35 Burst results for "Huma"

"huma" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

04:43 min | 3 weeks ago

"huma" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"And I think that there is a public interest. What when's that going to be? Is that out before you leave or it will take a bit longer, but, you know, I have a strong team that's on this investigation. We have committed to parliament and to the opposition who filed a complaint about this that we will complete that investigation. It's really important that we retain the records of government decision making on government networks. Yes. And I want to get to some of your other areas, especially the ones that may affect women and do affect women a bit more. But just one more which people will remember or may not, that was part of the problem. What's been described as a communication disaster of the NHS digital plan to pull GP data unless people opted out. That was paused..

parliament NHS
"huma" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

02:53 min | 3 weeks ago

"huma" Discussed on The Book Review

"There's <Speech_Male> the killings at <Speech_Female> Kingfisher hill. <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> I would say <Speech_Female> the little face <Speech_Female> is one of my favorite. <Speech_Male> I think her first <Speech_Male> one from 2006. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Kind of <Speech_Female> cruel was <Speech_Female> really good, lasting <Speech_Female> damage. <Speech_Female> So <Speech_Male> she's definitely somebody <Speech_Male> who you want <Speech_Female> to <SpeakerChange> watch what <Speech_Female> she's doing. And <Speech_Female> what about the crispy <Speech_Female> Jillian, which was the <Speech_Male> one that you really loved? <Speech_Female> So the one <Speech_Female> I reviewed, <Speech_Female> God, not that <Speech_Female> long ago. <SpeakerChange> It seems like <Speech_Male> forever was <Speech_Female> called <Speech_Male> the red lotus. <Speech_Female> It was <Speech_Female> a little bit about <Speech_Female> my memory is it's <Speech_Female> about rats <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> using rats <Speech_Female> to weaponize <Silence> some kind of plague <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> really creepy. <Speech_Male> Anything about <Speech_Female> rats and using about rats <Speech_Female> biting me? Anything <Speech_Female> about rats <Speech_Male> carrying <Speech_Male> something worse in <Speech_Female> the Bubonic plague <Speech_Male> because it was manufactured <Speech_Male> in the laboratory <Speech_Male> is pretty <Speech_Female> creepy. <Speech_Female> You know, I think his <Speech_Female> pacing is really good. <Speech_Female> I think he really, his <Speech_Female> plots are great. <Speech_Female> And, <Speech_Female> you know, they hang <Speech_Male> together. They make <Silence> sense even <SpeakerChange> when they're preposterous. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I like that. <Speech_Female> Rats, I'm trying to think <Speech_Female> about what's creepier <Speech_Female> carrying the plague, <Speech_Music_Female> rats or monkeys. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> I think that's the creepiest. <Speech_Male> Flight attendants. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Also, <Speech_Female> in the TV <Speech_Female> show in the HBO <Speech_Female> series, I remember <Speech_Female> her like knocking <Speech_Female> back the <Speech_Male> miniature vodkas <Speech_Male> in the hold <Speech_Male> as she was working as a <Speech_Male> flight attendant. I thought <Silence> that's how do you <Speech_Male> pull that off? <Speech_Female> Like drinking on the <Speech_Female> job and <Speech_Male> you know, <SpeakerChange> being like a <Speech_Male> full blown alcoholic <Speech_Male> the whole time you're working. <Speech_Male> I wonder how <Speech_Male> common that is. I've <Speech_Male> always thought flight attendants <Speech_Male> would make just <Speech_Male> make great <Speech_Male> subjects <Speech_Male> for novels. I mean, <Speech_Male> it's the idea of <Speech_Male> people who <Speech_Male> spend most of their lives <Speech_Male> flying <Speech_Male> across the world, <Speech_Male> but like spend <Speech_Male> most of it actually in <Speech_Male> a steel tube <Speech_Male> and <SpeakerChange> bad <Speech_Female> hotels. <Speech_Female> You know, it's funny <Speech_Female> you should say that because <Speech_Female> after <Speech_Female> reading this book, and he <Speech_Female> does give a lot of <Speech_Female> good flight <Speech_Female> attendant detail. <Speech_Female> I think he definitely <Speech_Female> did his research. <Speech_Female> I had this feeling <Speech_Female> of I <Speech_Female> need to read at least 6 <Speech_Female> other books <Speech_Female> about flight attendants. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> There's just a <Speech_Female> lot to explore <Speech_Female> there. There are <Speech_Male> a couple of thriller <Speech_Female> set on planes that <Speech_Female> came out this fall <Speech_Female> where flight <Speech_Female> attendants were <Speech_Female> figured in them. <Speech_Male> One of them I <Speech_Male> think the pilot <Silence> got some kind of note <Speech_Male> saying, either <Speech_Male> you crash the plane <Speech_Female> or your whole <Speech_Female> family will die. <Speech_Female> And then there <Speech_Female> are some other one. And of <Speech_Female> course, we think about flight <Speech_Female> attendants, <Speech_Female> you know, having to <Speech_Female> deal with things <Speech_Male> on 9 11 <Speech_Female> to bring <SpeakerChange> this to <Speech_Female> a depressing moment. <Speech_Female> I'm going to <Speech_Female> bring it back up, <Speech_Female> which is aligned <Speech_Female> from a David <Speech_Female> sedaris essay <Speech_Female> that <Speech_Female> ends with the <Speech_Female> flight attendant <Speech_Female> going <SpeakerChange> around the <Speech_Female> cabin saying <Speech_Female> your trash, <Speech_Female> your trash, <Speech_Female> your trash, <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> the <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> nice little double meaning <Speech_Music_Female> there. <Speech_Female> Yes. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Yes. All right, <Speech_Female> let's run down the titles <Speech_Female> that we read <Silence> this week, <SpeakerChange> Dave <Speech_Male> starting with you. <Speech_Male> Mine is man <Speech_Male> in the holocene <Speech_Male> by max frisch. <Speech_Female> Mine <Speech_Female> is a wrinkle in time <Speech_Female> by Madeleine <Speech_Female> l'engle <SpeakerChange> read by <Speech_Female> hope Davis.

HBO max frisch Davis
"huma" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

05:14 min | 3 weeks ago

"huma" Discussed on The Book Review

"And the tie in to children is that I read these because I got them for my teenage daughter who is in a thriller phase. And I grabbed a bunch of thrillers from the office and brought them home for her. And now I'm reading her cast off. So she's already read these. And it's funny because when I ask her what they're about, she's like, oh, I don't know, I don't remember. Suu Kyi inherited that for me. I can barely remember what either of these books are about. And I read them within the last month. But they are the flight attendant by Chris bajillion and perfect little children by Sophie Hannah. They're very different, although there's some commonalities. And I remember actually asking you, probably around four or 5 years ago you'd review the book by Sophie Hannah in the times and I was like, oh, I've never read Sophie Hannah and I think I asked you for some advice. And it wasn't this book, because I think this may be her most recent one. And it has a very creepy little thing on the cover that says 12 years have passed. So why don't Thomas and Emily look a day older? I mean, that's the kind of central mystery it's about a woman who goes back to see her ex best Friends house. And sees her ex best friend there, they haven't talked in a number of years. 12 years. And she is sitting in her car outside her the house, the ex best friend and two little children pop out looking exactly like Thomas and Emily, but at the same age they were when the friendship fell apart. And so you are wondering what has happened is this some kind of cloning thing? Is it some crazy secret plot? Is the narrator crazy, which I feel like there's where you have something in common with the other book, the flight attendant. And with almost every other kind of domestic or psychological thriller, your intended to ask, like, is the person telling us this story crazy or am I? Someone must be somehow not getting it. The flight attendant really different book is about Cassandra bowden, who is a flight attendant and an alcoholic. And it sort of is kicked off when she wakes up in a hotel room in Dubai next to someone she's been out with flirting and having fun with and the guy is in her bed dead. I hate it when that happens. I'd just like to interject. To you or just generally in a book. Well, you know, when you have a one night stand and they're dead in the morning. It's really insulting is what it is. It's like, really, was it that? No. Yeah, but I actually love that. You know, that sort of premise, which, of course, is the premise for many a thriller. And I had never read a book by Chris bojan. He's a really good writer. You know, it's commercial, but it's smart, commercial, smart, thriller, stuff, you know, and funny speaking of dostoevsky. I can't remember if just yev in here, but there's a lot of Russian literature, I think there's definitely Tolstoy. There's a kind of intelligence assumed on the part of the reader that I found gratifying. It's definitely not lowest common denominator reading. The Sophie Hannah is.

Sophie Hannah Suu Kyi Chris bajillion Emily Thomas Cassandra bowden Chris bojan Dubai Tolstoy
"huma" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

02:57 min | 3 weeks ago

"huma" Discussed on The Book Review

"I am finally ready for the lockdown novel after almost two years of resisting it. And this one is not pandemic related as it was first published in 1979. But it certainly going to feel familiar, the story is that an aging man is trapped at home in the Swiss Alps as this terrible storm is raging around him. And there are reports of landslides and he's cut off from others. But at first the stakes seem relatively low. He's just kind of hanging out at home building houses out of crackers and reading. It's kind of a collage like novel. It's written in this fragmentary form that is come in vogue in recent years. But at the time, I think was quite unusual. We get inventories, snippets from the encyclopedia about whether and dinosaurs and geology. And at one point, he sets off from his house to try to make it through a mountain pass, but he turns around and then heads back to the house. And we start to learn, we learn a few things that is mind is starting to go and he seems to be prone to blackouts. And that the landslides are a lot closer and a much bigger threat than he thinks. And so we slowly start to realize that his situation is far worse than he seems to understand. And so the suspense slowly starts to build. But this isn't really a suspense novel. It's much more a book about the banal creep of mortality and about life being reduced to facts and gestures and just pure concrete details once our memory start to slip from us. As he's starting to he's reading about ground erosion and mass extinction and glacial melt and we get the sense of the inevitable, the era of humankind, the holocene is going to go of the way of the dinosaurs. This book may be fits all too well, the cliche of the late career novel. It's short, it's formally strange, obsessed with mortality, but I'm finding it no less profound. And it's quite short. So it can be released from lockdown fairly quickly. Well, I love a good book about the banal creep of mortality. That's right. Me too. What are your other top? Topics in that sub sub sub genre. That is a good question about that. You know, so interested in this notion of during a very anxious time the number of people who seem to be taking some kind of pleasure, refuge, solace or whatever in books that to me would increase my anxiety. And I'm really interested in why this appeals to you right now. You know, I felt the same way for two years as I was previewing books that were starting to come out about the pandemic about lockdown books. And I just had this sort of visceral repulsion. I just could not. I just didn't want to read it because I was experiencing it, and I just, you know, it was the last thing I wanted. I wanted to escapism..

Swiss Alps
"huma" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

03:29 min | 3 weeks ago

"huma" Discussed on The Book Review

"Liz Harris joins us now with some news in the publishing world hey list. My Pamela, so there was big news this week that surprised many most people in publishing. Penguin Random House, which is the largest publisher in the United States by far, wants to buy Simon and Schuster, which is another one of the really major publishers. And because of the size of the deal on the market share, the companies would have the Department of Justice has been scrutinizing the deal really carefully. And on Tuesday, they sued to block it. And aside from the implications for publishing, that has really broad implications for how the Biden administration is going to approach antitrust concerns in general. Because for years, antitrust has sort of focused on whether or not a deal would harm consumers, which generally means whether it's going to lead to higher prices. But there's this growing movement among lawmakers and academics that that approach is too narrow. And the government should also look at potential harm to people like competitors, suppliers and workers, which in this case means authors. And specifically, authors of the biggest and bestselling books and the focus of the department of justices argument is that because pain and Random House and Simon and Schuster are often the last two bitters standing for the biggest books, combining the two companies will harm authors. And lower their advances. And they also say they're will eventually be fewer books because of the deal. Payment Random House is playing to fight this and they push back very hard on both of those arguments. First, they say that the rationale for the acquisition is to find savings on the back end and that they have no plans to publish your books, haven't modeled it are going to do it. And in September, they announced that if the two companies were combined, they would still be able to bid against each other when their auctions for book projects, and they'd be able to bid against each other as they do now. They did say that at a certain threshold like well above a $1 million for an advance, there would be some oversight, but it's not clear exactly what that would mean. So there are a lot of people in the industry who are quietly or not quietly celebrating this move. But one group that's pretty nervous about it are many of the authors and staff at Simon and Schuster. Because that company is for sale, no matter what. It's owned by Viacom CBS, which put it up for sale last year. And if PH doesn't buy it, somebody else will..

Liz Harris Penguin Random House Biden administration Simon department of justices Schuster Pamela Department of Justice Random House United States Viacom CBS
"huma" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

03:16 min | 3 weeks ago

"huma" Discussed on The Book Review

"Now, the sort of update if you will is that at least half of these characters if not more are either immigrants or children of immigrants, they're either the 1.5 generation. In other words, they came to America at an early age, the way I came when I was 7, or thereabouts. You've obviously got this kind of vanya on the Hudson thing going on. And it's fun. If you know that area to be like, well, there's a little bit of tivoli. There's Kingston and there's a little Red Hook here and some Hudson. Yes, yes, yes. We've got the Main Street of Hudson the food of Hudson. Yes. Yeah, yeah, and I have to say, I mean, you know, there's so much food and wine in this book. And there's so many great recipes that my Friends have bequeathed to me over the course of this pandemic. The alone is worth the price of admission. I mean, there's, you know, there's a big wineglass on the cover and I think that really sets the mood because I think food and wine kept me sane during this ridiculous time. You know, I miss people so much. I didn't know I had this kind of nostalgia or loneliness bone within me, but it was true. I just constantly kept thinking of what it would be like to populate my house with everybody I was missing. You know, so this really became kind of my sourdough became a kind of repopulation project in my own house. And you start actually with shopping with food shopping and wine shopping. And I'm saying you, meaning you the author. But you also, you know, you've sort of turned yourself a little teeny bit into a kind of anti hero, like obviously. Was that fun? Was that therapeutic? Yeah. Was that fun? That was fun. I mean, they last project was a huge step away from autobiographical fiction because it was about this sort of hedge fund schmuck. And although my psychiatrist was like, yeah, you know, there's still a little bit of that schmuck in me too..

