20 Burst results for "Hugo Award"

"hugo award" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:22 min | 7 months ago

"hugo award" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The climate wasn't quite right in the later part of the afternoon or the day was half an hour too long or the sea was just the wrong shade of pink And thus we're created the conditions for a staggering new form of industry Custom made luxury planet building Did you know Amazon's Jeff Bezos considered naming what would become his gargantuan retail disruptor make it so Making some is still a forge But what happens when a great literary genre Yes great is misread What might these tech moguls have learned if they'd only read slower or better Starting with the novel that introduced the word metaverse Neal Stephenson's snow crash So the metaverse is both a kind of immersive world that you can dive into or it can be accessed through goggles that give you an augmented reality Anna Lee newitz is a science fiction author and science journalist and co hosts the Hugo Award winning podcast Our opinions are correct The part that they seem to have forgotten is that the story around the metaverse in snow crash is that access to it is controlled by a crazy magnate named L bob rife whose name is clearly a reference to elron Hubbard And he controls a cable TV network so to access any of the goodies in there you have to go through this one corporation Ultimately rife decides that the best way to maintain his control is to release this weird kind of semi magical virus that's both a computer virus and a human virus that causes people's brains to shut down They crash And they are no longer able to speak or understand language Does Zuckerberg not see how he would be cast in such a scenario I mean that's certainly what a lot of people have been suggesting It's about Zuckerberg kind of misreading his place in the story I also think that it's about not being able to think about where Facebook fits into this larger social picture It's interesting to see this discussion about who Zuckerberg is in the story snow crash at the same time that the U.S. government is asking what is Facebook in the context of our nation trying to hold Facebook to account for everything from suicidal ideation among young people to the attack on the U.S. government in January two parallel conversations one of which is about what is Facebook doing to us right now in the United States and in other nations and also what is Facebook mean to the progression of humanity which is the bigger science fictional questions raised by thinking through snow crash In 1998 the philosopher Richard rorty said that novels like snow crash I mean specifically was a writing of rueful acquiescence in the end of American hope Inspired right Yeah that's what you really want to build your future That's Harvard historian and New Yorker writer Jill lepore I wondered if as an educator she saw reading comprehension as the issue They read the books for the gadgets It's like reading Playboy for the articles I don't know It's a weird thing And that's why they don't read Octavia butler or Margaret Atwood or Ursula le Gwen You know it's one thing to read Neal Stephenson for the gadgets and ignore the social world It's another thing to read Margaret at which is a gadget or the social world You're just pretty much can't do it Right So it's a very selective and willful reading It's an abdication of what reading is and it's an abdication of historicism viewer taking class in science fiction you'd be learning a lot about the writers and the world that they lived in and the nature of the critique they were offering These guys as boys read all these novels that were about the building of worlds right They're all world building novels And now they're the only people on the planet who are rich enough to actually build worlds Lepore is talking about the tech moguls raised on fiction written during the mid last century by mid last century men creating world suggested by and imagined in a time and place very different from our own The tech wizards she says used an exact O knife to extract the gadgets from these books Irrespective of the author's context Asimov in Heinlein were writing from this perspective of a 1950s madman era culture of swaggering white male solves everything with his fancy new computer we don't live in that world anymore And in fact science fiction has so long ago moved on from all of this stuff You know there's a whole world of Afro futurism and post colonial fiction and feminist science fiction These guys never cite that stuff though Well we're a really big science fiction fans but they read books that were published generally in 1952 like their vision of the future is unbelievably obsolete and antique It's not that the people who are not excited about the megaverse are Ludden backward looking it's that the men are versus luden backward You know science fiction is not fundamentally about the future really is always about the present or about the past So to read it as a manifesto for the future is to begin by misreading it Science fiction has never interested me as a vehicle for prophecy Gene Seymour is a longtime culture critic and science fiction fan whose works appeared in news day CNN the nation the baffler and elsewhere The idea that well someone saw nuclear submarines as far back as the 1800s Yeah it's interesting from a historical standpoint But I've always been more interested in how we behave whether it's a dystopia or utopia what we do to accommodate those changes And I find that science fiction writers are further ahead than most other people are in assessing those Science fiction and respective fiction has always appealed to people who see themselves or a force to see themselves as outsiders People either willingly or not left to their own devices And imagining okay I'm on my own How do I magnify my knowledge How do I magnify my presence How do I magnify me And this is why so many adolescents are attracted to it It speaks to that impulse to not just figure out who I am in relation to others who either dismiss or marginalize me You've written a lot about you've thought a lot about Afro futurism Yes As you know for many many decades you can see a science fiction movie or read a book and not find any characters of color or even acknowledgment that there is still such a thing as a person of color in the future And many readers of science fiction including me wondered okay this has to be altered somehow This paradigm has to be changed and how do we do that Well in the years since there have of course been many writers of color Octavia butler saying Delaney people like that NK Exactly Yes I love her In fact a lot of the leading contemporary Afro futurists are women Yes they are And tell about world building They've done some incredible things with that chest the details of their world The actual physical details but also the societal development When I read one of her books I'm always struck by how fully she imagined this and also the detail not just in the different settings but also in the social fabric They seem to have an understanding of that As good if not better than some of the great white bale science.

Facebook Neal Stephenson Anna Lee newitz bob rife elron Hubbard Zuckerberg Octavia butler U.S. government Jill lepore Jeff Bezos Ursula le Gwen Hugo Award tech wizards Richard rorty Margaret Atwood Ludden Amazon Gene Seymour Lepore
"hugo award" Discussed on The Current

The Current

05:41 min | 11 months ago

"hugo award" Discussed on The Current

"What does that come with. What what is the responsibility that comes with. I'm still figuring that out. They just announced it on december. I i think for me. It pretty much means business as usual. Not not much has changed a believe. It'll mean i have a bit more visibility out in the world so the mechanism by which people will come to me to be mentored. Who's usually applying to university. I assume that they will see applications rise from people from various backgrounds who want to write spec specific Probably also will mean a certain amount of backlash. There is a thread incense fiction community. That is really kind of angry. That women erecting it at all their women of color as well that they're people who are talking about systemic oppression which is about sense fiction is about so i'm not sure why they're mad so expect some attempts at backlash. Don't expect that they will be much of a problem. I was gonna say. I mean winning. This award could tell you one thing about where science fiction and fantasy is twenty twenty one but also the fact that there's a backlash might tell you something different. Where where do you think it is. I think the backlash is a tiny part of the community. And the kenichi has been actively working to to counter what they're saying so for instance There's hugo award. Which is a reader voted award and a group of people tried to subvert it a few years ago by collecting votes for their candidates. They chose writers. They felt writing the kind of thing they wanted. It was Usually it was always white..

kenichi hugo award
How Octavia Butler Used Science Fiction to Address Social Injustice

