40 Burst results for "Hulu"

Fresh update on "hulu" discussed on /Film Daily

/Film Daily

00:58 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "hulu" discussed on /Film Daily

"Who are like the big lizards this year? Also. Before I do that, I will say that on the side suggestion was another big winner Hbo really was a huge winner overall because watchman also won some key categories including best limited series succession took home best drama. As far as the losers because succession did so well, better call Saul didn't come away with anything Ozark only came away with one award for Julia Garner on and really the streaming services. Overall we're kind of the biggest losers because HBO dominated the Hell Out of the EMMYS and then since ditch creek dominated the comedy category, Pop TV your pop whatever the channel is called was big over there. So Hulu Netflix Apple TV plus they were kind of left out in the wind and they didn't win very much. Okay, let's let's move on from the EMMYS because I'm sure a lot of people who are don't even care about the award shows Let's talk about Marvel which a lot of people care about everybody cares about Marvel they've announced that they're making a Miss Marvel TV series and we now know Who the directors are going to be bent house better at least some of the directors I'm not sure if there are any more yet to be hired, but marvel has announced or a through the vision blog in Hollywood reporter word came out that several directors have been hired to direct this Ms Marvel Series on Disney. So among them are El rb and Bill Fella who are the two directors who made a bad boys for life earlier this year, which by the way I just looked and to confirm this, which is the bad boys for life is still the highest grossing movie of Twenty Twenty. Like worldwide, which is I never thought that you know in a normal year I I think it's safe to say that wouldn't be the case but here we are weird weird year. And then also Charmian Abbad Chinoy who actually a two time Oscar winner for the documentary short film category is directing and Meera Menon, who has previously actually worked with marvel before by writing episodes up the punisher is also going to be directing this show. So for those who maybe don't know anything at all about Ms Marvel because she hasn't appeared in the movies yet. It's about a Kamala Khan, who is a Pakistani American teen and Marvel's first Muslim Superhero to get her own comic title and the show is announced at twenty three last year there are. Rumors still swirling about who might be cast and all that kind of stuff they're still in the casting process but they haven't They have locked down a lead yet. So we expect to hear more about this very soon the timetable in terms of like win exactly the show is going to air or shoot or you know how it's going to connect to other things is still we're still too far out to know about that but it's cool that I think that marble and Disney are tapping these like relatively These people are not household names but I think. Some of this will anyway will add a little bit of an era of of authenticity to. This character that means a lot to a lot of people. Yeah. It's also interesting that they have a bunch of different directors here where I think there I what three series are directed by one one person each right is that correct? Matt Shankman Jackman is Wanda Division who is Loki I don't have that on top ahead. Yeah. I don't remember the name but I think I think you're right on that and Falcon Winter? Soldier had. Herring line. Yeah. Yeah Yeah I think that's true and so I, guess it's sort of like the the main laureate approach a little bit right like spreading the wealth a little bit from episodes episode. Yeah. I wonder what? The what the what the idea behind the change of that if if today was normal times, there'd be a black widow junket where I could ask him if I you this question, but it's probably not going to happen you. Can. Zoom me at home is eating. Okay let's talk another one was talking about she hulk they have finally found. An actress to play the she hulk us better yet Tatyana Malani, who is probably still best known for her work. Playing multiple roles on orphan black is is going to be playing the lead character in she hulk which in. She Hulk Jennifer who is a lawyer and we talked a little bit about this on a previous episode where she is sort of a, you know a jacked up full on hulk. Doing a hoax stuff in a courtroom and practicing law actively in all of that. So. I think she's a she's Bruce Banner cousin in in some versions of the the mythos mythology or what have you the lower of marvel so It's unclear if they're actually going to, you know retain that specific thing for the show but Tatyana Masonic is really great i. I loved her in. What was the name of that movie with Nicole Kidman that just came out last year that I am totally blanking on and I'm not. Hang. On one second I totally know the I totally know the movie by did not see it. So I don't even remember the name s I really liked it. Why am I not totally blanking on this Nicole Kidman for God's sake imdb pull this up the destroyer Yes destroyer. Thank you. Oh Wow. Yeah. I can't believe it took that long to get. That was the two thousand, eighteen, L. Man I'm time is is insane guys but Yes. Tatyana was was really good in a very small role in destroyer, which I think is a movie that not enough people have seen and I encourage everybody to check out. There's there's a lot to like about that film in particular. She's she's great. She's like a big She's really funny. She's been on parks and REC doing guest stints here and there. And she's just one of those all around great performers. So I'm glad to see her I guess joined the Marvel family. Yes. She's also in that HBO Perry Mason which I have not seen I. Don't know much about she hulk but last time we learned that like she's always the hulk all the time right? Like she doesn't become human like she doesn't have that Bruce Banner the hulk transition does does she like? Get anger fits like the hulk. Or is she always kind of like she more like smart hall core she's level headed all the time I. Don't know I think I saw Alan seven wall. WHO's a really famous TV critic I think he writes for Rolling Stone Right now I, think he mentioned like that be she is going to be transitioning between like I guess a traditional human form and more of the the whole version. So I I don't know where he got that from I'm not sure if he's basing that on a particular comic run that is being used as inspiration here. But I guess and again, this is the type of show that's still a little bit too far out for us to know in terms of scheduling and all that I think. We. We don't have enough concrete facts right now to to really. Say either way. But yes, I did see that being floated as as a possibility yeah. Because obviously she has to become she hulk and then according to her wikipedia..

Marvel Nicole Kidman HBO Tatyana Malani Disney Marvel Family Bruce Banner Saul Hulu Twenty Twenty Ditch Creek Charmian Abbad Chinoy Julia Garner Bill Fella Tv Critic Kamala Khan Matt Shankman Jackman Reporter
Fresh update on "hulu" discussed on American Hysteria

American Hysteria

03:34 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "hulu" discussed on American Hysteria

"So this came in two, thousand sixteen, a lot of people were like, Oh, it's because it came out, but it's not because it came out in two thousand eighteen. So part of what people believe sparked it was outside of sort of cultural consciousness was the low budget horror director named Adam Kraus. He had a creepy clown stand in the street holding black balloons trying to make a viral marketing campaign for his short film which was called. Gags, and then a bunch of people called the police and started taking pictures spreading on social media. Another possible beginning point was, have you guys watched I? Well, I Mike You Probably have it but Sarah have you watched the wrinkles the clown documentary on Hulu I have not what is so wrinkles was this character created by someone who has remained anonymous he is just kind of seems like normal dude and they started filming like creepy clown stuff and spreading it found footage. He put up all these stickers that said wrinkles the clown with a phone number and you could call this phone number and there was a creepy message or he would answer the phone and you know he was like A. Little kind of voice and. And he also kind of created this idea that parents could call so that there to scare their kids into obedience so parents would actually call and leave messages not actually wanting wrinkles to come, but you can hear the kids crying and screaming in the background is being like we're gonNA call wrinkles Adam come over if you don't eat your dinner awhile, but it was a a bogeyman Nari right it was coming a couple years before the actual panicked. So two, thousand, sixteen, we've got suddenly this group of kids in Greenville South South Carolina are saying that a clown was trying to lure them in the woods but in perfect to twenty-six. With candy but with large amounts of cash. Capitalism is so that these clowns flashed green lasers at them came to their door in rattling chains and banging around he left a trail of tide pods in the woods, for example. I'm twenty sixteen anyway. Of course, in classic fashion. The mom of one of the children's sort of fuels this by contacting the local news and coming on and they interview a lot of the children who were again like about seven years old and it's so cute and. He's like that I saw clouded the woods at he poet. Darling. For the mother is like they might. She might as well be leading like some new coalition against clowns like out. She's like a mad like mothers against drunk driving thing going on mother's against forest cloud. So she reports it So then more and more people start reporting it because on the news right and so one woman says there's a clown with a blinking knows near a dumpster but I kinda think it's just this weird attention thing right? Like the poison Halloween Candy you have people jamming tax into candy and then putting it on facebook and it gets like forty thousand shares or something. Is there any evidence that there were ever any actual clowns? There is no evidence but I think that some of it had to be. Because if I was a teenager in this was going on, there's a part of me that might have like done some jokes. Well, this is the thing is if we're in the middle of like a clown panic, it actually makes a lot of sense to go dress as a clown in fuck with people oh. Yeah I'm sure that happened. So basically, those same children, the Kinda were the first ones in South Carolina told police that a clown lived in a house near a pond at the end of betrayal trail through the woods which is..

Adam Kraus Greenville South South Carolin South Carolina Adam Director Hulu Sarah Facebook
Fresh update on "hulu" discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

00:36 sec | 10 hrs ago

Fresh update on "hulu" discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"There's a darkness inside all of us in push comes to shove who or what do we become Hulu. Presents a new original eight part horror anthology series monster land based on North American Lake Monsters the award winning collection of short stories by Nathan Balan Greg Monster Land Explores the faint line of man and monster as weaves a complex tapestry of horror that fully immerses the audience in its twisted world keeping audiences guessing as to who the monsters truly are. Monster land premiers all episodes exclusively on Hulu October Second Visit Hulu Dot Com for more..

Hulu Nathan Balan North American Lake
Fresh update on "hulu" discussed on Marketing Over Coffee

Marketing Over Coffee

02:53 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "hulu" discussed on Marketing Over Coffee

"This is what will. Seems to have a statistically higher probability of winning and then set up an experiment. You roll out some content you do some AB testing the follow the scientific method and test out these new ideas and these new ideas are winners guess what you may have discovered. A way to pivot your inbound marketing to be even more effective without having to spend a whole lot extra money. Yeah, that's great. I'll have a link to what we call the cheese report. There's a report that we do. That shows how this would work. You'd have all these terms and it will actually show you week by week when topics are rising the it's a little bit different that you're not analyzing your data. This is some external data that you're able to grab, but it just builds your content calendar. You may know intuitively like these are the ten topics that we normally write about but to be able to say okay. In March the third week of March. That's when we the content on Cheddar or it's late May we write about Hulu me because it's a grilled cheese and it's going to peak in July and August. You know you get some insights and you build your content calendar instead of I've been there myself right you your content calendar. You're basically just like throwing the word. Down on the calendar and that's just like, okay here's the with the weeks by the months you can actually put some science behind that. So yeah I don't any other applications of that that people should be aware of is kind of easy hits. So easy hits not necessarily. There's are some really great has and what's coming is going to radically change how we do inbound marketing. There's a whole sub section called natural language generation where machines are writing words and phrases in topics and sentences and even documents themselves. We're probably a good year or two out from having these commercially viable and accessible to marketers but. That will dramatically change how we do our content marketing because. If you are creating a blog post a week for your topic of choice and your competitor has an ai that can generate readable coherent text and Cohen put out a thousand blog posts a week guess who's going to win the war it ain't going to be you. Yeah you the complete overwhelming odds of that are not in your favorite whatsoever you're going to kill. All right. So I there is text mining second is network graphing. Now, in the past, you've done a lot of these events clouds and we've done for spot in the past to be able to just instantly see not who the most popular you know. Social media accounts are the ones with the most followers, but the ones that actually get the engagement digging deeper more like the way search engine looks at as far as referring traffic. You know somebody put something out there and actually the largest percentage of the audience engages with it re tweets it replies and the content that actually works in. Gross. But again. So first off, is that the the best use of network graphing now are using that other stuff..

Hulu Cohen
Fresh update on "hulu" discussed on Business Wars

Business Wars

03:23 min | 17 hrs ago

Fresh update on "hulu" discussed on Business Wars

"A billion dollar business and he's enjoying living the high life. The fire engine and the Lincoln K or just the latest toys he's already used domino's money to buy a fleet of aircraft and island and the Detroit Tigers. Baseball. Team. He's also blowing more than one hundred million dollars on building domino swanky new headquarters. But. Before the aid can urge caution the auction resumes Knicks this unique. Lincoln Model K convertible used by the King and Queen of England on their nineteen thirty nine tour. Canada. Monahan locks eyes with the Arizona car dealer. They both want this one the auctioneers senses the high roller rivalry. It looks like the light wage better get to the back for this opening at one fifty, one, fifty, one, fifty, one, fifty, one. Day Monahan bad at one, fifty, seven, six, zero, one, six. Oh, get him upset about one sixty, car dealer shouts out one, nine ninety. One hundred setup in go that's two, hundred, two hundred. Now, where's that? Two? Hundred? Monahan raises a hand bid at two hundred we go in and out and do ten once again. Do I hear a two ten to one or two from friends in the front there to ten to ten now you got the money is tantamount unit to ten. Dan the Arizona dealer counters so To Ten and twenty now twenty, thousand, twenty, two, twenty, eight whispers in Monahan Z.. Tom You've already spent two hundred thousand dollars today Yorkshire near looks at Monahan. Sees as frowning, he looks back at the auctioneer shakes his head. Pass this or it's gone dude going once going twice it. For Two hundred and ten thousand dollars. The car dealer leaps out. Yes I stole that car. The A.. Now I'm proud of you for letting go Tom. Monahan smiles. He's proud of himself to. After all he could have easily outbid that guy five times over. Monahan knows he's hot stuff and it's all the sweeter given where he's come from. I as a kid dumped by his mom in a Catholic orphanage where the nuns would wash his mouth out with soap for bad behavior. Then as the struggling businessman fending off conmen an arm debt collectors. Now he's the rags to riches pizza billionaire living the American dream. But while he revels in his riches, he's forgotten the proverb, the nuns at the orphanage used a hammer into. The one about how pride? Comes before the fall. Support for this podcast and the following message comes the Disney. Bundle. Get the Disney Bundle which includes Disney plus Hulu and ESPN plus all for only twelve ninety nine a month at the Disney. Bundle DOT COM includes Hulu ad-supported plan access content from each service separately. When you need your bank capital, one is right in the palm of your hand. So you can check your balance deposit checks, pay bills, and transfer money off from your phone with a top rated APP and when you're done banking, just put it back in your pocket, a banking experience built around you and your life. This is banking reimagined get started online anytime. What's in your wallet? Capital one in a member FDIC. From wondering I'm David Brown.

Monahan Knicks Arizona TOM Disney Domino Detroit Tigers Baseball Canada Fdic Queen Of England Hulu David Brown DAN Espn Yorkshire
What's new for TV, Movies And Video Games This Week

Geeks Under the Influence

02:32 min | 2 weeks ago

What's new for TV, Movies And Video Games This Week

"Hello everyone and welcome. It is the Gui recap. It's a recap of all the things that are going to have the week of September seventeen, twenty, twenty before it happens. My name is Bruce and let's get started with the Gui pick of the week. I'M GONNA go with Superman Man of tomorrow comes out on DVD and Blu Ray this week This is yet another year one slash origin story of the man of steel like we really need. One of those does anybody not know how Superman got his powers and who he is and Blah Blah Blah seriously. Are Right for TV pages on Monday ABC has the bachelor's greatest seasons ever finale NBC has the Premiere of American Ninja Warrior and Nat go has the premiere of life below zero for Tuesday ABC has a finale of what would you do? For Wednesday CBS as forty eight hours suspicion that's a premier. For Thursday ABC has the finale of Holy Moly and NBC has the NFL Twenty Twenty season begins with the Houston Texas taking on the Kansas City chiefs. Thankfully, some amount of normalcy is coming back. We've got football. Art for Friday, paramount network has built tour MMA live Saturday. CBS as the premiere of forty eight hours and. Has. The premiere of birds of prey and Sunday CW has the finale of fridge wars. For movies coming out this week you have the broken heart gallery This is the film about a young woman living in New York. City, who after being dumped decides to start a gallery where people can leave trinkets from pass relationships or for the items of love has left behind Oh whatever for DVD's like I said, you've got Superman man of tomorrow and first cow. For On Line Services Net flicks you have so much love to give get organized with home edit season one la- Alina shadow of narcos season one, the social dilemma. Julie and the phantoms season one, duchess season one and family business season to Hulu you have the premiere of woke season one for video games you have kingdoms of Millar re reckoning for the PS four, xbox one and P C.

ABC Kansas City Chiefs CBS NBC Bruce Paramount Network Hulu New York Julie NFL Houston Texas Football
Internet Is Down (MM #3450)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 2 weeks ago

Internet Is Down (MM #3450)

"Mason Minute The with I what's What's of to internet Yeah down kind it? realize before came the one online cloud called was figured was and other provider. lot things maybe Twitter Reddit Hulu also players it much frustrating you why happening. like Sorry You around. work, not One things days happens You And for you It's if point?