Hudson Kingston America
"huma" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

04:15 min | 3 weeks ago

"huma" Discussed on The Book Review

"By I'm not going to say who, but people saying, oh, this is very convenient that all of a sudden she's remembering these things. And as I'm hearing, as I'm literally hearing a commentator saying, oh, Christine blasey Ford. How come she didn't remember this ten years ago? And now she remembers it. That's when I remembered it. Well, it doesn't just happen in politics too, right? And that's my point is I think this is a universal and now we live in a time. When I can share my story and share my truth, and that's okay, and that's accepted. And not only that, I think it's important to do. And you know, I did share the story in real time with one or two friends. And so I kind of approached this more as a, and you know, I'm being careful for a very specific reason and that is because I know there are women and men in this country and around the world who have endured excruciating trauma who have had either years of it or just horrible experiences that either they've taken a long time to recover from, or they've never recovered from. And I don't want to equate my experience with these really important stories. And I think the one if I have to look at positive things that have come out of Hillary losing in 2016, one of them is this important movement is women standing up and speaking out for themselves and owning their own truth. And this was my small participation in that space. And so I shared the story. Another thing that strikes me about that story, in addition to the apology, which again, I will say, you are not alone in that behavior. It's obviously a learned behavior. But the other thing is you describe at that moment that you go into what you called problem solving mode. This mode of reacting where I'm going to fix this, I'm going to make it better, whether it's something to do with your job working with Hillary Clinton or something in your marriage. Is that a common theme? I think it is a very common theme. And I think this is something inculcated in me, not consciously, but now that I've actually been through therapy, I think I can acknowledge it. I think it's something I learned from my mother. You know, my father was terminally ill, but my mother, she made everything happen. She fixed everything. And I write all the chapters about her from my earliest memory, kind of reflect that. You know, if I needed a new outfit she so did, if I need a brownies for whatever, the bake sale, she made it. If we had to book tickets, she did it. You know, when my dad needed his transplant, she's the one who wrote the letter to say, look, we're going to get a transplant. We're not going to just be on dialysis and sort of just live in this end of life care. My mom was the Uber problem solver..

Christine blasey Ford Hillary Hillary Clinton
"huma" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

04:24 min | 3 weeks ago

"huma" Discussed on The Book Review

"I'm that physically affected. And I don't feel nervous. I'm proud of the story. I feel like for so long the headline around my name has been what is wrong with her and what is she thinking? What did you want people to know? Well, number one, I wanted people to know what it's like to be an American Muslim. I think the average American does not know what sort of the basis, the basic principles, the creed, my faith, stands for. I think that it is the reason why I write in detail about witnessing starting in the Clinton administration and then beyond all of the ways in which my faith was turned into a convenient boogeyman for certain forces in this country and turn it into a negative light and the negative effect it's had on the Muslim community. So that was actually very important to me. I mean, throughout the book, I talk about my faith and what it means and what it stands for. And I think a lot of friends who practice other faiths read it and say, oh my God, I didn't realize that Moses was your prophet or you believe in Jesus or all of these connections because ultimately, as I write in that chapter, my college chapter, I spend so much of my young adult life trying to make connections with other people. Other races, other cultures, other languages. It's something that really fascinates me. So that was one. And then, you know, I suspect you were referring to my marriage. Now that I am on the other side, I can say with confidence, I don't think what I went through is all that singular. I'm sorry to say, I think what's different is that I had to go through it on the front page of the news. And so I know there is a sisterhood and brotherhood of people out there in the world that have had to endure betrayal and have had to figure out how to move on with their lives. And these are the conversations that I still am called into the people who stop me on the street and ask me a simple question. When does it stop hurting? Should I stay, when do I leave? Thank you. You know, even this, even what I had to endure is making a connection with people out there in the world. And so if my story and talking through how I got to the other side, might help somebody or maybe you take something for the story. Maybe you relate to something in the story. I think that might be a small service..

Clinton administration Moses
"huma" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

04:47 min | 3 weeks ago

"huma" Discussed on The Book Review

"Huma Aberdeen joins us now from New York. She is the author of a memoir called both and huma. Thanks so much for being here. Thanks so much for having me. I'm so excited to be on your show. I should have said both slash and let's start with that title because it's not the obvious memoir title. What does that mean to you? Well, we went through a series my editor and I went through a series of options for the title. And I have to say, after going through what I had been told, at least at the time, a series of single word titles, which seemed to be the thing, at least for memoirs. None of them felt right. I had a couple that I loved that she hated. And then all of a sudden, this phrase just came into our conversation. And it just felt right, the minute I've been trying to think about how to talk about this book because there are so many different themes, but it felt the most right. It felt the most me. It's sort of holding more than two ideas in your head at the same time. Well, the idea that you can be both and it felt particularly more poignant, more powerful at a time when I think we are living in an increasingly either or world. And that is not how I was raised. My parents, both, my father came from India, my mother from Pakistan. They were immigrants to this country. They believed in this idea and this ideal of America. They gave up their families, their lives in pursuit of education, met, fell in love, got married. I carried my American identity with great bride as I write in the book, but they were always very particular about ensuring that we were exposed to different cultures and languages and faiths and people. And so we had the great privilege that were professors and we at the great privilege of spending every summer exploring a different part of the world and he gave me a real appreciation for other worlds. And so as an adult, I feel like I can be in both end worlds and be comfortable. I can be an American patriot and a Muslim. I can be Indian and Pakistani. I mean, a lot of these themes are in the book. And I'm comfortable in all of these spaces. Did you find writing the book, therapeutic? Oh my gosh, Pamela, it was the most therapeutic thing I could have possibly done. You know, as I write in the book, my father, when I was a little girl, you know, I opened the book, introducing this notion that I grew up surrounded by stories and my father and mother just filled our home with books and newspapers and whether it was oral histories or written stories that I was absorbing ever since I was a little girl. And I used to love to write and my father had great confidence in my writing..

Huma Aberdeen New York Pakistan India America Pamela
"huma" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

Skimm'd from The Couch

05:13 min | 3 weeks ago

"huma" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

"They kind of tossed you in the deep end, and they would see how you would handle it, like the story I tell about losing Hillary's clothes in the east river because I didn't know that when a president of the United States traveled it meant for helicopters and not one, and I am on the staff helicopter that lands. And as it takes off, the prop wash from the rotors lift her suit which she's supposed to wear for a speech the next morning. And Marie one is landing. The suit is floating in the east river away. Oh my God. I run inside and this man comes with a broom, and we didn't tell her that story for yours. I figured out how to get it dry clean. But it was all of these kind of like you either sank or you swim, and I was always determined to no matter what. I knew what the mission was, and I was going to get the job done. So I didn't lack that confidence. It was the public speaking. I mean, honestly, Danielle, I am doing right now with you, the thing that scares me the most. You've been through so many positions in your private life that have forced you into that spotlight. That ultimately got you here today talking about these things. How do you feel now when you talk about insecurity and fear of public speaking? Frankly, for most of my life, I was the invisible or secondary person to anybody else, whether it was my larger than life parents. I would walk around the streets of Saudi Arabia and people stop and say your mom's amazing, your dad's amazing. So I from an early age knew I was with people of great character and respect and then I go straight into The White House. And obviously, in the Clinton world, I was the invisible behind the scenes person, which is how it should be. And frankly, I liked that..

east river Hillary Marie United States Danielle Saudi Arabia White House Clinton
"huma" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:20 min | 3 weeks ago

"huma" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

"I was so scared of putting my voice out in the world. And before I would go to events, the 2016 campaign, I would be nauseous. I could barely function. I had two choices. Walk away, stay in my shell or do the thing that scared me the most. I'm Carly Zac and I'm Danielle weissberg. Welcome to 9 to 5 ish with the skin. We've run into so many questions over the years and had so many moments where we needed advice and we got it from women who'd been there. And that's what we're bringing you at this show. Each week we're helping you get what you want out of your career by talking to the smartest leaders we know. Because we know your work life is a lot more than 9 to 5. All right, let's get into it. Hey everyone, it's Danielle. Today, our guest is Houma Aberdeen. She started as an intern at The White House when Hillary Clinton was First Lady and has stayed close to Hillary ever since. She was an aide and personal adviser, deputy chief of staff at the State Department and a crucial figure in Hillary's 2016 presidential campaign. Whom I is also known for her personal life, including her previous marriage to former congressman, Anthony Weiner, and huma is now telling her own story in her own words. Her memoir, both and a life in many worlds is out on November 2nd. Puma, thank you for joining me. Danielle, as I think you know, I'm a huge fan of both you and Carly. So I'm thrilled and honored to be on your show. This had to be like a tough book to write for a lot of reasons. And just as someone who has seen you in various roles at various points, congratulations for getting it out there. So I want to tell you actually this book was great therapy. I mean, there were definitely moments that I was wandering around the sidewalk outside my building saying, what did I do? Why am I doing this? But everything I went through, it took processing. So I'm so excited to be sharing this book with the world. Okay, lightning round. Quick questions, quick answers. Here we go. First job on your resume. Working in my dad's office, office assistant. Most recent job on your resume. I haven't had to do a resume in 25 years. So chief of staff, Hillary Clinton. I think actually author is the most recent. You know what? I'm switching it. I'm updating my resume right after we hang up author..

Carly Zac Danielle weissberg Houma Aberdeen Anthony Weiner Danielle Hillary Hillary Clinton huma State Department White House Puma Carly
"huma" Discussed on Vogue Podcast

Vogue Podcast

06:12 min | Last month

"huma" Discussed on Vogue Podcast

"I think it's important for me to do my work, I said, blowing my nose. I think it would be good for you to go too, she said. I walked into her private restroom and looked at myself in the mirror. My eyes were puffy and red. I splashed cold water over my face, blotted it gently with a hand towel, and took a deep breath. Then I returned to work. That night we boarded the Secretary of State's aircraft, and hours later, when we were crossing from Europe to the Middle East, Lu lucan's mentioned we would have to switch planes in the next few days, which happened from time to time. He had already placed the request through state, but asked if I would call The White House for approval to make sure we weren't stranded on one of the Africa stops. I picked up the phone by my seat and called the State Department operations center to be connected to White House deputy chief of staff Alyssa master Monaco. I asked whether she had received a request for the plain, and she assured me she had. Then there was a moment of silence. Everyone here is thinking of you, she said. Then she added that the president had wanted to reach out. She hadn't known what to suggest. A phone call or perhaps a note? A phone call with the president of the United States to talk about my personal humiliation? It was more than I could bear. Please just tell him I am so sorry for embarrassing the administration. I hung up and stared out into the blackness through the window. Who was this man who sent the tweet? I did not know that Anthony. The Anthony I knew was so many things, but not that. I was snapped out of my days when HRC appeared from her cabin to join Philippe Jake and me at the table that anchored or Quartet of seats. It was only a few minutes into this briefing that I realized that I had tears rolling down my cheeks again. I hoped no one would say anything. The one thing that was worse than what I was feeling was the idea that people would take pity on me. Everyone acted as though nothing was amiss. A few hours later, before we landed in the Emirates, Philippe looked up from across the table. It's out, he said. On June 8th, that 5 11 p.m., eastern standard time, a day after Philippe's warning call, The New York Times followed almost immediately by several other media outlets announced I was pregnant. Sheryl Jake lona and Philippe had all given me big hugs congratulating me when I walked into work the previous day. They chose to focus on the happy news as I'd expected they would. But most of the dozens of people on this large airplane had not known until they got breaking news alerts on their laptops that the woman a few seats away from them was pregnant. Under any normal circumstances, it shouldn't have been national news. It wouldn't have been national news, but it was now. It was close to midnight when we arrived at Emirates palace hotel in Abu Dhabi and operationally it was business as usual. Except I was no longer anyone usual. I was now the thing in the room that everyone avoided talking about. HRC had a meeting at our hotel the next morning with The Crown prince Muhammad bin Zayed, or MBZ as many of us called him. He would be accompanied by his ambassador to the United States, Yusuf alator, a longtime good friend of mine. The cameras had already assembled to capture their greeting with HRC. I half wondered if I should join her, or if I should avoid being a distraction, but no one told me not to do my job, so I just kept doing it, though I hung back a little as we filed into the room. HRC easily could have avoided the official introductions of her team, but she beckoned me forward and made a point to introduce me. At a moment when any other politician might have disappeared her embarrassing staffer, HRC signaled to the entire world that she wasn't ashamed of me. Then yussuf gave me a reassuring hug. His wife, abir, had just had a baby, and we had marveled about their experience as new parents when I'd had dinner at their house recently. He smiled, said congratulations and whispered, you okay? That night yussef organized an informal dinner for a few of us at the hotel. I had just begun to eat when I got a message that Cheryl wanted me in HRC's room. When I arrived in her suite, HRC and Sheryl told me I should go to my own room, that there were some people waiting to see me. I assumed this would be about some kind of crisis awaiting us at our next stop. But usually I was the one informing her not the other way around. My room was big and comfortable, with high ceilings, plus carpeting, a neutral toned bedspread and curtains. As I entered, I saw a large coffee table, laid out with an elaborate tray of fresh fruit, dates, and chocolates, and beyond that, on a low L shaped sofa in the sitting area, was my mother. My brother Hassan paced near by. How did you know to come here? I blurted out. Hillary, my mom said, and I didn't need to know anything more. I hugged them both tight, and my mother, my brother and I sat together, holding one.