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:18 min | 11 months ago

How Octavia Butler Used Science Fiction to Address Social Injustice

"For some science. Fiction is way to escape problems. In the real world for octavia via science. Fiction was away to shine a light on those problems. She used other worlds to examine real human experiences and address issues facing humanity. Her works touch on the environment race. Theory black feminism queer theory and disability studies. She was a pioneer in the development of africa. Future azam octavia had a powerful certainty and drive in her writing career evidenced in the archives of her work at the huntington library she wrote. I shall be bestselling writer. And i will find the way to do this. So be it. See to it. She was right octavia won many awards including the nineteen eighty four hugo award for best short story and hugo award for best novel. Let in nineteen ninety-five. She received a genius grant from the macarthur foundation. Becoming the first science fiction writer to do so with this grant. She was able to buy a house for her mother and herself. In two thousand five octavia was awarded a place in chicago state. University's international black writers hall of fame by that point. Her books had been translated into at least ten languages selling more than one million copies a year later. In two thousand six octavia died after taking a fall in her washington home. She was fifty eight years old. Since her death octavia butler's writing has become even more popular. Her work is featured on college campuses and there are plans for some of her stories to be adapted for film and television one of her books parable of the sower feels particularly prescient. Set in the twenty twenties. Parable of the sower is based in a world that's largely collapsed due to climate change class inequality in corporate greed. In her work octavia exposed flaws of this world by creating others her uncanny ability to see understand and reveal deep-seated problems continues to inspire and provoke readers today

Octavia Azam Octavia Huntington Library Hugo Award Macarthur Foundation Octavia Butler Africa Chicago Washington
"hugo award" Discussed on I Learned Something in College!?

I Learned Something in College!?

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"hugo award" Discussed on I Learned Something in College!?

"I why there are so many other people. Why did they decide. Certain naming after rivers. What the hell insists. This is how we get the big bang. Would you like some facts about the moon's yeah go ahead then so care. Bros and hydro are fairly small. We think that they're made of two smaller objects stuck together kind of like an elope shape so they probably formed by smash. Yeah by smash description but you know how the moon of earth is tidally locked with the earth. Yes which basically means that the moon spins at the same rates that it orbits the earth so we are always seeing the same side of the moon. I did not know that. So the dark side of the moon is always the dark side of the moon. When it's between us and the sun it's laid up but from earth we have only ever seen one side of the moon. Yeah wait how lake weird in specific is that that that happens. Most major moons in the solar system are tidally locked with the object orbiting. Okay but they don't have an ocean probably right well. Some of them was the ocean to do with it. Well if it's tidally locked so it's also called gravitational locking. I don't know why it's called tidal locking okay. I assumed it was because it also explains how the tighter is tightly locked like specifically at always inwardly facing earth. Yes the same size always inwardly facing earth. That is what tightly locking is. Okay so could you potentially have a moon that is not totally locked but is controlling the tides. Yes because just aren't that's poorly names. Gravitational shifts are control the tides on earth right there was still be interactions between the moon and the water on earth. Even if the moon was not tidally locked. Though i'm not a hundred percent certain on that just because of how the size in all of that works so earth moon is tightly locked to earth but the earth just sorta spins on. Its own in pluto's case. Karen is massive enough that pluto is also titled locked care on the same side of pluto is always facing the same side of keiron Together and they're both orbiting a smaller spot in the middle because of the imbalance of gravity there so think of two concentric circles so smaller circle surrounded by a larger circle k. and pluto is. Let's say it. Like the twelve o'clock position and karen inside the twelve o'clock position and pleads orbiting the smaller circle at the same rate that karen is orbiting the larger circle so when pluto is at six o'clock on at six o'clock at three o'clock karen two three o'clock okay. Yeah and the same side is always facing the same side in that is quite uncommon because usually only the orbiting object only. The moon is tidally locked pluto. Tidally locked care or they titled talk to each other Yes to both okay whereas the moon is totally locked to the earth and not the other way around. Yes right okay so that only happens because on so big compared to puto yes okay. Pluto's other moons are not tidally locked in they sorta of spin chaotically the fastest being hydro which has a rotation every ten hours. What is zoom and very first. This isn't really a scientific question. But why do you think that people rallied behind pluto. So much why they didn't want to on become a planet. I think it was a cultural thing where i was raised. Being told there were nine planets and we as the last one was pluto and people don't like change so having this thing where like we were told that this is the way it is and now we're being told to different way. Get mad about it. I think it's a similar thing with other cultural traditions. Such as problematic holidays yeah. It is not morally problematic for pluto to be planet dwarf planet. But i think the same sort of reaction occurred. I think also people felt angrier because it had been taken away versus something else. I think i agree with that. Because i don't think people would be mad if we had eight planet and then they're like hey are reclassifying it and now we have a ninth planet. And they'd be okay cool well would they. I don't know if pluto was never considered a planet and then was added. I think people would be excited because there's also been talk of like there's a planet x in. What if we found it. When nappy super cool rather than were being taken away i think i agree with you. Yeah science changes as we get a better understanding of the world around us prior to twenty fifteen. The best picture we had of pluto was lower definition than the minecraft moon. Ooh cool and now it's adorable little heart it does have a heart while that's so cute all right. Thank you for listening to. I learned in college. If you enjoyed this episode. You can follow us on twitter at el-sisi podcast. I l i icy podcast. As well as review epa choice until friend about us is nice chatting with you. It will be her next week and remember so fascinating has certain folks suddenly care about historical accuracy and fiction when the black people show up..

o'clock nine planets karen six o'clock next week Pluto Karen twitter two smaller objects two concentric circles earth minecraft moon ninth planet one side three o'clock both first twelve o'clock pluto every ten hours
"hugo award" Discussed on I Learned Something in College!?

I Learned Something in College!?

06:22 min | 1 year ago

"hugo award" Discussed on I Learned Something in College!?