Mason Twitter
Intro to Amazon Alexa with Dave Isbitski

Sound in Marketing

05:02 min | Last month

Intro to Amazon Alexa with Dave Isbitski

"What have you seen recently in? The the creativeness that's been explored through smart speakers in skills and just function in general. We were an oratory. Society and people. Long I mean you talk about the Gutenberg Revolution in the printing press which really made you know the written word accessible to everyone it was you know talk was not cheap talk was everything if you take the Bible and you take scripture when you had rabbis that would quote they had entire chapters memorized and if you said something wrong people around, you corrected that right and we live in this age where talk is cheap right and you don't believe everything that's that's that's written. Also. Lost that art of communication you know when you're communicating. You, need to understand that behind every question is a questionnaire, right? We're all human beings and that's what got me most excited through. All of this is when I was a little kid I would get excited about back. Then it was commodore. I. Get excited about computers and I go and tell my parents and they'd be like I have no idea what you're talking about and that was a theme throughout my entire career like I felt excitement and I saw and there was just a barrier to tech and thing you know because we had to we couldn't have computers really understand human the intention but I, remember being like. Why. Is this so hard and it just every? You know I've been fortunate if I got to be part of the desktop revolution. And Client Server, and then watch the Internet grow and start and do html pages in mobile and clap and through all of this, we just left behind. I gave up explaining to family members or people in the neighborhood. What it is I even did they just didn't understand and smartphone came. How many apps don't get updated is don't get updated and they're just had to be a better way, and now we're at this point we're like talking to my mother-in-law she was telling me things she does with Alexa like asking when thirty. Roxanne on than I even know was there was a skill. They're excited and use this as much as my kids and I do and I've never seen that and that I think was what's really got me excited as it's back to human beings in, it's also to see during this pandemic. Just to share with you like. Skill usage and so I'm not sure if your your listeners know skill usage although a lot of people have used skills now I think the stats are around three out of four people that haven't Alexis have used at least skill when we created Alexa we knew. People were going to have conversations about all sorts of things, and we wanted to create a way for anybody to teach Alexa to have a conversation about something. And we do that as human beings in understanding context, and so you and I know what day of the month it is. We know what the weather's like outside where you are. You know we have some background we talked a little bit before this context, and so the I had really had to learn that of what is actually when I say something. What does that mean in the in that context? That's the way skills are. So if I create and I want to have a conversation about fitness, I, need to understand what a metabolic rate is. Would a heart rate is I mean all all of these things vernacular in a lexicon and that's really what Alexa skills are is have a conversation about anything And then you can share these with everybody. So we go through a certification process where Amazon we review it make sure that it does what it says it does and it's safe Amazon customers. And then we've also released over time because we heard from people saying, Hey, I'm not a developer, but I still want to create these conversations for Alexis. So we have blueprints which anybody can go to blueprints dot Amazon Dot Com and do these things visually right and so here we are in the past three months and I can tell you that just in the past two months skill usage worldwide is up over sixty five percent. We're seeing Alexa voice search like on fire TV that's also increasing. You know where you can ask, you can even go through not just Amazon Prime, but net flicks Hulu it's just a natural. To be able to ask for things spontaneous. It's inclusive. It just gets these these interfaces. Out of the way and what's great about this is you don't have to trust Dave one. You could ask Alexi yourself you can say Alexa, what are your top skills or Alexa? I want to play games so a lot of this you can do with your voice. Now we've enabled reviews to see you can give. You Know Five Star Review just with your voice you can get feedback to like if you have a suggestion for us, you can actually say Alexa of feedback. But what you can do outside of the mobile APP what I suggest to people who just go to Amazon dot com slash skills. And then you can look like anything else on Amazon. So you could say I want this category four stars up and you'll see some of these skills have like twenty thousand plus customer reviews and they are saying what are they actually doing

Alexa Amazon Roxanne Alexi Five Star Review Developer Alexis Dave
Selena Gomez To Star With Steve Martin & Martin Short In Hulu Comedy Series ‘Only Murders In the Building’

Colleen and Bradley

00:11 sec | Last month

Selena Gomez To Star With Steve Martin & Martin Short In Hulu Comedy Series ‘Only Murders In the Building’

"Returning to TV and a comedy for Hu Lu. It's called only Murderers in the building. And she is going to start an executive produce alongside Steve Martin and Martin Short in this

Hu Lu Steve Martin Martin Short Executive
Disney lost nearly $5 billion last quarter, but stock prices surged

KCRW's Hollywood Breakdown

03:23 min | Last month

Disney lost nearly $5 billion last quarter, but stock prices surged

"Disney is really an interesting story right now, it is massively exposed to the pandemic. They have just recently announced their results. They lost a staggering amount of money and yet they have some good news about their streaming service and it's like the market just. Has Undying confidence because of the power of Disney's intellectual property well, and the fact that they have pivoted to streaming in a major way I mean only in twenty twenty can you lose four point seven billion dollars in a quarter and have your stock go up because you also announced that you're streaming business hit sixty million subscribers for Disney plus one hundred, million subscribers include Hulu. and. ESPN plus I mean this is the craziness of meteorite. Now in that the the The Walt, Disney Company was more exposed than anybody else to this pandemic because the parks were shut down for most of the second quarter these parks were not operating not generating revenue and they're movie business was essentially shut down because for most of the quarter they were not allowed to release. Movies in theaters yet because the future of the business is in streaming and people on Wall Street and elsewhere are looking to growth in those categories to see if Disney will ever be able to compete with Netflix on that front it's actually a mixed bag for the quarter because streaming is great. Yes Jiming great I mean they don't charge that much for it's seven dollars a month. They have certainly tried to figure out how to keep it stocked. Challenge that Disney has really faced. They came out with the man delorean and then there was just incredibly long pause when you're talking about anything for a person over the age of whatever. Some people are love all of it for life, but primarily, their stuff had been appealing to kids. netflix's firing out new stuff. To the point where you can't possibly keep track of it. Disney was really kind of a bit stalled out. It seemed they had Hamilton and. They got a lot of noise with Hamilton putting the film online, and now they're doing a really big experiment that could affect the future of this industry, which is to put Moulin a two, hundred, million dollar plus film on demand not at the twenty dollar price point that you know universal charge for the trolls released but at thirty dollars. ESSENTIALLY THIRTY DOLLARS And they're saying it's a one off but they're also saying we're GONNA learn from this. This is a one off until it isn't and the interesting thing is that they're not just charging thirty dollars for it, but they're only making it available for Disney plus subscribers. So if you're not one of those sixty million subscribers who already get Disney plus you're GONNA have to sign up for the service and then pay thirty dollars to get Milan it's an interesting strategy. Mean they doing that because if they put it on regular premium video on demand, they would have to share a lot of that price with the platforms that help them That sale up here there's some rumors that they may be sharing a little bit of the price with the theaters that were promised movie that hasn't been confirmed but if they're willing to put it behind essentially a paywall and a paywall, we're really going to see what the demand is for this kind of high-quality a-list Disney content in a streaming

Disney Netflix Espn Hamilton Milan Moulin Hulu.
Roku Shares Jump After Stronger-Than-Expected Results

Talking Tech

00:33 sec | Last month

Roku Shares Jump After Stronger-Than-Expected Results

"Once again, cove has wrecked many companies but there are fringe benefits for those in the streaming Business Roku. The maker of streaming players said that viewing hours are up some sixty five percent over the last quarter some two point three, billion hours of streaming video is viewed in the quarter and Roku says. It now has forty three, million users not just this week Disney said it now has over one hundred million subscribers to its streaming services, which include Disney plus and Hulu to good time to be in the streaming business.

Disney Hulu
More Shows To Watch If You Liked HBO's Watchmen

The Popcast With Knox and Jamie

04:42 min | Last month

More Shows To Watch If You Liked HBO's Watchmen

"We're GONNA talk about recommendations. I for the long haul and these are things that we are either current or in the way back and there's this you know the. He is like when I sit down to try find something there's so much going on that I spent like an hour being watched I don't WanNa Watch. That should do this and it's like I, just want someone tell me what to watch. That's what we're going to hear for. Yeah. So we're GONNA basis off the some of the nominees for best show in the emmy categories I start off with HBO's watchmen as from Damon Lindelof this set in an alternative universe and drafting off the ground and comic book watchmen is It's like this dazzling procedure designed to also make you think that twenty six emmy nominations, the most of any serious. Like NERF gun to your head best show of the year. What would you say? Oh, it's watchmen watchmen to me like for limited series. So it's an a different categories, but I would even say it's better than all dramas on I. Think. So it's it's crowning achievement of TV this. So for sharp for me, I'm I'm thinking of like I want a show that looks great. Visually also will make me think. So I I wanted to go directly off of Damon Lindelof because I feel like he's kind of peak of his powers right now. So guys are wondering like other stuff he's done and I I can't think about the leftovers it's a similarly. It's a great show. It's alternative universe incredibly well, made really thoughtful but also like very simplistic in terms of you applying it to your that feels like watchmen felt current but also set in a different time. And leftovers current but also sat in a different times. So I love that the weirdness of the masks in watchmen which was so precious. So yeah, it's it's. It's phenomenal the other one I was thinking of when I want to. Recommend a show in in that Washington vein I'll say Black Mirror it's close enough. It's not really narrative based. Yeah. It's vignettes and different standalone stories, but it's kind of an alternate. Reality it looks close enough to realize that you're not sure that it's not. Yeah. But it's also telling us some darkened weird stuff about yourself. And the good thing about Black Mirror is to watch it. You're not watching it in each episode is its own Y'all episode so That's will put like some of our own favorite episodes that we both have really loved that we can include in the note. So you don't have to wonder because listen that first episode it's Just you just need to skip it. Hear me if you don't hear anything else if you don't hear Jamie doing the weird change of momentum at the beginning of the show if you forgot that already that's okay. Forget it. Here me this do not watch the first episode. Mom Don't do it dad don't do it much mom don't do it nobody do. It. Would be a mistake. Okay. It's a for me. If you love watchmen where you're like, that seems like it's good. Let me tell you to other shows that are good. So on that flakes, you can watch Jessica Jones I chose this because you got strong female lead just like you have in watchman, you have a superhero component which you also have and Jessica Jones it's dark. It's Gritty the villain in Jessica Jones is played by David tennant in that first season and he is per faction it keeps you on your toes. It's also very you're very to the visuals also recommending legion. Hulu. That's weird. Right because I think when you watch watchman, you're like I'm confused. Limits where you're like I, need to watch this again. Being, existing Ip it makes you think should I know that and I can confirm I. Didn't know. And watchmen I would sometimes read like recaps after I. Would Watch an episode and that would help me catch things maybe that I didn't grab the first time with Legion stars Dan Stevens? Famous playing. Matthew on. Downton Abbey He. It's a done by Noah. All Superhero Jason because this is the story of professor x his incredibly powerful, mentally ill mutant sign and so it's it also stars Jean Smart who is also in watchmen man she's in a Lotta. Golf that she has very good taste, and so it's weird enough that you're like It's not that classic Superhero which is what I also like about watchmen if we had done if we'd time traveled and done a designing women saying draft Jean Smart would not be my. Number. One pick would be any pots it would be we'll for private. Not. It be any pods, Anthony Delta Burke Julia sugarbakers. dixie Carter lab next to last over Jean Smart. Yeah. My point here is everyone would have been before Jean Smart Jean Smart was second. I'm going to be in Sweet Home Alabama and you're not going to know what to do with the low key cares. Okay.

Watchmen Jean Smart Jean Smart Damon Lindelof Emmy Jessica Jones HBO Anthony Delta Burke Julia Suga Jamie Hulu David Tennant Sweet Home Alabama Matthew Washington Dan Stevens Golf Noah Jason Professor
Review: amazing TCL/Roku TV for $229

Talking Tech

03:07 min | Last month

Review: amazing TCL/Roku TV for $229

"Graham here with a question when the last time you bought yourself a new. Year after year. You know I've been amazed at the falling prices of sets that would garner seven hundred dollars two thousand dollars just a few years ago, and I just picked up a new forty three inch, T. C. L. set with roku built in for two hundred and twenty nine dollars. Two hundred and twenty nine dollars for a display that offers four K. HD, resolution and HDR. But forget about the acronyms I'm just amazed at what you can get now for two hundred bucks. I bought the TV for a non traditional reason to use it as a giant computer monitor to watch videos that I have edited on my laptop on my little sixteen inch laptop. So I paid fifteen dollars for a ten foot HD my cord. That's the Court of course that connects the TV to other devices and I connected it to my apple macbook pro. It went directly to the TV. I didn't have to spring for an additional twenty five to fifty dollars for a separate. Roku streaming player right so I saved money. The footage looks so great at forty three inches I had to wonder why anybody would go out and spend big bucks on a computer monitor a quick look on Amazon in a forty three inch LG monitor is upwards of six hundred bucks wow. So the other thing once I sit up the TV. I never had to plug in antenna cable box or anything defined oodles of programming. All I needed was a WIFI signal. roku screen name and Password and suddenly I had five hundred APPs available on the platform. A lot of them wanted money from me, but there was many that didn't there was so much free stuff I couldn't believe it. I mean I come from a generation that's used to connecting things to the TV whether that be streaming box whether that be an antenna whether that be a cable box. I mean this is amazing. I can act the nothing. so the APPS. There's the usual Pandora Hulu Amazon Prime Video Netflix's s on and on two big ones missing Hbo Max in NBC's Peacock. Financial negotiations, and then there's the roku channel which is a homegrown collection that supported movies and TV shows mostly on the older side. Batman bewitched movies like the perfect storm, dogs and cats. Crimson tide. And live news channels and these are really good from ABC. NBC and CBS. Accord cutters dream no cable needed. All you need is Wifi and you get more stuff than you'd ever Wanna see without connecting anything. So how cool is that? The picture quality I would rate as a ten for a two hundred dollar TV or five on the overall scale. If you're comparing it to the best of breed leads a fifty inch led from Samsung cost eight hundred dollars for the TCL set. You'll have to sit right in front of it. Turn the lights on low and not be on the sides and that way the pitcher will look its best for a savings of six hundred dollars I can do that.

NBC Amazon Graham Samsung Apple T. C. L. Batman LG Hulu ABC Netflix WAN CBS
Amazon, Hulu Led Surge in Ads on TV to Exploit Loss of Sports

WIOD Programming

00:23 sec | 2 months ago

Amazon, Hulu Led Surge in Ads on TV to Exploit Loss of Sports

"No doubt noticed more commercials for screaming video services. There was a surge in advertising for Amazon prime who blew Disney plus Apple TV and CBS all access in the first half of the year. The streaming services are hoping the absence of sports will help them build their audiences. The two most seen ads were for Amazon, Prime's Hunters and Mrs America and Lulu. Nearly

Amazon Mrs America Disney CBS Apple
Elisabeth Moss to Star in ‘Shining Girls’ Thriller Series at Apple

TV's Top 5

00:29 sec | 2 months ago

Elisabeth Moss to Star in ‘Shining Girls’ Thriller Series at Apple

"Amazon has handed out a series order for paper girls. A drama based on the bestselling graphic novel from Bryan Cave on Netflix has renewed the summer sleeper, sweet magnolias for a second season and apple has picked up the thriller the Shining. Girls starring. Elisabeth Moss to series and speaking of the handmaid's tale. Elizabeth Moths has also signed a first look TV deal with Fox twenty-one and Hulu and is developing an anthology series for the streamer in which she would also star.

Elizabeth Moths Elisabeth Moss Bryan Cave Amazon Hulu Apple Netflix FOX
Floodgate and tEQuitable

Zero to IPO

04:39 min | 2 months ago

Floodgate and tEQuitable

"Welcome back to another episode of Zeroed IPO and we have to awesome guesses. Good Morning Lisa Good Morning. And how are you today? The morning? Good Morning. Doing great can't complain. We're going to have a very lively conversation about a wide range of things that I think will be applicable to our audience. Let me, introduce our first guest today and Morocco who is a pioneering tech investor at floodgate, and among many accomplishments, has a PhD in math modeling from Stanford where she also teaches entrepreneurship, and I think it's going to have a lot of insight to share with all of us today about what it means to start and run a company particularly in difficult times. I. Certainly Hope so I've started adventure in two thousand one, and then again in two thousand eight, so I do have some memory and recollection of hard times. Our other guests is Lisa Globe term. Who is the founder and CEO of technical and we're GONNA. Learn a lot more about equitable today, but Lisa has a fascinating and varied career. Leading up to the founding of technical, you were the chief digital officer for the Department of Education. You've worked at a bunch of big companies. You've worked at government, which is the biggest company of them all? You were the chief digital officer at bt. Networks You're also one of the senior management team for the launch of Hulu so when you started this company. You had a lot of experience navigating corporate environments, and so, why don't we just dive in and talk about how that experience informed the founding of equitable and why you did what you did? I've been fortunate enough over the course of my career to work on some pretty transformative technologies, so whether it was shockwave, which was the first time the web. whether it was helping with the launch of Hulu. It's been a hell of a journey in terms of making change, but it was really at the White House where I came to understand that we really could harness technology to solve what had been previously thought of as intractable problems right? I want to focus on making improvements right here on our home planet to solve the issues for the under served the underrepresented in the underestimate it, so that was kind of how it all came to be well. Let's get into the details of it. Tell us what testable is. How did it fit this this desire on your part, yeah? Equitable is really about using technology to make workplaces more equitable, and our mission is to create work culture that works for everyone and in order to do that. We've created this platform that that is independent third party and help people address issues of bias discrimination harassment in the workplace. But more generally kind of helps folks with in a personal conflict workplace misconduct, those kinds of things, so we do two things one is we provide a sounding board for employees where they can when they're feeling uncomfortable in the workplace and they can come and explore their options. Get Advice, and basically figure out what their next steps are in how to move forward, and then on the flip side. People are using the platform. We actually gather data that we anonymous and we aggregate, and we use that to identify systemic issues within organizations culture. We create a report for the management team with actionable recommendations so for us again. It's really important. Important that we work on both sides equation where we are empowering and supporting employees, but we are also helping companies identify issues and address them before they even escalates were trying to create this virtuous cycle again getting to the systemic issues. A lot of what you have done with tech quibble is create something that was needed, but that maybe people didn't know they needed, and certainly now they may not even know that the solution is out there for them. which I think will resonate for a lot of our audience members who are creating something to solve a problem that most people as you said at the beginning is intractable or people think that. If it was easy to do. Somebody would have done it right. I think that's it so for me. The thing that's been again really gratifying is that. We're just kind of talking to folks. People like you're the first vendor I have ever spoken with. That is solving a problem that I have today. I know exactly what this problem is, but I didn't know like. Where have you been all? My Life I didn't know a solution like this existed once. I've talked to somebody for five minutes. It's like Oh my God I totally. Totally, get it like this makes perfect sense to me, but I gotta get that five minutes because they don't even know that assertion might exist. That's actually one of my big questions for you all, which is what are some of the factors that go into when you're creating a new market? And how do you? How do you get people to even be aware of that situation?

