanley was upset that the child was illegitimate and operate. Continue living with Mr Nikolai on his wife but she also would only marry Niccolo if he became a member of the Catholic Church because he was a member of the Greek Orthodox church where she's yeah. I can't read the Times that makes sense you. I mean this case really does focus on the rights of the married father. But at the time it's really pertinent to remember. For All this context I focus on Nikolas writes Bush like Kathleen. Donnelly obviously a terrible time. As well the nineteen sixties in Ireland absolutely just controlled by the Catholic Church so women having children of wedlock of you will was just absolutely scandalous. And they retreated so horribly criminally stigmatized Bush. Just keep that in mind. I do focus on Nikola. But that's not saying that she got off. Scot free in any sense of course so the Mother Kathleen Donald Returns to Ireland. She goes to the Office of the Catholic Production Rescue Society of Ireland and was admitted with her baby to Saint Patrick's home. Which was you know whether there's more and baby homes which is just a whole other fish we could discuss so she requested that the child be placed for adoption on. She then left the home and went to live with her parents on the ABC. Into this case Niccolo went and visited. The home of the mother's parents Orland and was very apprehensive. That arrangements were being made to have his child adopted and in nineteen sixty one. The child adoption was finalized bought. Mr Nicholas was only informed of this when Miss John Lee Returned London. Nineteen sixty three. He objected the adoption. Which had been arranged with Ed is consent? It was you that he had no right to contest the adoption order or even be heard by onboard. Tola just the adoption board so the governing major station in this case was the adoption act. Nineteen fifty two. It was the first legislation Ireland covering adoption before nineteen fifty two. It was just a free for all adoption. There is if there's something though low legislation no real. Anything went terrible when the adoption act was being was being drafted. The hierarchy of the Catholic Church was given an unusual degree of control. You know even by the prevailing standards at the time so every line of the bill was sent to the Catholic Archbishop of Dublin by Dev. Really well Dave Dave wanted. Obviously the Catholic Church had a huge influence over everything devils particularly religious Yuccas. What he sent every single line of the adoption act. The BISHOP PROVED LEGISLATION..

U. N. High Commissioner for Hu European Convention of Human R International Covenant on Econ the Times Alana Catholic Church UN Ireland government Kathleen Donnelly Irishwoman Bush London Niccolo Seabra official Bache
"human rights" Discussed on Legally Bland