"Moon. now when i say organic. I don't mean that it was necessarily produced by living things organic a chemical classification but these are molecules that theoretically could have could lead to life forming. Okay presumably a long long long time from now right or longtime ago okay. From an article published in the journal nature in june of twenty twenty called evidence for a hot start in early ocean formation on pluto it is thought that pluto was relatively hot when it formed and had an early subsurface ocean rather than it's very cold existence right now and then over time it cooled right so other things about pluto has a very small and thin atmosphere which is less voluminous semi expected it to beat because prior to twenty fifteen. We really didn't have any good photos of pluto. We really didn't know all that much about it because it's so far away but in two thousand fifteen. The new horizon spacecraft which was launched in two thousand six finally performed. it's fly by pluto becoming the first in only spacecraft to do so and it gave us the best voters pluto we've ever had a gave us though first photos of some of its moons. It's gave us just a ton of data and information bluer that we never had before and it was super neat. When what's the fly by was in two thousand fifteen okay. So when did the whole thing go down. It lost its status. Oh yes this. New horizons was launched in july of two thousand six the next month in august two thousand six the international astronomical union released its definition of a planet in the solar system so one month after they sent the spacecraft to go see pluto weight changing the definition yes oh pluto's not considered a planet anymore because the definition of a planet is a celestial body or a naturally occurring object in space which is in orbit around the sun has sufficient mass to be a nearly round shape and has quote unquote cleared. The neighborhood around his orbit and pluto has the first two but does not have the third because pluto's mass is only point zero seven times the combined mass of other objects in. its orbit's this is in contrast to earth which is one point seven million times massive other objects in orbit excluding the moon. Right so wait. Does that exclude moon. I think generally yes okay. But the the difference is stark and earth isn't even that big of a planet and also starting in nineteen ninety-two. There were many objects found orbiting in the same range as pluto that had similar masses to pluto including one even larger called heiress. So i've heard that the reason that they changed the definition or at least if they still wanted to include pluto with the new definition they would have also had to include a lot of other bodies that were not previously considered planets is that true yes because pluto than the area of the sun's gravitational field that is called the kuyper belt and in its discovery in nineteen thirty. We really didn't know that much about the kuyper belts. But it extends from the orbit of neptune outward and it's has three officially recognised dwarf planets and it is similar to the asteroid belts but wider and bigger and while many asteroids are composed mostly of rock and metal. Most of the kuyper belt objects are made of isis of methane ammonia in water. If you're interested. Mike brown the astronomer most responsible for the reclassification of pluto wrote a memoir called how i killed pluto in why it had it coming. That's very good. Don't do this. Direct all complaints to him also so pluto has actually yet to complete a full orbit of the sun cintas discovery in nineteen thirty because one plutonium year is two hundred and forty seven point. Six eight earth yearslong haw. Yeah but also in ten years his one hundredth anniversary of discovering pluto. That's pretty neat. Okay this is a weird question. Yes if we discovered pluto in nineteen thirty why is it called pluto like we knew about it before. Then right because the romans and the greeks i'll okay. Okay i understand no. The planet pluto was discovered in nineteen thirty when pluto is discovered it made headlines like everywhere but the general theme of naming planets in our solar system is roman names for god so some of the finalists for the names were minerva cronies and pluto and pluto got a unanimous votes among the committee. That was allowed to it. It so apt that it's pluto in that it ended up getting ousted clever. It works really. Well yes so. Pluto has five moons. We'd like to get the names of some of them. Whole i knew one of them was karen. Am sad that you already mentioned it. I don't think one of them is santos but that would be an obvious one Hypnosis knocks. Knicks is one of them. Next is one of the okay but not knock offs okay. Heiress airs is one of the other large objects orbiting. Oh like yet. It's not a moon serb-areas cameras what care boroughs with a k. Is that the roman version. So cerberus is already the name of an asteroid but the greek form of the name caballeros was deemed acceptable. Okay any of the theories. Nope okay got you got three two more. Do more okay One of these. You'll be like oh. I could have thought of that another one. You'll might be mad about okay. Do you like me to tell you one more. Okay per seventy no okay orpheus. Now that one didn't make a lot of sense but i threw it out there or faces an asteroid. Okay all right. Tell me okay. So one of the mistakes come on. I thought they were all people. Okay hydra just just hydra..

Mike brown ten years five moons july three earth third august one hundredth anniversary seven million times first two one point nineteen ninety-two first photos One karen next month two thousand fifteen first june of twenty twenty
"hugo award" Discussed on I Learned Something in College!?

I Learned Something in College!?

09:06 min | 1 year ago

"hugo award" Discussed on I Learned Something in College!?

"Yes that sounds which is the term that i like. Yeah here's the thing if you do it the way that dragon age inquisition does it. I think that's fine. It does mean that your party has to be like very big because if you have three or four companions you've run out of like it's just one of each and if you have an ace character to like a and also when you mix it with different gender orientations which i i will say. That is something. I have not seen outside of super dry like a gender and like any sort of non binary character or like out of binary character. I've only seen that supergiant games. I obviously haven't played game existence. I'm sure there are other games. But i have not put them well. We stand chaos. Yes we've talked a bit around it but could you explain what game gate actually was. Yeah so gamer. Gate is a little bit confusing. Describe the same way that race fellow nine is a little bit confusing to describe because it is an internet discourse surrounding a controversy however the controversy at the heart of gamer gate is a little bit more understandable. Which is there were some developers who came out with a game that had elements that people in the gamer community had never seen before aka like people who either were out of binary or head like mental health issues. They were dealing with or so. And so you know. Non default character representation in them that they said was political correctness. Coming to take our games away. Never bring them back sort of thing so it was a lot of just hatred towards these specific developers and then everyone pick sides about like whether they were going to stand with the people who are getting harassed or stand with the people who are doing the harassing and it was a big blow up. The specifics have with sing and death. Threats and abuse it all started with. The developers boyfriends dachshund. Her so do you want to explain. Dachshund by the way in case people haven't heard of that term yes so dachshund is basically finding someone who was previously anonymous or semi anonymous online. Finding their personal information where they live and like publishing it online so people can direct more harassment to them right in this case it was like address and phone number details. The kind of stuff that is terrifying for the public to have especially when you're developer. One of the very few female developers at the time and already writing in coding politically correct quote unquote. That's the term that all the harassers us because that's what they understand like any amount of difference as any amount of diversity. They see political correctness. Something that i want to mention here. Is i decided not to go into game design partially because of the amount of harassment that i thought i would receive so and that was when i didn't know i was on binary ope indeed. It's a rough rough field for people who aren't straighten white in any capacity. I think any field is kind of hard for some people. Like someone who's nonbinary. I'm scared of pretty much any field. Equally however game designers horrifying to think like that specific field is is really terrifying to me more. Because i'm reconsidering whether i do wanna get into it so yeah it's been on my mind lately. Gamer gate happens in two thousand fourteen. It was a several month. Long fair though. Probably stretching into twenty fifteen. It's only been five years since then. And i am consistently shocked at what manages to make it into games in a good way or a bad way in a bad way. Every time i get into a game. I have started in the last couple of years. Messing around with the character creator. Usually i don't spend much time there because of boers frankly in most games. You don't even see your character a lot. And i would just sorta like do some presets in beyond my way. I have started looking at all the different options available because it is shocking. The amount of skin tone. You cannot do. you just can't do in games. Yeah no sometimes. There's like five presets three or four of them being whites. Oh yeah a lot of times there will be like thirty percents and twenty five of them will be white and then there's some with like sliders where it's eighty percent of the slider is white to tan and then like twenty percent of the slider is brown skin in then black you get a tiny percent of the slider for that in most of it is like the exact color of tan. You wanna be while still being white honestly. The world of warcraft character creation is one of the worst ones. I've seen the long time. I don't play world of warcraft. I never really have. But part of one of my classes actually was to make a character in world of warcraft. And just look at the presets and things like that and it was pretty eye opening. I have to say so if you do play games. Take a look at the character creation menu because if it doesn't specifically affect you you aren't going to notice because you're not supposed to notice the so my impression of your thesis was you. Were writing your novel. This is the academic intro. Yeah icy okay. So my actual thesis is the first fifty pages of my novel and a twenty five. Page intro my intro. Is i mean in terms of the assignment. It's supposed to talk about the tradition. That i am joining and how my novel fits into that tradition. So part of it's going to be a very in depth. Look at everything we just talked about. It's also going to look at how inclusion exclusion works in general not specific to speculative fiction like the different levels of inclusion. That i was talking about before. I plan to go into a lot of detail with that because i think that you could probably clearly define how inclusive a piece of fiction is and give it like a number and things like that and i think that we need to start talking about it with something like that instead of just saying it's diverse or it's not diverse. Okay so like in addition to this game has eight out of ten review score. It's fun to play. But it's like a two out of ten on inclusion. we should add that as a metric. I think so. I figured i could break into the industry. Become a fiction reviewer slash game reviewer than have that is one of your metrics. Yeah that would be a good way to get my foot in the door. I think entities. Exactly what i care about. I care about quality. I also think that there are enough artists in the world that we do not need to throw out ethics and that comes with just having a fuller understanding of the people who live in the world's through art obviously that contributes to the quality for me. I also want to be very clear that it's a separate thing because yes you can't have bad fiction. That is very diverse and awesome in that regard. All right well thank you for sharing. Yeah thank you for your questions what you got for me. Yeah so this week. I'm going to be talking about pluto. Which is most people's favorite dwarf planet. I certainly really like it. I don't think i know any other dwarf planets. Exactly what do you know about buddha. So the date two thousand and three really sticks out when i think about pluto. Can you tell me if i just totally nailed the year that it got thrown out entirely incorrect. Okay cool you miss all the shots. You don't take right. If you had gone that it would have have been really impressive. Yeah okay what i know about puto is that it used to be considered a planet in then i think we changed our definition of what a planet was. But i'm not entirely sure what happens and then it became reclassified as a dwarf planet. It's the furthest planet from the sun. Well well dwarf planet. Yeah i guess it was the furthest planet. It wasn't really it. Used to be considered the furthest planet from sir so actually between nine hundred seventy nine thousand nine ninety nine. Cluedo was closer to the sun than neptune. because pluto's orbit around the sun actually crosses over neptune's orbit kind of not like in any way where they would ever collide in the concentric circles of planetary orbits pluto. Circle gets closer to the sun at some points than neptune circle. Okay what do you know about the material conditions. The help pluto is day to day. I get.