Hulu Lisa Good Officer Zeroed Ipo Lisa Globe Founder And Ceo Lisa BT Morocco White House Harassment Floodgate Department Of Education Stanford
Big Music Deal for Spotify

MarketFoolery

05:24 min | 2 months ago

Big Music Deal for Spotify

"Going to begin with spotify. Latest partnership. And it's not a podcast which has been sort of the trend for a while with spotify when they come out with material news. But today it's the fact that spotify has a new long-term licensing deal with universal music group. Help me understand this I. It seems like spotify is going to provide not just marketing, but also data and analytics from their platform so that they can give universal music group, a sense of who is listening to what? Exactly, so I actually when we talk this morning to topics, I chose this topic because I just yesterday. Actually we were having sort of an investor roundtable about spotify and I am. Well I think that the platform is great. I kind of have a couple of questions. Particularly Round the valuation that there to ban demanding right now. It's almost fifty five billion dollar company and I just. For a little bit of. backstory or history on that market, so Ford Music labels actually owned about ninety percent of the market and so. Historically what we've seen is that pricing power is solidly in the hands of the labels within spotify so. They've struggled to really turn. Or demonstrate a consistent level of profitability and so You mentioned that they've pursued podcast. One thing I think that's a great idea because. You know if we think about exclusive content, so then pursuing a strategy similar to say Disney or Netflix or Hulu. It's not really possible music again for music labels on about ninety percent market. They tried to start their own label and actually backed off from an initiative because it was sort of Put them in at odds with their suppliers in some respect right so podcast is one way that they have tried to get that exclusive content deal, but I remained a little bit hesitant about this platform, just given I think podcasts are sort of a secondary offering that spotify particularly right now and people are still going there for the music and I think. Valuation today didn't necessarily Justify, With their music offering, but today's deal like you mentioned is the game changer for spotify, so they've signed this agreement with Vivendi's Universal Music Group. And for background, universal owns about forty percent of all US music for straightening and so. You're right the agreement right now. Is that you I'm Jay will provide their sort of massive music, Cadillac restraining and in return you J is becoming a spotify testing and development partner for new tools, services marketing products. So like you've mentioned there is a couple of things that have already been started on. It is part of what they're calling. Their two sided platform so. For example what they've been doing that, labels cannot pay to deliver push notifications that promote new music to user is either previously listened to that promoted artists added to their library and what they've seen. Is that Spending in marketing in this way is actually more effective than other options so I'm hopefully more agreements like that will come into play. Is Yet another way for spotify to get a little bit more margin on their core music streaming business. So this is what I actually think is could be a very strong game changer for spotify. For All the headlines that spotify has made and rightfully so for the acquisitions. They've made in the podcast space. My first thought when I saw this was. Oh, they're getting back to their bread and butter. Like this. This this is this is the main reason. People are going to spotify and signing up for it. You mentioned the valuation. A stock is up five six percent on this deal. It's nearly doubled in two thousand, nine, hundred twenty I mean you're not wrong when you say by the valuation of spotify you can, you can make bullish on this business and still look at what it has done over the last six, and a half months and sort of shake your head and say it's. Not a cheap stock right I mean I would say you know I think they've had a strong year. They have demonstrated stickiness to this platform that was certainly tested during Kovic. Pre Cove about fifty percent of their listening hours for spent outside the home, so assumed that was sort of commuting commuting time so either on A. smartphone or In the auto things like that, and so as covert happened. People were worried that you know people you don't have that those same anymore and so on. Are People really going to stick with? Continue to pay for this premium platform, and the answer actually was yes, so rather than listening out of the home. He blurted shifting where they're listening and what they're listening to you, so they talked a lot about. SMART. Connected, devices so gaming consoles. Things like that have seen an uptick in usage, also sort of these wellness or calming playlist, rather than they're commuting sort of upbeat things, but I mean that was one significant test of this platform that I think you know pre pandemic to necessarily seen or known that data, so it was encouraging. They've had a good year.

Spotify Universal Music Group Ford Music United States Pre Cove Vivendi Disney JAY Kovic Partner Netflix Hulu
Summer Movies 2020: What to Stream, What's Delayed

Nerdette

17:57 min | 2 months ago

Summer Movies 2020: What to Stream, What's Delayed

"Pandemic has totally thrown summer movie season for a loop. Lots of movies are going straight to streaming. Judd apoptosis and our Shirley's the roads and our welfare, but which streaming movies are really worth your time. And what will the pandemic mean for the film industry, and are we ever actually going to see tenant? The Big Budget Christopher Nolan Sci fi flick scheduled to come out in August. Will we ever see that on the big screen where it is meant to be seen? Well the answer to that question may actually be never. We just found out. That film has been delayed indefinitely, but there's still a lot more to discuss and here to talk us through it. Is Eliana Dr Men? She writes about movies and pop culture and Feminism for time Eliana. Hi, hi, how's it going good? How are you? Good holding up. So I think my first question just has to be like. Is there a summer blockbuster season this year? What happened? Yeah, I feel like saying. There's no summer blockbuster. Season is a little road to the movies that have come out on Vod vod meaning video demand, because a lot of stuff is just going straight to streaming racked. Yes, the things that are going straight to streaming which there have been some good things. But this certainly has not had the momentous feel of a usual summer where I convince my closest friends to go spend a ridiculous money to go see a movie in amax because it's summer and that's what you do. That is not happening. Hollywood has been a little circumspect about that. Keep moving movies that they insist have to count in theaters with good reason for some of 'em a movie like ten it would be much less fun to watch for the first time at home, but they keep sort of delaying it by two week increments, and delaying delaying delaying and I suspect that those delays will go into twenty twenty want, but we'll see. Yet kind of reminds me of early on in pandemic times it was probably like late maybe mid late February, when I found out that the the new James Bond movie was being delayed. Because that was supposed to come out in April. And they decided they moved it to like November. But I remember it was one of the first moment sitting at work when I saw the news where I was like. Oh. This pandemic is real. Yeah that was at the time I remember. Having discussions internally at time and just thinking personally. It's crazy that they're big to November. Why would they be November now? They look like geniuses because they sort of as this has continued to happen. All of these movies are rushing to find different dates, and I've sort of compared. You know finding the right movie release date to picking perfect wedding date. You don't want overlap with another big release that would. Not all the guests are going to come. And you also want to find a weekend when you know. A lot of people are free, so holiday weekends are always big Christmas thanksgiving Labor Day that sort of thing, so there's been just this total crush of movies. Where right now if things go the way that they are currently planned? We're just going to have a million movies released in November and December I. Don't think that that will actually happen, but they sort of James Bond beat everyone to the punch by claiming that date early. Right naming you know here. We are coming up on August. August like who knows what November's even GonNa. Look like yeah, exactly so I do think that most of those movies will probably move to twenty twenty one as well who knows, but it's sort of worst on such an ad hoc basis with all of this right now that I think the studios are also concerned and confused of course, so yeah, obviously you can't tell the future, but I do wonder like. Do you have a sense? You know you say? Probably? A million movies are gonNA drop in November December early. That's kind of the planet this point. is they're then going to be just like a huge drop off because of the stuff that should have been produced over the course of this year. That wasn't able to be because of the pandemic. I don't think we'll actually see that. Drop off until twenty twenty two because a lot of big movies that were supposed to come out this year like I remember another big kind of moment of this pandemic was real is when fast and furious nine moved from a spring of twenty, trying to spring of two thousand, twenty one, which also it doesn't the one that's taking place on Mars or something I think that the rumor is that they. I think that the actual poll of this. Is that this character Han? Who is very unjustly killed off a few movies ago, Mac so there's a whole justice for Han. A whole separate on my fast furious. Good to know. Just in case you're looking for. You on the list. So a lot of those movies have waited a full year. The top gun movie was delayed till Christmas. I think actually, but there are few other movies that have been delay pushed it back a full year. Yeah, push back a full year, so I think we will still get a crowded summer twenty twenty. One I think that we're really going to see the impact. In Twenty, twenty two where the delays in filming movies are are actually going to sort of manifest and that will be very strange. That's really interesting. So you say you don't want to do a disservice to the movies that have come out this summer that have gone straight to streaming services. What do you think are some the standouts that people shouldn't miss so I? Think that a few things have come out that have been great and entertaining, one big standout and profit by saying a lot of these movies are going to be on Netflix. Because Netflix was just more prepared for this than anybody else. WHO Like match? A four site that a pandemic was going to happen, but just by virtue of they drop a new movie every week at this point and write them have to be good. I think. The five bloods, which is Spike Lee movie that dropped on that flicks on June twelfth, and is h front runner in the very weird Oscar season. We're GONNA. Have a mom so far is definitely a standout. I think that that's one that is well worth people's time especially because there are going to be so few kind of prestige, Oscar movies that I think come out the series. Well that if you want to turn Oscar Susan that that is the way to go, okay so that one stands out I mean Hamilton. I watched as soon as dropped and APPS as. Everyone else I talked to did and I think they did a really good job of translating that to screen. Obviously, there's some reconsideration of Hamilton right now and rate. How good of a job it does! reckoning with the racism of the time. But I do think that unlike a lot of sort of problematic properties that were dealing with the summer lamelo Miranda has sort of owned up in participated in that conversations would say watch it with a grain of salt, and then go right you an internet deep dive. Researcher Slavery. And Google Hamilton slavery and just set aside a few hours for that So I think that stands out, I also really loved Palm Springs I'll too I just saw over the weekend, and I thought it was delightful. It felt like. Again try not to shade net flicks too much, but palm springs is one of the first movies released in quarantine that felt like an actual movie to me. and this came on Hulu. It came out on Hulu. It was the biggest purchase out of Sundance ever how it was supposed to be released in theaters. It was very much treated as an indie movie, but a big indie movie randy's hamburger than most people know about these days right and lonely island Andy. Sandberg's group produced it There's some Hollywood power behind it, but it felt like a fully finished movie with. With, the quirks of actual writers, directors incorporated in there and character development whereas I dunno some of the net flicks movies can feel a little bit empty to me like there was a concept and not a lot of follow through So this palm springs stood out to me. Is One a good rom com, which are hard to come by these days in to like. It felt like I would go to theater and pay money to see this movie. Yeah, totally so those are those are sort of a few that have come out so far that definitely stand out to me. As being people's time one that I've been hearing a lot about speaking of net flicks. is the old guard. I haven't watched it yet. What do you recommend it? So I do I mean? The old guard is sorta falls into that category of doesn't feel quite like a complete would be released in theaters film. And I don't. I can put my finger quite on. Why except that? I think that you know the premise of the movie is that these immortal beings are basically you know. superheroes that are constantly saving the world. I would watch that. Yeah, it's definitely entertaining, and like it's Shirley stare on shortly surrounds Great Gina Prince would who directed love and basketball won't have the greatest films of all time. Directed this and I think she does a good job. I do wish that these immortal beings were a little more interesting like if they've lived for thousands of if they had lived for thousands of years, I wish they had. More interesting quirks more things to say about the state of the world. That's a fair critique. Nothing can be perfect. It's definitely a diverted way to spend a couple of hours, and you know well worth people's time if they are looking for bad action, movies, and and kind of not even bad like. This is terrible action movie, but just like not A. Junk food. Yes, junk food. That is the perfect word for it which I mean like. Maybe the bar is really low now. Anyway. Right because it's like if I'm not leaving my house. If I got nothing to do then why not eat some junk food? You know exactly and I think that the I think that Hollywood is scared that we're going to get so used to junk food that we're not going to want to spend a little extra money on not junk food. After this is all over and that will sort of accepts. This is movies now. The netflix version of movies that feels a little bad for me and lacking in a little substance is just going to be the state of the world, and we're not going to spend the extra money to for example, see Palm Springs in theaters or see you know the Irishman in theaters vs on Netflix. To use another sort of direct networks parallel right so. What you're saying, is that essentially like if we are getting used to a lower quality than than what is our incentive to WanNa like go to the theater and spend a bunch of money. An let alone the fact that we're also like sitting. You know theoretically at least shoulder to shoulder with strangers, which is not a thing that people are super interested in doing right now during a pandemic. What do you think is sort of like the future of the movie theater industry? Like are they just doomed? Yeah, it's really hard. I mean as someone who watches a lot of movies, both in my personal life, and for work I cannot wait to get back to the movie theater. Going experience and I do think that there is that sort of feeling that once it is safe. I would happily walk several miles to go. Sit in a big theater next to some co workers or friends. Friends and watch a movie like Ted I. Wait for that to happen I am not comfortable doing right now. Though I do think that it's going to be a question of timing, and how long movie theaters can survive financially until moment where we do feel comfortable all coming back and I think that there's this fantasy that a movie like tenant or a movie like move on. It's just GonNa stuff movie theaters right off the Bat and there's going to be a moment where we all decide. Yes, this is the weekend where it's safe again. where I'm excited about going to the movies and I WANNA. Go sit next to a bunch of strangers and have them. You know spill popcorn on me. I don't think that that I. think that. That's sort of this illusive fantasy I. Don't think that that's going to be the case I. Think it's going to be a very slow trickle. I don't think people are chomping at the bit to go to the movie theaters I do think that that is why studios have been holding back the. Most expensive contents for kind of lack of a better categorization. Is because they don't want to give us Moulana streaming at home, and then have us come to expect okay I'll just wait for Milan's come onstream. I think that they want to create the incentive to go to the movie theater because it is so essential to their business. Surviving I just think that you know that means we might have many more months of not so great content. So, you're saying that it's not only like AMC theaters who need movie theaters to exist, but also Hollywood itself. Yes Hollywood definitely need movie theater to exist I mean the reason that you can make a movie like tenant for hundreds of millions of dollars is because you make. Hundreds of millions of dollars back by selling movie theater tickets. There's just no way that they can make that on Vod. It's not possible, so we'll see how they strategize it going forward, but I think sort of takeaway from this is that Netflix was already fighting it into the Hollywood. Business an Hollywood was not prepared for it, and this is just accelerating the process. So you've mentioned tenant a couple times, this is the newest is it's Sifi right from Christopher Nolan. Yes, it's a new Christopher Nolan movie. The reason I keep mentioning Tenet is because Christopher Nolan. Or Warner brothers have styled tenant as sort of the movie that is going to save the summer blockbuster season. They keep talking about is the first big movie that's going to open the movie. That's going to draw people back to theaters movie. That's GonNa save movie theaters the movie that's going to save the concept of summer blockbuster the movie that's GonNa. Make us feel better again and. I mean that sounds great i. does sound great I mean in fairness them. It's a good movie to pick to pin that on. Because Christopher Nolan is one of if not the only director left who can drop a totally original film that has nothing to do with comic book series. A book is not marble is not DC, NI, and, but this is still one of those like big loud movies. That's like perfect for a movie like a theater going experience that right, yes, yeah heart of the appeal of a movie like ten is that you see it with a big group of people rate, and then will gasp at the same reveal exactly like some of my favorite summer. Summer movie moments are the moments where you know. Something crazy happens in everybody screams. Everybody laughs I think of I. Guess is two summers ago. When the last mission impossible became out and spoiler alert for the first half hour of the mission impossible movie, there's a moment where they are jumping out of an airplane. A character gets struck by lightning and funny in this amass the lost bear market. And as well as the greatest movie memories ever had because it was just this collaborative woman just happened. And those are the best. That's amazing. That's so good well, even though we have just learned that the ten release has been delayed indefinitely, I hope cautiously optimistic that that will. That will have that again someday soon, ish. I hope so too. And in the meantime there are things to watch at home They might not be the things that we were excited about several months ago. but there are things to watch at home, and after this kind of summer movie season is over frankly studios graft figure out what to do with their Oscar contents, and I would not be surprised if a lot of them just get released straight to streaming so that they can qualify for the Oscars this year. Wow, the Oscars, which have officially been postponed right, yes, the Oscars have officially been postponed, and they've also changed their rules, so that movies that are released to streaming can qualify which is a. Huge concession on their part Isis County will change the back afterwards, but it's been a big fight in Hollywood as to whether streaming movies can count for the Oscars in hopes of saving the movie theater, going experience, and so now streaming movies will qualify and I think that's going to change the calculus for a lot of studios that aren't necessarily trying to make big money movies that they are trying to win awards. Interesting

Hollywood Christopher Nolan Netflix Oscars James Bond Eliana Dr Men Palm Springs Shirley MAC Judd Spike Lee Sundance Google Oscar Susan Basketball Amax
Documentaries having new life thanks to streaming

Talking Tech

07:45 min | 2 months ago

Documentaries having new life thanks to streaming

"The pandemic has sent us all home without access to gyms, hair salons movie theaters. So what's a documentary into do? Peter Spier Academy Award nominated producer director has been making films for several decades dock. He says the documentaries are now finding a renaissance in streaming. One of the unexpected side benefits were filmmakers and peters going to tell all about it Peter. Yes thank you very much a pleasure to be here with us. To tell us about what's going on in streaming. So right now. Because of Covid people are staying home. Fortunately, streaming has really picked up since that time and their reports for the strenuous got up between thirty five and forty percent, so people are now. Using streaming taxes, all of their content Bluefin's shows the Netflix. We're talking about Netflix. Talking about Amazon Voodoo Fandango Comcast Cox. All of these platforms are doing very well. You've got a bunch of different. Movies are out there right now. Summer old summer newer. Tell everybody about what you've got in what what you've seen it. Is it been easier to get them up there? So let's start with telling everybody about some of the titles. Right, so I have a couple of club rugged entertainment. We have three titles right now. A film that I got back from a distribution company called Doug's more which we now have on Amazon Voodoo and Fandango? Probably a few others Newfield called the Sharm hate about the OT. PT Community and that film is currently on all platforms. And we're what's called transactional video so for your for people out there that don't know the difference. There's a transactional video which means you have to rent the video there s Vaud or Day. which subscription video which would be services like? Netflix and Hulu at Amazon and Yeah, so those are the two main. Video. in demand on demand services. Are You finding? There is a bigger thirst for documentaries from the buyers right now than there was before covert. I think with the emergency. Some big documentary programmes tiger king right now out of control in terms of popularity Are you know the jinx? That was another one that kind of broke through and we're looking at documentaries that. Are Not only one offs, but sure. I have what's called a one off. which is just single episode, but. They're also you know episodes. Alike limited a limited series for it's. One two I mean would say three to five or six episodes now. How are you finding the documents as Documenta? How're you finding as a documentarian? Being able to shoot right now when we're social distancing and we're wearing masks, and you're not supposed to be going out and doing these things how you're getting stuff done. It's almost impossible I you know. I think the industry is trying to come to terms with how we are going to move forward shooting the biggest issues insurance so being able to cover, not only the liability. But to protect the crew, that's a whole thing, but you know what it's easier with documentaries and doing a full on production so I think you. Wall Street documentaries because of the cost and the. The smaller impact with the size of the crew well, you could always interview people outside. You don't have to interview them in their office and that has to help right. Well people are doing those kinds of things and then there are you know because people are getting accustomed now to save zoomed interviews, there are documentarian making. Documentaries using zoo. Which is pretty interesting so They're just setting it up and you know you do your interview it. Routing out with other kinds of clips and archival footage, but yeah I mean. People are doing all kinds of work around to make this. If you watch the local news or the National News, it's now become the reporter introduces. As Zoom interview basically and they they cut back and forth between the reporter, staring this computer, his or her computer, and then there's zoom interview. So how do you? You Always WanNa, take documentary docu documentary and take it to another level. So how do you make that more instinct? Well I think in those cases. They're using just the. presets of that look. I think if you're doing the documentary yet more time to creatively do with that particular interview, but you bring up a good point, and you only have limited resolution and quality to zoom interview and. you know unfortunately you have to deliver to the platform, and the platform may reject it based on the quality, so it's definitely something that's going to have to be navigated. Okay finally, tell everybody, but does more. This was the film that you did several years ago. It's been lost lost for years, and it's now back alive again. Thanks to streaming, so plug it in television, yes! Dunn's more features. wwl Brown could name. Harbison Talia Shire a Barry Corbin. Some really cool actors. It's kind of who done it I call it You know a small a town film. On steroids and it's very cool, cool film. And I've got disarm hate about the LGBT committee that's got documentary out now. Streaming narrated by Harvey Fierstein and we have our latest film. Michael Debar. Who Do you walk me? Be About? His kinda zealot type character who was in the film shirt with love and also performed of a billion people at live aid. And why is there a documentary? Why is there a documentary about him now? Well. He's also currently DJ Little Steven's underground garage his second. Biggest DJ that's to Howard Stern, so he's very popular on Siriusxm but He's got an incredible life I. Mean you know it's? It's also a story about recovery. And I'm telling you no matter what you've been through in your life, it will not compared to what he's been through. You can't even imagine the stories the sky half well you. You'll get to see in the film so if you're going to go off and watch documentaries on streaming this weekend. Where should we go? go to Amazon Tango all those places. VOODOO COMCAST COX but the three films to watch Dunsmore. Michael the bar. Who Do you want me to be and disarm me and you could see them on Fandango, Voodoo and Amazon. All of those react Peter spier rugged releasing.