HRC Lu lucan State Department operations ce Alyssa master Monaco Philippe Philippe Jake White House Sheryl Jake lona Anthony Emirates palace hotel Crown prince Muhammad bin Zaye Yusuf alator Middle East United States Europe Africa Emirates yussuf abir The New York Times
"huma" Discussed on Vogue Podcast

Vogue Podcast

06:56 min | Last month

"huma" Discussed on Vogue Podcast

"What I want back is what I was. Sylvia Plath. When I awoke in Buckingham Palace, it was as if I were still in a dream. I turned my head to the tall, narrow windows, where sunlight was just beginning to peek through the gray clouds. I had drawn open the heavy drapes the night before, so that I would rise with the first light and see the view of the Queen Victoria memorial and gardens. At the palace gates, the queen scars stood erect in their red and black uniforms. The balcony were the queen stood annually to inspect the trooping of the color parade, and where Prince William and Kate Middleton had waived to fans on their wedding day three weeks earlier was just down the hall from the bedroom where I lay. It was early, but the fatigue I had been experiencing over the last few weeks felt like a distant memory. I pulled the sheets down to stare at my belly. My long fitted gown for the evening's white tie dinner hung on the bathroom door, and I hoped I would be able to get the zipper all the way up. At the foot of the bed was an elegant chestnut brown writing desk. Where I had left the briefing book I had started reading the night before. On top of that was the Secretary of State's private schedule, which noted the evening's dinner, hosted by Queen Elizabeth, in honor of president Obama's state visit to the United Kingdom. Among the many staff members on this trip, I was one of the fortunate few invited to stay at the palace and attend the dinner. Courtesy of The White House. Next to my formal invitation to the dinner was a stack of pale blue palace stationary. I climbed out of bed, wearing one of the delicate white nightgowns I had been given at my bridal shower, impractical until this trip, and I sat down at the desk to begin my day. When I had caught up on emails, I pulled out a single piece of stationary, and wrote a letter to my husband. Dear Anthony, is it possible for any two people to be happier or more blessed? Some days I can not believe it. We must remember to be grateful to God, that he has given us so much. I love you. Huma, wiener. May 24th, 2011. I hadn't legally taken Anthony's name when we were married, and never used it, except for this one single time. He had never asked me if I wanted to or would, and since in both Islamic and Middle Eastern custom, a woman retains her maiden name when she marries, the question had never occurred to me until we were applying for our marriage license, and the official asked if I plan to take my husband to be his name. I declined without even considering it. In this moment, though, I felt more connected to Anthony than ever before. I place the note in the matching envelope, got dressed and went into the adjoining sitting room, that connected our two bedrooms to meet up with my boss, who was seated in a wing back chair, reading some papers as the palace staff wheeled in scrambled eggs and properly brewed tea. For a moment, I thought I would tell her. But I stop myself. It was too early to share the news. I first got my period when I was 11, and in a panic ran to my father for help. He calmed me down, patiently explaining that it was a natural process in a woman's body. He then gently passed me off to my mother to show me how to use what he referred to as the necessary napkins. From that day on, I have been down to the day regular. So, when four weeks earlier, I had to struggle to zip up my skirt, feeling bloated, but not menstruating, I knew. I didn't share my suspicion with Anthony, but stopped at a pharmacy to pick up two pregnancy tests. Both of which almost instantly developed a faint pink line. I handed Anthony an old black jewelry box with one of the sticks in it. And he looked down at the box, then at me, thunderstruck. What is this? And then are you sure? As he lowered himself onto our white sofa in Washington, his eyes instantly beginning to water. Anthony, never at a loss for words, was, for a brief moment, speechless. He kept staring at the stick, then at me, stuttering. I can't believe it. As the news began to sink in, he went right back to being himself. Are you okay? How do you feel? Have you been sick? How long have you known, what can I do? Oh my God, I can't wait. I'm gonna be a father. We're going to be parents. Are you craving anything? No, I wasn't craving anything in particular, and I felt fine. Those were the cursory answers to his questions. On a deeper level, I was uncertain about what this meant for my life. I had gone from dating a man, my first serious relationship, to engagement, to marriage, and now to pregnancy in the blink of an eye. Whenever I visited friends and family who had small kids, I was comfortable holding, playing with, feeding, and babysitting them. But I was always happy to return them to their parents at the end of the day. I also couldn't register how quickly I had gotten pregnant. Since I had been so often warned about the challenges, especially since Anthony and I were old to be new parents. I was 35 and Anthony was 46. Some part of my mixed emotions was sheer disbelief. But the obstetrician later pointed out that I was healthy, had no family history of difficult pregnancies wasn't a smoker, didn't consume alcohol. She was not at all surprised that it was so easy for me to conceive. I could finally allow for the possibility that God really was granting us this gift. Walking out of the doctor's office that afternoon, reassured that all was and would be okay, I was so excited that it seemed almost impossible to contain this new.

Anthony Queen Victoria memorial palace gates Sylvia Plath Buckingham Palace Kate Middleton Prince William Huma Queen Elizabeth wiener United Kingdom White House Obama Washington
"huma" Discussed on Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

04:30 min | 2 months ago

"huma" Discussed on Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

"The i don't like i see. That's a really tough question. Because i really can't sit. I think there's a space for every trope. Now as i say not cliche not things overseas turning the other way becoming offensive or whatever. But i think there's a space for every trip especially in fact in dystopia when it's dark storyline you'll maybe following along people died. We're talking usually about some sort of prejudice happening in mind prejudice against the undying these people that live for a long time. I think sometimes you need to either break up was something like huma or sometimes just a nice soft moment. You love triangle comes in you. Fake dating your somebody. At god's running towards you see you have kids in the corridor and took behind the corner. Everybody loves that trump. And i think it gives a little bit as well of a of a break from that ready hauled cool story..

huma
Hong Kong Teachers Union Decides to Shut Down

The Economist: The Intelligence

02:01 min | 3 months ago

Hong Kong Teachers Union Decides to Shut Down

"The security law imposed in hong kong last summer has been the force behind change. After troubling change in the city in nebulous turns. The law says police can arrest people for any conduct. That seriously endangers national security i. They came for the protesters and activists who ground hong kong to a halt in two thousand nineteen. Then they came for the media outlets such as the pro-democracy newspaper apple daily and its outspoken owner. Jimmy lai now. It seems the authorities have their sights set on the city's storied organized labor outfits a few weeks ago chinese state media called the city's largest teacher's union a poisonous huma that had to be eliminated and hours later. We sold the hong kong education bureau. Say it would no longer recognize the union of around one hundred thousand members or about eighty percent of the city's teaches swollen wong as a china correspondent for the economist. So then the union tried to mollify the government it cut ties with several pro democracy organizations in hong kong as well as education international which is a global group of teachers unions it also announced it would form and you working group to try to promote chinese history and culture among teachers and students but despite these compromises the union still declared it was disbanding on august tenth and it sounds as if that's not the only union that's been targeted no in july we saw five liters of speech therapists union also arrested so they had published three allegorical picture books for children about sheep protecting the village from wolves and the police accused them of writing stories that incited hatred of the government on top of this over the past euro. So we've seen three of the city's top trade union leaders arrested and that really has been deeply chilling to the labor movement. More broadly this is all part of a broader crushing of civil society in hong kong.

Hong Kong Jimmy Lai Hong Kong Education Bureau Wong Apple China
Why Every Leader Fails Without Community with Dr. Darren Whitehead

The EntreLeadership Podcast

02:13 min | 6 months ago

Why Every Leader Fails Without Community with Dr. Darren Whitehead

"We were made to be around one another This something about the full embodiment of being with one another. That is the way that god is actually designed us. You know when you're physically with someone. There are terabytes of information that is going between brain to brain and it's spacial communication and it is the the things that you sense emotions and you you just have like the so much of communication is nonverbal so when when we are in the presence of one another that is the maximum level of communication flow when you reduce it to screen and you say you face timing now. You're looking at megabytes of information that is going by you. Don't have that same spatial. Understanding is you have when you're in the presence of someone within if you then reduce it to a phone conversation now you just hearing you not seeing and so you're not actually even getting to to what someone's facial expressions you know what i would to discern what they actually meant by something because he just hearing the audio within when you reduce it to say an email you just talking about bites of inflammation and you having a difficult time disowning you know. What did they mean by that. Well then you get even less than that and you start looking at a couple of characters on a text message you say we were made to be able to discern one another's presence and communication by being in the presence of one another and we've been essentially stabbed of that for the last year. So i think people are lonely. I think people are missing reference group in other words than the missing. What natural relationships do when you with one another as you kind of your reading people's response on how they receiving you and that in many ways coat-tails things that you say or things that you say. You're you're working on huma. All of that kind of natural interaction. Motion shared experiences happens in the presence of other people You don't get on zoom. You don't get that on a phone call. You don't get that on email to the degree that you when we are in embodied space with one another

Dr. Marty Makary and Other Sciences Suggest Natural Immunity Is Lifelong

The Dan Bongino Show

01:07 min | 6 months ago

Dr. Marty Makary and Other Sciences Suggest Natural Immunity Is Lifelong

"Check this out. Wall Street Journal Story by Marty Macari Who's terrific. He's a colleague at Fox. Talking about this new Wall Street Journal Op Ed, he wrote. I'm talking about it called the power of natural immunity. Told by the media and their fear mongering campaigns to Should get vaccinated right away. You have you had the coronavirus. We've been told that because you got to keep people scared all the time. Well, do you? Well, that sounds like a personal decision to me because it's Marty, who is a medical professional. Unlike the people in the media writes in his piece, Natural immunity is adorable. Researchers from Washington University in ST Louis reported last month at 11. Months after a mild infection, immune cells were still capable of producing protective anybody's the author, the authors concluded. Prior Covid infection induces quote a robust and log lived long lived. Huma rel immune response, leading some scientists who suggest that natural immunity is probably lifelong. Cause infection began months earlier than vaccination. We have more follow up data on the duration of natural immunity than unvaccinated immunity. Where are you hearing about that? You're hearing about that anywhere else, Fellas, ladies, anyone? Who's Jimmy here about that? Didn't hear about that. That's kind of been. Yeah, Yeah. I didn't hear about

Marty Macari New Wall Street Journal Op Ed Wall Street Journal Huma Rel FOX Marty Washington University St Louis Jimmy
How to Use Humor to Boost Your Marketing Campaign

Accelerate Your Business Growth

02:07 min | 6 months ago

How to Use Humor to Boost Your Marketing Campaign

"Loves a good story. We were a toddler. Our parents knee having them read a story all going to a movie in and being told a great story that is just a coal fundamental human motivation that when we see a good story we are week we'll attracted to it One of my personal. Inspirations has always been picked saw and they then mantra is. It's all about. The story story is king. And so you know just being funny for the sake of being funny. Isn't that useful in a business sense unless it's connected to a story that's going to drive action. That's obviously what else selfish market has one. But the coming back to your question why why is huma so effective. Well it just. There's so many reasons why huma has been so much more effective for us as you mentioned in the intro. I started this agency twenty years ago. Doing what i now call boring. Appetizing the direct response. Tell him the features. Tell them the benefit shovel coal to action down the throat and ask for their money and you know there's still a place for that. I guess but nothing in the fifteen years that we did those kinds of ads Obviously television is a whole nother. Animal the online online the biggest video we ever had got one hundred thousand views when we switched to huma a first campaign between three videos. Got seven million views. Online goodness phosphor. Today we literally just don't launch the campaign yesterday that was the third video in in a campaign. The first two videos a close to seventy million views seven zero. So you tell me which would you rather have the the results from the boring or the results from the

Huma
The mystery of the flute boy bones

Science Friction

01:41 min | 8 months ago

The mystery of the flute boy bones

"Was originally on display beautiful in the center of the room. When my office is. I remember just being immediately really captivated by what is the story with that skeleton. It was just incredibly irreverend yet. Really surprising to say something with so much huma and whimsical and kind of goes against the grain of what we think about medicine today. I encountered the skeleton as a medical student. Now assisting over sort. Of course it's got to be real big suspicious. It's a fake scott. What otherwise look like a normal foot likely but it is unlikely ending credible story. You're about to hear from a collection that the public can't say it's tucked inside the harry. Brookes allen museum of anatomy used to take generations of medical students at the university of melbourne including this guy at the entrance to that museum. There are a few specimens skeletons and one in particular. Was this little boy sitting on a pedestal with this one leg so in his quite unusual looking arms and hands he's has a flute recorder just held up to his mouth. My name is dr. Chris o'donnell and just has patients who are alive and dead. So i spend about half my time doing radiology of the living butts. My job is as a rail. Just or as. I call myself a nick radiologist looking at right all of the safest at the victorian shooter forensic medicine

Brookes Allen Museum Of Anatom University Of Melbourne Chris O'donnell
Human Factors on the other side of the world

1202 - The Human Factors Podcast

04:55 min | 9 months ago

Human Factors on the other side of the world

"And welcome to this episode of twelve to human factors podcast. I'm nothing slightly. Because i've been playing around with the new gadget and actually be playing the intro before the start of a recording session where normally i'm cutting afterwards This focused is a bit special for me. Because actually it's going to be the third we've ever had a guest and it's a gentleman who used to work with in early career. It's actually real delight to be able to catch up with somebody. So i want you all to cowbridge. Welcome cal thank you now to say yes. It's it's been. It has been way too long. Tallies the director of age of x which is a human factors consultancy based out in new zealand. And that's where he's talking to his Today he's a A member of the human factors ergonomics society of new zealand ways. Also been past president and he's also a fellow of the charge into economic and human factors here in the uk. So thank you very much for making time to chat today. It's absolutely fantastic. It's it's early in the morning for you at the moment. is that right. Nine o'clock nine. That's still in the morning. Yes relaxing get at least it took about organizations. Look at niebuhr tried to work out exactly where we were in the county. I actually had to do maths. Partido my strongest point and the year as well yes. He does not harmful. It's absolute fantastic to catch up so the audience. Could you just give a quick rundown on. What is he doing now. So what you enroll in What do you get up to okay So as far as already said i run a company called hatchbacks limited and saturday with huma practice consultancy. that's based oakland and the Consultants dotted elaborate country. Also complete news in australia and the a lot of the work. A lot of the work that we are doing at the moment is is. i suppose. It's focused if you can imagine a general project lock saad Very much focused on suppose the more often than not test inside of things so So usually we get cold into either test new technology. That's already been deployed which is not ideal obviously o'reilly We may well begin. Possibility and more requirements are suppose requirements looking at gaps analysis. You Kicking off a project. That's g that's generally the the bulk of the The area where we are that being said in congress too much detail by working such project to the where we have been involved victims from taiwan and To some rapid prototype in some testing on in the process now of of just kicking off the final aspect may trial at the new technology. Selectiveness generally what it can be quite varied quite a rarity. Isn't it to pick up the product right from the beginning of which we preach and evangelize about human factors should be throughout. It is still much more rare than than i would like. Yeah yeah so. Before we get into the project you get into all that type of thing we are talking through still through the pandemic. It's still kicking around but also new zealand is being you've done within a very different way too. Many of the other countries you personally you clearly have done. All the countries are you've dealt with it very differently. How you found working through. Code fatty extremely hard. And i don't thing that many of us human factors people using that have an easy ride from its own. I can't speak for everybody personally. And what i found was a lot of projects guts canceled Projects got delayed And that was not necessarily affecting too badly because they had naturally stocked. it's out in some cases. Been an opportunity that was in the pipeline over native really. Was the name on the dotted line in that nine. Never came Really for me. I don't tend to think that we've got work until that names on the doc- lab because of the years that you can think that you've got something and then right at the eleventh hour. Somebody changes the martin. Some corporate decisions might control