twenty percent three five years four eight eighty percent one world of warcraft two twenty fifteen pluto thirty percents twenty five first fifty pages this week puto ten dragon age inquisition two thousand four companions
"hugo award" Discussed on I Learned Something in College!?

I Learned Something in College!?

07:44 min | 1 year ago

"hugo award" Discussed on I Learned Something in College!?

"Said that he mispronounced several of the nominees names most of which were people of color. Even though he had been given a pronunciation guide he praised lovecraft and campbell. Lovecraft was so racist that other people in his time he to racist i bought a collection of lovecraft stories. Like four years ago or something. I was reading through it every four or five stories. You know these are. These are very short stories. Probably like five to ten pages every four or five of them he would just go on like to paragraph rants about like some specific minority group and it was total nonsense. Hogwash that had nothing to do with what he was talking about. It was bizarre. Anyway they both one retro for things they should have won if the hugo's had been around during that year however last year mostly because one of the people who won a different hugo award and twenty thousand nine mentioned that campbell was not only a racist but also a fascist. there used to be an award named after campbell. They renamed it. He still wanna retro hugo cool so during the twenty twenty awards martin focused very heavily on praising not just them but also the whole history. It was very history focused. However the history of speculative fiction is incredibly based on racist old white men and apparently currently based in racist old white men. Well that right. There is a main topic of thesis. The reason that i'm interested in all this and why tracked it back to two thousand nine with race. Fail was because as far as i can see in sort of the mainstream in the mainstream backlash that is the first time or discussions of inclusion. In general obviously race fail. Oh nine is mostly about race. But it's it's talking about inclusion as a concept instead of. Hey let's not be racist in terms of. Let's not go on racist rants. We're talking about inclusion and diversity and that's different than like talking about how not to go on assistance in the middle of your fiction. It's more than that. Obviously that was the first indication that i saw in the mainstream. Discourse in speculative fiction was oh nine twenty twenty bit with martin is sort of where we are now in the timeline. The response to that was very strong against martin so the fact that it was the mainstream response to be angry. That was not the case. Ten years ago. Okay so it was sort of split. Ten years ago is also like mostly on blog posts instead of twitter. The kind of things that mainstream writers maybe might not even see whereas you're going to see if it's on twitter probably and people are talking about you so a big thing that happened in between nine now is what martin calls puppy gate which is probably an app term but in two thousand fifteen and kind of in two thousand sixteen twenty fifteen was the big year two groups. One was called the sad puppies. One was called the rabid puppies. One of them is less obvious about it. but they are both anti diversity. Groups and specifically speculative fiction. So they're against having diversity in speculative fiction. Yes the way. They go about marketing. That is a little different. They talk about it as they see political correctness. Taking over speculative fiction and pushing out quality in favor of political correctness. Oh poor babies. You're not represented in every role. Ever all. I'm so sorry just representative. Most of them now sad puppy yup so they would push slates of approved. Candidates white men generally and approved works and those people in those works didn't even have to be related to them at all. The martian was on their one of gaming's books which he has since told them to be cough kindly. So yeah like most of these people either refused the nomination. Once they realized what had happened or didn't even realize that they had anything to do with it because they were already on track to get hugo and it didn't matter because this is a pretty small group that is very vocal but that's sort of the only reason why we know about them however they did game the nominations in two thousand fifteen which is a lot easier to do than gaming the actual prizes because you need significantly fewer votes to get on the nomination so in two thousand fifteen. There were entire categories that only had people from the puppies in the slate and in two thousand fifteen. They did not win any prizes because people voted no award rather than give it to them. Wow so yeah. Most people felt like they had cheated even though everything they did which was basically just say. Hey you're writer you want yearbook on. I'm writer. I want my book on. Let's get everyone. We know to vote for each other and just do it that way so if you get enough people enough writers you can game the nominations like that. So that's what they did. Of course you can't do that with a nebulous because the nephew is as the committee. However some people see the nebulous as a little bit out of touch because for example when the martian came out the book the martian it was not even nominated. There are a lot of hoops. You have to jump through to even be able to appear as a nebula nominee so a lot of people look to the hugo's to be sort of like what the people think. Here's what's actually good right. Yeah so how does this tie back to your thesis. Also this is part of my thesis. The way that you are supposed to think about a thesis at least the way that ohio university wants me to think about it is the quote unquote tradition. That you are joining and the tradition. That i'm joining is the pushback against not just white supremacy but all sorts of non inclusion in speculative fiction. Okay that pushback has existed forever but it is not been mainstream forever. It is starting to get there now. I don't mean mainstream in like you know a few years from now. All of the huge game of thrones like i are going to be full of black people and it's going to be wonderful and everyone's gay. I don't think that's going to happen. I think we're getting there. I think there are also a dozen sub levels in that the same way that the first level was not going on racist tirades in the middle of your book in the second level is like adding a black character. There are a lot more levels after that to that we have never seen because we can't get past the first two. I guess i'm not really aware of the current state of speculative fiction. But i do watch quite a few fantasy. Tv shows sort of things. And what i've noticed is in the past ten years or so. There's been a noticeable increase in inclusion a- show. I was watching fairly recently. Called a dragon. Prints had a speaking character who sign language in had like verbal interpreter. And that is the first time i've ever seen that in media ever. Oh yeah. I remember that. I watched that show too. And i was like what that's cool. Yeah i was like that. Not something i was expecting but like hell. Yeah yeah so. We're getting there for my thesis. I'm sort of breaking it up into inclusion in general which we have a problem with for like you know any type of media doesn't matter what the drawn race it's always going to be a little bit whitewashed or a lot whitewashed. It's always going to be a little bit sexist or a lot sexist. we're always on that spectrum in mainstream western media or somewhere on that spectrum however there are also very specific ways in different dramas that that is shown so for example in romance..