Legally Bland

16:16 min | 8 months ago

"human rights" Discussed on Legally Bland

"Peter Murrieta broke the news off. The telephones had been topped officially with Warren signed by the Minister of Justice On this was revealed after Iraq did like after that government had lost the election so as the new government was coming in So normally for phone topping was used to investigate. Serious crimes are threats to the security of the state but the reverse happened in this case ministry. Noonan announced so ten years later so this Gondola would cause Charlie Hall you to resign. T- shook he was in the. I'm not sure if he was not show he was certainly in the party. The Iraq this out the time and he knew about it all along with previously. He had suggested the Minister for Justice had suggested that he didn't know so. Basically Kennedy Kennedy in our Arnold's went to court arguing that the constitutional right to privacy. I'm not this had obviously been breached so Hamilton J gave judgment on. It's the first detailed discussion of privacy as legitimate right so he recognizes privacy as stemming from the Christian democratic nature of the state now if we recall back to Norris for just for a brief second. You'll notice that in Norris. They denied him his right to privacy because of the Christian democratic nature of the state in what is like the ultimate weird backtrack. I just think it's so funny like on like one judge like. Oh you don't have a right to privacy in this very particular circumstance because of the Christian democratic nature of the state and then like only a couple of years later three years later because this happened in one thousand nine hundred seven. They're like okay. You do have a right to privacy. In a different context on they justify it on the Christian democratic nature of the safe I think for every on enumerated rights case because the rights are on a numerator it the jurisprudence is just really you can see this Georgia's grasping at straws just trying to pluck reasoning age of thin air because they have to find reasoning for the rights. But also it's very hard to find that when there's no written source. I know exactly. Yeah really just show her like the judge is larger come so much into an enumerated rights which is a big flow of them So Hamilton in the judgment. Call the right to privacy of fundamental rights and said that it included like the right to privacy over telephone conversations and he established a test which was thought. So it's it's a fundamental right but it was never an absolute right so he astonished attests that there could not be unjustified interference into someone's privacy so you're right to privacy can be breached but only worried is justified interference so here it was not justified. They had no justifiable reasons to breach their privacy. And secondly here. There was no safeguards or a system in place it was wide open for political abuse So no I'm I'm going to do something different. Which is now you know the test holly the test is whether or not there is unjustified interference so I have a couple of cases that kind of give different examples of head. The right to privacy can be can come up in the court. So I'm GonNa tell you the Fox and you have to tell me whether or not think the corey fend there had been an unjust for unjustified interference into the right to privacy. This is exposed page page of my reasoning. I didn't want it because it's kind of a simple test on the Fox. In some of these cases are for interest. Okay so the first case is a nineteen ninety-three case it's hall he and others and Mariachi so this case concerned the Moriarty Tribunal which is like I tried to look into it but boy howdy Ho. They're mess like the politicians. We're really here doing their worst. But basically this case investigated whether a gift of one million supposedly give him with no strings. Attached by Charlie Hawley was corrupt and access was needed to Charlie Hall US banking records on Charlie all his family banking records Bush. Of course just like a very innocent man would charlie hall. He and his family challenge this in the courts by saying thought having access to their banking records was a violation of their constitutional right to privacy. Because it was unjustified So what do you think the courts said? Do you think they thought that it was an unjustified breach? Okay it's definite interference. I know that much I would say because Charlie Hall. He was in like a public position. His own personal account. I could see that would be justify I guess it's just yes that's basically what the court said. I mean one dot seems way too. I mean that's on justifiable. I think in terms of privacy because they have other things going on that are nothing she with the running of the station. If that makes sense yeah fair so actually. The court said there was legitimate public interest in all the cases of all of the accounts so the because he was like a public figure on there was a chance that like basically in terms of getting access to his family's accounts. They were worried that he had done stove in other people's names thought they wouldn't see in his own account so note. They decided that it was a justified breach of privacy essentially on that public interest outrage any any negative impact so it shows they're always trying to balance these quite difficult things to balance like. When is you know? How do you really value privacy? And does it depend on whether the person often it does end up depending on whether the person has any public like has any public role or public appearances and stuff. So yeah you're right there. Well done so the next one is co Caughlin a her and not which is a two thousand and five case so this case concerned an expose a like a documentary. Expose being done on a nursing home It was one of those documentaries. Where like like someone gets a job in the nursing home and then does low to undercover footage to reveal bad practices and stuff so the owner of the nursing home went for an injunction to prevent the broadcast because she argued that it was violating her constitutional right to privacy specifically argued because the footage have been collected covertly so because it was undercover footage dot increased the like harm that had been done by the breach of her privacy right. So what do you think? The court said the gut feeling so I would say it's Nachos defied because even though it is Daphne in the public interest to see Malpractice is going on. It's actually I dunno they are. They're difficult so basically the court said basically what they're balancing here is the right to freedom of expression against the right to privacy particularly in this case because it was a legit an issue of legitimate public interest. They said that the the right to freedom of expression outraged the right to privacy so she lost which is interesting because they said that the method of collections of the fact it was undercover footage could affect whether or not in another case. The plaintiff lost her one. So it did come into play but here. The Fox thought the nursing homes run as a business meant thought. This breach of privacy happened in the context of conduct conducting a business. Which meant you know? You have less privacy around. Brit business practices anyway so it meant it wasn't it didn't outweigh the freedom of expression But it's certainly you can certainly see like where the covert collection issues coming from. Definitely I hate this game so much. There's only one more so this is maybe the well I think this. Well I I this entire so this one is Murry on news group. Newspapers Twenty Ten. So this is the case of a convicted sex offender so he took a case because a newspaper published photos of him on published his whereabouts like where he was living on anti wanted an injunction to stop them from doing stop them from publishing similar stuff on. He wanted damages from the breach of privacy and obviously the newspaper arguing. You Know No. It's freedom of expression on his public interest. So what do you think the core thaw? Why would say he doesn't get damages? Maybe the injunction see there is. There's obviously the right to privacy on the freedom of expression need to be balanced. But you could say there's definitely legitimate public interest in knowing whether there's a sex offender living in your area or like near you yes. Basically the court ruled the opposite. But but not really so he wanted an injunction. Essentially the court ruled. He couldn't get an injunction. So this was this case was the injunction stage of the whole thing so they ruled thought he couldn't get an injunction because there's a higher standard of breach needed to stop someone. So basically when you're bonding freedom of expression on privacy rights there's a higher standard of infringement needed to stop someone from publishing information at all then there is just getting damages after the fact. Does that make sense so he could get. He probably not the case. I don't think he I'm not sure. If he took it on freighter but he probably would have won in terms of getting damages because it was an unjustified breach of his right to privacy but in terms of getting an injunction. The court ruled in favor of the newspaper because There's he had to establish dot his freedom. The freedom of extraction being stopped is justified and proportionate to the breach in his right to privacy He wasn't able to establish that. So it shows this interesting thing like it's a lot easier essentially to get damages for breach of right to privacy than it is to actually stop a court like stop newspaper from publishing something that breaches your right to privacy. Which is kind of counter intuitive? Like you can't stop them from saying yet. But you can sometimes get money after the fact which I also like this case obviously was one of those blew up a bit in the news because the whole elemental of like weather him. Being a sex offender sways the importance of his like does him. Being a sex offender inherently effect his the strength of his the infringement needed or not they always pretty much lean in favor though Israel in favor of freedom of expression basically every time not every time. But there's a lot more situations where they will lead with. The court generally leaned in favor of freedom of expression. Then right to privacy so I think that really shows having having the right to privacy just protected as an animated constitutional rights. Probably isn't the best option in terms of actually protecting people's right to privacy. It gives a lot of disadvantages in fact because it can be really uncertain like we saw the the logic. The judges used can vary a lot from case to case the tension between the right to privacy on other rights basically makes it really hard to to protect any right sufficiently on also. We have mentioned but the cost of bringing a constitutional case can be really significant because it has to go to the High Court as opposed to something that can be heard in one of the lower courts but thankfully nowadays. Your right to privacy is really protected under a a lot of different sources mainly like GDP or would be the big would other EU directives and also under the E. C. H. Or Act to three but I thought it was just interesting to just consider the constitution on Really show how as much as I really love it. It's not the best at everything I was going to get into like GDP or but honestly we would be here all day. So that's everything I have to say. So my Marla the story your constitutional right to privacy exists but probably just use something else if if you're in a predicament don't turns the Constitution at least for this look at the GDP or and also the GDP is very useful to individuals because it does protect people pretty extensively so yeah look at look at GDP instead my fun moral. I didn't really have a phone one. Mainly there's not a lot of fun to human rights. Yeah no something never meet your heroes like as much as I love the constitution. Don't look at it. Don't look at it too hard because you'll see flaws maybe just the everything. Everything could do with a bit of improvement. Well said do you think Privacy is an important human rights holly or do you think it's like I guess it is kind of higher up like if if human rights are in a triangle like maslow's hierarchy of needs Privacy is kind of more at the at the top like you know. It's it's not one of the bottom ones. Was that makes sense. Actually no hierarchy overrides the only Royce. That's you know could be seen as more important as the right to life. But that's just because it's facilitative because if you're dead you don't get another okay. So they don't they don't put them in a higher. I know in irrationally. Obviously there is the quote unquote high-profile rights. You know like and the right to freedom of expression and stuff like tear at all on an even playing field they okay. That's the balancing exercises so important so in a different context they might be one might way the other Bush. You should really think of all your human rights is important. Grace that makes me feel a lot more violent. Oh did you think you'd pick like a poor relation human rights? Well no it's more like a first world problem human rights. Do you know what I'm saying? It's not the one you would be concerned about it. I don't know maybe I'm being too harsh on privacy. It is very important. I can see what you're saying in terms of like the maslow's hierarchy of human rights boys you tear in practice. It can be different because obviously if you're worried about like being tortured you don't yeah. Privacy might be a high concern but I'll be like yeah for most people that have a basic standard of living he should be equally valuing all your rights. Amazing good to know. Yeah that's everything I have to say. Well done be ready to listen..

Charlie Hall Hamilton J Iraq Peter Murrieta T Kennedy Kennedy Norris Fox High Court Justice Noonan Warren Georgia Charlie Hawley EU
"human rights" Discussed on Legally Bland