Human Factors Ergonomics Socie Huma Practice Consultancy Niebuhr New Zealand Oakland Reilly UK Australia Taiwan Congress Martin
Upgrading a Software Product with Machine Learning - with Dr. Pavel Dmitriev

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

06:24 min | 1 year ago

Upgrading a Software Product with Machine Learning - with Dr. Pavel Dmitriev

"So pablo glad to be able to have you on the program. We had nanny your ceo on not that long ago. And you're the data science guy here. So i want to really open up with you. I say outreach billion dollar company growing very fast fast platform now it's about taking it to the next level with what are really those opportunities in upsides of taking up popular sass product and layering. Ai why is it worth this. Additional effort of of baking a into the mix. Yeah thanks them credit to be here. Yeah it's very interesting. I feel like At outage the moment To build a in a. And i think as you mentioned it does not start as a companion by that's moments Started building a. yeah. I was actually very good. Good moment to start when we already have had a pretty good user base. Yes yes and very active. Here's our base is very important. Bidding this one aspects of companies. We can collect a lot of raw data from those users and head into All a good amount of data available is kind of a requisite for being able to building a into the product and Heads it if it is already had a good number of customers allege amount of data and actually a lot of insights into the problems of those customers more so at the point where the solutions kind of needed to be developed as unjust not just five on customer but but for many customers. That's that's a very good moment or staff to bringing bringing in anything said that opportunities. That is a clear that ability to solve some of the some of those problems customers ahead him at scale. So i think that's gonna ring true for a lot of the audience. I think people will understand like okay. We're gonna use to solve important problems or pursue important opportunities. Obviously some of that you've been able to do just with the assassin platform itself. You know the company itself. Oh well you know here. We have a problem. Okay build a feature. Push this button and it's going to send an email okay. That's that's a feature. He know he didn't need for that. But then there's other kinds of problems where maybe we do need i. Maybe we we. We do need to leverage like you said the data of all these users we have. Do you think about that. There's some there's some problems where there's no reason to use. Ai would be overly complicated. And then there's others where we do need it for you you know. Why is it important to to go after the i. Opportunities there instead of just the additional sas features. You know what what is the. What's big upside here. Yeah yeah look. At the outage three phases. The kind of the evolution of product and filler step is a step before outage before sales engagement products appears self process was very disorganized. It was kind of like what you're seeing. The contacts ends are good. Luck gone closet and it's ready to Plan and farkas kinda process. It's very hard to understand. Buds is a swedish propagates station. So that's spenders asians. That is very important. A dozen telling me the i. And that's what outreach at standardized the sales process secure but then the next stamp is optimization. The way i think about it is that off. You take a tender outage products and then you take your sales process you would. Outrage is great gun around a lot faster however you spend the bad sales processing place. Now you have a bad sales prosperous minor really fast as opposed that is still By the values bedding might shed. He'd use so helga now customers. The ability of the sales process is is. The next step is the look at what is happening. In aggregate in the government hewlett huma even Across all of our customers and tried to use a to come up with this broad acts of communications on the types of fish which start improving the efficiency of the sales process for example if companies especially those companies who did not have an automated kind of as sales and you kind of sales still in the past sales process tends to be very shells To project prostate the few times small number of times but we know from best practice is that eggshell intakes of seven fifteen or even in some areas. Maybe after source you digest extra Prospects so those kind of best practices can be just baked into the product That can be used to discover those kinds of insights so that the second stab the sword step once wednesday were able to optimize the process. A little bit than the step is personalization because even though we can have as sales process which is on average of optimal on average is good in evidence. Specific situation forever sales. You might even for evidence sell them. They can extra little better than average. If you can tailor what is suggested commends Unique skill since disaster unique situation. So that personas asian aspect is bad guy is really an affront and said that he cannot do it without a because the volume of of people themes and update is too high to be able to manually

Pablo Farkas Helga Hewlett
bUnit: A Blazor Testing Library With Egil Hansen

The 6 Figure Developer Podcast

06:06 min | 1 year ago

bUnit: A Blazor Testing Library With Egil Hansen

"What are you working on these days. So kate mentioned i'm a principal developer fall for delegation. And we're working primarily with asia dot net. So that's that's really nice like a to really really out on on on the latest technology around that In my free time. I spent quite a lot of time on be units Which started about one and a half years ago which is a place of testing framework. Well according to my wife. Lisa spend too much time on that but that's also very fun. It's like it's have your own baby and you can. You don't have customers in such as that required to deliver in a certain schedule timeframe not accurately so so i get sort of really really go deep and play and experiment on and get something right. At least i hope so. So you started on. The unit before blazer was even jessica even server side. I'm trying to think back. I started units back in february or march in two thousand nineteen. It wasn't called that it was. I had a very microsoft product name back then. It was called the race testing framework or something long. Did i buried descriptive name. But it wasn't there. Google friendly because it. Yeah all all the in that. Just rent a belgian generals from keywords. But i i watched one of steve sanderson's presentation someplace and got bit excited. I like most people did around that time. And then i started playing around with trading just creating a component library. Just trying it out. And see what i could and couldn't do with and being a big fan of tipton development. They're kind of like. I'm not smart enough not to write test for my court because it'll break very fast if i start. Factoring are miss something. So i realized there wasn't anything available to test your quote with place at that time so i sort of build something. That wasn't really you know ready for primetime at all and it works But it had a few issues Then around september last year. I believe steve came out with this chatting prototype. And and that's all. I sorta inc what he had their into into what became be unit and edits so he had an all things where he was able to sort of get x to the component testing and be smart about how to get the mark of the component. And that sort of basically made what i had. Something i quit. You know reasonably go out and see where you can actually use this and and from there. It's it's it's not a getting some attention and community started building around that and people started using using it for real so it's been exciting but it's it's fun challenge to sort of be be part of something like that and suddenly have people depending on you delivering a something of a reasonable quality. Okay so you. So you just mentioned that you can after borrowing some code from st sanderson and mixing that with the giardi had you can Test the markup is generated from a component. How do you set that up. How do you actually get it to where you can use the component in the test. That's a really good question. So the first thing. I try begging way back whilst just to see if i if i knew my component and try to chest institute like you would in a regular unit test. That doesn't really work. You quickly realize because the news doesn't actually know how to produce output like stephen and the team. There have made a really good decision about having teens. Raisins of concerns between what a component is and what the fingers that renders the component and. So what you need to be able to actually verify. All lanes baked the mockup that a component producers that you need something that can take the component you want to and render it and then hand you back what else created and this is sort of what what bid unit encapsulates in in the context that you can ask to rent a component and you can pass it parameters and what you get. Back is an abstraction. I called arinda component. That object contains the instance off the component. You asked to be rented but it also contains the role model that the component producers but inside of that we use angle shop which is a shout based library with html and it's actually Competing of huma five spec so i passed role model. We get from from from from from from basically the data shaver runtime which i'm using in the vagrant bucs twinkle shop and then it passes of that and then we have Just the same guys. We have in the browser to query the generated which has represented in estan notes shop. So you can use your cruiser dick to all an in glaze. Actually i have sought options short hands for that. I have find find all niffer that takes us next so you can go in and in very it feels like it doesn't feel like i guess you i- testing in innocent kind of way like you have to set a lot of things up and you have to actually run that the abdication in a in a full instance and you have browser. You're automating. maybe it's hit up but it's still being automated. It's just one and completely shop and everything you winning and components shop and then you get the output and you can carry that through the english. Api

Steve Sanderson St Sanderson Kate Lisa Asia Jessica Microsoft Arinda Google Steve Stephen
Mindfulness Interview With Dr Sarah Shaw

Secular Buddhism

06:50 min | 1 year ago

Mindfulness Interview With Dr Sarah Shaw

"Dr Sarah Shah, Faculty member, and lecturer at the University of Oxford. She has taught and published numerous works on the history and practices of Buddhism including an introduction to Buddhist Meditation and the spirit of meditation. Without further delay years the audio from my interview, with Dr. Sarah. What inspired you to write this book I something. That's always interested me. I always noticed that mindfulness gets described in different ways in different historical periods and then Chased Kim and Nicola as. Shambala actually. Asked me to do is short history of mindfulness to make it very short, which is very, very difficult at, but I enjoy doing something that's just always interested me, bitch. I read articles about mindfulness and they can be quite rigid about it's this or it's that or it's this. Anak must have hundreds of my computer on some of them are really quite dogmatic but what I liked to its way in different settings would just get his slightly differently and has a slightly different feel and application with an underlying threader voltages. Pull that keep things alive by soon changing formulations wraps looking at them in you setting so. That seems the mindful way to approach the subject. So I. Really. Enjoyed it. It's great. It's interesting how? Like you mentioned how? Many different ways there are to use the word right when somebody says, I'm trying to be more mindful. You almost have to ask what what does that mean to you because there are so many interpretations of what it means to be mindful I think the people. In what's one person needs may be different from another person so I wouldn't want to be rigid about how it should be interpreted. Well that's great and and tell me a little bit about your background with with Buddhism with mindfulness Where did you? Where did all that start your interest in this topic? I started meditation many years ago. When. I was at Manchester University and that's what I I really encountered word mindfulness in Buddhist searching. Amusingly my meditation teacher told me that he hadn't met many people who is so unmindful the tolerating needs to didn't. Have I think that's A. Problem for academics, you can get very over focused. News surroundings. So I was intrigued by then and I try to sit down I have ever since I'm not sure I've ever really found out what she chews. On still craft it enjoy trying to rouse. I love how the title of the Book you know brings up right away to things where where does it come from and what does it mean if you had to answer that short way to somebody in an elevator? How would you answer that? Where where does it come from and what does it mean? And I would say it comes from is, is any one place Lipa come from coolest A cells that cindy the only person who can be mindful and do something about which is on self. And what it means. I would say. An attentive alertness to. Worship brings health to the mind. Something like that. Yeah I like that I think it seems like sometimes at least the way at. That mindfulness has evolved in the West. there seems to be a tendency to think of mindfulness as an altered state. and. It seems to me like what you're describing as more of an altered trait. It's a way of being. I can affect everything that we do rather than thinking. Well, here's my normal ordinary life and when I mindful I'm separate from that. It's this other state that I'm in. It it would be nice to be mindful of time I think we will have lapses one consent it'd be mindful day life it helps. Hopes to be mindful in daily life and one one needs to, of course in meditation. So it's something that can be there all the time how you arouse it sounds different circumstances might be different but the quality. Certainly according to the Buddhist tradition is that when the mind is healthy and Alert. Does a Buddhist fishing called the epidemic and it says that when mindfulness is present, lots of other factors come into play too like. Confidence. In this. Huma. Balance a lot of these other qualities come in as well. Yeah. What's Nice as the moment that we are mindful of the fact that we're not mindful we've already started right? We've already. A good a good point. Yeah So, what would you say is the biggest Maybe, misconception that you've encountered about mindfulness. I'm. Really, think very much in those terms actually oddly enough because I am an academic, that's what we're trying to do a misconception. I would say that the notion that it's somehow something that is very different from daily experience and I think that's probably one and does something that. Is owned by anybody at. The. Particular A. Just, save it. Psychology knows what mindfulness is in a way to. Practice, space traditions. Up Stem tool that Everybody will have found some way of arousing alertness and the attentiveness of mindfulness under different circumstances.

Buddhist Meditation Dr Sarah Shah Dr. Sarah University Of Oxford Manchester University KIM Faculty Member Nicola Cindy Lecturer
Sutra Statements For The Seventh Principle

Daily Breath with Deepak Chopra

03:25 min | 1 year ago

Sutra Statements For The Seventh Principle

"Hello my friends I'm the bookshop. This is daily breath. We are continuing our discussion on the seven principal of Singapore destiny. Today I'd like to offer you Sutra statements that apply to the seventh principle. Accessing the conspiracy of improbabilities? Remember always we. Do a little meditation, FOLLOW THE BREAD DO A. Mantra and then. The following techniques. One imagine that you move in rhythm with the impulses of a conscious universe mentally recite rhythm rhythm rhythm rhythm also the Sanskrit word for rhythm harmony. Okay. To imagine that you dance to the rhythm of the US. Mentally. Recite. Rhythm Rhythm Rhythm. Imagined that your body's rhythms are in perfect order mentally recite rhythm rhythm rhythm for imagine that your body is a symphony of the total universe. Mentally Recite Rhythm Rhythm Rhythm five imagine that you're the harmony of the universe. Mentally Recite Rhythm. Rhythm. Rhythm. Six imagine that every time you seek something, the universe is providing clues in the form of coincidences. And Mentally Recite Rhythm. Rhythm. Rhythm. Seven imagine there's is a connection between what happens in your dreams and what happens in your waking sit. Mentally, recite rhythm rhythm, rhythm. Eight imagine that you're transforming an evolving into a higher beam. Whatever image come? See Your my mentally recite rhythm rhythm rhythm. Nine imagine there's meaning and purpose to everything that happens and everything you do. Mentally Recite Rhythm Rhythm, rhythm. Ten imagine that you have a contribution to make to the world mentally and recite mentally. Rhythm Rhythm Rhythm. Eleven imagine that life is full of coincidences and mentally. Recite. Rhythm. Rhythm Rhythm. Twelve imagine that you notice what others may not notice. You notice what others may not notice. You see things they don't see and mentally recite rhythm rhythm rhythm. Thirty imagine that you see the hidden meaning behind all events and mentally recite. Rhythm Rhythm Rhythm. Fourteen imagine that life is full of peak experiences and mentally. Recite. Rhythm Rhythm Rhythm. Fifteen imagine that you have unique talents that you used to serve and help others mentally recite. Rhythm Rhythm. Rhythm. Sixteen. Imagine that all of your relationships are nurturing and playful mentally recite rhythm rhythm rhythm? Seventeen imagine that you delight in play and Huma and mentally. Recite. Rhythm. Rhythm. Rhythm.