five second level martin Lovecraft last year first level One twitter four years ago ten pages Ten years ago five stories first two ohio university campbell nine first indication both first time two groups
"hugo award" Discussed on I Learned Something in College!?

I Learned Something in College!?

07:35 min | 1 year ago

"hugo award" Discussed on I Learned Something in College!?

"I'm marci resident writer. Jorge anti fascist scientists. And you're listening to. I learned something in college each episode. We talk about a topic from the scientists and one from the humanities so there was a violent coup attempts recently incited by the president. Because he was angie that he lost the election and it was very predictable and we saw it coming and it was intentionally mishandled by the dc police because the people that were attacking capital with the same sort of people that worked as police. Yeah i was pretty sure when i was watching it as it was happening that something happens when they actually got in the building because there was no altercation at least at that point and then we now have video evidence of people like moving barricades and telling them to come in so they let these people in yup and comparing that to the resistance to peaceful protesters over the summer with like full militarized police response and like riot. Gear and tear-gas shooting people. Yeah i am shocked. But i am not surprised at all. I think that's a good way to put it. Yeah yeah it's been telegraphed for months but it was still mishandled and i mean people did die more people could have died but it was a coup attempt. Yeah and there will probably be another one by the way because thoroughly planning for it. Gray on inauguration day so they are not organizing in secret. It's very obvious. We knew that the six was a date that they had been talking about for a long time so they had every reason to be prepared and it seems like they wore. But that was intentional. It seems also because they decided not to ask for help from certain people until like it was happening. Cy wanted some rock paper scissors and talk about our topics. Cool three to one once again. it was. Predictable was telegraphed. And yet we still let it happen through all right so my topic for today is it's very theoretical compared to what we usually talk about but this is pretty relevant now and it's also kind of what my thesis is about so i've been doing research on it and i am surprised at how again how telegraphed it was the warning signs so recently i don't know if you know about the hugo awards but them in the nebula awards are like the top two science fiction and fantasy awards given so the hugo awards this year. The third sorry last year. Now were hosted by george martin and there were just some things that happens that sparked some controversy there but there's also a long line of other things that have happened that have sort of led to this moment. So i wanna start in two thousand nine in this bubble. In these speculative fiction which is a fantasy science fiction and horror. They're kind of one john jonah. Just don't think about it too hard. It's okay speculative fiction. It's all three. And the hugo and nebula awards are kind of indiscriminate of which sub genre they are in. It's it's just speculative fiction. In general that being said hugo is usually considered the science fiction one in nebulous usually considered the fantasy one. But that's not really how it works. The more important distinction is that the nebula awards are chosen via committee and the hugo awards are chosen via like anyone can vote. But you have to pay for a ticket to world con- so it's about sixty dollars. So that's the range there but it is like public access compared to the committee. That the way the nebula awards work so in two thousand nine there was sort of a discourse online. I think is the best way to describe. It was all over the place but the way it started was there was a fantasy writer named elizabeth bear or at least. That's her pen name. And she wrote a blog. You can still find. It is actually one of the few sort of important blog posts. That didn't get taken down from this whole situation which is now referred to as race fail. Oh nine so. Elizabeth bear wrote this post called. Whatever you're doing it's probably wrong. Which is about diversity and inclusion in fiction writing. Her point in the post was when you include someone in writing we sometimes talk about. It is writing the other someone. Who isn't you. Essentially someone who you don't have the lived experience of when you're writing the other bear said you have to be very careful because this might be the only character that someone read some day in can say oh this is like me and that is true of a lot of different types of people for example if i had been aware of my gender identity growing up. I don't think. I would have seen any examples of that. Which is probably why i didn't know about my gender identity growing up so bear then goes on to say i try to do all this research to make sure that the characters in my books isn't like she says throwing sand in that kids. Is that kid who is looking for representation. If the one representation they get is a flat character or is insulting right or is a villain or is just not actually how that works in. It's very obvious that the person didn't do the research that feels awful. It feels worse than if you didn't do it at all. What bears saying is that basically. She tries her best not to do that however she says in the name of the post. Whatever you're doing it's probably wrong. She says you're not going to please everyone so a blogger replies that saying hey you wrote a book or the black character is early enslaved by the white character and i read that book halfway through in the night through it across the room. Because it's trash this is seeking avalon in this blogger. Goes on to explain in detail all of the ways why that was awful in like obviously not good representation in damaging and so those were the two first starting point of this discussion. That kind of blew up everywhere. In the community of speculative fiction in two thousand nine and it continued for months in kind of years it definitely sparked a discussion that continued to waiter discussions. What happened with georgia are martin. So in two thousand twenty. He hosts the hugo awards. There was no audience in person. Obviously but it was live so plenty of people were watching tweeting about it while it was happening. Some of the things he were for example he talked about the genitalia in a way that completely ignored the fact. That some men don't have penises like incredibly transphobic remarks and he repeated them three times. The oscars janet. What you know the oscar statue. I mean i know of its existence. You know looks like a golden person. Yes i don't remember exactly what he said. And i don't really want to repeat it but it was about the oscars genitalia and how it could be a man. Cool some transphobic nonsense. Yeah yeah great..