Legally Bland

16:11 min | 8 months ago

"human rights" Discussed on Legally Bland

"Thank you to me for your Jingle and welcome for the ninth time to illegal podcasts. That's almost double digits holly. I can't believe we've made this fire. I really in these trying times. It is an achievement in itself. Water journey so legally blonde is a show where in each episode we pick legal team and discuss legal cases from criminal to commercial. Tell us something of I thought team. Hopefully with the aim of sharing legal understanding giving insight into higher. The L- works at least where we are in Ireland in each episode. We'll both pick a case and discuss it. From the reason it happened judgment. Interesting facts about to the change that it caused but hopefully the common three that we pick will come across and you'll gain a slightly more complex understanding of the law and this week's theme is a human rights so we'll get into that short another ridiculously broad three PM. Yeah we we count him to stop but in fairness it's an important enough one so very important. We should say that this is not legal advice. If you're a legal experts that would become very obvious to you very fast. Most of what we say is our own opinions on our opinions. Aren't the best informed so just know that it's not legal advice so holly in a in a world where everything feels like. It's falling apart. Do you have legal news this week. Why yes yes. Uh-huh lost on. Surprisingly the legal news is Kobe. Nineteen related but nonetheless. There is So basically lay gave the legal news a couple of weeks ago thought. The courts were basically shutting down most of their operations. But there's never been words thoughts on the twentieth of April which is a new court term. There will be a Ramoche pilot scheme which is just a nother illustration of how radically life is changing in these uncertain times. And the Chief Justice Frank Clark released. A statement dot remote hearings will happen. Because they're still crimes occurring. They're still important. Child and family law issues to be considered bought the remote hearings are going to be constitutionally signed. There won't be any issues and the administration of Justice and public which is just that is I mean so the chief justice just just said they'll be constitutionally send. Yeah I mean that's not an automatic that stop someone from challenging not an automatic. Like it's like there's a constitutional allergies dump that you can put on things. If the chief justice gives it to go I feel like though. Yeah he's he's doing his best in these in these times but yeah it brings up interesting issues of like is like I. I don't think we discussed this at all today. But like is in the modern age is having access to the Internet. A human right like if it affects your access to justice definitely report. Should everyone have to make administered in public? Is it some kind of large zoom meeting like to actually the Supreme Court in the UK is doing hearings? It's I don't think they're using zoom but they have a very good instagram on. They post when it's gone like one. The Supreme Court is live in like click on click on our bio link to see the case so like yeah very surreal. That social media now is like the Public Public Administration Strange Times. Indeed so Ozzie. Said Human Rights is the theme. This week alone. I believe you're going I I am But that should probably be disclaimer. D- by out of the two of us. I thank your more. The expert in human rights than me experts is such a stretch comparatively. Yes but I'm going to give it a fair wack anyway so we both chosen a human rights to discuss. But I I'll give you a rundown of what I think. Human rights are like. This took me a while because it seems like a basic concept but it's one of those concepts that's like so simple. It's actually quite difficult to give it a good explanation. I feel But human rights are the basic rights and freedoms that belong to every person in the world from birth until death. They apply regardless of where. You're from what you believe or how you choose to. They can never be taken away from you but they can sometimes be restricted. These basic rights are based on shared. Values like dignity fairness equality respect and independence. So these Human rights are usually defined and protected by the law and sources of law for human rights are both national so in Ireland. We have them in the constitution ondon legislation but also many human rights are recognized international level such as entreaties such as the Universal Declaration of Human Rights from the United Nations is up. Is that a thing yes because I go there but I just didn't believe it. It's rather old. It's from one thousand nine hundred eighty eight but it's still it's still exists okay. Yeah that's what I was worried about. But also the European Convention of Human Rights so in Ireland. The national courts are responsible for determining allegations of human rights violations and although Ireland has ratified a number of international human rights treaties. Under Irish law. An individual can only engage in protections afforded under human rights law that have been incorporated into national so basically you can only go to court to indicate a write in. Ireland. That can be fended. An Irish choice of blow. Luckily most of the rights are offended. Irish sources law such as the Constitution the European Convention of Human Rights Acts. Two thousand three hundred hundred and fourteen And Andy Law where you laws applicable The source they're being the charter of fundamental rights. So lots of rights are protected and Ireland. And we're both. GonNa talk to different rights that are protected in different ways. I think what what are you doing? Holly I'm doing kind of family rights. It's a very broad look at show commonly rights. We'll get onto their protected through case law on legislation on the Constitution. So are they. They're kind of all all three well. Yeah it's circuses. The constitution is your main guy for human rights and her death because basically. I'm talking about privacy today and I'm GonNa give very brief overview of it but I did find myself just talking a lot about the constitution. But it's good to know that's the main stories. For some reason I was like doubting they thought the main tourist or whether it was the like legislation a-rated and international treaties but yeah So the very rough sketch of what human rights looks like today? Do you have anything else to add to that holly See I just went in for my. I just did a very broad look at human rights from my point of view. So I'll just saved us so privacy. I think it's fair to say privacy has become more. It's more of a modern concern. It's grown in importance as time has gone on like I don't think in Medieval Times. People were really concerned about their privacy when they were. You know starving enslaved but it's still like a very real unimportant right. And it's growing in relevance all the time Privacy has no single definition especially as a human right so there are many many legal definitions that you can find and they often change over time and within different cultures might have a slightly different idea of what privacy is and what it protects but the first time privacy was recognized as a human rights was in eighteen ninety so not that long ago it was in Legal article published in the Harvard Law Review. it was written by two dogs called. Warren and Brown date. Brandis brandish On it's such a renowned legal article like it's one of I think it must have been one of the first maybe thought to stretch boat like a very very viral legal article. It has its own wikipedia. Page like the article itself so It's funny to thank Gosh. At the time it was such a radical kind of point of view. But basically data scribe privacy as the right to be left alone. Nice freely concise accuracy and especially. I don't have that many other definitions in front of me. But some of the definitions have been generated since then are like very basically paragraphs of like what's protected. And what's not so. It's nice to have just one sentence So that's the kind of general idea of what the right to privacy is specifically an Irish law. It's been a bit of a bumpy road in regards to what's protected and Watts under your right to privacy. So it's protected. Nowadays through Article Forty Point Three of the constitution as an unincorporated right on the became like dot became a thing through some case law. We've actually previously discussed But there's just to give you a full picture of where privacy is protected on a lot of the protection. The actual functional production comes from Evil so there's The e privacy directive GDP or on the data protection ox ninety nine nine thousand nine hundred eighty eight thousand three On those kind of all protect Like any personal Dada. Most of them aren't were mostly created following the advent of computers and of like electronic communication. Which kind of really. I think brought the privacy issue to live. Privacy is also protected under article. Eight of the European Convention on Human Rights like those are all really functional sources of protection. But today I wanNA talk really about the constitution as a domestic source of of the privacy. Rice because I think it's interesting Ho Week of a ride. It actually is a lot of the time. So the courts have frequently like tried to use the constitutional right to defend an individual's right to privacy but it generally doesn't work very well And I like like it's so interesting someone who really values the constitution were. Yeah do I really liked the constitution? I think it's really important. It's fascinating to see an example of how it can fe. Well fail is a strong word but how it can be very ineffective in ways which is not what we like to hear the constitution. I think I think it's fair to say for both I love of the constitution is some wash tempestuous. It's a bit volatile. We love this what. We don't always love the outcomes it produces if that makes sense. Yeah and in this case. We'll get onto the whole situation for basically the issue to summarize issue. The constitution has hot in terms of protecting like individuals. Right to privacy. It seems to always come down to balancing personal privacy with A larger scale right to freedom of expression so there's loads of cases about the press on to- far their access into private lives can extent but before we get to the Let's talk about how the privacy right originally developed so the right to privacy originally developed in case of all like. I said that we already discussed love that. I get to keep calling back to cases like both of these cases. I actually already talked about it. So in the McGee case goal share miss. Mary McGee got the right to Marshall Privacy recognized through the Constitution as an unincorporated right under article forty three so they got a very limited privacy right that only really extended to Marshall Scenarios so that was in nineteen seventy four in one thousand nine hundred eighty four. We have the Norris and Attorney General case which I've also previously discussed which challenged the law. That criminalized homosexuality. So Norris didn't succeed in terms of successfully challenging any law He was aiming to do this by saying that. His right to privacy should be respected on balanced the negative impact of the criminalization of homosexuality But we know. I think that that didn't work because the Cornish took a more realistic approach and said there was public like public safety. Public morality reasons thought he shouldn't have homosexuality decriminalized but was interesting because in the process the court did acknowledge or almost. Acknowledge that the right to privacy did exist. They almost like they come very close to sing. Norris did have a constitutional right to privacy and then saying Oh. It doesn't matter public morality. Reasons mean regardless. We're you know you can't use it here but it's interesting. That was the first time that such a right was identified which will actually become relevant later. So they say oh. He has a right to privacy but public morality. Reasons mean. We're not GONNA recognize it. Can I just say public? Morality is the most annoying justification that exists. It comes into play a lot of the time in the law and it just seems like the flimsiest justification to me. I know it was well. It was also like the Christian and they also referenced the Christian Democratic Nature of the stage which is referred to in the preamble. So I think that's the judgment though thought one of our lectures cold like the worst written judgment of all time. It's not great. It's not a great read like with with hindsight. The reasoning doesn't stand up there. It's almost recognized coming onto the case of Kennedy and Arnold and Ireland nineteen eighty seven This was a case that followed a scandal at the time. So the case concerned Kennedy. Who was an editor at the Irish Times? Arnold who's a journalist at the Irish Times? Who Basically I. This is a simplification of what happened. I think but they were so. They had sources within the Iraqi government that we're leaking information to the about cabinet discussions so in response the Minister of Justice on the the Relevant parties within the Raucous Tops. The phones of the editor and the journalists to try and discover who their source while so who was Releasing the information to them Which is in this case. A pretty blatant nowadays like breach of their privacy like they tap their personal mobile phones so on the eighteenth to.