Amazon Netflix Peter Spier Academy Peter Peter Spier Covid Michael Debar Reporter Howard Stern Harvey Fierstein Sharm Harbison Talia Shire Siriusxm Newfield Dunsmore Producer Bluefin Doug Director National News
Peacock is live: Heres everything you need to know

The 3:59

09:29 min | 2 months ago

Peacock is live: Heres everything you need to know

"He caught. The last of the big streaming services has finally launched nationwide, but at joint a crowded room, streaming services, including busy, plus and that Blix. So how does this stack up? I'm Roger, Chang into your daily charge. Beckley I don't have to answer that question because with me. Is Our media expert, John? Salzman and software services. Reviewer Alison. Danisco, welcome both you. Thanks all right so John with you. He is live after having launched in Beta mode to caucus users a couple months ago, so so give us a land now. What is the streaming wards landscape? Look like this is basically the last of the big new services to land at least as far as we know. We had apple and Disney plus come in November than we had depending if you consider it bigger. Bigger not clubby came in April followed by Hbo Max in May, and now finally we have peacock, and it's a little bit different than the rest of those, because it not only is, it has big budget originals big back catalog, like most of those other services do, but it's also doing some other things that are digging a little bit when the others I it has. It's going to have live news. Life sports other sorts of news and sports replays highlights that kind of thing and crucially has a free tear at as a tier with advertising we can watch about two thirds of the catalog just by signing up and not paying anything there are ways you can take out the ads and unlock the full catalogue if you WanNa pay, but having that sort of on ramp that free just sign up and start watching thing. It's something that these other big services in the streets haven't tried yet. Yeah, I would just sort of generally speaking. Have we talked about the free cheering a bit but? In terms of these other players out there have any cover merged as must have service to rebel Netflix's certainly a streaming service, the new streaming service that's landed with the biggest slash by far is Disney plus. One media analyst when it launched last year there was one media analyst and widely followed one who called it one of the greatest product launches of all time. To give you a sense. Track Google search trends around these launch dates, and the Google search trends for Netflix are a good baseline. You know it's established. It's always very popular as a search gives you a good baseline of how other services stack up and people, search addressed most of these other services. They haven't crossed the level of net search interest, even on launch days, whereas Disney plus like quadrupled the amount of Netflix interests on its launch day now it's come down since then, but among these new services Disney is the one to beats, and nobody has even come close so far. Are also you've been testing out the service. How has the experience on Peacock Ben? Overall I've been having a really positive experience with peacock so far to be honest. I wasn't expecting all that much. Since we do already have Sumani streaming services, but the fact that it has this free tier is John mentioned where you can still watch. Tons of movies and TV shows with ADS does make it stand out from competitors like Netflix and Hulu it gives you something for free that similar to say a Pluto TV or a to B, but with this premium streaming. Streaming service interface, so it looks really good, and you also have the opportunity to upgrade if you want to. It's pretty easy to navigate. It has a few quirks, and there are some features that are still missing but overall. It's a solid free surface at launch. If you don't mind watching those ads in terms of that that user experience that the navigation the experience itself. How does it stack up against DISAPP- loss or Netflix's or some other more Polish premium services so in. In my mind, peacock isn't quite trying to be a Netflix or Hulu or HBO Max. It has a similar tile layout, and you can browse things by TV shows and movies and get recommendations, but it's kind of doing something different, and it's probably not going to replace any of those others for you, but it's something you can get for free to have more options. It reminds me a little bit of Amazon prime video in a way like on that one you can get. Get, a lot of shows and movies included as part of your prime subscription, but you'll find others mixed in that. You do have to pay for so on peacock. You'll find some shows with a little purple feather in the corner, which means you have to upgrade premium to watch them, but they're so plenty of free options to. And since we're in this time of economic uncertainty, you know free services a welcome option, even if you don't watch it every single day, right? Joan. Beyond this free tier is there anything else about peacock that makes stand out, or the folks should know about? Yeah, definitely, the frontier is obviously the first thing that people are going to encounter when they try to sign up and they realize they don't have to provide any sort of payment information. Start watching. But beyond that you know. Being in the pandemic, there's a lot of things that peacock wanted to have available right now for its launch that aren't a manifest really until next year or later, for example, the entire reason that it's launching right now in the middle of July is that originally peacock witches, NBC's streaming service thought they'd be able to piggyback on all the interest in the Olympics. That should be happening right now. Is the broadcasting partner for the Olympics in the United States, and so of course everyone remembers every Olympic season how there's just like blanket coverage on NBC. All of NBC's other cable channels. But because we don't have that until next year, that's a huge driver to get people interested and knowledgeable that that the service exists. That just doesn't exist right now. Also their originals. They have nine original series at launch, but just like everybody else all their production of new content. At least any live action content had to be suspended in March, and so they don't have as much in their pipeline. That's going to be ready to release win. They had hoped to release it as have if we weren't in this situation where everybody's lockdown the also could you break down the? Tiers, obviously, there's the free cheer that's at basement. What are you getting with those I? Think there's two different paid tears. He kinda run through them. And you actually get sure so in the free tear you get thirteen thousand hours of TV shows, Movies News Life Sports. Some of the biggest name shows you'll find. There are and Recreation, Thirty Rock, law and order. Order Svu but you know. Some of those are also currently on Netflix and Hulu to so there's some confusion there potentially, and you also know that the office won't be coming to peacock until January when it's calm when his contract with Netflix runs out, but in the meantime you'll also find current episodes of NBC shows one week later on that free tier. In terms of movies, you've got some big slightly older hits like Jurassic Park the Bourne identity, the Matrix and also newer kind of Oscar Z. ones like phantom thread and tally, and so for something. That's free. You'll probably find something. You WanNa Watch, but then you'll also find these two paid tears. One is five dollars a month which gives you access to the full Peacock Library which is about twenty thousand hours of TV, and movies, but you'll still see ads on that one. If you WANNA GO AD free. It costs ten dollars a month and you'll get still get that full libraries well. A few things you'll find on the premium tears, but not the free tier are all of the episodes of peacock originals, the major one launch being brave new world, and you'll also find more new movies and also next day access to new episodes of current. NBC shows one interesting thing that we haven't really seen before is that you'll get early access to some shows like late night with Seth Meyers and the tonight show. Show with Jimmy Fallon the night that they air, so you can watch them at eight PM instead of eleven thirty pm, but that would actually start until those shows are back in the studio and not running from home during the pandemic. Okay We've talked about this before, but they're just too many strips out there. They're all asking for money. Yes, peacock has a free tier, but there's clearly they want people to. Upgrade to these premium tears. How does market support so may services Comey Services? Can a household actually afford to pay for so from the experts that I've talked to and the research that they've been doing? It seems like there's a couple of interesting things going on one is that the total number of streaming services that people are subscribed to and are trying is going up now. That's partially because in the. The pandemic so many entertainment choices that we normally would that normally would keep us from streaming aren't happening right now, and we're all locked up in our homes, and so it's the primary way other than regular TV. Your needs that you would entertain yourself when you're stuck at home anyway, that's to do with it, but even before the pandemic. We were starting to see that all. This wave of new services what starting to tap higher, the amount of services people were trying and also subscribing to. But what we've found in the pandemic from the research that I've seen as that people are also much more willing to cancel subscriptions so. It's mostly price sensitivity factor as you know. Jobless numbers are soaring, and as people are reconsidering howl. They dedicate their money every month. Once they hit the point where a free trial ends or this ends. They're more willing to quit. Because they become more educated on other options that don't require payment that conserve their entertainment needs, you know. Alison, she mentioned to be There's other ones like that. That are free services that peacock sort of straddles the line with people are realizing that they have those options to if they don't WanNa, keep paying

Peacock Netflix NBC Disney Peacock Ben John Alison Peacock Library Hulu Blix Beckley Salzman Google Media Analyst Olympics Amazon
'Palm Springs' Romantic Comedy Is A Total Winner For The Lockdown Era

Fresh Air

05:30 min | 2 months ago

'Palm Springs' Romantic Comedy Is A Total Winner For The Lockdown Era

"Are film critic Justin. Chang says it could be an especially good time to watch palm springs, a romantic comedy about two people forced to repeat the same day. Over and over again it stars Andy Sandberg, and Kristen, Milly Odi it streaming on Hulu and playing in some drive in theaters around the country. Palm Springs a hot ticket at this year's Sundance Film Festival one of the last public events to take place before the movie industry shutdown. I didn't see it there, but having caught up with it months later at home I can't help but feel as though this breezily entertaining movie. Please a little differently in the era of covid nineteen. It's a comedy. About is the LATIAN repetition which might not sound too appealing at a time when many of us are also leading lives of isolation and repetition. But don't let that dissuade you. This first feature directed by Max barbeque cow, and written by Andy Sierra turns out to be a total winner, Sharp, funny, and even profound in a sneakily offhand way. The story is a riff on that Herald Ramos Classic Groundhog Day in which Bill Murray had to keep replaying the same day until he learned to become a selfless person, but palm springs is trying to push that message. It knows that just getting through life with your dignity intact can be hard enough. That's certainly true for Sarah played by Kristen me not who's serving as maid of honor in her sister's wedding in the California desert town of Palm Springs. S Sarah Drinks too much and stumbles her way through the reception. She finds herself intrigued by one of the Guests Niles played by Andy, Sandberg. Niles is kind of a goofball, but also manages to work the room with disarming ease. It's almost as if he's been through this event before and knows everything that's going to happen. Sarah finds out why when she follows him that night into a mysterious cave out in the desert. Within seconds she's waking up the next morning only to find that. It's actually the same morning as before the morning of the wedding. Time has reset itself. In a panic Sarah Trucks Down Niles at the hotel where they're staying. He explains that when she entered the cave, she made a big mistake because he followed me. What's going on? I tried to stop. But, what is this? When is this? Yeah. About that so. This is today. Today is yesterday and tomorrow is also today. It's one of. Infinite time loop situations you might have heard about. That I might have heard about. There's been a lot of those infinite time loop situations in recent movies and TV. Some of them excellent like the Tom. Cruise Action Thriller Edge of tomorrow in the NETFLIX's mystery series. Russian doll. The pop savvy makers of Palm Springs clearly no those stories and suspect that you might know them to. As a result, they're able to jettison a lot of the usual exposition about how this world works and simply cut to the chase. Sarah is eager to bust out of the time loop but Niles. WHO's been stuck here for ages tries to dissuade her. Virtuous acts won't work. Suicide won't work although that doesn't Stop Sarah driving straight into the path of an oncoming truck just to see what happens. Eventually Niles persuades her to stop fighting the space time continuum, and just enjoy their time together, and so she does with the threat of permanent removed. These two misfits are suddenly free to embrace the craziness of every moment. Sometimes, they blow off the wedding to go on long desert drives and hang out in bars. Sometimes they stick around for the wedding, so they can play tricks on the guests. WHO WON'T REMEMBER ANYTHING ANYWAY? The guests are played by fine actors. Including Peter Gallagher June squibb and Meredith Hagner. J. K. Simmons also gives a terrific wildcard performance as a guy who POPs up at the wedding on Sundays, but not others for reasons that the story will soon make amusingly clear. As fiendishly clever, as it is on the surface, palm springs has a pretty straightforward takeaway, since life can sometimes be pointless and tedious whether you're stuck in a time loop or not, you might as well spend it with someone you love. It's pretty good advice. Even Still Sarah doesn't know how much longer she can stand being trapped in this desert purgatory, especially since Niles seem so lazily resigned as fate. I won't give away whether they succeed in escaping or not I will say that the movie doesn't entirely avoid a tired gender dynamic in which a smart determined woman has to expend a lot of emotional and mental energy, and just to get her boyfriend to WanNa move forward. But I love the way the actors conspired subvert that Dynamic Sandberg isn't that's Hilarious as he was in the Music Biz? Satire pop star never stopped never stopping, but he does have the whole. Doofus slacker routine down Pat. But, he's eclipsed by Milly Ot, a versatile performer who won a grammy for the Broadway musical once, and who can turn from madcap comedy to breathtaking emotion on a dime. I'd watch her. Any Day. Justin Chang is a film critic at the L. A. Times.

Sarah Drinks Palm Springs Niles Dynamic Sandberg Justin Chang Andy Sierra Kristen Hulu Netflix Grammy Bill Murray J. K. Simmons California Herald Ramos L. A. Times PAT Sharp Peter Gallagher June Squibb
How a Passion for Patients turned this Pharmacist into a Software Developer with Newvick Lee

Learn to Code with Me

05:32 min | 2 months ago

How a Passion for Patients turned this Pharmacist into a Software Developer with Newvick Lee

"Went through all this work in effort to become a pharmacist. And then you left pharmacy like you know got a job after you laugh, too. So what led to that like? Regis defined it as fulfilling, or you just were very excited by software, engineering or Yeah! That's a good question. Yeah spent maybe like. Five six years in an industry including education. I think. The more. That's really monroe for me when when I made that program to all the made finding prescription due dates. Preceding that that's program. Bring down the task for like two hours to less than the second. I. I can't tell you how amazing that was. Like it was so painful just looking through every specialty. Bro And finding that but being able to do that in just in just a short program. I thought that this is. This definitely I wanNA. Do in the future. Yeah. That's really cool and. You wrote that I program. What language technology re using some also thinking? Aren't there a lot of? Regulations like in pharmacies like imagine with their computers like things you can and can't do. So Dea it. They have lots of obstruction on the computer, but this was just a local, so I wrote it in Python and there's a local script. It didn't require any. External. dependencies in I didn't look for any other API's so I I just donald a spreadsheet file from our local pharmacy software and plug that into the firm Python program, and the on saw local, and there's nothing to worry about on security side. Gotcha I'm just laughing. Because I'm like imagining like in other jobs or other professions, you could just bring the work home with you, but it's like you can't just bring home like people like I'm sure. It's like sensitive data. Right that you're working with. Other. Same last name address and everything's all there, so you can't really take home, but. You're able to do it at the at the pharmacy while you're working and all that. Yes, keep it to that story, Yeah! Just for context for myself in the listeners. How long ago is this like when you first started coating when you're still working as a pharmacist? How many years ago at this point or pretty recent? Yes Oh. It's Today is the first. One full year that I've been at this company, and then the MRI her I saw been working. suffered the bubble for two years now. Yeah and I think I started just in these in opponent projects. Three years ago. So took me about a year to get. Re Yeah, yeah, exactly like you said about a year when I was working as pharmacists to feel comfortable to looking for a job, and I've been working as a developer for two years gotTa, and then how long were you pharmacist for? Awesome for two years, oaks about the same now right like seeing amount of work experience from pharmacy to announce a software developer torture. Gotcha okay, so we just got your background with the pharmacy in in all of that and your first job. which now you're not there. You're working at a SYNTECH company, right? Cool, so were you planning to work in Fintech? That sort of just come about because I feel like. Some of your experience would be really helpful in like a med tech kind of industry. Yes so that's that's another good question. So the eighty first company went down I. Actually had to go through a job, looking process and actually interested in metallic. How tap that sort of thing because? I thought okay, I do have A. Background there and that interest there, but the thing was when I started the appointees. I met second how companies they required. Either a lot of suffer experience or a lot of research, clinical experience and I had. Neither. So it was difficult to to get into that soul, I started looking into other companies that I thought I had a shot at and this company turned out to be a great fit for me. Go for Culture Wise, and also lies got it. That's interesting about the clinical experience. Research experience at the health. Tech MIDTECH. Quick Sino, could you? Is there a difference between those two things? I love talking about like the different sectors technology. Is There A DIFFERENCE BETWEEN MED? Tech in health tech. Some people police Actually I don't think there really is a difference in my point of view. Yeah, I, mean I. Don't know I. I was asking I was like. Okay. Could be medicine, maybe or to the health could be like me. Look physiotherapy or something. Yeah, yeah, that's a good point. Maybe helps more broad. YEA like. Fitness APP or something, or like the thing I always get commercials for Num num the weight loss. You know talking about Donald State. Have as many on I have Hulu, Hulu live TV, and I swear like. Every break! There's a new commercial which is like I guess it's an APP that uses psychology to help you lose weight, but I feel like that's kind of like I guess it was developed by. Doctors by must be yet like health. More. Health Tech