george martin john jonah Elizabeth bear martin last year each episode today elizabeth bear georgia this year nebula three times six Jorge third about sixty dollars three one nine two thousand nine
"hugo award" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"hugo award" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"Hello and welcome to misinformation a trivia podcast for ladies and gents who love cool trivia and sticking it to anoint teams. Have pop quiz where your hosts. I'm lauren and i'm julia hate y'all lowered. Are you full of cheese. Still i am still full of cheese. I want to tell you that the were recording on the day that the cheese up came out and my husband came home and ate an entire block of gouda because apparently he was like that. She's episode really maybe hungry for cheese so we ate a lot of our cheese in our fridge. So did its job. Did what it was supposed to do that yet. We hope you guys enjoyed that. It was something a little different than normal but <hes>. Somebody else mentioned that like they're not a big fan of cheese but they would love to do another dash along episode with its point. So we'll brainstorm. We'll come back to that. Yeah maybe we'll be eating. Maybe it'll be something else. You know who. That's interesting. Mike along with juliet tandem bike. Listen to me. We get a tandem bike and a couple of layers. Listen or and we bike around rochester and talk about the of bicycling and also talk about the history of rochester. How great with did you just come up with this disraeli. I literally just came up with this first of all key. Imagine what people would they. They saw on a tandem bicycle goalie. I attached to us. Like a yeti microphone at like yup. Yup and josh is right a lot riding alongside of us and then our in car bike so i didn't mean this bird. I'm like no it's fine. He's gonna drive next very slow with the with the cords running into the car. I love this so much. Okay that's our next thing called ride along with julian lawrence as they get hit by multiple cars because the worst almost ill-advised thing but you asked for it. Everybody so get ready. It's on your hands. Our blood is on your hands. Basically is what we're saying. Get ready for that man. Speaking of blood oh man. I am very worried now so for this. I decided that i was going to cover <hes>. An author that. I'm not super familiar with a genre of literature but i'm also not super familiar with. I've really learned a lot. And i hope you all will too. I hope i will. Are you ready. Lauren i'm has ever i'll ever be this week. We're entering the brave. New world of octavia butler. Oh you know what i have. Been meeting to read some octavia butler. But i have now. I have not read in a very long time. And i feel like i don't know if i'm ready. You know. I do bet that you would like it. Okay probably a little more. So than i would i. I'm willing to give it all a try great love i think maybe a lot of people have heard her name but they're not totally familiar with her work. Or unless you are like a sci fi reader maybe maybe her name is like completely foreign to you. So here's what you should know. So i was a groundbreaking american writer. She was one of the few women of color publishing an agenda dominated by white men <hes>. Butler won the coveted hugo award which is considered the premier award in science fiction as well as the nebula prize which are which is given to the best works of science fiction or fantasy in the. us <hes>. She won those twice each and that was loud. She all the time she was also the first science fiction writer ever to receive the macarthur fellowship. Wow wow that's interesting. I didn't know that octavia butler was born in pasadena. California in june nineteen forty seven. The only child of her mother's name was also octavia octavia margaret guy who was a housemaid and loris james butler. Who was a shoe. Shine man <hes>. So octavius father died when she was seven and to support the family. Her mother worked as a maid <hes>. She was extremely shy. As a child in octavia found an outlet at the library reading fantasy books and also in writing <hes>. She did have a mild form of dyslexia but she didn't let this challenge deter her from developing a love of books <hes>. She started creating her own stories early on and she decided to make writing her. Life's work around. The age of ten octavia wrote reams of pages in her big pink notebook and at first she was enamored with fairy tales and also horror stories but she quartz came interested in science fiction magazines. Such as amazing stories and galaxy. Science fiction so octavia did do a lot of interviews later in life. And so i've gotten some really great information right from her own words that i'm going to ask throughout this so to an mit class on the media in transition in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight butler told this anecdote. It's impossible to begin to talk about myself. And the media without going back to how i wound up writing science fiction and that is by watching a terrible movie. Movie was called devil girl from mars. And i saw it when i was about twelve years old and it changed my life. It was one of those old nineteen fifties movies in which the beautiful martian woman arrives on earth to announce that all the martian men of died off in there are a bunch of men. Hungry women up there and the earth. Men don't want to go. As i was watching this film i had a series of revelations the i was cheese. I can write a better story than that. And then i thought gee anybody can read about our story than that. And my thought was the clincher. Somebody got paid for writing. Not awful story. Yeah so often. Writing and a year later i was busy. Submitting terrible fiction to innocent magazines.

octavia butler julian lawrence rochester octavia octavia octavia margaret guy loris james butler lauren julia juliet Yup hugo award josh Mike Lauren octavius Butler pasadena dyslexia Shine California
The Brave New Worlds of Octavia Butler

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

05:55 min | 1 year ago

The Brave New Worlds of Octavia Butler

"Hello and welcome to misinformation a trivia podcast for ladies and gents who love cool trivia and sticking it to anoint teams. Have pop quiz where your hosts. I'm lauren and i'm julia hate y'all lowered. Are you full of cheese. Still i am still full of cheese. I want to tell you that the were recording on the day that the cheese up came out and my husband came home and ate an entire block of gouda because apparently he was like that. She's episode really maybe hungry for cheese so we ate a lot of our cheese in our fridge. So did its job. Did what it was supposed to do that yet. We hope you guys enjoyed that. It was something a little different than normal but Somebody else mentioned that like they're not a big fan of cheese but they would love to do another dash along episode with its point. So we'll brainstorm. We'll come back to that. Yeah maybe we'll be eating. Maybe it'll be something else. You know who. That's interesting. Mike along with juliet tandem bike. Listen to me. We get a tandem bike and a couple of layers. Listen or and we bike around rochester and talk about the of bicycling and also talk about the history of rochester. How great with did you just come up with this disraeli. I literally just came up with this first of all key. Imagine what people would they. They saw on a tandem bicycle goalie. I attached to us. Like a yeti microphone at like yup. Yup and josh is right a lot riding alongside of us and then our in car bike so i didn't mean this bird. I'm like no it's fine. He's gonna drive next very slow with the with the cords running into the car. I love this so much. Okay that's our next thing called ride along with julian lawrence as they get hit by multiple cars because the worst almost ill-advised thing but you asked for it. Everybody so get ready. It's on your hands. Our blood is on your hands. Basically is what we're saying. Get ready for that man. Speaking of blood oh man. I am very worried now so for this. I decided that i was going to cover An author that. I'm not super familiar with a genre of literature but i'm also not super familiar with. I've really learned a lot. And i hope you all will too. I hope i will. Are you ready. Lauren i'm has ever i'll ever be this week. We're entering the brave. New world of octavia butler. Oh you know what i have. Been meeting to read some octavia butler. But i have now. I have not read in a very long time. And i feel like i don't know if i'm ready. You know. I do bet that you would like it. Okay probably a little more. So than i would i. I'm willing to give it all a try great love i think maybe a lot of people have heard her name but they're not totally familiar with her work. Or unless you are like a sci fi reader maybe maybe her name is like completely foreign to you. So here's what you should know. So i was a groundbreaking american writer. She was one of the few women of color publishing an agenda dominated by white men Butler won the coveted hugo award which is considered the premier award in science fiction as well as the nebula prize which are which is given to the best works of science fiction or fantasy in the. us She won those twice each and that was loud. She all the time she was also the first science fiction writer ever to receive the macarthur fellowship. Wow wow that's interesting. I didn't know that octavia butler was born in pasadena. California in june nineteen forty seven. The only child of her mother's name was also octavia octavia margaret guy who was a housemaid and loris james butler. Who was a shoe. Shine man So octavius father died when she was seven and to support the family. Her mother worked as a maid She was extremely shy. As a child in octavia found an outlet at the library reading fantasy books and also in writing She did have a mild form of dyslexia but she didn't let this challenge deter her from developing a love of books She started creating her own stories early on and she decided to make writing her. Life's work around. The age of ten octavia wrote reams of pages in her big pink notebook and at first she was enamored with fairy tales and also horror stories but she quartz came interested in science fiction magazines. Such as amazing stories and galaxy. Science fiction so octavia did do a lot of interviews later in life. And so i've gotten some really great information right from her own words that i'm going to ask throughout this so to an mit class on the media in transition in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight butler told this anecdote. It's impossible to begin to talk about myself. And the media without going back to how i wound up writing science fiction and that is by watching a terrible movie. Movie was called devil girl from mars. And i saw it when i was about twelve years old and it changed my life. It was one of those old nineteen fifties movies in which the beautiful martian woman arrives on earth to announce that all the martian men of died off in there are a bunch of men. Hungry women up there and the earth. Men don't want to go. As i was watching this film i had a series of revelations the i was cheese. I can write a better story than that. And then i thought gee anybody can read about our story than that. And my thought was the clincher. Somebody got paid for writing. Not awful story. Yeah so often. Writing and a year later i was busy. Submitting terrible fiction to innocent magazines.