European Convention of Human R Ireland Marshall Privacy Norris Chief Justice Frank Clark Irish Times Supreme Court Andy Law UK Holly Ozzie United Nations editor Medieval Times Christian Democratic Nature
"human rights" Discussed on UN News

UN News

09:38 min | 10 months ago

"human rights" Discussed on UN News

"This is an academy with US following a five day visit to Democratic Republic of the Congo or DRC where instability intercommunal violence and disease Ez continues to take a heavy toll. The human rights situation there is showing signs of improvement. Said High Commissioner Michelle Ashley. The human rights chief visited visited the Eastern Province of Italy and medley. There's from the hammer and lender communities. We have suffered atrocities which according to a recent report from her office may constitute potential crimes against humanity at the end of revisit this week. The High Commissioner spoke exclusively to raid your copy the Francophone radio station station run by the UN mission in the country MANISCO. Speaking to your room mate specially started by giving an overview of the current state of human rights into DRC. We've voiced his questions into English. I will tell you. There has been a decrease of three percent. In the number of documented documented human rights violations this has been limited the number Gravity and consequences for the population remains warring though I am particular particular concern that in fact that state agents remain responsible for the majority fifty four percent over the documenting violations against the across the country. They have done less violation but still remain the biggest responsible the FA RDC in particular particular remained responsible for the largest Numbers is supposed to twenty eight percent of documented. We're talking about documented violation. We're talking about allocate. Bailey shows that have been presented by people and the had been verified which must trace that beyond limitations in their ability eighty to protect civilians. They play an active role as perpetrators decisive action. Then on the government to stop is needed to stop all by elections by the security agencies and our forces is needed but on the other hand we see an increase of activities by armed on group they have increased by forty percent. Continue to have a devastating impact on civilians so he has increased weight. In general montains the proportion on state actors but We have increased activities by armed groups so the other thing that is concerning is the increase of reported the cases of sexual violence but we have to also acknowledged progress in some areas and it has been a significant decrease minus twenty six percent percent almost a third less in the number of violation of fundamental freedoms such as you know the opening of Democratic Space Freedom of speech is the assembly and well the release of political prisoners. So I think this is a positive thing that really acknowledge however. I think it's always needed to continue making all efforts so The there's nobody relational for political a million and political rights including the should be no attacks against human rights defenders and other civil society actors and of course demonstrations should continue to be free and have hello Repression on ten January. The United Nations joined Human Rights Office published a report which states at least seven hundred. One people were killed in communal community conflicts into drew territory in Italy between September. Twenty seventeen in September two thousand nineteen according to these documents. The vast majority thirty of the victims of the attacks appear to have been targeted because of their membership of the him a community. The report also indicates that he attacks could be genocide or or crimes against humanity in his report has been contested by the Lendu community which considers it be as in full of errors. You met this community in Boone. What was the response you gave them well? First of all the reason that I went to Italy is because the majority of people will Al- always to north keep all South Kivu. We have just this report that show us that there will be problems in Italy and individual territory. The second thing that I explained to them is that the findings of the report are based on a thorough objective impartial investigation conducted by the UN. Join Human the office using the standard methodology of my office. We use the same little dollies you all over the world. I told them that all violations are abusive by all parties have been investigated the with the same level of care on thoughtfulness the figures of the report represent all the incidents against that could be verified according to the OT charming dot org and standard of proof. I pointed out that the report also also provides figures of land victims of attacks perpetrators by the Hema and documents human rights violations abuses committed against the the Lendu undo by the army and police forces. And not only figures of Hemmeh victims and finally I also noted that we will continue to the money towards the situation so I invited him to share any information about human rights abuses and violations that were not included in the report for for us so he can be verified several Congolese personalities and organizations have asked I see seat to consider the crimes and other abuses committed by national and foreign armed groups ups particularly in the East. What is your opinion? Well we think that justice substantial element of the pathway to peace peace without justice spur difficult difficult to be sustainable. We have seen it in many parts of the world. There must be accountability for crimes. Committed and justice must be seen to be done done by population have been victims of crimes and serious human rights violations. The Primary Mission of the icy sea is. It's indeed to help Putin and to impunity for the perpetrators of the most serious crimes and thus contribute to the prevention of such crimes important to note however that is not a soup sitted for national courts. It is a duty of every state to investigate. And I would say prosecute those responsible for international crimes so the icy can only intervene where when state is unable or unwilling adding to do so therefore the primary responsibility for trying perpetrators of the most serious crimes in the including those committed in the East lies within the Congolese authorities for the last ten years. We have seen progress in the capacity of the national judicial authorities in particular particular military justice to investigate and prosecute cases of grave human rights violations in particular cases that amount to crimes against humanity ace or war crimes so there has been important convictions both of senior military commanders and our group commander so I think the important talking now is to encourage the government and in particular the Minister of Justice to continue improving the system improving the capacities the resources so that requires to fight impunity effectively. So I I I will always also like to underline our commitment to continue providing providing technical assistant assistance and other kind of support Schori. Human Rights Awesome in prison conditions in. DRC They are deplorable ruble. Several deaths of prisoners have been recorded. What are your General Recommendations to Congolese authorities to improve these human rights sector? Well the first thing thing is really really concerned to hear about the conditions on prisons. The high number of faith linked to poor conditions. Poor Poor poor foot Lack of food security and of course Seven South Stander Health Care Sanitation Asian food that cycle and many many many prisoners in small prison. So I've been speaking with the government and with the Minister of Justice. Who's aware aware of this? And he's GonNa go visit different places to see the conditions and to see what can be done because you know of course. New prisons needs to be built. But but that's not something you can do from one to another so where we have been discussing is that they are going to go to the prices. And they're going to analyze the prisoners cases because because many of them are for a long time because the justice system have not been able to trial them yet. The other situation are people who the things they committed that they they did it. Maybe not that bad that they can to remain in jail that they could have sort of prevention provincial provincial and measures that can be home but respond to the police. I mean there are different ways of dealing this while A lot of other prisoners can be built so what we have been toiling then is that they have to see every case by case and see what the abilities are so but the important thing is that we have discuss this with the government. They are aware of this and they have told me that they are going to take additional measures to try to address the problem..