Principal Huma United States
"huma" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"huma" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"County and Huma County to deploy into our hospital systems between Northwest Regional Medical Center Human Regional Medical Center in Tucson. Medical Center, and we still have 820 of our Great Guardsmen on Mission to support Cove in 19 Nick. Thanks so much, General, I really appreciate all the all the work you're doing on every front and before we go to questions, I want to just say a personal thank you to the press. And to the assembled media I made on ask last Thursday that you help spread the word that you are safer at home and that the virus is is widespread. I'm grateful. I know that that was widely reported. I saw it in print all over the place. So I want you to know how much I appreciate it. It's going to go a long way to bend the curve in the right direction. And it's still the message. So I'm going to be saying it, The more it's amplified the Mohr Arizonans. See this, The faster we will navigate through this to a place in position of off higher safety. And protection for all of the people of Arizona. And with that, Patrick, let's open up for questions. Afternoon governor Deuce. The 50 or less is what you said for public gatherings. Does that include churches Does that include religious gatherings worship? What's the one of the restrictions? So those those are public events that we were putting out there? I mean, you're you're safer home is what we're saying, Peter, we want to see physical distancing. On going to continue to put that message out there. But those those are public events and then places of business where there was large congregation is what the order covers. Enforcement is by city correct by local health officials. Yes. S o. The penalties were up to then if there are any up to them, although the department of Liquor and licenses, of course will be doing an enforcement anyone that would not follow the executive order that we put out for bars and nightclubs. How do how do the enforcements work with bars? Who also served food. That's the loophole from the last time around. What what's different in the executive order? There's there's much clearer guidance as to how this is going to work, and it's it's going to limit the large congregations and then we expect our operators that are going to be operating in terms of food service. And dine in to have physical distancing inside their establishment, along with the proper use of face coverings. And for Dr Chris really quick. The testing delayed today. They're the result of skewing the results being released, the data released delays. That's what I wanted to say what happened. So it's an electron IC lab reporting file. So something happened with the file. It didn't get transmitted to the department in time to process it, so it will be included in tonight's processing. So we expect a larger number tomorrow because it will include the labs from today in the labs from tomorrow. People in the back. Hi, Howie. Two things one. I saw the order on bars. What about restaurants? We're going.

Northwest Regional Medical Cen executive Huma County Tucson governor Deuce Cove department of Liquor Howie Patrick Arizona Peter Dr Chris
Deepak and Mallika Chopra Want Us To Focus on Being Human

Mom Brain

06:18 min | 1 year ago

Deepak and Mallika Chopra Want Us To Focus on Being Human

"With your book and with both of your philosophies, how can you make sure that we're having open conversations with our children? And how can we teach them how to feel not just think but how to really feel entrust their feeling I. think it's one knowing our own feelings, knowing our own reactions to things, 'cause we lead by example so all of the techniques that I talk about talk about because my parents taught me and my brother, but were importantly my parents lived them, and so in turn tonight done as well. And then it really is knowing your individual kids, so my younger one who is more introverted more into gaming and things like that Actually what's fascinating is in the last two months of me, my nephew, my sister-in-law, we've all actually joined her gains, and so finding that a joining her platforms rather than making her. Do what we want. Has helped for all of us to communicate better. It's so true they learn from what they see you do on a repeated basis and what you make time for and how you speak about yourself, and how you speak about others and it it strikes me that your family. I feel like has has always been this very calming presence I for people who know you far and from afar and up-close in who you love and respect you and I. I feel like you were one of the earliest. Earliest ones to be talking about the power of meditation in the power of taking that moment of quiet or prayer, and there's so many ways of talking about meditation as not just a place to settle, but also a place to energize which I think is a really interesting sort of dichotomy of energy, and and and the calming experience of Meditation, and the, and the also extremely energizing experience of it and I love If you would talk about how you learned to meditate and I think. A how you learn to do it and how you make time for it regularly and be some some of the ways that you think something like a practice of meditation could be useful in a time like this, so it's you know it's A. It's a loaded question, but I love if you'd you both still seem so calm and wonderfully collected so share with us whatever the magic pillow is. Lots of ways to look at this sinc- Loria as pregnant. I think I can start right there. Because my Nigga traumatic it was go nine to eleven and she can talk about. NATO! But. This is not know from a scientific perspective. Some of two three months of pregnancy. How are you? I'm six months so at this moment. Your baby in Utero is listening to this conversation, even without maybe understanding it and this conversation, the tone of this decision is actually cleansing the baby's genetic activity. Endure electricity, right. If you were listening to music or reading, or dancing or laughing or watching candid camera. Maybe even if others show. And finding. The baby. Be having a good time and the genes regulate homelessness is set. would be activated on the other hand if you're listening to siren right now, an ambulance or gunshot wounds or anything that we watching US right now. The baby's genes would be activated in the direction of inflammation and distress when the baby's born even without knowing why if the baby would hear that sound the sound of the ambulance or the sound? Of the sound of the gunshot, it would go into. Anxiety would going to fear, it would go into the body would respond with inflammation and a compromised immune system. So the best thing you can do for your baby. Right up is set rate exists in every RAIGAD through huma joy through dodds to music to storytelling. Even right now you could start singing nursery rhymes, gio baby, and he or she would be. That the moon! After the baby's long the fibers. Please don't try to. Say or lecture or give it by steal baby or even make your baby a child mindful. because. The baby doesn't listen to that all the baby just a devouring. Fix your movements. A you two. Are you comfortable or not? Your facial expressions, you happy or not the tone of your voice. Your body language and you'll gestures. That's it. It's got neurons, so if you are stressed and if you're unhappy. You, are fearful doesn't matter what you say doesn't matter how much you meditate or do yoga debriefing. The baby is going to be. Period all the baby needs up to Flavius. deep, listening affection, which means deep getting appreciation, which means deep noticing of the baby's strengths, qualities, beautiful ages and acceptance do not tried to gauge that because it's unique so after five years you can tell your okay. Let's shut up her by minutes today. And when six showed up six minutes. To meditate when she was nine without any brush at all, okay and her brother young brother seven ourselves not precious. It happens by itself because your children are yourself in disguise. That's all they are. They just waiting different uniform because the different body. But they're mirrors of who you are.

Loria Dodds United States Nato Utero Flavius.
Coping with the food landscape during a pandemic

Body Cons Podcast

09:56 min | 1 year ago

Coping with the food landscape during a pandemic

"This is where we are not recording on our kitchen table as we normally do. We are currently speaking to each other looking each other through video recording on like a video chat. And that's why the audio doesn't sound as great as what you know released to. We just wanted to kind of fit together already. Quick Emergency Series to help you navigate. Diet COCCIA BODY IMAGE ISSUES. This weird kind of food landscape that we're in at the moment this weird time full of in dieting tate. We wanted to help give you some good stuff resources positive and saying how you feel better annisten how we doing it say currently I can see Lachey on a video screen. She can say me we've done into these people they sway as well and Yeah I mean how you really naughty how you doing well. I had a bit of a realization yesterday. Thoughts this kind of cycling through lots of different emotions I go. I was reading giggly for example and then I realized that if I stalked and just thought about it for minute that she fading Really Sodom ready scattered semi giggles like tips over NSA crying and the very rapid change in how. I'm feeling which I'm sure that listeners could probably relate is grief so I think I think we're collectively grieving will pass. Lives the wells where we could just step outside the front door Down the street in Kathrina Silva isn't it? The the freedom of both psychologically and physically is on the loss of that is something that I'm I'm ready feeding the moments but I'm okay. I'm alright just so weird. Isn't it how you how are you feeling really similar really? I think the Iranians that I've been looking at on social media like radio impressed an absolutely loving reading people's posts about how that ray enjoy his time to meditate and do yoga Latin language and a new hope night at tonight themselves and I think that's a lovely. I'm one hundred percent not doing any of that because I'm schooling. My children. Work is absolutely just so hectic busier than ever. And when you're self employed you tight what when when you as well so I feel like I'm spending a lot of time walking which is good because I enjoy the WOK and I'm spending a lot of time with the kids and I think this weekend probably be the first time that it really hits me because I've been busy And I'm just kind of getting through hour by hour antiquing list and being with the kids. I haven't really had a huge amount of time to kind of price. That's what's going on in amendment. I'd love to learn mandarin or something like well. It's I think it's really interesting though because I think what this is showing us is. How all kind of natural states respond in a change of circumstances. So you know. I'm finding who accepted the on. Probably a bit more of an introvert than I used to be. So this toll staying home thing. Knock seeing anyone. I am down with that. I'm quite happy to to be at home but I think there's something about the The the list of projects like Oh. Now's the time I can read this thing and do this. E Costa Last year and I can spring clean house. I think but it is a form of trying to take control of your situation in which we don't have any control and that's just all brain just protecting us from that so I think we just need to kind of making the list is enough like to feel like we have some control over the situation. I don't think we actually need to learn them under three interesting sang. That 'cause I'm always say body. Collins is all about body Image Diet Colin and mental health. And how the subjects into secretary parenting on social justice issues on the thing. The thing I really night chased is how when people are anxious it might offend all sorts of different ways people who have made a been an recovered from Diet Coccia or maybe in a eating disorders or disordered eating or a variety around body image. Who've been fine now their anxieties coming back a situation that we have no control an old. She's that they've gone through before and I think he's really interesting. That whole thing about you wanting to gain some control so people looking to gain control by do not nights of high workouts for example which are like everywhere lyman or being where he controlled about that reaching and then that whole feed landscape where the moment where people are shopping in different way and then why that is going to run out or maybe. They've got a lot to of food in the cupboards and then used to having that much freedom competence and that that can be tricky for some people. We've got a brilliant gas dawn today. Hyper Guy who's a campaign? She got an amazing book. I'll link all of her places in the show nights. That hype campaign is dumped scales campaign. She's not over. She just reached over a hundred thousand signatures on her changed all petition. She's campaigning to change the way that eating disorders are diagnosed in the UK. And taking away from how having a minimum white basically in order to help and we have actually talked about her campaign previous on the. Po Costs into a that will share in a minute talks about food. Lion's gate and how to kind of navigate this this weird time from the angle and it might be really helpful if you are recovering from an each disorder old disordered eating or even just you know diet culture which I think. We're all kind of recovering from two CY. Young Son How he's been managing that whole aspect of things not well. I've really noticed. All of those kind of body shaming soft tweets and memes and stuff going around about people saying what their body might be like after this is over on the basis of what you've just said. I you know different Change to our eating habits or exercise habits or whatever I find that really fascinating that that's something that people are focusing on because that sought to sort of direct line between our bodies function on. What's going on out there in the world right now like the idea that health is at such a premium right now and. I don't know I'm still kind of figuring it out. I guess I'm really grateful to be in a body that is healthy that doesn't have underlying health conditions understand. That has a massive privilege in that I think about my friends and my family situations Nano people you do have those underlying health conditions I'm worried for them. But it's it feels like it's kind of a few steps down from about these look like now and that's really fascinating that when we get out of this. I'm ready interested in whether that will just change Perceptions of our bodies. What how we prioritize them. Oh how we perceive them what do you reckon I cannot say Lonnie I can ask really helpful positive looking on I feel like diet collishaw and like some of the FA favorite memes and Jake's have been going round and say like influences like selling immunity boosting recipe ease at which also at the same time. Get Your own point Arabs. I feel like what could could die coach. You don't give us a break. Like the world is on his knees right now. Can we know what just no life for second? I think that I say that says you can point about kind of let's cut like actually practice. Gratitude for bodies can day. I'm on and say these like literally fighting off this invisible virus and and I think that's interesting. I think with it with regards system the means and stuff that I've seen gotten around always see in a situation like this. Humor is is a valid coping strategy. Or how people are dealing with earnings authority over rain via and Huma is often used as a tool for that and I guess it's just a shame the alot of The Hema at the moment that people seem to be finding comforting is around basically fat shaming and I. Guess not just comes back to that thing that we've always said is that like fat shaming and body shaming is like the last bastion of accessible.