Octavia Butler Julian Lawrence Rochester Octavia Lauren Julia Juliet Octavia Octavia Margaret Guy Loris James Butler YUP Hugo Award Josh Mike Octavius Butler Pasadena Dyslexia Shine California
"hugo award" Discussed on Read Between the Lines

Read Between the Lines

05:07 min | 1 year ago

"hugo award" Discussed on Read Between the Lines

"Intense. Oh yes and especially for me with this podcast site at get sent all books for pretty much all of the author right and series instead layer. Okay i've got five books on my shelf from one author. Yeah and then. Yeah and so it's been it's it's fun it's not. It's a bad thing to have in excess reading. Yes yeah someday. I will probably into where i am most likely to die as when my dvr pile falls on me. Oh same yeah. I think for i think for most readers that would you mind sharing some of the books on that pile Sue i what are some of the books that i have not had time to read you through so many of them I have not yet read in k. Jameson is a the city. We became which. I really want to read She's one of my favorite authors. Now and i just haven't had time to pick up Golly i'm stumped there's so many How do i prioritize. Others one called d.c Which is a nonfiction about dick slayton. Who is one of the The head of the astronaut office during the apollo era The shoot what is the name when alive. It is non-fiction right now. Because i'm gearing up to write another book So i have a giant nonfiction pile in addition to the hero of the the novels that i want to read You said you're going to be gearing up to write another book which you mind sharing what you can about it if search. Yeah i'd be happy to. I'm finishing writing A novel that is not in the lady. Astronaut universe that's that's a detective novel. That set on a an interplanetary spaceship happily married couple and their small dog So anyone who has seen these thin men movies yes. There are some very very conscious nods there but the nola. I'm getting ready to gear up and right. Which is why. I've got some these specific nonfiction books is Called the martian contingency in its book for the lady astronaut series So that is Omar's all the time. It's the establishment of the first human permanent human settlement on mars after read the series for sure. Yeah that sounds so good all right so what you have coming up. So you've said you've got those books. Are there any like interviews or anything that will be releasing. Yes so actually. Probably the easiest thing to do people to go to my website to mary. Robin cole dot com. There's a full list of all places that i'm gonna be And the magical thing about Our sparkling isolation is that it doesn't matter where in the country any of these events are happening. Everyone can come to them yet. Court team is terrible and very hard. But it's been very nice for like the book world because everyone gets to experience everything being closed. That's been no. I know although the nashville library has Has great thing where you they have curbside pickup. So you can check stuff out online and then drive up and they will put the books in your trunk. Allen wishing i lived in naff in nashville but which took move so many books right. I know there's that all right well did you have any final thoughts anything you think. So you have been a delightful host excellent interviewee thank you all right for read between the lines. My name is molly sal. I'm mary rubbing nicole. Let's end this the way all great stories and happily ever after the and thank you for listening to read between the lines book podcast. This episode is hosted by molly southgate. It is edited by rob southgate and produced by southgate media group. You can get in touch with the show at read between the lines at ci. Mel dot com. Or you can send us a voicemail at seven. Oh eight eight seven nine. Four seven three. That was seventy eight. Eight eight seven nine four seven three. You can also find a son. Instagram at read between the lines podcast. Thank you so much for listening..

dick slayton Jameson Robin cole Omar nashville mary molly sal molly southgate rob southgate southgate media group Allen nicole Mel Instagram
"hugo award" Discussed on Read Between the Lines