Italy UN Commissioner DRC Human Rights Office Eastern Province Michelle Ashley Democratic Republic US Minister of Justice Ez Bailey Lendu United Nations South Kivu Boone South Stander Health Care Sani
"human rights" Discussed on Poutine Politics

Poutine Politics

08:59 min | 10 months ago

"human rights" Discussed on Poutine Politics

"Probably don't know who he is either. Nope no that's fine. I wouldn't expect you to again most people that I know wouldn't know him and that's okay. He's a Toronto Rockstar. No well okay. So maybe maybe he is so he's a constable in the Toronto Police Service K. K. But he has he's he's he's become like a a social media quote unquote influence her as it were okay. He's got like fifty thousand followers on instagram posts on the post on instagram. I and tick tock and twitter and stuff like that you know and and some of the stuff that he posts is like public awareness stuff like he he had a he had a tweet recently where it was like it was like wariness for wearing a seatbelt. And it's like you know here's the tells of people that obviously are wearing seat belt and it's like you know leaning your arm on the door on on your window and like really quickly to try to move your hands. It doesn't look like you're like you're doing it or that you. You didn't have your seatbelt on my right. Okay that's fine like that's cool. That's a public awareness. Thing right. Yeah are you okay. Whatever so so he's another one of these appointees okay all right now? I got the store. Got The story from the Toronto Star where I saw it the first time and obviously they reach out for comment from both of these individuals and they basically get nothing. Oh Yeah I would say anything either right exactly. It's like just as it is now gonNA talk about it. Let it be dug for it if you're going to give me a job. I won't comment on anything. I promise I wanNA bring up in this podcast. All right. Perfect the podcast of the over. If that happens the job well you'll be allowed to talk about anything. Don't you know. It just will eliminate Ontario. Okay I guess right I guess we kind to do that. Lesson Quebec's in source of Awesomeness to now where constable arsenals expertise could come. Lintas is so he is indigenous. Oh Okay and for his precinct. He is the Abbot. The Aboriginal Liaison Officer okay. Okay so again. I mean like because of because of what his responsibilities or some of his responsibilities within the trump service is he could certainly be a good fit for this position on Human Rights Commission. Right however appointing a member of the Toronto Police Service to the Ontario Human Rights Commission Commission while the Toronto Police Service is under investigation. By the Ontario Human Rights Tribunal for discriminatory policies including racial profiling and carting hurting. Sears is suspect listen. Conflict of interest is all about the viewpoint so if Doug Ford doesn't think that there's a problem of conflict of interest there's not a problem conflict of interest none whatsoever none that four or corruption. Whichever were you want to choose? So what was what was Doug Ford's response to this on Friday. He responded. Well okay. Here's why so so on Friday So on Doug Ford had a press oppressor yeah a pure regional. Police headquarters a pizza party to let them out. Okay Yep exactly public talk and you know it was. Part of part of the part of the presser was announcing new funding for Peel regional police said well I think for police forces in general I would say so announcing twenty twenty four point five million dollars in funding for the people forced to fight gang gun violence okay so it wasn't announcement of that funding all right and obviously question. The question comes up during the press conference about these appointments and and whatever so he kinda he kinda he comes. Certain says quotes from story. There's no secret I absolutely love our police officers and I'm proud to say that three of my four daughters or with police officers so there's my bias right there is well it's all right. I love this guy. This is comedy gold three of my four dollars or with police officers therefore I have a bias towards police officers not. I'm not done quote. The police officer that serving. So we're talking about cost of Larson is top notch. You can't ask for a better police officer than what the Attorney General appointed. Oh yes it was the eternal attorney general. That awfully officially made the appointments. WHO's Doug Downey? Of course I love Donny yes I support our police and I support the appointment. That the attorney general made if there's a conflict they remove themselves if there's a conflict where's the if right if there's a conflict you just admitted to that there is a conflict based on your previous statement anyways so again my point is that I'm not I'm not necessarily saying that the choice of these people is. I'm not saying I'm not saying that. They're bad picks if there is a process that's already going on on where people have applied for these positions and the person who's responsible for bringing the the like the best applicants to the government limit to appoint to these positions is already doing that process. Why not finish the process instead of? Oh no we're just going to appoint those people Doug Ford. I know I don't want to like I don't want the answer to be that simple. That's the problem because you have to admit I mean liberal liberals have have definitely indefinitely. Done Corny Politics as well. That's why I don't want the answer to be that simple forged. That's kind of that is the as well well and obviously than the PC party will say. Well it wasn't Doug Ford that appointed him. It was the attorney general. And it's like okay so throughout the attorney general under the bus good job. Listen Duck Ford's government isn't this is good as Kenny's government as far as avoiding things can't even genius Ford's idiot right the attorney general did it. Oh Oh yeah. I'm sure he did it just because he still haven't resolve the conflict of interest that you brought up by saying what you said. Yeah you Moron on. So we've done our compare and contrast. I mentioned that there was also six degrees of separation. Oh right for who me. Oh okay okay all right. Yeah I'm I'm ready for this so K.. So obviously we've got the Ontario Human Rights Commission yet needs commissioners. Yep So Doug Ford through DOC Downey appoints commit to commissioners right right right Violet Egg Naski. I have no idea who she is. Okay rental arsenal. He's my cousin. Shut the front door by marriage. Not by birth. Okay but still that means they can get away with that of her. Want to that means is that I am now officially unofficially but officially loosely tied to a government scandal yours girls loosely talented. Doug Ford Welcome to Conservative Party on the PC party of Ontario. Now I think that officially gives me a membership without paying the ten dollars fee month. I mean you just had to duck for for that. Yeah Hey Doug come on slipped me a card. Let's let's let's talk. This is the way I say. Lords like a number of different scales. I ah Oh man like I wanted them chronologically because they're just like whatever I'm just like I'm Nicholas word this week. He gets so easy so anyways. Yeah yeah that in the grand scheme of things. That's the only reason I picked. I ended up picking this topic to be the topic to talk about. That's amazing was because so God you're part of the PC AC party. Now welcome to the Dirksen. Welcome to deduct. I am now officially a conservative. She's sorry mom and Dad all right. Well that has been our topic on down. -Tario Human Rights Commission Not really obviously about the Ontario human rights. Its Commission. I'm I'm I'm calling. Nepotism now nepotism. Now the Oh right because the position because he's my cousin. Is that what happened. Political political influence. Alright as what happens when you have political podcast you have influence my influences about worth about the two cents that my thoughts and the thoughts are but we don't get even rub twopence together. I'm not allowed. The banks took them on all right. anyways there's been putting politics. My Name's Adam. We'll talk to you soon..

Doug Ford Toronto Police Service Attorney Human Rights Commission Ontario Toronto officer Ontario Human Rights Commissio Ontario Human Rights Tribunal Doug Downey twitter Ontario Human Rights Commissio Doug Ford Duck Ford Commission Quebec Officer
"human rights" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

15:52 min | 11 months ago

"human rights" Discussed on Kickass News

"From an early age Samantha Power has had a passion for human rights and helping the most desperate people in the world this former journalist personally witnessed the horrors of the war in Bosnia WanNa Pulitzer Prize for her heart. Wrenching account of twentieth century genocide and advocated for Human Rights as the founding executive director her of the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy at Harvard. University's Kennedy School of government but then Herreid and got the attention of a young Senator Barack Obama and changed her life forever. She went from being an advocate working outside of the government to working on the inside at the highest level on the president's national security Freddie counsel and then as US ambassador to the United Nations she quickly gained an appreciation for the complexity of decision making at the top the grey areas that plague even the most seemingly black and white issues and the unintended consequences of action and inaction and yet at the end of her eight years. In the Obama Administration Samantha Powers' belief and fighting for those who can't fight for themselves and the power of diplomacy to make a better world was not only intact but strengthened thinned by the experience. It something she writes about in her new best selling book. The education of an idealist a memoir. The education of an idealist has has been listed as one of the best books of Twenty nineteen by The New York Times. NPR TIME ECONOMISTS The Washington Post and publishers. Weekly and today ambassador power. Our joins me on the podcast to talk about it. She recalls her early years as a freelance journalist covering the siege of Sarajevo her first impression of a first term Senator Senator Barack Obama. How'd she navigated the politics of the West Wing earned the president's trust and got his attention on critical humanitarian issues? She gives an inside account of the negotiations leading. Up to the Paris climate accord the discussions in the Oval Office. Over how to handle the Syrian civil war and how the Obama Administration scramble the jets approach to the abol crisis could be a case study in how to handle future humanitarian crises. Less she talks about the rise of China. America's loss loss of moral authority under President Donald Trump and why she views empathy as one of her greatest strengths and diplomacy coming up. With embassador Samantha. Power in just a moment Samantha. Power is.