Lachey Kathrina Silva UK Self Employed Lyman Secretary Collins RAY Lonnie I Colin Jake
This Is Nothing We've Ever Seen Before

Latino Rebels Radio

10:21 min | 1 year ago

This Is Nothing We've Ever Seen Before

"I wanted to talk to you a little bit about for for people that aren't in the scientific community how they can begin to make sense of the data that's coming in. What tips would you give people if there? Because there's a lot of people with a lot of time on their hands and they're listening to like the news but it feels like there's a lot of data out there that might at least inform people more. Can you begin to at least break down? How like non-scientists could start looking at this pandemic in a way? That might want to say reassure them but at least keep them as informed as possible about it absolutely so let me start by saying that. What we're leaving is unprecedented. There's probably nobody alive right now. Nobody life was an adult. At least that has lived through something similar to what we're going through. This is historic our grandkids. Great grandkids are going to be talking about this disease the abundance of a century so I want to start with that because people are trying to get some point of reference from their best. They'RE GONNA they're gonNA feel pretty disoriented. We have to acknowledge that the reason that they're unprecedented measures implemented right now. The reason this is such a big deal because cities is a really big deal. So what we're talking about here. Corona virus is obviously a virus. And it's a virus that humanity has never seen before so every century or so. This happened last time this happened at this magnitude was in nineteen. Eighteen in what in English is called Spanish flu luxury per minnows? You enter the SEO showing Spanish and that was essentially also pandemic like this one at what happens. Is that sometimes viruses. They mutate they change and their viruses that infect or specialize in different types of animals. There viruses specializing huma snakes and fish and bacteria these viruses in particular corona virus. The governor nineteenth was a virus that was present in Somali. Snuffed clear wish want some people think it was a bad other? People think he was a reptile. Like a snake. Be At what he may what happened. Was that the virus. Mutated capable now affecting human cells now. Scientists have predicted these fools with these viruses. They predicted that about a year ago from research. The danger of of that type of mutation is that because no one has seen it. It's you know it's in Virgin territory. So we have immune system immune cells that creates memory of diseases that we had before but he'd never seen these virus. No one has in their immune system and memory of the virus. Oh Dan what happens is condemning. Which is what's happening right now. It's spread like wildfire. So what looking at the data? Because you know we're we're kind of still at the at the beginning of the curve is at safe to say like we're not really. I mean the scientists saying that the best way to at least temporarily slow this. This spread is to avoid contact with people ride. So that's where the idea from what I understand. Is that if less people get it at least the people that haven't now have a chance to recover so that more people get you know and then it's it's helping with the health system. Is there anything in the data right now? That suggest any pattern at all or are we still like starting to still figure it out and we're just at the beginning. Yeah so there are few questions there. Let me let me break them down so the first question. Where are we indicate? Let me start by saying that the US has had a bridge ordering Australia's countries are pretty pool responsibly. Virus so we don't even have enough data right now know exactly in the US where we are. Why because the federal agencies that we're supposed to be running tests for this virus I I didn't take it seriously enough second. There were budget cuts those federal agencies. I'm talking like CDC. For example we heard from the leadership from president trump. These wall Senate big deal so that was wasn't thinking we've taken with the seriousness that he deserved now in. An epidemic studied spreads spreads very fast. But if you've gone Dane at early then you can. You can continue to get you know. It's in a safer position. But you need to know who to contain and were on if you're not running tests because you haven't prepared the resources to run the best. Which is what happened here then it. It's threats you don't know where it is so right now. That's a long winded way of telling you we don't have a lot of data about how many cases we have here in the US. I think we are going to gather data quickly soon. Like I think people are GonNa see you see particularly I gotTa make institutions but the federal response was baseball which affected the recollection which affected the epidemiological projections so in Puerto Rico. When I talked to radio stations in Puerto Rico. To make an analogy between these eric so I don't people that the detest for dividers are like a Doppler radar. So you don't have the doppler radar you don't know what hurricanes you know the wind strength and then you've got not make meteorological projections. That will tell you well. He my rain here in the wind's might be the strong. You might make landfall over here. You know what I mean. So we're lacking that data. I suspect that we're early on in the in the early we are and how how exponentially it's going to grow. I think that they still incoming. What can we know from say a place like China where you know? It's I guess it's like a couple of months ahead of us. Is there anything that we can learn from other countries still or is it still in your mind in your opinion based on what you've seen too early to even look at this globally? No I think I think what's coming three obvious by looking at other countries and scientific projections right like I mean where we are in the part. That's hard but what's coming I mean it's Privy double and I think that's where a lot of these policies of social distancing Come into play. So the social distancing comes from the knowledge that this virus is contagious that no one has an immune response against it and that the way that he gets transmitted by contact so review something that has the virus a surface or somebody contaminated with the virus. You know you don't get seek it you actually. You Don got sick. If you don't like it cannot go through your hands. You have the skin protects you. You get sick if you touch your face. So that is the importance of like. Don't touch your face wash your hands recommendations right if you go to the supermarket to buy something then wash your hands frequently because As long as you don't touch your face it's okay. It's in your hands for a little bit. You WanNa wash your hands so you make sure you touch your mouth or your eyes or your note saying now so we know that we also know the sequence of the virus we know. The percentage of people that get complications because of the virus. I'll like to clarify that. Not EVERYBODY THAT GETS THE VIRUS. Get sick like at an individual level. Some people are completely what's called a symptomatic indicates that they don't show any symptoms. They actually perfectly healthy. Maybe they get legal headache but nothing out of the ordinary. But they have the virus and they're capable of spreading the virus but then there are people particularly people from vulnerable populations we respiratory diseases or people elderly but not exclusively also young people that are healthy that have complications complications that can go all the way from putting ventilator to this and that is that is when it gets really complicated to get to get to your question of what is the importance of this this concept that people go flattening the curse. Yeah so okay. So I'll explain that. In a few sentences so flooding into Gurvey's our health system has certain capacity. Meaning that like I'm just GONNA MAKE. I'm just GONNA make up some numbers to explain. Yeah let supposedly healthy stem gun. Accommodate a hundred people a month. That's made up Nkomo. Nice round number for this for this Stan. Nice round this for your explanation. Continue so one hundred cycling hundred people you got. You got more than one hundred people you got them. You don't have beds. Doctors you have ventilators you name it now. Let's suppose that a thousand people get sick when I felt some people getting sick. It's not a problem if they get sick a hundred times over ten months because you capacity for one hundred a month other de months they get sake so you're MELENA now. If a thousand people get sick at the same time you have capacity for one hundred a month then you have nine hundred people you cannot take care of and that effectively does is that it overwhelms the healthcare system. If you look at what's happening in Italy that's exactly what's happening. You have so many ventilators and you're left with this really tragic decision of having to ask a doctor to decide who leaves and who doesn't because the the healthcare system is overwhelmed with cases now the void that is by all social isolation by making sure that even if you're seek like if you stay away from people not owner you protect yourself. You're almost shaving a call it over like a Patrick duty of not getting other people sick. Yeah because I like getting an remember. Every if if you're spreading this contagion issue spreading this desease you're also putting out risk not only loved ones that might be vulnerable like elderly Baron scrummed parents or people with respiratory diseases or even young people that might have complications. That are foreseen. But you're also putting at risk healthcare workers that are in the front lines that that needs to take care of these people because you have been walking around whatever socializing not not heeding the

United States Puerto Rico CDC Senate President Trump Baron Scrummed DAN Australia Social Isolation Patrick Duty Italy Eric China DON Gurvey Nkomo
Hellboy talk with Tim

Covert Nerd Podcast

12:22 min | 1 year ago

Hellboy talk with Tim

"Are seeing more of change. I think in response to books like Hell Boyer Black Hammer. Where because there is a firm time line and things are happening characters have to react to the things that are happening even if they don't have full context for what's happening so that's what you like about hell boy be. Pr General. Think helpful like you said Houston's Gone Yeah Houston's gone what are you GonNa do hell boy died? What are we going to do? And that's another thing stopped me please. If I'm going off the rails in the world of hell boy. Bpd WHAT HAVE YOU? Death is final unless it isn't and what I mean by that is when like okay but speculate for just a second over. I'm going to spoil recent events in Batman that's okay. I'll put spoiler at the beginning. The Alfred was killed by Bain in Batman a couple months ago Alfred. Dying is a huge deal. It's a very good story. I'll be really hard pressed to say in five years. We're not going to have comics with Alfred. M I think we'll see Alfred Comeback in the hell boy world if there was a a character analogous to Alfred. If he died he'd be dead. There's only been three characters I can think of who haven't stayed dead One of them is Huma Hunky list which is hard work as say I can read it forever. A monkey lists named Roger. Who's liveability is questionable? At best the other two and I could be wrong as well like I'm not concrete giving you information but This based off the best of my recollection the the other two characters would be Rasputin. Who is the main villain and Hell boy himself and when hell boy is brought back it's not his choice. There was There was a thing that I want to say. Scott Allie who was an editor and a writer on BP said is If he said death is final and things will break and if things are repaired they will still remain broken. So if you like break glass table you can put that glass table back together. It's not going to be as strong as it was. And that's kind of a tenant and B P R D if we're gonNA break it we can put it back together but it's not gonna be the same as a storyteller in a fan of of character the way hell boy and it's related books handle stakes is so it's so unlike anything else you're gonNA find in modern pop culture and he loves. Mike loves the supernatural world. Because I hadn't read hell boy before but I read Joe Gholam which is one of my aches works and it has a very supernatural tinder taste to it for lack of a better word but he really loves that supernatural world when I was reading up about how he came up with hell boy and the Supernatural. In general he started. Reading Brahms stroker's Dracula and just got sucked into the all. The supernatural world and missed. Go along with that and even see that. In Gotham by gaslight. Yeah I think that's where he got a lot of this inspiration because like you said. Eprdf just kind of a supernatural monster story arc on each in how he tries to solve this mystery so to speak. But I really like those like you said the BP because they're short. In general. At least the ones I read are fairly short. They're kind of wins a call because they take place in the past share. Well it's it's interesting because Mike men ULA has trusted so many people with his world. Geoff Johns has written for PR. D- we've got Chris. Roberson does a lot of stuff Scott. Allie Gabriel Bah and Fabio Moon. Who ARE TWINS? They've done some work on a book called. B P R D vampire. Let's just phenomenal. It's so good Abe Sapien had his own series for awhile and there were another set of twins that were working on the art in that and their names escape me off hand but pitch perfect. They're wonderful the those twin they're now working on Lucifer for DC like the the Black Label Sandman books but It's just so good There's a horror comic called Herro county that's written by. Cullen Bunn the art and that is done by Tyler Crook and there was a tiny little bit of animosity because Tyler Crook was the second main artists on E. P. R. D. And when he went over to do Harrow County kind of left He left the crew in a bit of a bind and everybody was a little upset but also he's doing the work of his career on. Harrow. County That's how we got Lawrence Campbell as the main artist on be prd through throughout the run of like hell boy traditionally the art in that is either Mike Minneola or Mike. Minneola esque yes. There's a there's a very good so pretty still pretty rough so to speak but it I think it fits in his universe. Yeah it absolutely does. If we're not getting Mike Manolo. We're getting somebody like Dunkin for Griego who has a very manolas style over. Mvp what we got was a completely different visual. Take and we had guy. Davis was the main artist for play frogs. Hell on earth. We saw Tyler Crook and then going into the devil you know we had Lawrence Campbell. And they bright. They brought a very interesting like real world. Visual take on what Mike Minneola drew as more than esoteric stylized monster world and just like injected it with like this fierce ground level realistic take in it so to to see how Lake Dunkin for draws Abe sapien versus how Mike Minneola draws EP and versus. How Tyler Crook Draws Abe sapien versus? It's so it should not narrative Lee speaking work. It shouldn't do it Michael did a whole issue of of that. We have a painted issues that are done by just masters of their art. And it's it's so wonderful and and just the fact that you can have these visual styles who divorced from divorce from the words divorce from the writing you would never know that just because this character looks a little more cheesy in. This character. Looks a little more realistic. There is no. There's no what if in the hell boy universe whenever you read a story As far as the comics the short stories are a little different. There's pros and all that but we're talking about the comics there's not Lak- what if Abe Sapien was fighting in World War. Two like it's there's none of that every everything you read actually happens To those characters in the world of hell boy and having such unique creative voices all working in tandem to tell this one epic it should not by any right work and if it does work it should not work nearly as well as this does and it is so much fun it does. It's a fun a fun book. Speaking of you talked about Abe Sapien. What is your favorite character from hell boy? Do you bomb or is it a cop out answer cop out answer and then maybe might cop out. Answer is Every every major comic book company I believe has a trinity of some kind so. Dc Has Batman. Wonder Woman Superman Marvel's got Captain America. Thor and iron man You could argue. That image has spawned in which blade and someone else that I can't think of offhand For Hell boy it's definitely you've got an expansive universe of characters but it comes down to Abe Liz in hell boy and if I get one of those three I'm going to have a good time and be in for completely different reasons there so three very different characters In the in the Gemmell del Toro movies. They had a romance between. Liz and hell boy does not exist in the comics. That's not a thing If anything Liz and Abe kind of have an unspoken thing that nobody ever acts on and that's kind of cool because you've got fire and water and that's like a neat neat thing like that. Yeah it's really fun. But if you were like gun to my head me pick a character man. It's GonNa be a tie between it's GonNa be a tie between Captain Daimyo from be PRD. Who is in the newest? Hell boy movie. He's the the wear Jaguar. I love him or Johann Johann Krauss whose an echo plasma ghost in a in a sealed suit don't make can't choose between those two a close honorable mention would be roger but I can live without roger it's fine but But no I love and that goes to the military guy in me I love. Diageo is a traditional military guy and he is just he's hired basically to militarize the PRD and get them to work as a cohesive unit and he just comes in and he's like all right. Look I'm done I'm done like I cannot handle. Whatever it is you guys are doing. I need you all. Just cut your drama. And let's do this. And he just has no time for any of the. He's he's not ignorant to the fact that he's working with monsters he's he gets to the point where he's like. I don't care that you're monsters. We have work to do. And I absolutely love that. And then Johann who was voiced by Seth McFarland and the second held boy movie the The Golden Army In the comics he is so flawed that he is. He's the most fun to read. Because you you just like him you just like him and he makes some really dumb stupid mistakes but they're mistakes that you could see yourself making and you see some emphasis me speaking of myself when I say you but I see so much of myself in him that when he makes a mistake. I'm like own own. No real world content is one hundred percent what I would do and we would all be in so much trouble So I absolutely adore the dichotomy of those two and they don't get a wall but No it's my it's A. It's a complete cop-out I answered it twice with no actual answer. That's okay. I like the fact that like you said it is kind of whimsical. Boys Got A. Would you say it dry sense of humor? I would say Ri- I think is is not so much dry it's like. He knows he knows what he's just so he's just kind of he's perpetually forty and he could you imagine being being against. I'm in my late thirties. Man If you just I would be unstoppable if I had energy and I see hell boy as just perpetually old enough to know better young enough to not care and he kind of can get away with

Abe Sapien Hell Boyer Black Hammer Tyler Crook Alfred Mike Minneola Twins Abe Liz Mike Scott Allie Lawrence Campbell Johann Johann Krauss Roger DC Houston Mike Manolo Geoff Johns Joe Gholam Seth Mcfarland Diageo Allie Gabriel Bah
Wayne Marshall Discusses His Short Story Collection Shirl