Donald State Hulu Monroe Regis Fintech Software Developer Developer Sino
‘The Office’ Blackface Scene Edited Out, Netflix Pulls ‘Community’ Blackface Episode

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:26 sec | 3 months ago

‘The Office’ Blackface Scene Edited Out, Netflix Pulls ‘Community’ Blackface Episode

"An old episode of the golden girls has been pulled up Hulu because of it not so funny scene in black face sources tell deadline that Disney ABC asked that the episode be removed it features the characters rose and Blanche played by Betty white rue McClanahan greeting a black family while wearing black masks the golden girls isn't the only classic sitcom that featured characters in blackface episodes were also pulled this week from shows including thirty rock the office and community

Hulu ABC Blanche Disney
"hulu" Discussed on Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

08:13 min | 5 months ago

"hulu" Discussed on Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

"What I would love and this is something that I wish I had growing up. Is those kids that grew up in the inner city who grew up in low income households that when they have a dream, they have an idea that they will have the resources that some other kids that are very privileged that they have and I an ideal world. Be. You know if that could be equal and so. I think that As we continue to learn, it's important for us to continue to spread the knowledge in our community spread that knowledge to make. Dad Become. Reality I think on my end I agree with you breezy because you know growing up, we had so many ideas and we had. Things you want to do in life and we did have people in our lives. That told us that we couldn't do what we could do, but the reason why they told us that is because they didn't have people in their lives. That showed that they could actually do certain things, so we can't really be mad at those people i. do think that it is important in my ideal world. All the kids and children and the youth will have resources or people. To be able to succeed in their dreams, their goals in their everyday life. I'm Kimberly drew and you're listening to your attention, please eight Hulu podcast with iheartradio. This is the final episode of Your Shit please. I'm full of so many emotions I am so full of gratitude for everyone who has listened to one or eight episodes of the series I am full of sadness, because this is our last episode y'all but I am also so full of gratitude. Of, all the episodes to be are less episode today we are joined by Coco and breezy to young women entrepreneurs who also happen to be dear friends of mine and I cannot wait to get. Today's conversation kicked off Coco and breezy have been on quite a journey living in Indiana. Tennessee and Minnesota all before landing in New York with big dreams of becoming entrepreneurs with some savings, they took a big leap and turn their love of eyewear into a flourishing business today, there eyewear brand, Coco and breezy has blown up with stars like Riyana Williams in Prince wearing their creations. I am such a lover of fashion, and I think that everything that we wear that. We put honors. People's tells a story about who we are in who we hope. Will See us as an a day to day basis I am so fortunate to have worn a pair of cocoa and breezy glasses I had my first pair for south by South West probably two or three years ago and I remember coordinating each and every one of the outfits that I wore for that week around the glasses because I wanted them to be the statement piece because there is a very very very. Very special energy that goes into each of the pairs that they have each of their frames is so full of life and a story and a narrative, and there is something almost cosmic, and like you're almost like a space jam level transformation that happens when you put the glasses on, because you know that you're standing in your power, or in your power and ways that may not have been accessible to you before. Like I said I think fashion is such an incredible portal into who we are, and I think every time that I get the opportunity to share space with going breezy. I learned just a little bit more about my friends. There's so much that they accomplished in such a short amount of time, and there's so much more ahead of the both of them. So if they could have your attention, please our guest today our final guests. Hobo. Greasy I'm coco in I'm breezy, and we are co founders of cocoa and breezy eyewear. We're also co founders of a real estate property called the Lurker, and we are deejays and producers, so let's start I talking about the video that you guys made for your attention. Please on, Hulu Can you talk about what the process was for making that video? If there are things that came up, that were surprising to even you guys. You are a retelling your story to the audience. Something, that was really important to us. was insists was a project for black history month. It was very important to have a team that could also be celebrated to create the Vision, and so on our end. WHO SUPPORT IT? We as founders as well, and they support it all of our businesses, so it was, it was actually unreal, because we've never worked with the company that understood our you know. We wanted it to be very sensitive when it comes to. Celebrating things that have to do with. Black history month or LGBTQ plus world, because we think it's important that the people from inside to tell a story all the way out, and it was cool that we ended up. Shooting at our property called the Lorca. They included are I wear in a gift. Like Marketing Promo for their customers in the viewers were watching the season, which is really exciting, and we also got to score and curate the music for our episode, and let alone be in episode in share. Our story love to hear that I. Wonder If guys could talk to me and you already started to hint on in terms of personal style you guys have. Always in all the years that we've known each other been so distinct in the ways, in which you present yourselves like in truly. Oh fashion! and I wonder if you could talk about your style evolution as its change from childhood to the present day. Our style has evolved so much. I mean we always say that we evolve every couple of years and the way our style evolves is. We evolve. Our personal style based on how evolve as women and I think that's very interesting and one big time that we were trying to grow as people. We had this time where I thought. You Know Breezy Ni-. We hid behind our hair. We hid behind our sunglasses when we first moved to New York the first year. No one saw is we always just were glasses and covered. Our is in, so there was a point in our lives we we kinda felt. Lonely insecure and people who only know us from our glasses, our hair in our clothing. And we only knew ourselves for the material that was sitting on our body. So one thing we did was. We were like in order for us to grow needed. Take away something that we that we love. We ended up shaving our hair and we shaved all of our hair off and our hair with us you know, but helped us grow into a new path in our lives because I always feel like with evolution. When you take away something that you love you, have this new growth within yourself. And during that timeframe we actually slow down with wear makeup as well because we felt like we were covering up all the scars. And we didn't want people to see low scarfs, and we were covering ourselves up again with the makeup with the hair, covering our faces with the big clothing. Then once we shaved their heads. You know, stop wearing makeup We actually, and then we actually slow down wearing glasses, and we have to look people in there is. They helped us evolve with women in so now every day every year. The evolutions not only with our style, but it's with our sal within ourselves as people in his women. So I think that like cocoa, said we, once we start to grow within ourselves spiritually in coming into our womanhood. We realized that we were allowing that trauma. That childhood trauma of being bullied. It was really rolling over until adult life, and once we actually pinpointed, were those phillies were stemming from, and we felt that it was stemming from billing being bullied. We started till you know,.

Hulu Coco New York phillies Kimberly drew Indiana us. Tennessee Riyana Williams Prince Minnesota
"hulu" Discussed on Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

11:48 min | 5 months ago

"hulu" Discussed on Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

"I Love I love this but if all goes away tomorrow like it's still not the core of my identity. It's my job and I've read. I mean I spent what I spent almost twenty years writing without anyone reading. You know so. It's a goes back to that. I think it's just. I think people get in trouble when they kind of tie this metaphorical noose around their neck. And it's either the attention or it's the money or it's the acclaim like and like if you need those things than you're always holding yourself hostage. There's no room for joy sneer. There's no room for joy. There's no room for joy. I guess I try and be as much of a self contained unit as possible and so which is a gift and our full place to be in. I think we all have to do it in some way shape or form. But that's been I found. That's when I've felt happiest That's when I felt more saying most in control when I'm like. Oh this is my job the same way I used to go into this office. And Upload adds to twitter like that was my job and so being making it my job and my profession but not my life I think has helped balance out a lot of those other pressures because I also put a lot of pressure on myself to free amazing things like I'm never satisfied with anything. I'm still mad satisfied with the first two books so I don't need the per like I put enough pressure on myself to make it as good as possible so I know I don't need to outsource that love wall. We have two questions from some folks who have watched your segment on your attention please. Okay so our first question is from Pierre in Ohio. Pierre says or Pierre Asks I should say Told me do you pull any inspiration from your personal experiences when writing l. Yeah they're all everything I've ever written is just memoir fantasy fan fiction and so it's it's a lot of the questions. I was getting when book to I. Came out is like Oh. It's so dark and I was like yes I was in a very dark place and so It's I use. I mine as much from myself and from the people in my life as possible and mostly. I really mind my emotional truths because I think that's what makes our resonate when it's like whether it's a fantasy or whether it's real it's like when there's there are universal emotional truths that every human being unless you have like an intense psychological disorder. That's my grave McGuire thing. I was like well do sociopaths. Feel that so I don't know but the average human we all experienced these same emotional truths whether they're positive emotion old truce or negative emotional truth so I really focus on that. And it helps make the writing I think I think than the readers feel it but then also personally it does help me to. It's just it's weird to see your own life as a story because lives aren't actually stories but they are stories and so for me. I see different parts of my life like books and so two right things for Zali and then be like oh my gosh. This is me living out this thing. This has me living out. This liked I. It's in way writing. It allows me to see my own character arc because whatever they lease dealing with is usually what I need to deal with and overcome And then it's the same with the other characters that everyone just represents a different side of me and I always say they have the best parts of me in the worst parts of me. So so yeah. It's I think that's part of the time I don't know if this is creative. Just took the information the data. I have from my own personal experiences so yeah I think it's good to make stories personal. Our next question comes from an anonymous. Hulu Subscriber. I want to know what is the key to being a bestselling author? And how does it feel I think the key to being a bestselling author is to be relentless fighting for yourself And for your book and Yeah because I've seen especially having being in a place now where I've seen and met a lot of like bestselling authors commercially successful authors. That is the one common thread. It's not about like I mean one. They care they care about their stories. They don't write things that they don't care about And they try and do their best. I think that's a big part of it but I also think there's that relentlessness. Um Not settling knowing you're going to have to do even as someone who's had a book on the Best Sellers List for two years You know it's like I basically did my cover. I had to do a lot of my. I'm very very intense about my marketing. I'm intense about my. You know like it's not you can't hand over the reins and expect a lot of success because no one is going to care or fight for your story or yourself. The way you will so I think the earlier you can realize that in the earlier you can say okay. I want you know I had a friend literally say I WANNA be a New York Times bestselling author and then she busted her but you know when no one else believed in her she busted her but for years and she got there and you know so it's like you again. It's not that it's impossible. It is difficult but it has to be your like okay. I'm the protagonists. This is my goal now here all obstacles in my way let me fight them and and how does it feel it still surreal? It's still very surreal. There's this incredible high like the first time you see your name on this list in which you when you didn't even think you would ever really have a book out one day So there is that high in that disbelief and then it's mostly cereal it. All of this stuff still feels very surreal. So for this next segment. This is your opportunity to just sound off about anything. That's on your mind. It can be anything that has been like weighing on your mind heavily or as exciting to you. Something in the news. Something that you recently fell in love with But just two minutes. All you go okay. What is been consistently on my mind? And what has been that just keeps coming up either through the things. I'm reading or the things I'm hearing is just the importance of having the right people in your car. I'm going all the way back to our driving metaphor. It's like you have one car and there's a difference between having that car full of people who love and support you that you also love and support and having that car full of people who are draining literally the life from you who are really dumping all the gas out or playing lake. I don't WanNa say country music because some people love country music but like if I was driving across my life and someone was like we can only listen to like Blake Sheldon situation for me so I think it's just it's makes a world of difference. We don't think we have that much power over the people that we allow into our car And the people that we say you know you can't be in this car anymore. But you do you have full control over that and a lot of the of the bad things. I went through was because I had people in my car that I shouldn't have had and so when I finally said not even not even a bigger explosive way just when I find Melissa. You like you know what I don't have a mini van anymore. I have a jeep. It has four seats. These are the people filling them like. I wish you the best. On this journey. My life changed in a guy was so much better. And it's weird to say you don't have to talk or interact with people who cause you pain Or who like make you cry. But you don't you actually don't. It was a funny realization. So that's been I guess the thing I'm most passionate about is I think we as humans we tend to be really complacent not just with like our lives but also with the people in our lives and I say people can be anchor. People are usually inkers or balloons. So it's like an anchor pulls you down the drain you they drain your time your energy your resources your money And balloons lift you up. They make they give they they make you feel so euphoric you know they make you cry. Because you're laughing so hard or because you're so proud of that you know and I will just say I think that can be our lives work to fill our lives with anchors and and that no sorry to fill our lives with balloons. I think most of the time we kind of complacently Miller lives with anchors without realizing it well. Yeah don't feel weird about wanting to spend the time that you exist on this planet with people who lift you. I was really surprised to hear about Tommy's career before she veered off that highway and towards being a fulltime writer. I think a lot of times. It's always helpful to learn about the work that our heroes were doing while they were making some of our favorite books at the end of the day. Writers are human at the end of the day. Every story starts with a single word with a single letter. It's not all about pure magic you look at especially like Tony's books are very long and it can be sort of intimidating to think about how to get through that story and how to Be Able to articulate an idea as fully as some authors are capable of doing and so it's really always such a gift to hear. Any writer articulate. The journey of their lives did really love to find another partner and thinking morbidly very casually deal and I think oftentimes we just be shy away from his conversations and It was just really nice to talk to another person who sees world sees and makes and understands worlds in ways that don't shy away from difficult conversation. I hope that anyone who's out there and listens to today's episode understands that there is always an opportunity to take a turn at that exit towards the thing that you want to accomplish. Those things can be large or small but they are always on offer and available to you and as Tommy mention. It's so incredibly important for us to think about who is in the car with us. Who is riding shotgun? Okay think about it. Make sure that your whip is fit with the team.

Pierre Tommy writer twitter Zali New York Times McGuire Ohio Tony partner Blake Sheldon complacently Miller Melissa
"hulu" Discussed on Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

09:28 min | 5 months ago

"hulu" Discussed on Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

"So this is the part of the episode where we have a few questions from our Hulu subscribers who have watched your segment on your attention please now streaming on. Hulu and come up with their own questions. Our first question is from Ayla and North Carolina. Ayla how do you balance your passion with self care and or spending time with those? You love a great question. It was definitely something where I kinda locked out so when it comes to caring for my plants but also putting the time in with my wife My plants take about four to five hours a week to care for and in that week a lot of that in a lot of the time on particular weekend day and I am blessed with the fact that I have always slept for about four to five hours and have been good with it so I wake up really early and I do all of the plant stuff early in the morning and my wife just happens to love sleeping so she doesn't get out of bed and I feel like for me. It's making sure that you set that schedule like it is. It is time for me to tend to plants here. Your doesn't schedule and then for the rest of that day. That's for whomever our next question is from Greek in Georgia who has inspired you Derique three three. I would say I've been inspired by so many people. I mean as an artist I went college. Grad school I feel like for me across the board is been artisan general now when I talk about artists. It's like in filmmaking A lot of us talk about how We we I were. I guess. We I found filmmaking And I would say in my in my household like Spike Lee was like one of the rectors. Where my mom made it known to me? This guy's a black guy making this film and I remember hearing that. I was excited about that so when I first saw school days I was like wow like. I don't know what it's like to being college but this feels while this feels like a lot like crazier than I thought college would be but during that time as well never really thought about college like Gucci. Yourself going to jail before you start yourself going to college so for me. That extra escape was knowing that someone like spike could do this thing in my make something and be like in the world creating this art. That's different than what I wanted to be at that time. Like as a Kid. I wanted to be a cartoonist. I wanted to be the next Walt Disney saw thought about was like I want to make cartoons. Um so when it comes to filmmaking. I feel like that was my first initial like inspiration when it comes to film but as I got older like it changed until like French new wave and all the directors there and then like Bergman was someone who I thought Had A really great way of Creating compositions that told a lot just by the framing itself and I was super excited about that when it comes to bringing plants into a space. I'm inspired by what I see in a lot of the buildings in Construction that's happening in Singapore and our last question is from a Lia in New York. Who are your mentors and have those relationships influence? Your trajectory mentors I will say you know what I'm GonNa say this Justyna from the jungle She has been one of my biggest Mentors in this space because in a space where I'm dealing with learning new things how to how to Take a partnership with a brand Who wants to put out a planter with you? How do you have those conversations where you go about Making a deal work. What does it mean to take something that you are super passionate about in create a business behind that? She's always been super influential in that element but and in that respect but she always makes time for me someone that she just knows via like the phone. I guess in social media but she'll make that time to talk me through whatever I'm thinking and whatever issues that I might be having with a particular project in an let me vent and she'll give me like super I would say detailed Information that won't allow me to take that next step in to not be afraid to do so so she's been great shot mentors that take phone calls for sure and now we're at the part of the show where there are no more questions skit to sound off on something. That's on your mind something that's kept you up at night or wakes up in the morning or something that you'd like to put to bed but two minutes two minutes all me. I mean I think spoke a lot of the things. They're nothing the one. When it comes to plants in bringing in greenery and people going out and buying plans is to know when it comes to social media that a lot of it is everything isn't exactly what it is made to be there my house the images that I- I post and the things that I do aren't just based on a particular plant amount of plant. Some of it. A lot of it is based on the bone structure of my apartment. See what I'm saying like there have really large windows which can push a lot of light. The space was a me to have more plants There are there have really nice hardwood floors which allow me to take great photos of these force because they reflect really nice and light and I have really high ceilings. Everyone doesn't have that so it isn't always just going to be Abundance of green. That's going to make you feel better about yourself or that. You're a part of the community of plant lovers. It's just gotTa be about what works for you. And what makes you feel good? If that number's four plants cool so being the numbers of thousand plants. I hope you have no other job but to care for those plants but just I duNno. Just just be mindful that you're talking about life over the course of my conversation with him. I felt many many things I think. Poulton story is an incredible one because it has so many twists and turns so many moments of discovery So many moments of him coming into his adulthood and learning that plants were such an important path towards that towards self respect towards being more caring. And so I think for me. It was an incredible roller coaster learning more and more about plan care plant investment. And what it means to say goodbye to plants because you spend so much time with them. After today's conversation I one feel guilty which I always maybe not. What Hilton intended But it made me think about all of my plan babies at home that I miss It made me think about how I went astray from talking to them. I used to talk to my plans. All the time and life has gotten so busy that I've forgotten to take time to do it And so I think that today it reminded me that maybe I need to spend more time with Dolores and Layla and Cleo fees and all the ones that I haven't quite named yet maybe I will go home and I will name some more of them. I hope that anyone who is out there and living a savage lifelike me or like I was I should say and maybe taking care of their plans but maybe not taking care of them as well as we can I hope that this conversation inspires you to take a beat to take a moment to check in with your plans to check in with yourself to water both your plans and your own soul which sounds so cheesy but it's so true so that's all for today but we'll be back next week with another episode until then don't be afraid to find what you love share with the world. It's free from the mountaintop your attention..