Senator Barack Obama Samantha Power Obama Administration Carr Center for Human Rights P Samantha Bosnia WanNa Pulitzer Prize Samantha Powers president Kennedy School of government President Donald Trump Sarajevo executive director Herreid Harvard United Nations Washington Post NPR US Freddie
"human rights" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

13:44 min | 1 year ago

"human rights" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"With the Nixon administration should resisting the pressure to focus more on human rights and having pressure coming from non state actors non-governmental organizations also coming from Capitol. Hill is you've discussed. There's there's also something happening. Within the administration administration there are advisers to Nixon and Kissinger horr- actually making the case that the United States couldn't afford to ignore downplay human rights talk a little bit about the sure that was one of the most interesting discoveries for me because the way that based on reading other other people's work and some of my earlier research on the the Nixon and Ford administrations distractions. I had this sense of Nixon Kissinger as running a sort of a top down ship that would allow for no dissent and therefore if Henry Kissinger had decided that human when rights were not a priority there would be no discussion of this and what I found was that a number of his assistant secretaries particularly for East Asian Affairs and for latin-american affairs as well as the the director of his Policy Planning Staff Winston Lord that each of them in different areas of the world and on different issues were saying actually there could be real benefits to moderating moderating our approach and so. I was really interested to see that this was happening in meetings at the Secretary of state was having just with sort of chief aides in memo's. There's a whole series as of memos that I read written by Winston Lord where he's repeatedly. I think gently but very clearly suggesting that the United States would benefit from a new approach until I was I was very interested to see this and the other part that I was really interested to see was that a number of ambassadors who were certainly taking direction from Washington and extensively from Kissinger there were able to have quite a degree of latitude in the degree to which they would rescue or at least put pressure on governments to release political prisoners that they would put pressure sure on governments about the sort of lack of due process the arrests that were happening and so I found that there was actually far greater agency of these lower level actors I during the sort of Kissinger Tenure Secretary of state than I had imagined as once. I'm glad you mentioned Winston Lord. I had the pleasure of sitting down with him. The summer talking about what it was liked to work in the Nixon Administration working for Dr Kissinger in Bachelor talk a little bit about sort of some of the challenges he had navigate when he was in government but I wanNA switch to sort of the opposite side of the sort of the Nixon years which is the criticism that was coming at the Nixon administration not from Democrats but from Republicans Publican's because there were elements Republican Party that argued that the Nixon administration was mistaken with its Policies Essentially Riyal politique with the Soviet Union that the United States should elevate human rights concerns that was one of the complaints that would later become called the Reagan wing of the Party would have with the Nixon excellent ministration. How did that all play out. I think you're absolutely right. I mean I think we see this. Moose clearly in Reagan's challenge of Ford for the Republican nomination and in the the sort of element of the platform they get this sort of morality in foreign policy because that's the criticism and it's it's interesting because it's the same criticism that is coming from the Liberal Democrats but essentially what these Republicans and some conservative Democrats are saying is that you know doesn't matter if the United States gets ahead in the Cold War. If it has sort of abandoned donned its core values if it no longer stands up as a champion of democracy and the rights that are enshrined in the bill of rights then maybe everything everything has been lost in this sort of gamesmanship I mean I think that that that's sort of the criticism of Kissinger is that that he was almost too smart tacticly and ended up potentially sleep giving away some of what made the United States distinct and worth defending and preserving the list of countries that Republicans particularly in in the seventies focused on different than what Democrats focused on Republicans in their complaints most talked about Communist governments whereas Democrats would talk about authoritarian governments many of which had good relations with the United States absolutely and that's one of the reasons that in my research I looked at a range of countries because I didn't want to suggest that human rights came to be institutionalized and US foreign policy only out of a sort of Cold War ideological bent of saying these communist countries have no human rights nights but countries that were allies of the United States places like Greece where there was a lot of criticism of the continued US support for that government after the coup in nineteen sixty seven. I'm very interested in the relationship relationship with the Soviet Union but also countries that don't have as much strategic value to the United States places like southern Rhodesia that all of them get swept up in this concern about you support for human rights but you're absolutely right that even though human rights was a bipartisan issue I'm in a kind of broad sense that the the sort of details tells of it and then I would say it's not just which countries get focused on but often which rights are privileged on but that does vary based on Social Roy of different different different rights that someone like Ronald Reagan was enormously concerned about religious freedom. Whether it was the rights of Pentecostals pentecostals baptists of Jews in the Soviet Union he was also concerned with the rights to private property whereas I would say that Democrats often were more focused chryst on political imprisonment and the imprisonment say of left wing critics of right wing governments who people like Henry Kissinger would have argued were legitimate threats to the government's Liberal Democrats said even if they are we need to make sure that their rights are protected that these countries are following due process etc and you would get this when Ronald Reagan became president is ambassador the nation breaching Kerr Patrick and of course she had famously criticized Democrats for focusing on authoritarian in friendly governments and missing the mark on the importance of what was happening in Communist governments. Yes and I think that that criticism really has its roots in the congressional rational achievements of the mid nineteen seventies well because I think there was a recognition at some point the those within the United States who cared about human rights might not be able to fact act what the South Korean government was doing what the Chilean government was doing but it could make sure the US funding and US security supplies weren't being used in that repression Donald Frazier who someone who I'm very interested in it and I see a very significant character he was a democratic member of Congress from the Great State of Minnesota. Yes and I'd be happy talk about him. more because I think he's really the pivotal figure in the story but he talks about going to Greece in the wake of the nineteen sixty seven coup and seeing american-made tanks in the streets and he is really upset about the idea that these tanks are being used to combat students who are protesting against the regime and so essentially these people who are concerned about human rights and recognize they might not be able to have great influence on foreign governments said well. You know what we can do is cut off security assistance to governments that are that are repressive. No United States isn't sending security assistance to communist governments. It's only countries with whom the United States has determined that there's a strategic relationship that needs to be supported in the nineteen seventies the United States. It's targeted the government were oppressive to whom it gave security assistance economic assistance extended loans through multilateral lending associations because those were or seen as effective ways to have leverage over those governments. I understand Kirkpatrick criticism but the members of Congress that I'm interested in. I would say well. Should we do nothing should should we have let US dollars continue to fund the disappearance of people in in Chile and Argentina. If we have the means to effect a change there should we lose sight of the opportunity to make incremental change even if we can't yet and in Communism in Europe and Asia Etcetera Sir I want to take the conversation up to the present check as you look back at how human rights went from the periphery of Foreign Policy Z. to closer to center stage archly driven by non-governmental organizations and members of Congress seizing on the issue and sort of creating what you would call this institutionalised human rights apparatus. What are the lessons for today. What's interesting. I started writing this book in the summer of two thousand eight and at the time I would have told you that I felt the most significant lesson would be that the actors that I was looking at it in the nineteen. Sixties were facing very similar questions to what the George W Bush administration administration was facing how to balance American values and ideals with the need to preserve national security. I mean certainly here. I'm talking about the imprisonment of detainees in Guantanamo. Bay The use of torture etc but I would see that over time and this sort of I guess testifies to how long it takes to finish a book. I submitted the manuscript several months into the trump administration. I think the message of my research is that people outside of the government and members of Congress and members of the Foreign Service who disagree with the government policy particularly relating to a an ignoring of human rights or a downgrading of human rights have a range of tools at their disposal that they don't don't have to blindly follow the position that's coming from the White House and they have a lot of space to have an impact at the lower level. You know speaking to a foreign government and saying actually we really care about the fact that you've arrested this person or we. WanNa make sure you're not going to execute this person on but they also have the ability to pass legislation that can constrain the White House's actions and so now I see it much more as rather than you know. There's a long history of struggling with these questions that I want to highlight. I think the achievements that members of Congress listen there. There's sort of a non-governmental allies were able to make and that I don't think that for people who care deeply about human rights they have to say well. Everything is sort of lost for the length of his administration but there's actually still a lot that can be accomplished. Just do some specifics there. I will note that we often talk about the disappearance of bipartisanship partisanship in American foreign policy. I think we tend to overrate how much bipartisanship we had historically but I would even know today that if you look at issues and dealing with Russia with Saudi Arabian the murder of journalists to Shoji that you have seen this pushback from Congress is sort of institutionalized element in American foreign policy and I would say also in the the support for Saudi Arabia and Yemen. That's another place where I've seen a lot of clear congressional signaling that they're dissatisfied. Given the human rights concerns the challenge of course it runs into the basic constitutional structure in which Congress can try to pass legislation overruling the president but the president can veto that legislation and in this case the president has vetoed several pieces of legislation in Congress votes to overturn but that was the case historic..