Published...Or Not

10:17 min | 1 year ago

Wayne Marshall Discusses His Short Story Collection Shirl

"That you've been getting some great reviews rarely been rating than they In the press. But could you tell us a little bit more about the pathway from the awards at Josh mentioned. It's not quite as simple as just getting shortlisted. How did you get to this moment to die? Sure so the shortlisting was a whirlwind anthony. We'll stay with me for the rest of my life. I think Contacted by agents and publishes the very same day of the announcement which was fantastic announcement on on the announcement receiving emails frog messages on twitter. It was and and if you hate from a Christian Fish Chen or any of the other rod has its time experience so At that point I only had a thirty seven thousand word manuscript. It always influenced to actually Melanie Chang head submitted. A similar word can't install Ebay had had success. There was a Willa Center event where she spark and that was the moment that actually decided to submit the thing in the first place. It wasn't really on my right up at that point so it shows that a warden spas other artists to get input Stuff into the wool absolutely and so through that process affirm press came aboard and wanted to publish the book but it was still too short so the idea is that you would try to get the collection out as soon as possible. Bang that it was still you know the APLA shortlisting was still very much out there. So I had unwritten one story in the previous year and when I saw him with a fan press. The deal was four stories in four months which was terrifying and exhilarating the same time a deadline. Exactly it just shows you yes. So I managed to produce the full stories Are went for some. I didn't have time to doubt the material doubt the premises so I went with some stuff that I otherwise wouldn't have gone with had a bit of a list of ideas. I I did a deed but a few of the stories that had around for maybe three years but hadn't quite moved along with them or just forced myself to write first drafts. And it's down in the something to work with whereas before I just thought that ought not gonna work so there are two stories and it looked quite metaphysics which I played around with that conned of fiction nonfiction mash up a little awareness about their own existence. Yes side Some things that were on the journey to rotting show that awed decided it was time to put in such as I went through cancer In the in the early stages of the book which was an impetus to writing the book in the first place. And how did that for you up to to write. What has led to this stunning book? Yeah sure it freed me up in the sense that I thought none of these stories I would be published that you know it was very very seek That were just diagnosed and it took a year Eh. Going through all that until the second stint of came to water out again and I was doing came on Friday Friday mornings and I'd get up and write for two hours beforehand forehand and it was stuff just to amuse me. There was no industry. No hearing about concept about published that was turns out that that was exactly what I needed. It's so true silver lining from a very dark clad so with the stories and I. I can't believe how you do this. Every time we get to the end of the the story I had a hell. Did he do that now. I'm going to look at one section of prize from you've got people in the front of your book who've praised the collection who've read it in advance of publication GonNa Ray the nines to whine Makola Nikola generals in Reina. Neil all very influential influential writers an Australia authors but I actually want to zero in on John Rosen's because she starts in a way that you'd think the maybe this doesn't sound so vain she finishes cries. I'm going to read this APP. General sense is on Wine Marshall's collection show these stories of a strident men in small towns and pull suburbs stories of sport drinking fighting and love sands awful right that she puts but there's a big battle here but these are stories. Tall was SAIMAA chart. Wit a meticulous craft that even as you're reading about a limitation Class A man in love with a kangaroo a mermaid on a fishing trip. You're asking yourself why did did this really happen. Wine Marshall is a worthy successor to his town might pay to carry. That's prize. It went a writer of gorgeous imagination endearing experimentation ikin compassion and chill is one of the best books of Australian stories. You'll rate wow and autograph with her on that assessment. I'm not gonNA make anymore. The raiders. Fortunate can't that listeners. Fortunately can't say that here but there are other prize in however automob- beyond that prize tries to the craft. You mentioned before how it freed you up to right. I'm GonNa quite something. It sounds like a real mouthful from aristotle. approachable impossibility is preferable to an impossible probability. I I had to write that. Deng's always mix it up but in wine Mashall's world old. You start with the everyday will that we think we Then you give it a bizarre twist and you you make us believe it. And that's what I my. By the time you get to the end and status with his arresting ending. We took hand-held that he does that. So do you start with the bizarre edition or the ordinary reward and let it emerge. Yes so it's normally. It will come to me in a bizarre image or concept. They're usually quite concept driven stories so we start not like that and I guess I've always had that Oban. I'd been working on writing for ten years before I started having success with these stories and I could come up with an initial initial idea well enough but I think what was holding you back as well is. This seems to me now. Like a Secondary Act of imagination. Where you get the blood D- But the grounding the will building the making real which is absolutely essential on not so much into say straight out surrealism where it's just go let craziness? I want. Want to feel absolutely real and so. That's the big task beyond the initial idea. And that takes a lot of drafting and all that. So I'm probable impossibility impossibility. You believe. This could happen but you know it's impossible in the back up. Yes you do that. So it's the balance of the two and finding what you call a secondary incidental storyline more like. I guess it would come back to will building the Secondary Act of imagination. You've gotta fill that. Would you've go to populate it you've got to fill it with all the details not too many. That it bogs down and working in short stories. You've got a zipper too long. But I wanted to feel real fo for raiders but real to me too I want these stories to feel absolutely real. Even though they're crazy like I know I'm going to go to a specific example here and it's it's the story that's inspired the cover of show and a man has fallen in love with the kangaroo route. How on Earth do you make that real that that sort of the bizarre things you wouldn't put it in a literary collection of short? Say How do you make that believable including that the kangaroos wearing accounting jumping. I think it's the stuff like the cotton jump and the party pause and the name of the beer and the name of specific replies that gives it that you can feel that house and that place and the two men that popular that story. I think this is real reality to those guys. And that's where I grew up. That's my culture and so drew on all of that again beyond the crazy idea to fill it with with realistic Dato and to just dropped often draft and draft until it felt real it does feel very real one of the things I really liked about. It was the kangaroo. Never reacts in the way you expect now take something personally and some there does that so you give it a three dimensional character a kangaroo. Yeah but you don't buy that. We all got along with each. I really like I think you. Would you call that an. I probably want to bring this up in terms of defining does the Jonah but would you call it magic realism of fantastic realism here. I'm a bit be careful with the magic realism stuff. Because it has a specific origin and a specific cultural lineage being in South America and the magic realists to come out of there so that the second one fantastic realism. It's really you know. Version of magic. Yeah improbable things happen everyday. Well I think I'm coming more and more to the understanding that I my entire style comes out of the young culture that I grew up in. I grew up at a suburban Melbourne with people. Ah stood around telling toll stories full exaggeration and huma and color and be twists. And I've just realized that informs my style so much that sums up beautifully and it shows and all your work now you have a Melbourne launched last week at the hill of content bookstore in Melba. You've got a bacchus marsh. Could you tell us the data. Yes I do. So we have a launch of the Pekka Smash Lobby this Saturday at twelve thirty. And it's GonNa be really special because they've supported may for so long mm-hmm and they gave me and another friend of mine. Jim Tully Mila the lessons to do things like create the pay to carry short story award which we in running for four years. It's just small ward. That is now national and really personal imprimature. Hasn't yes and hate us as the winning stories and to talk to someone like to carry even Chrissy. Molly's Alley's huge so. Tom Employs at the back of Smash Library this Saturday at at twelve thirty at twelve. Thirty four thirty. Yes yes exactly yes thank. You're very much wind Marshall on your congratulations on your debut. Collection of short stories show is the title published by FM. Prison back to you

Raiders Marshall Melbourne Twitter Ebay Melanie Chang Willa Center Josh Wine Marshall Pekka Smash Lobby Makola Nikola Jim Tully Mila South America Writer John Rosen Chrissy Bacchus Marsh Oban Deng
Low Country Showdown: Belgium vs. The Netherlands

Travel with Rick Steves

07:19 min | 1 year ago

Low Country Showdown: Belgium vs. The Netherlands

"Days in Europe you hardly know when you've crossed the border but when you get to know each region it's clear. Cultural differences are as distinct and strong. As ever. You're it's fascinating that even as your continues to unite. The differences between the various regions remained so strong the historic nucleus of the European Union. Nyon was a trio of little countries known as Benelux Belgium the Netherlands and Luxembourg and it's very small area. It's fascinating in its complexity lexi. We're joined in the studio by a guide from Belgium and another from the Netherlands to explore the cultural differences between their two countries. Allen Yanji is guide in the Netherlands and Hilbert buys is from Brussels where he teaches at the European School of Communication. He teaches history and politics. And he works as a tour guide. Hilburn Hilburn and Ellen. Thanks for joining us now. Ellen you live in the Netherlands and you work as a guide in Amsterdam. What's your family's history are are you like? Have you been the Dutch forever or what yes. I've been Dutch forever but my grandfather was a German so they came over from Germany to the Netherlands and they settled in brabant. John's which is the south of the Netherlands. And it's a province that was divided when the two nations of the Netherlands and Belgium were created. Rob You have. Yes so so. You have north brabant. which is part of the Netherlands and you have south but album which is in Belgium and so you ended up in the Netherlands? Yes yes that. A blessing or a curse Both we'll talk more about that in just a minute. And he'll bring you Belgium your home. And how did you end up there because you sound like you have an American accent to me well yes. My parents are of Dutch extraction in fact but with NATO We ended up in in bracelets right. Grew up and have have managed to stay so you are European. If you're living in Belgium the Edison near you the cut up there and all the EU excitement. Now when you think about the low countries country's once it was all the same wasn't it The low countries the Spanish Netherlands. The Spanish Netherlands were separate from the Dutch republic but before the Spanish Netherlands became Spanish. Yeah we were all part of the Holy Roman Empire and then what happened because to me. It's kind of a cultural divide between Belgium and Holland today. You've got french-speaking speaking while loons and you've got Germanic speaking Dutch you've got Catholics and Protestants. You've got south facing German facing. Is that a cultural. Divide of some sort ellen. It is the language barrier has been there for a thousand years. It's not a part of Belgium. Belgium created as a nation in eighteen. Thirty it was was not that then. The language barrier started to exist is was already there long before tectonic plates coming together right here from Roman Roman speaking tribes heading east and Germanic speaking tribes heading west and so they joined up so you had these language barrier from Roman speaking and Germanic Manic speaking which is more or less where today's language barrier is in Belgium. So we're kind of talking about between the Netherlands and Belgium but also within Belgium. We've got this split with the north being more culturally and linguistically tied with the Netherlands in the south being more connected with France yes because of the language and of course because his French has always been the dominant language throughout the Middle Ages. When you had people who wanted to be anything in life had to be able to speak French and later on it it stayed the dominant language in the industrial era and Flemish was the local dialect so If the man comes into fix your door he's going to speak Flemish but if the the guy who runs the city the unknowns the bank. He's going to speak French. Yeah he'll burn if you WANNA have historically in the in Belgium has set the case if you want your kid to be made to meet a very important person. They should speak French. That isn't true today. No nineteenth century historically Boulogne. Yes polk were loon. The elite of the nation spoke French French because they were of nobility French has have replaced Latin as the dominant language in much of Europe travel. With Rick Steves. We're talking about the cultural differences between the people in Belgium Belgium and the people in the Netherlands. We're joined by Ellen. Yeah I'm saying from the Netherlands and Hilburn buys from Belgium when we think about we've been talking about or the origins of these countries. But we have this situation today where we've got a the Netherlands which is Dutch. Speaking in the northern half of Belgium which is Flanders Flanders. Right Phlegm is that is that the same language. The language is formerly the same in Belgium. When you go to school you go to a class called Dach- the way that in America when you go to school you don't learn American when no one you go to English when no one was called Nederlands? It's called Nigel why don't they just call it Flemish. Just because it's the vendors we share the lexicon. We share the dictionary if you read the dictionary which is produced for the Netherlands and Belgium collectively the only thing. You'll see his annotations in. The definition conditions will see used regionally or applied in Belgium this way and in the Netherlands Hall that way so what are the Flemish speaking people. The Netherlandish speaking people of Belgium. I'm well how do they relate to the to the Dutch. What is the cliches? What are the jokes saw? Well at the well at the Belgian. Talk here for a minute I okay. I'll preface this by saying I studied in the Netherlands Dutch origin. I really don't have to side with any of this. I have a nice anecdote with two friends who met one was Belgian. Elgin and one of them was touched in the Belgian tells the Dutch when he says do you know upon northern border. That's the end of culture to which the Dutchman responded yes that's true but on our our southern border that's the end of intelligence who we go and Ellen. What about you from the Netherlands How did the Dutch the think of the Belgians? Then what's a joke or a little insight into the cultural differences. Well there are many things that we like. And let's say on the plus side. We love the Belgian sense of Huma among which is kind of surreal. Sometimes we don't even understand it. They definitely have a different sense of humor than the Dutch have. And we sort of admire that because it's subjects are very frank and very straightforward very matter of fact. Yes I've got a Dutchman say I've been with him and he says you know it's it's exhausting I to carry on a conversation. Let's just not talk with each other and not be stressed out about it right so the to me. That was so Dutch a Belgian might be a little more no Belgians and more they like to keep themselves to themselves on more modest and you can experience this when you travel there for instance. You're in American and you're in Belgium and you want to ask something I think it's always polite to us. Do Speak English. When you're in Flanders they will say oh I don't know yes maybe a little bit and then you start a conversation and and you find out that the perfectly perfect well with England when you go to the Netherlands and you ask their Excuse me do you speak English. They so yeah. Of course. That's right so there. You have the difference. Like Belgians are more. Yeah more modest landed dot Chamo- assertive assertive described as self effacing using the Belgians are okay. That's that it's very. It's very nice. Also that in Belgium rules are a little bit less importance. Well it's it's more dramatic in the north breath.