Hulu Spike Lee North Carolina Walt Disney Singapore Georgia Bergman Poulton Dolores New York Layla
"hulu" Discussed on Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

06:10 min | 6 months ago

"hulu" Discussed on Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

"So this is the part of the episode where we have a few questions from our Hulu subscribers who have watched your segment on your attention please now streaming on Hulu and come up with their own questions. I'm really nervous. Should I be this? Do not be nervous at all? It's just questions from people who are like we like you. WanNa know what you think's solid so our first question is from Tony from Toronto. I Tony How do you use or plan on using your differences to make an impact on E. Sports and East sports leadership love it? Thanks Tony I think there's it by fold answer here. I is very functional into my organization when I walked into. Eg It was twelve men working with a bunch of players under them in a tiny little room and a suburban industrial facility in Washington. And now we are seventy strong men women. Lgbtq plus family people who have kids like. We've just a big diverse group of really strong high performers across two facilities and Seattle and La with even more players beneath us in more titles. And that isn't done just by throwing money at something that is done by setting a vision that people can align and feel comfortable with to not just work for but also perpetuate in that vision is really what. I what I tell my staff. The goal for me is to hear people say I want to work or compete at evil geniuses and the nuance there is. It's not sports. It's not gaming. It's they want to work at this organization because it has the reputation the prestige and the infrastructure to support all different types of people and to be excellent and so then functionally that it's tied into me rolling out. I know I talked earlier about like. Hr Department a Finance Department. Learning in an organizational development initiatives. These are things that maybe sound commonplace in some industries but are very nudity sports a little bit of tying back into our brand identity you know living evil as we say is being comfortable being questioned for what we do and why we do it but we show through results and this is really showing that bringing select parts of what a Lotta gamers will corporate culture or best practices to make a space in workplace environment successful. Bring that in house doing things. Ethically doing things Well documented and scalable. That's what's going to help. Bg Be another top Tier Team for another twenty years. And hopefully we'll set the stage for the rest of the space where. Oh E. G. OFFERS ME XYZ EERIE G supports XYZ. That's where people are gonNA WANNA flock to not just as employees or players but his fans our next question from Dylan from California. Which sport is your favorite one So Love Rocket League title for as a player If I'm to pick amongst all of my my children as I guess I should say Counterstrike is pretty cool. Only because it's completely boggles my mind. It's very difficult first person shooter. Things are very fast paced. And what's interesting about? Counterstrike is survived many many years and what was exciting for me. We re entered counterstrike not too long ago as a title which was one of Evil Genius. I ever games. They played over twelve years ago so to bring that back and bring back such a strong team of really goofy guy is the counterstrike culture's pretty cool. It's bit more street. It's more fun Has Been It's been a cool Group to be with and our last question will be from Linda in Texas. How do you deal with stress? Call it the Iron Church and that is the gym. I think it's it's a hard trap for like professionals in any work environment. You know okay stressful. It's grab drinks. Let's go to happy hour was go. Grab dinner That's fun I found. That's not conducive to my best mental health state my physical health state so I have carved out physical activity as well as social time to really make sure. I'm always breaking my game to the table because stress is hard one issue. I as a new sports team owner One thing I I. Struggle with still is when the team loses I internalize all of those losses which is bad because a a lot of teams that do great and don't agree that I'm send Making sure you know I carve out time to to separate from the work. Identity is work as me in. I am work to our small successes and failures just tried to buffer those a bit more emotionally of been difficult so meant so much feeling so bad and it's terrible one of our titles we compete in. It's it's live and I'll go to the matches and I'm in the front and I know I'm on broadcast live the cameras and I have no fo- poker face whatsoever like I. Our players will make a mistake. I know they made a mistake. My face this showing the made a mistake in the night no one broadcast. Kohl's pistole shit her team doing so I e to counterbalance out of it better. What is it like seeing yourself on those broadcasts? It's it's funny because people will say. Oh you you're so good you must love it. It's not my Intrinsic Comfort Zone Base. Because he had no poker like. I'm over here like dropping F bombs and like getting mad at my poor GM who sits next. Why are they doing this? So it's been a learning experience learning curve for sure. Yeah I can't imagine you're like flipping tape technical fouls sports there are. I luckily have not committed any but you know their players aren't so seized like obscene gestures or say certain things Li by being a bold team. We have gotten into a more than one a little snafus here in the past. But it's okay no foul.

Counterstrike Hulu Tony I Hr Department a Finance Depart Toronto Wan GM Seattle Washington Iron Church Li Dylan Texas La E. G. Kohl Linda California
"hulu" Discussed on Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

07:56 min | 6 months ago

"hulu" Discussed on Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

"I'm Kimberly drew and you're listening to your attention. Please a Hulu podcast with iheartradio. Today I'm joined by. Philip humans a promising young director. His film burning. Kane made him the first black director to win the best narrative feature at the Twenty Nineteen Tribeca. Film, Festival. Eva duvalier's collective array picked up the film. And since then Phillip has gotten a ton of much deserve recognition. After watching Phillips segment on your attention, please I was really excited to go back and watch burning Kane I think that when you see these moments of flares pop up especially from young aspiring voices I feel really protective, but watching burning kane and seeing. The incredible promise in almost every single frame of film I knew that that protective energy wasn't necessary. Philip has a very special gift, and I'm really excited to continue to follow his career. It's such an honor to be joined by Philip at such a nascent point in his career, where there's so much ahead, but already so much that he's accomplished. He's so young. Where's I? Hate to say, but at age twenty he's already accomplished some directors wildest dreams so if he could have your attention, please our guest today Phillip Human. So my background is mostly in visual arts and I think a lot about how an artists are making the object. There's a surrender that happens where you handed off. You know the script. You're still living with it, but do you feel that release? Or what is the? What are the motions that come well? It's interesting because. I feel super I feel confident my in my voice in in that kind of stuff, but you never feel. Completely comfortable feel I feel like it's. Like I learned so I went to the Sundance labs with the script. And the Sundance labs are amazing like I went in with an idea and they tore it apart. In the best way possible I thought I had an idea that movie was movies called Magnolia Bloom. It's about New Orleans, Black Panthers. And I went in there with an idea about what that movie was, and it verified a lot of ideas about what the movie was to me, but also kind of just one expanded that, but it was interesting. It was like the advisors were amazing vets, but it also felt like all of that feedback. All of the conversations around the film were dictated by the screenwriter like it was more about me asking them what I wanted to get notes on as opposed to them. Coming out Blob with here are notes you know which I thought was very constructive and was also a period where. We were really really kind of motivated to embrace ourselves in our connections to the piece. I feel like writers. oftentimes, we are aware of a lot of what we're writing. How how much of that? How much of ourselves we can see in writing? But oftentimes I feel like at least in my case in the past. I've tried like push that away and make it less overt. In this case, it's like why make it less over like it's so you are you're the you're the artis I mean. You're the creator of it, so I feel like that was also dope perspective that a from the labs that really shaped draft as it is now so I feel confident about it, but I also feel scared in nervous and all that kind of stuff because I made. The first feature made a made in shooting with a budget of ten to fifteen thousand. This film is a period piece I mean. We're going to need millions, yeah! So, it's just is leveling up. It's it's nothing to complain about I mean I'm very very excited very fortunate. It's just. New Ground New territory. That's wild to think about I mean even in general as a person who's outsider looking at like? Go to watch movies. And thinking about the budget and scale, and just the sheer number of people that come together to make something possibles kind of wild How when you especially at this stage in your career, you have demonstrated promise as a filmmaker as a writer as a camera operator. There's a level of trust that I'm sure. People have with your future right now. I wonder how you maintain a level of vulnerability in those spaces, or is that even a goal if yours? I feel like I'm always vulnerable. I feel like I'm such a an open book because I'm sure in some ways especially when you're selling something, you have to go in with certain level bravado. Talking about this the other day like I feel like as artists like there's a certain amount of of. I don't know if it's ego or narcissism or whatever it is, but you have to believe that what you want to say. The work that you're making is important enough for someone to listen to your voice is important enough that in itself takes a certain amount of self confidence, but no, I just feel like there's a healthy amount of that. That's really necessary to put anything out there or at least to be able to put it out there and stomach it So yeah. Whenever I look at artists, and or even you're saying being at the Sundance Lab. People tearing it apart like my soul is like. Yes. It's so hard to sit down and just take it until I realized another thing with like any with any film like the process of getting notes like when I first started getting them I was so emotional about every little thing, rebuttal rebuttal bottle, and it's like it doesn't. It wasn't constructive until when I was doing. note sessions for Burning Kane. EP Ben. He was like really really motivated me. Not Say a single thing walking there. Just let people you go around the room. Everyone says they're notes. I can't rebuttal them because at the end of the day like it's an argument, you know. They saw what they saw. They had had the feeling the reaction to that they had And it also makes it somewhat awkward. You know because it can get so uncomfortable when you're having an argument with somebody about notes piece. Yeah, you invited them to like. I want your opinion but I. Feel. So! Let's deal with that yeah! Tell me about making the video for your attention. Please okay film. I should say. Well so it's called Imagine Moon Colony and it is about a kid named Henry Wade It's nineteen seventy. He asked his family. To imagine the twenty twenty three Black Lens, so he creates you know abstract visuals based on his interpretation of their ideas you know and it was interesting because I knew initially I wanted to shoot that piece. Only super eight but I realized the potential switch formats for super super sixteen was such. An interesting sort of you know idea proposition. You know 'cause. 'cause I've also been experimenting a lot recently with varying formats when it comes to shooting, you know especially the documentary form as well, but I wanted to show a family living influence I wanted to show you know a mother and father who had a lot of sexual energy, and we're still grabbing each other making out still like just in a this. I don't know in a in a more celebratory display, our blackness. You know what I mean. I felt like especially from making a film like. I've been talking to a lot of people about it recently like. I'm not in this sort of I guess more. More I don't know I was I. Think my head space back when I was making films a lot. More bleak is today, but I've noticed such a shift in the work that I've been making its I mean significantly happier now, just kind of objectively. I wonder for you. If there is. Any way in which you feel protective over the stories that you're trying to tell or if you feel like there's a push to stretch beyond.

Kane Sundance Lab Phillip Human Philip director Burning Kane Kimberly drew Eva duvalier Magnolia Bloom Black Panthers New Orleans Imagine Moon Colony Henry Wade writer
"hulu" Discussed on Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

03:23 min | 6 months ago

"hulu" Discussed on Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

"<Music> acting <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> visual <Music> space <Music> <Music> excited <Music> <Music> I <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> will say <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> today's conversation. <Speech_Music_Female> I was <Speech_Music_Female> thrilled to <Speech_Music_Female> meet the person <Speech_Music_Female> behind <Speech_Female> the legend. I <Speech_Female> was so excited to sit <Speech_Female> down with address. <Speech_Female> But what I didn't <Speech_Female> anticipate <Speech_Music_Female> was his continued <Speech_Music_Female> commitment <Speech_Music_Female> to empowering <Speech_Female> others. <Speech_Female> It's one thing <Speech_Female> to say I want to own. <Speech_Music_Female> I want to <Speech_Female> excel. <Speech_Female> I want to <Speech_Female> maybe seek out <Speech_Female> power. But there's <Speech_Female> this way in which <Speech_Music_Female> is able to resist <Speech_Music_Female> some <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> of the most tantalizing <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> things about power. <Speech_Music_Female> He's really <Speech_Female> interested. In investing <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> ewing. A sense of purpose <Speech_Music_Female> in <Speech_Music_Female> others that <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> was really <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> refreshing to <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> say the least <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> especially being <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> twenty two years <Speech_Music_Female> old and thinking <Speech_Female> in this way <Speech_Female> in a world <Speech_Music_Female> that's so shiny <Speech_Female> and demands <Speech_Music_Female> us to be <Speech_Music_Female> really competitive. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> We have <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> an example in Idress <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> being just more <Speech_Music_Female> collaborative <Speech_Music_Female> and more expansive <Speech_Female> and the ways <Speech_Music_Female> in which we think about connecting <Speech_Music_Female> to each other <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> oftentimes <Speech_Music_Female> when especially <Speech_Music_Female> for marginalized <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> people <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> when we reach a point <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of success. It <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> so much about. How <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> did you get here? <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> And why are you <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> saying here? <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> And there <Speech_Music_Female> isn't always opportunity <Speech_Music_Female> to talk about <Speech_Music_Female> these real <Speech_Music_Female> personal <Speech_Female> driving forces <Speech_Music_Female> and how <Speech_Music_Female> those driving forces <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> help us to better <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> imagine a future <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> that doesn't <Speech_Music_Female> exist yet so <Speech_Female> much of today's dialogue <Speech_Female> was <Speech_Female> really about pushing <Speech_Female> beyond our own imaginations <Speech_Female> and really <Speech_Female> thinking in a grounded <Speech_Music_Female> way about <Speech_Music_Female> the impact <Speech_Music_Male> that can be had when <Speech_Music_Male> we have people first <Speech_Music_Male> mindset. <Speech_Music_Male> I think what <Speech_Music_Female> was really interesting <Speech_Music_Female> in being able <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to finally share? <Speech_Music_Female> Irl's <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> space instead of <Speech_Music_Female> URL. Space <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> with eidarous <Speech_Music_Female> was just <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> his <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> incredible. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> I don't even WANNA <Speech_Music_Female> softness because it's <Speech_Music_Female> so much more dynamic <Speech_Music_Female> than softness <Speech_Music_Female> but there is a way that <Speech_Music_Female> he holds himself <Speech_Music_Female> in space <Speech_Music_Female> that I wish I <Speech_Music_Female> could teach other young <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> men and <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> young other young people <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> period not to put a gender <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> on it but <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> there is a <Speech_Female> grace. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Let's say grace <Speech_Music_Female> in the way <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> that I just <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> moves in space <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> that <Speech_Music_Female> I think could be <Speech_Music_Female> really informative <Speech_Music_Female> especially <Speech_Female> when thinking about <Speech_Music_Female> the business world especially <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> when thinking about <Speech_Music_Female> being asked <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to step up and <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> take charge <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> there's a grace <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> smoothness <Speech_Music_Female> <hes> <Speech_Music_Female> to everyone <Speech_Music_Female> of irises <Speech_Music_Female> kind of <Speech_Music_Female> articulations <Speech_Music_Female> in real space. <Speech_Music_Female> That I WANNA <Speech_Music_Female> masterclass on. <Speech_Music_Female> I <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> have tried <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to learn how <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to program <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> both in a classroom <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and on my <Speech_Music_Female> own <Speech_Female> Will never forget spending <Speech_Female> the entirety of <Speech_Female> hurricane. Sandy in New <Speech_Female> York trying to <Speech_Female> learn how to code <Speech_Music_Female> on my own <Speech_Music_Female> and being deeply <Speech_Music_Female> intimidated <Speech_Music_Female> by the process. <Speech_Music_Female> I don't know if <Speech_Female> I have the courage <Speech_Music_Female> to get back in <Speech_Music_Female> there with with <Speech_Music_Female> coding. But <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> I definitely <SpeakerChange> left. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Today's conversation <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> feeling <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> like there was an open door <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> that <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> I don't know if I've ever <Music> <Advertisement> been presented with <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> that's all for <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> today but <Speech_Music_Female> we'll be back next Friday <Speech_Music_Female> with another episode <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> until then don't <Speech_Music_Male> be afraid to find <Speech_Music_Male> which you love <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> share it with the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> world and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> screaming from the mountaintop. <Speech_Music_Male> Your <Speech_Music_Male> attention <SpeakerChange> please. <Music>

"hulu" Discussed on Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

01:58 min | 6 months ago

"hulu" Discussed on Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

"This is the part of the show were handed over to our Hulu subscribers. They've had the chance to watch your segment on your attention please now streaming on. Hulu and have come up with some questions of their own. We have our first question from Danika from Washington. What advice you have for someone who's been in a creative. Rut for a long time. Denecker has changed jobs and finds herself working taking classes being fulltime. Mom and wife and yes. We all may have the same hours in the day but her office isn't quite the traditional space. She wonders if you have any advice for staying motivated. That's like one of those questions where I feel like I'm not qualified to answer because it's like this is like a woman that's like a wife and a mother and those are things like I have in like experienced. Just continue their that perseverance to want to explore your creativity and I feel like you will come to you. Our next question is from Yolanda from Florida. What did you do when people told you know or that? You couldn't do something I think when people Tell me know that I can't do something. I respect their truth here. No I'm just like okay. Cool you know and just carry on and execute on doubt That's something I've never struggled with you know and I think like you know if you're doing something you're not either really love the really eighty. You're not doing enough. You know like I never really let that affect me on. I accept People's truth for what they are understanding that we all see life differently and I'm not interested in convincing people to seem you know life the way that I think it should be. It's more so of just how I see life in as an artist. Here's my painting if you don't like it and I mean if you like biding.