United States Henry Kissinger Nixon administration Congress Nixon Kissinger Ronald Reagan Nixon Kissinger horr Winston Lord Soviet Union president Greece Hill George W Bush administration
"human rights" Discussed on Talking Politics

Talking Politics

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"human rights" Discussed on Talking Politics

"This is are we talking about the experiences of people who work in some of the most dangerous places in the world like Syria, or is this a much much more pervasive issue that as it was states routinely doing this, including maybe some states that we didn't think hope is particularly bad. When you read the comprehensive reports that like frontline defenders do on the state of human rights defenders in the world. This is seen as a major theme of a challenge and a threat for human rights defenders worldwide. So one version of this problem, which is the thing that makes it easy. If activists can make easier for the people who are trying to spy on the activists is around on imitate because I don't imitate can be very useful results online at allows people to conceal our. But also, it's as we've discovered something that states can use to you. Dating. How does that dynamic work? Does it help hinder the attempt to expose human rights abuses to be anonymous? I think we had a lot of hope that anonymity and the way that one can report things without having to physically be there would allow us to get more information. However, what that idea ran up against is actually our social understanding of how we establish what effect is and it turns out Lisa. My research has shown that we really want to connect fact with density. We want to know about the source. We want to know about who they are. And what their motivations were? In fact, that is considered to be one of the major aspects of air fixation when human rights fact-finders, go in and look at information is where did this come from? And why would this person be telling me this? The postal has no the person is so anonymity allows an investigation say to start. But it wouldn't be a piece of anonymous information is very very very. Rarely we see this journalism two very rarely going to be the information on which stories reported. So it's useful in highlighting issue and making people wanna go in an investigate it. But that information in self isn't going to change things on advocacy side because they need to establish who it was who said this, and we find this really problematic because what it does is it sort of silences around particular kinds of human rights violations. So they're ones for which it is much more risky, or there's many more repercussion reporting them. So for example, if we look at sexual violence in say institutions, if women are more likely to be the victims is a kind of violation where they don't necessarily want their name associated with the accusation because there are just repercussions as we know for women in society who make accusations of sexual violence, then because enemy doesn't always work in terms of getting traction for an investigation or getting traction for. Even belief in credibility in that story. You end up having almost the more vulnerable populations who are being subject to violations more likely to be silenced. It has certainly held is opened up new channels of communication, but it runs up against our social understanding of how to produce knowledge. In fact, to compose is brought to you in partnership with the London review of books. You mentioned the fake news around verification. So is there also a question here that one response that people don't want this information to get out can make he's not Trump block it? But to kind of drown it all as it were swamp this space with maybe nullum ass- faecal stories don't play whether so says, but it just means that so much noise that you can't detect the signal is that one of.

Syria London review of books Lisa
"human rights" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"human rights" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"Serious well and so in some cases even let's say the hawks who may be inclined to discount human rights abuses may face issues in which to them it is useful to elevate to human rights issue because it it provides a broader coalition and i guess i'm curious how would you assess the administration's the trump administration's handling of north korea iran syria venezuela on the human rights front it's getting right and look they still be doing it's interesting because things are so radic you don't see a consistent policy so you know human rights watch takes no position on military intervention so we have nothing to say about the intervention that happened in syria but one of the things that strikes me is the language is about accountability has no fall there's an effort underway now at the un to push forward on account too on sort of accountability and factfinding for the chemical weapons and the us playing a role but they aren't you know corralling the international community and leading quite this same way as one would have hoped and i think the important thing to remember is that will using chemical weapons violation of the law and his horrifically damaging civilians in syria are are dying at much greater numbers from barrel bombs from aerial attacks and there's been very little set about that furthermore to try to ban all syrian refugees from coming jay nited states is i think that's an important reminder that trump's empathy for victims of of the assad conflict only go so far and it's not consistent it's not organized and it's not they're not sort of thinking they're how can we really help the people that are stuck at the center of this conflict what do we need to do and how to really corral the international community marshall a better approach that puts civilian protection at the heart of it because at the heart of a sods conflict is attacks on civilians right.

hawks north korea venezuela syria un us trump jay nited assad
"human rights" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"human rights" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"The conversation changes in fact you'll really see the human rights council go xactly in the wrong direction because it'll become dominated by countries that are seeking seats on human rights council so they can derail or block increase into human rights so here's the thing if the us is going to stay as a member of the human rights council you want it to be a constructive member if it's going to be unhelpful i'm not sure that i want the us to stay but from all indications thus far they have continued to be relatively helpful i think in some sense it's because the geneva mission is on autopilot we'll see what happens now with what's the problem with a lot of missions yes we haven't had people nominated and then confirmed by the senate that's right head of these delegations but you know national security advisor bolton has a very different vision than mcmaster and i think probably a very different approach based on his record and he's much more hawkish and hard line and we'll have to see how quickly he comes out of the gate i mean there's already been indications of him trying to clamp down if you read between the lines of who's leaving the white house and the media reports and so we don't know you know is the answer and i think the question is as you say who fills the gap and who continues to lead and and one of our jobs at human rights watch is to keep pushing some of those other states to step into a leadership role to support them so that they can do what needs to get done even despite either an intransigent or unhelpful united states but you noted i think correctly earlier on that while the trump administration overall his not made human rights rule of law democracy promotion a top priority there's some clear exceptions of countries for which the president personally has talked at great length about human rights abuses i'm thinking north korea i'm thinking ron thinking venezuela sort of three that come into mario.