Belgium The Netherlands Belgium Belgium Spanish Netherlands Benelux Belgium Ellen Netherlands Hall European Union Europe Hilburn Hilburn Nyon Flanders Brussels Nato Rob You Allen Yanji Brabant European School Of Communicati Rick Steves Holy Roman Empire
Tumors and their Entourage: Exploring the Tumor Microenvironment

Sounds of Science

07:17 min | 2 years ago

Tumors and their Entourage: Exploring the Tumor Microenvironment

"Cancer Research is a complex in ever evolving field one of the most promising research areas involves the habitat that cancer is able to create for itself which is known as the tumor micro environment to discuss this topic. I've brought in Vienna Jenkinson Director of Science at Charles Rivers portishead site. She has over a decade of experience in the fields of oncology and immunology and she has agreed to talk with me about what exactly the tumor micro environment is and and how we can exploit it to treat cancer. Welcome rhiannon thank. You see me to stay today. Thank you for coming. So let's just start with the basics six. What is the tumor micro environment? So when we think that chairman Momaday on we often maybe think of all of tumor cells so quite a genius in the way that it's formed and these cells really foam from our normal cells which being incorrectly programmed maybe gone bad resulting in them growing up normally taytay an affecting the normal function of our organ all tissue but really the reality is a lot more complex as often is in these scenarios. I'm really uh not more different cell types get recruited by the missiles into the moncur environments to the tumor cells themselves along with these other south types. And the extra study in a mate checks at the cell. sit-in form the Cheema Might Kerr environments so then that raises the question of what are the cell types in the tme. and and why are they. They're severely if we think of the Cheema styles what they're trying to do is survive on and gray said to do this. They need gray. Factors this nutrients and sell staff is signals from types. So as they grow they send out signals and this results in other cell types coming to the Cheema not an infiltrating into the sort of Chima cells to form a tomb amass in addition in the Magrao's it might results into she strasse S. or dangerous signals and this results in the immune system which is constantly surveying the bulge coming along to see what's going on and that rain really is which tax help on these dangerous signals resulting in killing of the Cheema cells so the body is like attacking the tumor but is the tumor able to use news. Those attacks to its own advantage sometimes. Yes that's right side. Whilst I hope would be that the immune cells come in an act against the Shema resulting in killing the reality. Is that the tumor fights back against this. And what it does is generates immunosuppressive environment. Soup one in Wichita riches. Switches the T.. Cells off on the other immune cells and really on subverts them to support the Does this immunosuppressive effect extend then beyond the tumor micro environment to the rest of the body or is it pretty localized. It tends to be localized to the actual Chima micro environment itself. Because we've got to remember that the cells the at the a very very specific on full the tumor itself so it generates sort of a small niche weather cells. Become we'd programmed an influenced by the environment itself. So what does having all of these different types of cells present help us. When we're thinking about ways to inhibit tumor growth? So when we're thinking about inhibiting CI mccray we can think of to on strategies very broadly so the first strategy and the one that's traditionally Russian people total. When they were thinking of drugs? That could talk at the Cheema. would-be Chuma intrinsic mechanisms. So those would be therapies. which would die? We talk the Cheema sales but now we can think about hole of a subset of therapies and these are the ones that will be talked to the other cell types which within the Cheema Might Cram Graham varmints best supporting achievement rife so if we can impact on that function then then now supporting the Cheema and we can even turn theirselves against the Cheema and then that way we can fight back. So it's like you're killing the protection around the tumor and therefore leading the body. Do its natural natural thing and defending against the tumor. Yes that's right so effectively. We're reactivating on the immune response as it is and we will send may be switching the phenotype five of some of the other cell types. which in the Huma so we can think as well as the immune system we can think of the vascular cells? The within the Cheema Might Kerr Garment. Nice saleslady that and they form the Bulls of the blood vessels. They supply the medicament new chance. Perhaps that could be a target cutting off the food supply yet and changing the metabolism. So you could think about strategies by talking yourselves we can say. Think about lymphatic. endothelial cells those form part and emphatic drainage they're taking away debris and metabolites from the tumor itself essentially keeping the environment mclane so again if we could impact on that then we might impact on the amount of danger signals that the chew Miss Generating Sort of the other cell types would be cancerous icy I took five glass. So CAIN FIBERGLASS and normally they're voting but these ones have been subjected to produce despite fat to lay down extra study in a matrix such smooth muscle up ten Collagen If we could talk at these cell types than we talk potentially attention to the framework in which sits and again. It's sort of just about mobilizing those cells and reprogramming them effectively to stop then and helping matchy mccray okay. So we've got the cells. That are helping the tumor get fed. We've got the cells helping. Keep the tumor environment clean. So what would the role of immune cells be in trying to create a therapy based on targeting the tumor micro environment. Tma Chima micro environments often contains on several different types of immune cells. But as we just mentioned the tumor really acts to switch these cells off it wants to survive that wants to grow and then the opposite of the immune system. It's coming in there. It's looking for danger. Signals nuys the team as abnormal. So it wants to go back to its job of killing the Cheema Sales The the two must sort of in a way that it's able to educate on the immune cells ineffective be switched them all in a goal that you have the selective pressure of having the immune system and then the tumor adapts to type with sales in the micro environments support. We often end dot webs Chima which has been infiltrated by mean cells. He's at the team. has actually influenced these cells to become regulatory uh-huh suppressive or switched off and clearly the role of a lot. It's therapies with Ben's Bay either to switch southbound colon ole to drive an the influx of new fresh immune cells into the Environments Obesity just get cells sort of right into the Tumor Micro Environment Rothman perhaps just sitting around the edge itself. There's a few different strategies. We can thank cope when thinking of the immune system in the context of Chima

Cheema Cheema Might Kerr Garment Vienna Jenkinson Director Of S Chima Cancer Research Rhiannon Charles Rivers Chairman Mccray Wichita Momaday Gray Bulls Mclane BEN Magrao Rothman
Thomas Cook collapses, leaving passengers stranded.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

06:23 min | 2 years ago

Thomas Cook collapses, leaving passengers stranded.

"Coming up on the news a Thomas Cook Airline in collapsed triggers largest peacetime repatriation in UK history Boris Johnson declines to comment on claims he awarded what is public funds to a friend and UN chief urges action to make Earth Carbon neutral by twenty fifty. It's Monday September twenty three. I'm Anthony Davis. A British tour operator rated Thomas Cook fell victim to multiple setbacks including shifting travel habits the rise of online booking sites the sinking pound and even unusually really hot weather that encouraged few northern Europeans to travel specific problems of its own like a one point six billion pounds debt pile made it less able to to react to change it all added up to a perfect storm that leads the one hundred and seventy eight year old company to cease operations. Elliott this morning stranding ending hundreds of thousands of travelers analysts said Thomas Cook which wrote a package holiday boom that started in the mid eighties was too slow to react as consumers huma moved away from buying trips bricks and mortar stores. The company did push into online business with forty percent of its bookings coming from the Internet has of last year yeah but not fast enough online rivals. Meanwhile didn't have to bear the costs of owning two hundred hotels five hundred travel agency shops and one hundred five airline jets but acted as middlemen but other factors late into the British travel company also company officials have cited uncertainty over Brexit Brexit' both from consumers worried about its impact on their finances and from the timing given that one unfulfilled deadline for Britain to leave the EU fell on March Watch thirty I just days before the heavy European Easter holiday travel season this year after twenty ten the Arab spring revolts discouraged travel to previous is UK favorites such as Egypt and Tunisia more than one hundred fifty thousand customers are currently stranded abroad leaving the UK government to to carry out what Foreign Secretary Dominic Robb calls the biggest peacetime repatriation in UK history. The job of bringing Thomas Cook customers estimates home falls to the United Kingdom Civil Aviation Authority who says the number of travellers being brought home is unprecedented. The agency says it has secured a fleet of aircraft from around the world to bring the passengers pack. Comores Johnson has repeatedly declined to comment on reported allegations he failed to declare close personal links to an American woman who received thousands thousands of pounds in public business funding while he was mayor of London the Prime Minister refused to answer six questions today about his links to Jennifer or curry curry a US technology entrepreneur a company run by curry received access to money to assist business as well as places on trade trips at times following the intervention of Meryl officials. It's also reported that Johnson was at the time a regular visitor to our curry's east London apartment and and that she described him at the time as one of my best friends the report said are curry's most recent company one one hundred thousand pound and government cyber skills grant intended to assist UK firms even though she has now returned to live in the US the Department for Culture Media and Sport Bolt has confirmed. It is investigating how the money was awarded. This isn't the first time Boris Johnson is accused of financial mismanagement during his time as man he famously spent millions on a new bus for London. That was less efficient than the ones. It was replacing. He builds a cable car that nobody used and commissioned Asian to garden bridge that cost fifty three million pounds despite never being built well leader after world leader told the United Nations today they would do more to prevent a warming world from reaching even more dangerous levels apples but as they made their pledges they conceded. It was not enough. Sixty six countries have promised to have more ambitious climate goals and thirty ETI swore to be carbon neutral by mid century heads of nations such as Finland in Gemini promised to ban coal within a decade Donald Trump dropped by by fifteen minutes listened to German Chancellor Angela Merkel's detailed pledges and then left without saying anything and even before world leaders made their promises is in three minutes speeches sixteen year olds climate activist Greta Tune Burke in an emotional speech chided the leaders with the repeated phrase. How how dare you this is all wrong. I shouldn't be up here. Tune Bug said I should be back in school on the other side of the ocean yet. You have come to US young people. I hope you have stolen my dreams and my childhood with your empty words. We will not let you get away with tune. Berg said right now is where we draw the line. UN Secretary General Antonio Guiterrez opened the climate action summit by saying Earth is issuing a chilling cry. Stop Gutierrez told world leaders that it's not a time to negotiate. He said the world can hit it strictest temperature goal but to act to make the world carbon-neutral literal by twenty fifty you can subscribe to the news with your favorite podcast. APP Oskar Smart Speaker or enable the news as your Amazon Alexa Flash briefing skill follow us on twitter at the news underscore podcast. The news news is an independent production covering politics inequality health and climate delivering honest verified and truthful World News daily.

UK Boris Johnson Thomas Cook United States Curry UN Thomas Cook Airline London World News Anthony Davis United Kingdom Civil Aviation United Nations Comores Johnson Elliott Brexit Brexit
"huma" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"huma" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Name Huma, log will remain on the market. Now, you say, how can it cost so much influenced been around a long time? It's patent manipulation what Senator Kennedy called the patent thicket on this show yesterday. If you want to take that on goat at Bill Senator Kathy not Senator Kennedy confused, the two from Louisiana, go to drug pricing, truth dot com drug price. Tsing troop dot com. Bill, Cassidy said, doc bell said they're going to fix this, and even though the country is deadlocked. And there's a standoff between Trump and Pelosi, I believe that will in fact happen, how much of his stand up, I want you to hear what the president said yesterday, starting with cut number seven. So I came here to do a meeting on infrastructure with Democrats. Not really thinking they wanted to do infrastructure or anything else, other than investigate, and I just saw that Nancy Pelosi just before meeting made a statement that we believe that the president of the United States is engaged in a cover-up. Well, it turns out the most I think most of you would agree to this. I'm the most transparent president probably in the history of this country. We have given on a witch hunt hoax. The whole thing with Russia was a hoax, as it relates to the Trump administration myself. It was a total horrible thing that happened to our country. It hurt us in so many ways, despite that we're setting records with the economy with jobs with the most imp-, most people employed today that we've ever had in the history of our country. We have the best unemployment numbers that we've had in the history of our country in some cases, fifty one years, but generally the history of country. Companies are moving back in things are going well, and I said, let's have the meeting on infrastructure. We'll get that done easily. That's one of these ones. And instead of walking in happily into a meeting, I walk into look at people that are just said that I was doing a cover up. I don't do cover-ups you people know that probably better than anybody. This is not usual for president to do. He is obviously angry as possible with being the attempt by Nancy Pelosi to manipulate. She wanted what happened yesterday. She got it. She wanted the president to, to leave the meeting he did. But I don't know that she doesn't understand if she understands what the country thinks about this. I do not believe the Democrats are well served by impeachment. Go for it guys go for it. I watched the Republicans run up that hill in nineteen Ninety-seven and get slaughtered in the nineteen ninety eight elections. Go ahead. Run up impeachment hill. President continue cut number twenty three. And I was just looking at a list of some of the things that. Would just did more than two thousand five hundred subpoenas qualified for, and I let they talk, I let the White House counsel speak to thirty hours thirty hours. I have nineteen special counsel lawyers,.

president Nancy Pelosi Senator Kennedy Bill Senator Kathy Trump Huma Louisiana special counsel White House United States Russia doc bell Cassidy thirty hours fifty one years
"huma" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:04 min | 2 years ago

"huma" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A cheaper version of Huma log its insulin drug Huma, log is one of the most widely sold insulin drugs in the United States between two thousand nine and two thousand seventeen the wholesale price of a single vial tripled, according to data from IBM Watson health to two hundred and seventy four dollars and seventy cents. So what does the availability of cheaper version mean? That's what we'll ask health reporter Bram sable Smith, who's based in Madison Wisconsin, thanks for joining us. Thank you. So tell us what kind of insulin. We're talking about here because someone who needs insulin can need a combination of different kinds. Right. That's exactly right. So what we're talking about is a fast acting insulin. So for most patients that's about half the insulin that they use the other half is going to be we call basal. And that's just to keep your blood sugar to normal rate this fast acting insulin. This is what you use when you're eating carbohydrates, and how much you used depends on how many carbohydrates you eat. So you need less when you're eating a small salad, then you do for when you eat a big ball pasta. Like I did last night. Okay. So they're promising a discount on one of the kinds of insulin somebody with diabetes needs. So is it actually a break financially? Well for some consumers. Yes, it will be so intimacy potential a little bit cheaper for them. Most patients use one or two vials of insulin per month in this new insulin is priced at just under one hundred thirty eight dollars per vial now because of insurance most patients about ninety five percent are already paying less than one hundred dollars per vial. So the impact of this new insulin is really aimed at people who were exposed to the high list prices, and those are people with high deductible health plans as well as the uninsured. And for them the cost of a vial could drop in half from two hundred eighty dollars to one hundred thirty eight dollars. But remember, this is only one of the two types of insulin that they probably need. Why is the company doing it? Well, they say they're doing it to help people the context for this timing here. The timing of this announcement is that they've been allowed stories about people who've suffered and even died because they couldn't afford their insulin drug companies recently got grilled by the US Senate, and it was a bipartisan grilling in Minnesota last October, the outgoing state attorney general actually sued the three big insulin makers alleging price-gouging, so there's a lot of pressure here. There's lots of bad press. And this is almost a low stakes way for them to say that they're offering a cheaper product. All right last question, you've written a lot about insulin and diabetes because you were actually diagnosed with type one diabetes in your twenties. What kind of reaction have you seen among not only activists on this issue? But also just people living with this condition. Yeah. There's a lot of conversation. What I like to call diabetes Twitter's. Well, I'd say it's been met with a lot of ambivalence. And a fair amount of frustration so buying insulin. It's not a choice for people with type one diabetes. You either take it and you live or you don't take it, and you die. Those are the stakes for being able to afford insulin. So one thing to remember is that human log entered the market in nineteen Ninety-six at about twenty one dollars per vial. So this generic.

diabetes Huma Bram sable Smith Madison Wisconsin US Senate United States IBM Watson reporter Twitter Minnesota attorney one hundred thirty eight dolla two hundred eighty dollars seventy four dollars ninety five percent one hundred dollars twenty one dollars