Hulu People Denecker Washington Florida
"hulu" Discussed on Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

07:57 min | 6 months ago

"hulu" Discussed on Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

"An idea will for me. Is award of harmony? I don't really like the term violence because I think balanced notes to equality. And, I am a equality -tarian. I don't know if that's a word, but I just made up of his. You know write that down. On them. But I think a world in which everybody is. Living in harmony, and we accept people's truthful what they are on. We don't. Project DR, INSECURITIES FEARS ON, other people we truly. Accept an honor people for where they are in life. Long Yeah I. Mean I think that's really? I'm very like I, guess I say Ray. Utopian with it, but it's Utopian balance in already. Don't believe in balance unbelievable harmony. so I think I. THINK THE WAR I. Really WANNA see harmony. Been like Oh my God, like I mean tagging. I'm black, so I want black would've conquer. I conquer is very patriarchal masculine word. That's built in power. You know until I. I just want to create across the I. Just want to see a world in which everybody respected. And and view. Accepted for who they are. I'm Kimberly. Drew and you're listening to your attention. Please a Hulu podcast with iheartradio. Today I'm joined by Eidarous Sandu. When I was a child, he started teaching himself programming languages. By the time he was thirteen years old. He was already shadowing an engineer at Google since then he's put in a lot of work to become the architectural technologist he today. I I got to learn about dresses work through a mutual friend name, nor to gory, nor is an incredible interviewer, and knows so much in love so hard of everyone in her universe, and learning about addresses vision, his passion through North is made me fall in love with his work as well he works as interlocutor between technologists, challenging algorithms, and thinking about these really quite confusing things, and is able to take that language and make it super accessible to future generations, and not just make it accessible, but give people the tools and empower them to make their own infrastructures for the future. I'm so excited to sit down with Iras today to learn more about he's inception, and what his hopes are for the future, so if he could have your attention, please our guest today. I Dress Sandhu. Talk about the ways in which creativity are designed? Inform the work that you do on a day to day. Yeah, I. Mean I think you know we've encountered so many different terms. You know that some we've you know used to define the work we do in some others. Just pick it up like we've heard architectural technologists. We've heard architect designer. We've heard software program. There's like so many different things right and. I think really. What connects all of that at the end of the day, no matter what embodiment or what definition of a of skill set or whatever people embody my work in is the connection to empathy and technology like that's my main goal like when I like, think about just like things in the future of technology we create or like you think about like man like if somebody like you know if if you win any award ever like. What you wanted to be an I. think about like being able to like have a pulitzer for like connection between technology and empathy. You know what I mean like using technology to bring people together rather than keep them apart. And being a kid from Compton being a kid, I grew up in harbor city. I realized that like growing up education. Itself was classic system in that. You know kids in lower income communities weren't learning things that other communities where learning in that was very evident for me growing up in hearing people like like even to this day. It's like a while you started programming when you thirteen like. That's an anomaly in the black culture, but you go to other cultures like that's not an anomaly like kids learn how to pay piano at six at seven. They learn how to Code Ten. You know what I mean like so really just inter standing that. like for me. My work is to expose people to all the necessary information. And form equal opportunities for them to create what others can. How do we create technologies that while people every single time? Even though we grew up in a world, war, technologies, abundant right, I mean that's the human connection to the empathy. Rate is when you create or you program with empathy in mind There's a higher chance of being able to directly connect with the user I want to of course. Talk about the video that you made as. As part of your attention, please in the video. We see these incredible moments of interaction for you right where you have the moment where you're in the library, and you meet the Google and then you also an equal measure talk about meeting. Nipsy and talk about the importance of like it's not this you know there's so many ways in which I'm sure your story misinterpreted I. Wonder if you could talk about collaboration in your process and about timing. I think like you hear the term like Tunde meeting preparation. I mean even if he says that in a song But I think really opportunity, preparation and skill level all coming together. have always assisted me personally my work because there's I see people that like have amazing opportunities that they're not prepared for the opportunity meeting, not preparation but for me like everything that I do. I made sure that I put myself in environments. Where like I'm not going to go. Sit Down with that person unless I know that. I'm ready for that because I. Even in conversation you can be on the same wavelength and mentioned something. Now you WANNA. Go create something with somebody but yeah I think my messages like even in the video I was talking about like how? One person that helped me was away one personnel me was the black literally Union Yang, but those people approaching me in the same fashion. Seeing the same light I think that's the message that I want to convey most people that like. You know it's like what is color color subjective? You know we might live in the monochrome world. It's like you know like when we look at other planets, and we claim that there's life there what what is life. What is the definition of what is real and what is fake? You know what I mean, so it's like there's so many different things, and I think for humanity. Our sanity is dependent on subjectivity. Right so like. Our Sanity is in God helped me or God loves me, or the universe loves me, or the Universe is on my side. No, the universe is. In favor of good, and if you happen to be on the side of good, then the universe will assist you. It's not about you. You know what I mean. It's like so when I think about my work. I also put myself in the same position. Even though I'm creating these technologies, even though we're empowering the culture, it's really like. I'm just one person working on the Great Wall of China. You notice like we're just one person to inspire the next generation to to to continue. Can you talk a bit about preparation? And how stay prepared because I can only imagine. How many things are at all times dragging you in different directions? How do you stay prepared? I think you know. With me, I've always been avid reader like always avid reader. Naito like so many young kids. You know like to appreciate an interstate in the power of knowledge. You know in like Einstein, said like yeah, you know. The knowledge is one of the most powerful forms of power, but the second.

Google Compton Eidarous Sandu black Dress Sandhu engineer Ray Drew China Nipsy Tunde Einstein Union Yang
"hulu" Discussed on Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

05:02 min | 7 months ago

"hulu" Discussed on Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

"This is the part of the show where we give Hulu subscribers chance to ask you their own set of questions after watching your attention please now streaming on Hulu. Our first question is from Eliya from North Carolina. Is it recommended to earn at least a master's degree to work for NASA? I would recommend depending on what you want to do. If you WANNA be a professor I'd say yes gopher but one thing that I've noticed as a scientist an engineer in many companies is that it really matters. You're passionate matters. The most as far as what you bring to the table your experience a not necessarily your degrees where I work. Currently there are people that are sitting at the board table putting in their ideas. That have no more than a high school education people with Bachelor's degrees people with Masters degrees and people with PhD's so don't think that your degree is a barrier innocence. But know that there are organizations where they do use it as a ceiling so I would say think about what you want to do ultimately and see whether or not degrees help the PhD or a Master's helps or if they're looking more at experience and your your global perspective. Our next question is from Lenny from New Jersey. Oh New Jersey from Jersey. How do you feel about Space Force next question? I have the same answer for people who ask about. What do you think of space x and Elon? Musk and do think it's competition and I say no. It's not a competition where we all work together and I love any excuse for people to be aware of space. I'll it like that if you if space force gives you more awareness attention to oh there. Are Things going out in space? Let me research more. What kind of things. What kind of defense related topics you would need within this base force? Well okay then that kind of achieved. My goal of you have more awareness. So I like putting it positively in that sense. What do I think space? I love any excuse that gets people looking to the stars and our last question comes from guiler or maybe gahler from Azerbaijan. Have you ever thought that there might be civilizations? Advanced enough to hide themselves in the cosmos. Ooh That's an interesting question. I think if there was some civilization out there I doubt they would want to hide themselves from us because the ability to make contact with another civilization is incredible and we know based on some of the observations of what exoplanets are nearby that the closest one is still going to be so far away. And we maybe we'll make contact but the from maybe radio waves or electro magnetically but as far as meeting people. I think that's probably not going to happen. We Need Interplanetary Barbecue Potato Salad. No I don't know I mean maybe. They saw some of the things that happened in our society with they may wanNA hide themselves. But I don't think scientifically they would want to hide themselves so this is really fun. Okay what I Mike you to do for the next two minutes fish is talk about something that you've been thinking a lot about. This is a part of the segment where you can just sound off things. You're obsessed with things that you want people to hear a message that you want to leave behind Go Yeah it's funny because growing up and going through different scientific disciplines one thing that I am trying to combat is people that feel like they need to advance by stepping on other people and I want to project to other people like other women and other scientists men and women but especially to women that like. Hey you you can do this. You stay true to who you are. Whoever that is and five for your space and fight for your ability to be you and be a powerful you and be a leader U. N. b. A BOSS. You and you have to not sacrifice who you are To to make things work and to make things happen hopefully this inspires somebody or or resonates with someone out there. That's in any field. That's not necessarily science or engineering or aerospace where you're struggling and you're sitting and thinking to yourself how do how do I reach these? The audience that. I'm trying to reach and do I have to sacrifice who I am to to make that happen. And the answer is no there is a way where you can stay true to who you are and Um stare authentic self and still achieve what you need to achieve and it might be a little bit naive. And maybe you to rose colored..

Space Force Hulu New Jersey PhD Musk NASA North Carolina professor Azerbaijan Elon Bachelor scientist Um engineer Mike U. N. b
"hulu" Discussed on Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

05:02 min | 7 months ago

"hulu" Discussed on Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

"This is the part of the show where we give Hulu subscribers. Chance to ask you their own set of questions after watching your attention, please now streaming on Hulu. Our first question is from Eliya from North Carolina. Is it recommended to earn at least a master's degree to work for NASA? I would recommend depending on what you want to do. If you WANNA be. A professor I'd say yes, Gopher HD, but one thing that I've noticed as a as an engineer in many companies is that it really matters? You're passionate. As far as what you bring to the table, your experience a not necessarily your degrees where I work currently there are people that are sitting at the board table, putting in their ideas that have no more than a high school education people with Bachelor's degrees, people with Masters degrees and people with PhD's so don't think that your degree is a barrier innocence, but know that there are organizations where they do use it as a ceiling so I would say think about what you want to do ultimately and see whether or not degrees help the PhD or a Master's helps, or if they're looking more at experience and your your global perspective. Our next question is from Lenny from New Jersey Oh New Jersey. From Jersey. How do you feel about Space Force? Next question. I have the same answer for people who ask about what do you think of space x and Elon Musk and do think it's competition and I say no. It's not a competition where we all work together and I love any excuse for people to be aware of space I'll it like that if you if space force gives you more awareness attention to Oh there? There are things going out in space. Let me research more. What kind of things what kind of defense related topics you would need within this base force well, okay, then that kind of achieved my goal of you have more awareness so I like putting it positively in that sense. What do I think space I love any excuse that gets people looking to the stars? And our last question comes from guiler or maybe gahler from Azerbaijan. Have you ever thought that there might be civilizations advanced enough to hide themselves in the cosmos? ooh, that's an interesting question. I think if there was some civilization out there I doubt they would want to hide themselves from us. Because the ability to make contact with another civilization is incredible, and we know based on some of the observations of what exoplanets are nearby that the closest one is still going to be so far away and we. Maybe we'll make contact, but the from maybe radio waves or Electro magnetically, but as far as meeting people. I think that's probably not going to happen. We need interplanetary, Barbecue. Potatoes. No I don't know I, mean. Maybe they saw some of the things that happened in our society with. They may WANNA. Hide themselves but I don't think scientifically they would want to hide themselves. So this is really fun. Okay? What I Mike you to do for the next two minutes. Fish is talk about something that you've been thinking a lot about. This is a part of the segment where you can just sound off things. You're obsessed with things that you want people to hear a message that you want to leave behind go. Yeah, it's funny because growing up and going through different scientific disciplines. One thing that I am trying to combat is. People that feel like they need to advance. Other people and I want to project to other people like other women and other scientists, men and women, but especially to women that like hey you. You can do this. You stay true to who you are whoever that is. And five for your space and fight for your ability to be you. And be a powerful you and be a leader U. N. B., a boss. You and you have to not sacrifice who you are to to make things work, and to make things happen. Hopefully this inspires somebody or or resonates with someone out there, that's in. Any field that's not necessarily science or engineering or aerospace where you're struggling, and you're sitting and thinking to yourself. How do how do I reach these? The audience that I'm trying to reach and do I have to sacrifice who I am to to make that happen, and the answer is no. There is a way where you can stay true to who you are and Um, stare, authentic self, and still achieve what you need to achieve. And it might be. A little bit. Naive and maybe you to rose colored,.

New Jersey Elon Musk NASA PhD North Carolina Azerbaijan professor Bachelor Um engineer Mike U. N. B.
"hulu" Discussed on Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

03:29 min | 7 months ago

"hulu" Discussed on Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

"hulu" Discussed on Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

07:33 min | 7 months ago

"hulu" Discussed on Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

"Lucky and blessed to. Be Able to take street dance on in places. That normally wouldn't be. from the Ted Conference to just like. Performing at Galas in ballet festivals in just places where like it's not usually highlighted in I mean we've been kind of like Building those bridges right to like Kinda. Get people to appreciate what we're doing. Also go into world where they're not used to what we're doing and Howard doing it and get to introduce it. You know so like for example like we did this massive. Ballet Festival in Guadalajara Royal Ballet English ballet rushing Bali, all the top ballet companies all over the world. Are there me and him were the only street dancers at this? Massive Ballet Festival and ten thousand people in attendance, and you could just tell like just a response from the ballet community of like what is it that you're dealing? WHAT ARE THOSE TECHNIQUES? Were the names of that like? What does that move called? you start seeing people's like as soon as you give them access to what it is were doing. They can take in the soul of it in the essence of it. It's like it's it. People naturally will gravitate to it, but if they're ignorant to it, then they're not gonNA. Know sometimes people think me in buck. Do the same style. That's how ignorant they are to the genres. I'm like there's some similarities we have. 'cause. There are certain things in Memphis Shukan that you'll see in popping as well so there's some. Synergy, but at the same time you just see the lack of knowledge, people have for black street dances in other spaces, so we feel proud to be able to just go in these different spaces in colleges. Introduce it to because we're really just like you, said we just educating people more spaces. We get into like this on like. Just our culture and you know what's really out there like like you said we've been part of so many been blessed performed so many different stages, because and only because we've done one thing literally and that's. Changed the music to what we danced to last, so we started breaking down these barriers, even within our own culture of just performing to rap, music or hip hop performed classical music performed. Indian Couture Budi music performed any music that we feel something from and that we can never motivated driven to to dance to so Don't let we don't have any boundaries as far as like. What's moving us whether there'd be nature or the music you know the John Wick music with whatever's moving. WE'RE GONNA move to it and in create art through that for me. That's always been something I've been doing since I. Kana started. You know like so passion between film and Dance, and marrying those two mediums, and like I notice all the films. And even just the artists that I like. They had social context to their work like if you think of Nina, Simone Nick of Michael Jackson They. Don't care about us and man in the mirror. And then Nina had plenty of activism or James. Brown say it loud. I'm black and I'm proud to all the artists that I idolized growing up. Use their platform to touch on the social climate of what was happening so. Like we always live by this quote. That Nina Simone, so she's like you can't be an artist and not reflect the times, so it's one of those things where like we're obligated to do that. Because sometimes the news Angang tell it like it is and other platforms may not tell it like it is, so we try our best to our artistry to Kinda give you. A Lens of what's going on strata in the places were from what it looks like, and it's not to say everything we're saying is the truth, but it's just a perspective from the people who really are in those places in those environments. We're using what's happening in the world to to inspire our art. And I think that's the best way to do it, so it always comes naturally. You're doing something that really means something to you and you're not like. Oh, I'm an activists. I have to do this or that. You know what I mean. You just Kinda. Leave yourself room to feel as we were starting to do more social activism work inside the art that we do. We had to say we gotta really be about that lifestyle. You know what I mean because we coming at it from an artistic perspective, because we're talking on so many topics that people have studied their whole lives, you know, and and put their lives work into it. We had to start affiliating ourselves with real people who do that. Grassroots work on a regular basis, so we know Bryan Stevenson Bryan Stevenson is a lawyer in an ambassador? Carson ration- It'd be just mercy came out about him. He has a lynching museum in Birmingham. which are film that we did? With them? It runs on loop every day in that museum and we're. We're Hella honored. For that because it's like this dude is like a modern day Martin Luth. Same spectrum is as the mlk's to me in the Malcolm X. is to me in for us to be able to. Reach out to him in in in get statistics in real facts on these things, it just helps our work become more authentic. I mean books brought to attention to the way we approach it. Like what does it look like? What does it sound like? Was it feel like you know what I mean so? These are things that we ask ourselves when we're approaching these. Different films that were going through different performances in all these things. I mean I appreciate you guys breaking it down like that for any non artists that are listening because I think sometimes it's so. It's a gift of watching all move. It literally looks like sorcery like I just don't understand how your body's do that. On another level, then thinking about the physical literal weight of the subject matter that you're moving through I also wonder if you could talk about bringing black dance to the world, and what are some of the thoughts that go into it, because it's interesting that you guys have taken on the role of wanting to teach the world about black dance, but I wonder if you ever feel protective over those dances on what that what? That looks one hundred percent? We do especially being like the dances that. Are Practiced in our. Cultural driven dances. These dances I've been here before us. So. There's a huge responsibility and there's a huge It's a big deal for us to be able to take these dances, and and really elevate them as high as they can go like you said, and really you know, show the world that true power of these dances, because there's no opportunities in Memphis potatoes and not a lot of opportunity for people to be able to shine industry dancers in, and really you know, bring these black dancers to to the forefront. Of our industry or you know to get people to respect them on a level that we that it needs to be respected on, so it's a lot of work and we've been doing it for. For years now like I've been I moved to La from Memphis. was. Years Old, and I started my career at the star everything all over again at age twenty at the start. Literally I I was an unknown world announced space, trying to show you know. The whole world what Memphis has to offer in La. You know what I'm saying so. It was a lot of work and a lot of times. You know it's you it's it's very hard. Man Like just living at Depths Dan's life Israel Israel is.