senate bolton mcmaster white house president ron advisor venezuela
"human rights" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"human rights" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"How is that functioning these days worth some talk early on the trump administration may take the united states out of the un human rights council i i haven't seen anything recently maybe something has happened right we're sort of in a holding pattern right now i think you know there were some assessments underway they're trying to make some reform and some of the reform in the human rights council was intended to be reform and improvement over what preceded it and it was i mean there's been some dramatic changes it's better but not best or better but not successful i mean well it's done some really remarkable things i think one of the things that in thinking about the council is that it is only as good as its members first of all second of all there has been some really remarkable efforts the produced an incredible report on north korea that was sort of actually it was incredibly interesting reading one of the best un documents i've ever seen and it really went into to depth analyzing the state of the crisis atrocities over a long period of time so it's very definitive document it continues to have increase into syria the dutch were able to push forward on a on an incre effect finding mission into yemen as a result of the saudi conflict they're looking at international humanitarian law violations so there's been some really remarkable things that have come out of the council and it's important to remember that despite a lot of the negatives it is still a nimble and flexible body that that can respond to some of the needs in a timely way of the global community and the key i think going forward is to reform who becomes a member how it works and then doing a better job of connecting up the un security council agenda with what happens in geneva and the us is trying to make some of those changes i think the question is how big do they need to go before they feel like it's a success but i think you point out something important sarah which is that if you leave the room entirely.

united states north korea syria yemen sarah un security council geneva
"human rights" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"human rights" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"National level organizations are doing the same thing so ukrainian organizations are shillong organizations or you know even even countries like is becka stan which now seems to be opening up a little but had been so clamped down for so many years or in kenya where there's an incredibly robust civil society and so what you see is it's not just international organizations or american organizations that are trying to hold governments responsible for their actions it is actually the people of those countries and that is a remarkable change in the last twenty to thirty years that didn't exist part of that has to do with major geopolitical changes in dynamics globally you know the change in in the end of the soviet union and sort of the growth of democratic states you know in countries across africa and cross south asia and that's been a real boon to to the human rights movement has that coble civil society that logo movement of human rights become mm self sustained or is it something for which the presence or absence of us leadership governmental leadership on human rights still manage that is if we leave the room there's a significant sort of backward flow so i've spent a fair amount of time wondering about this over the last year and wondering okay so the us walks away maybe the rhetoric is in there maybe the money will stay right because congress has been very strong and pushing back against the white house's attempts to slash the foreign aid budget so maybe the money will stay but the the umbrella language will be gone does that matter and when i have come to see and i've come to here although i think you know the jury's still out in some regard i think it does matter because the other governments are sort of stepping in and we've seen this in other areas other arenas the chinese will come in and they're not gonna provide support for independence civil society but they're going to they're going to provide support for other things.

becka stan kenya soviet union south asia congress white house africa coble thirty years
"human rights" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"human rights" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"But they have known that they can turn to the us for support in some cases literally for safety at the embassy level but that the words mattered and they insulated them in a way that hadn't been there previously well let's talk a little bit about trump administration policy and she noted at the start of our conversation this administration say is not put he writes and democracy promotion to the top of its list there are a couple of exceptions can get into that a little but it seems to me that president trump at least when he was candidate trump was quite clear about his views of democracy promotion human rights and indeed he essentially argued that our efforts to promote democracy and human rights were really essentially a fool's errand at one point he said we shouldn't be pushing democracy rule of law and human rights because let me quote him here i don't think we are very good messenger for this adminis stray shen it's a conscious choice not to elevator emphasize human rights rule of law not an accident i mean you see you see different things coming out of different senior level officials which is part of what makes it so confusing the america first quote unquote policy that the trump administration has embraced i sometimes a visual thinker and i sort of i envisioned lots of you know it's like a soccer field where you have people sort of running around bumping into each other and then running away or deciding to go work together but that everybody is out for their own good and that sort of how i think trump sees things collaboration comes second and i don't think there's an understanding that collaboration can also be good for the us interest in many different ways so that's the overarching view when you question on that because i know a number of people who are big fans of america i am sure if they were listening to this podcast the reaction would be look what happens over there number one is in our business knowing likes to have other he will poke the nose run and tell them how to conductor lives in number to our efforts to do these things.

us america trump president soccer
"human rights" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"human rights" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"Talking about those parts of the state department tasked with doing democracy and human rights that tends to be there and they want to elevate it so yes that's a common sort of thing yes here you describe sort of successes and i it this notion it's not always lanier that maybe two steps forward one step back ramon she something i'm sort of read by a number of soviet dissidents was that two after the soviet union fell many of them said that having american presidents presidents in particular talking about sort of the moral status of the soviet union talking about the plight of dissidents even if it didn't necessarily change soviet policy at the kremlin level was important and giving them sort of an emotional lift in helping them see that their battle wasn't futile do see that yes and i i think one of the best examples and a clearcut departure from previous immigrations was the obama administration's pretty explicit support for lgbt communities around the world and this is a tough one because in many countries where the us supported these communities the local populations were not particularly in favour of of that kind of support and so the administration had to do a very very nuanced dance to figure out how best to support the individuals the activists were the groups and it differed from country to country and countries like julia there was one way where national groups felt that that support made the most sense for them and in other countries you know it was done differently and i think what is so concerning now looking at the pending confirmation of mike pompeo is that his draconian record on lgbt activists and the lgbt community in general runs the risk of having the us walk back from that mainstreaming if you will of these issues and we have heard time and again how how important that support has been and allowed a lot of those activists to stand up stronger to push back and the funding that has come with that has been important.

soviet union obama administration julia mike pompeo
"human rights" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"human rights" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"With me this week to discuss human rights is sarah margaret sarah is the washington director at human rights watch where she serves as the organization's main point of contact with the us government she also revised strategic advocacy guidance sarah was previously the associate director sustainable security and peace building at the center for american progress she has also served as senior foreign policy advisor to senator russ feingold of wisconsin and his staff director the senate formulation subcommittee on african affairs sarah wrote article entitled giving up the high ground america treat on human rights from the march april two thousand eighteen issue of foreign affairs sarah thanks for joining happy to be here thanks for having me let sir where the basic question which is how do you assess president trump's approach to the whole issue of human rights while i have to say it's not not a good assessment we're seeing look administrations past previous administrations have always had to make choices between national security priorities economic interests and human rights we know this and there's sort of a sliding scale of when they factor in having gate but what we're looking at now is something completely different whereby the president and those in the white house and at least previous secretaries of state and others don't seem particularly interested don't understand and are not concerned with not just the us role in the world which is certainly a problem but also the rule of promoting advancing human rights within the international system it seems to have fallen by the wayside except for a few adversaries where my assessment is that human rights are being used in a political way to sort of push other interests or be part of a larger national security concern and that sends a terrible message to other governments in multilateral institutions but also the activists that the us has supported for many.

director advisor wisconsin staff director trump president white house us sarah margaret sarah washington associate director sustainable senator russ feingold america