Nina Simone Guadalajara Royal Ballet Engli Memphis Bryan Stevenson La Memphis Shukan Bali Israel Howard John Wick I. Kana Angang Brown Martin Luth Hella Carson Birmingham. Michael Jackson James Simone Nick
"hulu" Discussed on Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

08:13 min | 7 months ago

"hulu" Discussed on Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

"I'm John Bugs I'm little and together. WE ARE ENEMY I. So for anyone who's listening who isn't familiar with the work that Shell do I wonder you could just give a general introduction to Ma I why you decided to start it and specifically because twenty sixteen is when you guys started. I think around that time bucket I have known each other since two thousand nine, so we've been dancing together for a really long time. Then we had a period where Kinda Buck, when off, and was torn with Madonna and torn with your mind, I was still street performing in La and then we both happened to sink back up in Las Vegas, when I was dancing for Cirque, Du Soleil the Michael Jackson show at Mandalay. Bay Buck was happened to be in that same show, and even back in two thousand nine. We shared the same passion for where we wanted to take dance. We wanted to elevate street dance artistically theatrically, and just we shared that passionate like bringing back the era of like Fred Astaire Gene Kelly's Gregory Hines Nicholas. Brothers like quin dancers and movement artists like household names you know, and so we shared that passion and. That passion was like. The root of why we started, Ma I wanted to put movement artistry in dance on a higher prestige level in change people's perception of the art form that we do so in two thousand sixteen. I happen to leave Cirque du Soleil. 'cause buck was like convincing me like hey, man is great. You're working there, but we need to like. We need to start our own thing. You know I mean kind of like you know our own Cirque du Soleil. Let's say you know what I mean like our own brand and film, because one of the strongest points I saw John Bugs was his His amazing creative way of. Combining dance and film, because when I met him now, he was already in that space. You know what I'm saying like. What means a lot to him. And you know socially and and his movement, and telling stories with that, so when I met him he was just you know we. I just knew him as a freestyle popper and he was extremely good at that. We street form together, but the more we talk to each other more. We really started to realize that we're like minded about the trajectory of street dance, and where we where we see it and and yeah, I started seeing, he started making these films. Films that were just unbelievable. You know and people weren't doing anything like that and street dance. especially in our genre, people weren't making films about homeless people you know, and about bringing awareness around a Lotta these different things that we see on everyday basis you know, and it just means nothing to the average person, but like the he just gives so many different topics that means a lot to him so much substance and we wanted to. We want to build their platform again because slowly dance has kind of. You know diversity like back background behind the scenes, which is good because a lot of dancers dreams now are to like dance for a certain artist, but like a lot of times we forget how important how? How power for our own artistry is in its own I, wonder if you could talk a little bit more about that where do you hope that the Dan style that you do goes, or what are the things that motivate you in terms of sharing your dance with the world? I mean I think the goal in the trajectories you know we consider what we fine art. You know the same way people admire Basquiat or. Picasso or Van Gogh. we strive to have our artistry hopefully be honored on that same level. You know so really. The trajectory is just to break down those boundaries and borders that people tend to put on street dance. You know they tend to. It's just a freestyle thing, or it's a street thing or know we try to constantly kind of push back on those stereotypes, and just keep stretching out the possibilities of what it could be an also just like. You know when we talk about Fred, astaire's and or Gene Kelly Michael. Jackson's or any of those powerful artists like we feel like every year. There should be a dance film. That's honored at the ask. Why can't we have a film as powerful as the color purple or the revenue or I? Don't know I'm just thinking of films. Schindler's List films that pop into my brain by can't dance. Be Pushing those narratives, and now we start to change what a dance film really could look like so trajectory. Wise hopefully just more. Award winning worthy dance films, and also just in general, the genre being honored on the same level as any other fine artists. It's wonderful speaking of video, so you guys worked together to create this really beautiful film that was aired on your attention, please. Could you talk a little bit about the creative process? What went into building out? That idea highlights difficulties in the production. WHO's an amazing experience working with their film? And you know we got to really hone in on what we do best which is. Performance in the direction of it as far as you know how we wanted to start it and We worked with a great. Camera Operator Cam. You've been working with him for so long and he's he's actually. worked a lot with us on our company, so he knows exactly how to shoot us. And it was. It was just beautiful. We got to really tell the story wanted to tell. The story was about just honoring the legacy of the dancers that came before us. The black dancers that came before earl snake hips Tucker's to the different groups. The G. Styles dentures in our neighborhood that you guys don't know about the. The help cultivate our movement in such a way that it's you know. Become a global phenomenon. poppins became a global phenomenon due to you know these people that were like rooted in our history and Mrs. Johnson became a global phenomenon because people deeply rooted in history in Memphis of We wanted to tell Dole's stories as well as you know, the ones that a lot of people know about such as like earl snake hips or the Nicholas, brothers, and all of those is. We wanted to really just. Make a film that impact that really shows that impact that they had on us, and also the trajectory, and where we see that type of artistry like books was talking about before like so you see the setting in the museum and I don't like if you haven't seen it go. I don't WanNa. Give too much away. I don't know if I'm given too much around as Vargas. But like if you see the setting that we're in, you see that museum setting you see the frame you see like what we're trying to. We're going with it. The storytelling with it and how we visualize and CR selves is fine are. You know in that picture so with incredible. spoken word, artists. Beano are calling me books. Columbia number name is Robin. Sanders one of the most incredible artists of our time period is shot out to Robyn who added the strong vocal narrative that we needed to kind of tie it all together. Shoutout to choose from Miami. He scored the film. Both of the songs you here in the film come from Miami artists which is really. Really Cool, for me, being from Miami's just given ourselves an opportunity to not only create something powerful, but we. We liked to stick with our tribe in our our people, so it was nice, it was it was nice on so many levels to be able to provide jobs to different people that we have been building with for years, and give them an opportunity to put their artistry on a platform like Hulu, so it was it was. Was Redman, so by way of brief introduction, a lot of the work that I do is promoting the work of black artists and a visual art space, and I often try to think about ways to reduce the barriers of access between a public audience and the art form itself, and it's interesting to see both in the film, and just in general in the work that you're doing trying to make sure that people under not just. Just elevating dance because I think that that's a whole other conversation. You guys are saying like what is here is greatness We want to invite you into the practice of doing this to or appreciating it in these ways I wonder for you all what your goals are in terms of where dance finds itself or where dance audience is find especially the styles that y'all are doing. Is that make sense? It makes sense. I mean. I think we've been really.

Fred Astaire Gene Kelly Bay Buck John Bugs Michael Jackson Miami Gregory Hines Nicholas Cirque du Soleil Du Soleil Shell Madonna Mandalay Las Vegas La Hulu Basquiat Redman Schindler G. Styles Robyn
"hulu" Discussed on Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

11:40 min | 7 months ago

"hulu" Discussed on Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

"I've always envisioned a world that was based off art in the reason why I say that is because art brings people together big allegations future and Travis Scott live can I was tripping out like the diversity of people that came to see these artists me now imagine if like art was the highest form of currency are in a way where. I feel like when you talk about like you go to these communities and highlight. Some of the art programs are not funded in like how arts is like low on the totem pole. Like imagine if that was reversed. It's just one of those things I think give to a world revolved around art. I think would you would see a lot more of a peaceful world because I just noticed dance music. All those universal languages unite people drew. And you're listening to your attention please. A Hulu podcast with iheartradio. Fine now you might have already seen your attention please on Hulu but if you haven't let me sum it up for you really quickly. It's a short series about nine amazing people who are defining what our future might look like. It inspires us to think about the black creators of today and tomorrow the show invites us to dream and have more imagination about what's going on in relationship to black culture and black creatives. I hope that this podcast provides a deeper perspective on the work. That each of the nine fabulous people that are featured on the show what they bring to the world. I hope that everyone leaves with just different and more bold perspective of these incredibly complicated figures and I hope that that complication of their narratives helps each of us to walk away and ourselves to live more boldly and to make our own bits of history. As for me I'm a writer curator and activist passionate about sharing black stories. And I couldn't be more excited to share space with these heroes today. We'll be joined by M A I Aka John and little bump 'em is stands for movement art is and that's what they're all about movement. Their workers visually stunning an absolutely moving to them. Movement is entertainment but it's also so much more it's a pathway to empathy to connection and to actions my first interjection to Ma. I and more specifically little box was actually on YouTube. I was doing research for some projects and discovered low books video with Yo. Yo Ma getting to see little light across the floor and defy gravity left an impression upon me and my thinking about the future of black art and today. I'm thrilled to be joined both by Buck. And his incredible creative partner John to learn more about the work that they do together and to learn more about the bright future for the collective. Ma I so if they could have your attention please. Our guest today A. I'm John Bugs. I'm little and together. We are enemy. I so for anyone. Who's listening who isn't familiar with the work that you do. I wonder you could just give a general introduction to Ma. I why you decided to start it. And specifically because twenty sixteen is when you guys started. I think around that time bucket. I have known each other since two thousand nine. So we've been dancing together for a really long time. Then we had a period where Kinda buck when off and was torn with Madonna and torn with your mind I was still street performing in La and then we both happened to sink back up in Las Vegas. When I was dancing for Cirque du Soleil the Michael Jackson show at Mandalay Bay. Buck was happened to be in that same show and even back in two thousand nine. We shared the same passion for where we wanted to take dance. We WANTED TO ELEVATE STREET. Dance artistically theatrically and just we shared that passionate like bringing back the era of like Fred astaire gene. Kelly's Gregory Hines Nicholas. Brothers like quin dancers and movement artists like household names. You know and so we shared that passion and that passion was like the root of why we started Ma. I wanted to put movement artistry in dance on a higher prestige level in change people's perception of the art form that we do so in two thousand sixteen. I happen to leave Cirque du Soleil. 'cause buck was like convincing me. Like hey man is great. You're working there but we need to like. We need to start our own thing. You know I mean kind of like you know our own Cirque du Soleil. Let's say you know what I mean like our own brand and film because one of the strongest points I saw John. Bugs was his His amazing creative way of combining dance and film because when I met him now he was already in that space. You know what I'm saying. Like mixing what means a lot to him and you know socially and And his movement and telling stories with that so when I met him he was. Just you know. We just knew him as a freestyle popper and he was extremely good at that we street form together but the more we talk to each other more we really started to realize that we're like minded about the trajectory of street dance and where we where we see it and And Yeah I started seeing. He started making these films. That were just unbelievable. You know and people weren't doing anything like that and street dance especially in our genre. People weren't making films about homeless people. You know and about bringing awareness around a Lotta these different things that we see on everyday basis you know and it just means nothing to the average person but like the he just gives so many different topics that means a lot to him so much substance and we wanted to. We want to build their platform again. Because slowly dance has kind of you know diversity like back background behind the scenes which is good because a lot of dancers dreams now are to like dance for a certain artist but like a lot of times we forget how important how how power for our own artistry is in its own. I wonder if you could talk a little bit. More about that Where do you hope that the Dan style that you do goes? Or what are the things that motivate you in terms of sharing your dance with the world? I mean I think the goal in the trajectories you know. We consider what we fine art. You know the same way. People Admire Basquiat or Picasso or Van Gogh We strive to have our artistry. Hopefully be honored on that same level. You know so really. The trajectory is just to break down those boundaries and borders that people tend to put on street dance. You know they tend to. It's just a freestyle thing or it's a street thing or know we try to constantly kind of push back on those stereotypes and just keep stretching out the possibilities of what it could be an also just like you know when we talk about Freddie stairs and or Gene Kelly Michael Jackson's or any of those powerful artists like we feel like every year. There should be a dance film. That's honored at the ask. Why can't we have a film as powerful as the color purple or the revenue? Or I don't know. I'm just thinking of films Schindler's List Films that pop into my brain by can't dance be pushing those narratives and now we start to change. What a dance film really could look like so trajectory wise. Hopefully just more award winning worthy dance films and also just in general the genre being honored on the same level as any other fine artists. It's wonderful speaking of video. So you guys worked together to create this really beautiful film. That was aired on your attention. Please could you talk a little bit about the creative process? What went into building out. That idea highlights difficulties in the production. Who's an amazing experience working with their film? And you know we got to really hone in on what we do. Best which is performance in the direction of it as far as You know how we wanted to start it and We worked with a great camera. Operator Cam you've been working with him for so long and he's he's actually Worked a lot with us on our company so he knows exactly how to shoot us and it was. It was just beautiful. We got to really tell the story wanted to tell. The story was about just honoring the legacy of the dancers that came before us the black dancers that came before earl snake hips Tucker's to the different groups the G. Styles dealers even in our neighborhood that you guys don't know about the help cultivate our movement in such a way that it's you know come. A global phenomenon poppins became a global phenomenon due to you know these people that were like rooted in our history and Mrs Johnson became a global phenomenon because people deeply rooted in history in Memphis of We wanted to tell Dole's stories as well as you know the ones that a lot of people know about such as like earl snake hips or the Nicholas Brothers. And all of those is we wanted to really just make a film that impact that really shows that impact that they had on us and also the trajectory and where we see that type of artistry like books was talking about before like so you see the setting in the museum and I don't like if you haven't seen it go I don't WanNa give too much away. I don't know if I'm given too much around as Vargas but like if you see the setting that we're in you see that museum setting you see the frame you see like what we're trying to we're going with it the storytelling with it and how we visualize and CR selves is fine are in that picture. So within credible Spoken word artists. Beano are calling me books. Columbia number is Robin Sanders. One of the most incredible Artists of our time period is shot out to Robyn who added the strong vocal narrative that we needed to kind of tie it all together shoutout to choose from Miami. He scored the film. Both of the songs you here in the film come from Miami artists which is really cool for me. Being from Miami's just given ourselves an opportunity to not only create something powerful but we. We liked to stick with our tribe in our our people so it was nice it was it was nice on so many levels to be able to provide jobs to different people that we have been building with for years and give them an opportunity to put their artistry on a platform. Like Hulu so it was. It was Redman so by way of brief introduction. A lot of the work that I do is promoting the work of black artists and a visual art space and I often try to think about ways to reduce the barriers of access between a public audience and the art form itself. And it's interesting to see both in the film and just in general in the work that you're doing Trying to make sure that people under not just elevating dance. Because I think that that's a whole other conversation you guys are saying like what is here is greatness We want to invite you into the practice of doing this to or appreciating it in these ways. I wonder for you all what your goals are in terms of where dance finds itself or where dance audience is find especially the styles that y'all are doing. Is that make sense? It makes sense. I mean.

Ma Buck Hulu Cirque du Soleil John Bugs Gene Kelly Michael Jackson Miami Travis Scott YouTube Fred astaire Michael Jackson creative partner writer Las Vegas Robin Sanders Redman Robyn Madonna Schindler
"hulu" Discussed on Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

02:32 min | 7 months ago

"hulu" Discussed on Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

"There is a reason why so many science fiction novels and films have been set in the year twenty twenty. It just sounds like the future like those movies that imagined a world with super complicated technologies is an alien invasions the real twenty twenty has its own set of heroes people who are ahead of their time or shaping culture today an intern defining the world of tomorrow. Those are people like the movement artists John Bugs and little buck. Who together are showing the there's no boundaries with street dance also preserving it by making sure we are knowledgeable about our craft as possible so we can actually educate people. At the time we're expanding. There's no limits to what we can do with this movie. And then there are people like Lucci Cooper a scientists who spencer days making sure that Earth and other planets don't fall victim to the destruction an apocalyptic future. It's so many of those Scifi movies have predicted. That's kind of my duty this something that I owed to. The next generation is to inspire them whether or not to be a scientist or something else. I don't care if I talk to kids and no one wants to be a scientist. But someone's like you know what I want to be a lawyer. I want to be an artist. I want to be something else. I just want them to be inspired period. Over the course of this podcast. You'll hear from people of made the world brighter. Safer more fashionable and so much more interesting. As amazing as protagonist are as much as they're fueling progress. They all have their own stories of how they got to where they are and where they're headed next. The truth is success. Doesn't look one way and success is not out of reach for you. Guess you or anyone else willing to imagine a better future and by the way my name is Kimberly drew and as a lover and curator of black art. I spent all of my days thinking about black futurity. I'm deeply committed to telling the stories of people who have unique visions and bring them to life. But if I've learned anything in my years of studying and uplifting black artists all have the power to create something beautiful. That's why I'm pleased to introduce you to people who have broken down boundaries in fencing brought a love of house plans to the world and helped to create the first ever smart store. It's a big deal. They're a big deal and it's time we give them our attention. Your attention please. From Hulu.

scientist twenty twenty John Bugs Lucci Cooper intern Kimberly drew
"hulu" Discussed on Ross Patterson Revolution!

Ross Patterson Revolution!

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"hulu" Discussed on Ross Patterson Revolution!

"I'm good i think i was in after after one with the wire was the white cop i thought i thought other black actors were fucking knocked it out of the park would harrison those guys idris elba it was the white cop for me in that show who's might may might be british and real life yes he is he's amazing are you kidding me okay with curly hair he's fine he's okay but to me cow that cast that brought that home to me but i'm glad i gave it four after everybody said hey you should fucking do this westworld westworld i needed three episodes to get in and fair westworld now checked out where it's just like hey ski seems kind of a mess right now sure i'm gonna i'm going to watch it or tempt too but because you're already in but it's kind of a mess i'm able to walk away from shit and just do it case in point handmaid's tale so we're hulu deniers there's climate deniers feminist doesn't denied me hulu deniers which that is our household yes we were never going to have hulu in this household was for bowed forbid and i did not wanna see who lou on my god damn television screen i come home and do right what did you say didn't there is nothing out on netflix oh boy i had a stalemate with soon as i heard those four letters come out of your mouth in all caps of who sure i didn't know whether to use my backhand a switch or a belt i understand you.

hulu netflix idris elba lou
"hulu" Discussed on #Viral with Natalie Alzate

#Viral with Natalie Alzate

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"hulu" Discussed on #Viral with Natalie Alzate

"Hulu their modern to the very first episode of hashtag viral with me natalie thought they ak natalie's outlet i'm so excited to be sharing this project with you is after months and months of planning i really believe there's so many people would enjoy and benefit from learning about my experience and especially the experience of other video and social media creators all sorts of john rose and backgrounds so i decided to do something about it and create a show for the community and well by the community each episode of hashtag viral we'll start with a segment just like this one where i talked to you about what's happening in my world i'll give you an update on my life and projects and things that i'm working on restarting our blob channel talk about industry trends and maybe talk about new viral creators are changing the game as family and of course i wanna be able to connect with you so i'll be answering questions from the hashtag viral mail which i'll talk about in a moment and then for the rest of each episode interviewed the week's featured guest and i have to say right now i'm so excited to share these interviews with you and i don't want to give too much but for this season you'll hear me interview craters like leash marie kernigan arsia hannah hart and influencers who are hashtag viral in these interviews we talk about everything what their day to day lives are like the tips and tricks to how we build our audiences the need to build a team around you as you continue to grow because honey you cannot do it all how he staying gauge with our fans are successes failures and how we monetize and bill businesses like this one there's going to be a lot i talk about on here that i don't get a chance to say in my videos of what's happening in my life what's on my mind and updates about my career and if you're listening and have never seen my youtube channel that's okay too you can still learn a ton about the business of online video for me in our special guest each week as you'll hear our guests are very open and honest and get pretty candid and very real sharing about their personal lives and all my best to do the same so make sure to tune in each week for worthwhile.

Hulu hannah hart natalie john rose