Read Between the Lines

08:13 min | 1 year ago

"hugo award" Discussed on Read Between the Lines

"Making a better choice and you were saying. It's like a road bath. Writing very much is a road map for the people reading it. like if it's it could be fiction fiction. Especially i personally think because vault. It can't be a story without some type of moral in it. At least i believe that. Yeah well. I think the thing is that even my thing is that. I don't think that every story has to have like a purpose. But i do think that the authors will unintentionally include the things that they're thinking about and so if they don't think about it consciously than what they wind up with is something that is either regurgitating something that they've already seen or that is not doing a good job of Exploring in examining the thing that is in their mind or that is putting pieces on the table that they didn't intend be because they aren't thinking about it and then the reader even if if the other is like you know what this is just going to be a fun romp reader. that's all the only thing this is here for is just be fun. For the reader the reader then comes in and We'll look for meaning that something that we also tend to do. I think it's it's not just that we are made of narrative but the we also have a an urge to fill the void. And so if you leave avoid if you leave a blank space there the reader will fill it in. And it's so. I feel like heart of good. Writing is to examine things consciously Aren't putting stuff in your Fiction by accident. It's still you're still going to be put You're minimizing the things that you put in your fiction bitter accidental. Yeah definitely and i also think fed off of that with the writing if if didn't have some sort of like some sort of lesson that was learned even if it's not like overt in any way but like as something that the author was thinking about then there would be no story at all because it would just they wouldn't have any there would be no conflict though. Well i maybe using our words differently here So i think for me. There's a difference between a unit the less of the story and the thing that the author is thinking about so the moral of the story is. Here's the thing that i'm thinking about in this is the right answer and would i. I prefer with my own. Fiction was fiction that i read is. Here's the thing that i'm thinking about. Here's a whole bunch of different things that are know that that go with that. That thought that. I'm considering what did you think about it. And then hand it to a reader. Yes that's what. I was meaning. I was thinking in a strange way. That is yeah okay great. I think we're just using a word in it in a different way 'cause i don't it would be just like a normal a little kids like an early reader book might otherwise but i was saying that it needs to have that sort of element of this thing about these different answers for other house. It would just be a book with no answers. Yes yes exactly. And i think that letting people go. This is the thing that fits me In infrequently things. Where i do have. I do have a strong point of view that you know. It's like here's the thing that i think And that'll express in the fiction but But i think that doing the a disservice. If i do not include an in the story of doing the story at disservice if i don't include no other options it's it's the difference between You know a Standing near soapbox and having a conversation one of them is a lecture and who wants to pick up a book for lecture and the is a is sharing and conversation. That's that's interesting to engage in definitely. So what interested you about writing like when did you start it when you were a little kid or so. I don't fully remember a time that i was not writing like the the first thing that i know that i wrote was in kindergarten. I still have a copy of it. it was a story from my mom for mother's day about as spaceship. That was like an iris And i route through high school and into college. My mom sent me to a summer writing camp. When i was in junior high or high school and it was the. There's not a time that i remember as i say not. Doing that was one of those kids who wanted to do everything and then When i started doing public tree. I stopped writing kind of tapered off. Which in hindsight relies was. Because i was getting my creative jollies from theater instead of From from writing. But then i had a puppet injury and was out for about two years and during that time started writing a serial for my niece and nephew who were in china at the time and remembered that. You're not really enjoyed doing this. I forgot how much i like writing. And so Started digging in and pursuing it and And here we are. What was the cereal about. So it's not a cereal. I would write today but it was It's called a journey to the east and it was a spin on a monkey. King story Monkey king is one of the most famous folk hero. Who's in china. And there's this massive massive book novel it's I can't remember how old it is. Several hundred years old Called journey to west so the title was a play on that and it was about these two american kids who were in china because their dad was working for the embassy and they get caught up in the supernatural tale with the monkey king and the white bone demon and And it was It was it was about a bunch of. I was trying to give them something that would help them. Learn a little bit more about where they were living and and give us something to talk about So but it's yeah it's It's it was a you know. Essentially middle grade book. Yeah that sounds awesome. Do you think you'll publish any. Do you think the right anymore. Middle grades stories or books. i hope so I would like to as i've never done anything with that one I would like to. It's it's a form that i think is fantastic Just been reading You just read The award saved my life. And and i'm listening to the audio book of the sequel. The war i finally one those are middle grade. And it's just such good writing such good storytelling. The they're really good. If you like audiobooks highly highly recommend the the audiobook the narrator in the narration is wonderful. Wonderful i'll definitely have to try that. That i love audiobooks. Yeah yeah i just finished the handmaid's tale want oh well no not the handmaid's tale the testaments and that was the narration. On that was so beautiful because it had the actual actors from the show. How can recommend for noted. Yeah yeah i have. That's on my my giant list. Of at some point i will not be. Our pile is pretty.

King story Monkey king china
"hugo award" Discussed on Read Between the Lines

Read Between the Lines

07:13 min | 1 year ago

"hugo award" Discussed on Read Between the Lines

"But for life theater to like you have something off. The audience can always tell. If there's disconnect yeah and exerts a beauty of writing that you can write at and you can show it to people before goes out to the whole world to find so that is exactly so true. And that's why like when you're in when you're doing theater when you have the opportunity to do a dress rehearsal in There's the stumble through and then there's the dress rehearsal and then in broadway. That's the one of the reasons that they do. Previews is so that they can get it up on its feet and see how often ince's react You know there's the invited dress. All of these things are designed to give you that that feedback loop from the audience And yet it is exactly the same thing with puppets puppets Puppeteers are actors. It's just we are using an inanimate object instead of our own bodies but other than that. It's it's all the tools that we have meet actor Or a a fleshy. When we're being really really snarky as opposed to a plush well as a fleshy outing so do you prefer writing by rock peter or using a typewriter where he likes to run. Mostly right on computer I will change moods depending on this story or if i'm having trouble So my first series is kind of like jane austen with magic so parts of that are written longhand some parts of that are actually written longhand with an actual quill just when i wanted to change of pace. But what i find is that Whichever sing i'm using. It affects the rhythm of the story and sometimes i want that like i have my husband and i collect typewriters that we have over twenty now And sometimes i will write on a typewriter and the thing about a typewriter is. You can't back up. You can't go easily. Insert stuff if you're like. Oh you know what. I should've said this earlier. You you just kinda have to keep going. It's all it's all of this kind of relentless forward. progress. But when you get to the end of a line the into each line you have to hit the carriage return and so. There's this moment you are composing in your head before you start going again and then when you get to the end of the page will you have to pull the paper out and put. The new paper in is again a moment when you are composing thinking about it. That doesn't happen in the same way. When you're using a computer likewise with writing longhand. I am writing slower than i can think so. My sentences tend to be longer and more complex and it was particularly true when i used a quill pen because i had to dip and i could about four lines of text before i had to dip again and it really was my sentence. Structure got significantly longer and more complex but also found that. I was losing a little bit of the coherence. The overall coherence of the scene that ahead a little bit more repetition Because it was harder to scan back. Through what i had written already. Oh yeah that does make sense. And did you find it hard. When you're writing in longhand get back like 'cause you have to get it into the computer to edit the showed. No that was fine. Actually was a another editing pass so i would fit at write it and then i would go and key it into the computer and would make adjustments in changes as i was keying it in a when i started writing Way back in the door of time we we had a computer from when i was really little or young I'm not sure how old i was when we got the first computer but we got. We got a very early generation. Pc because my dad worked for ibm. And so i did. I wrote on that. And i had a. I had a typewriter that you could. You could like write a sentence at a time and then it would type it you. It had a little bit of a tiny bit of memory. But for the most part. When i wrote when i started writing i had to write longhand because they didn't have a laptop now. There was one computer in the house. the typewriter was a pain And used resources. So i i mostly wrote longhand and then we'd it in so that was for longtime that was part of my process and now i just i i write on the computer and a except occasionally okay. Yeah so could you talk about the importance of strong female representation in novels absolutely so the thing for me that i did not realize really growing up was How how much we model ourselves on On the things that we read like as humans. We are made of narrative. It's we we talk a lot about what what makes someone it's the elicited to like. I think actually it's that we tell stories to each other. We and we tell stories about ourselves. Even if we're not doing fiction we the part of our day that we choose to present to someone else is is a form of narrative structure. So when you're looking at Female representation any representation in novels. What you're looking for people who will help you learn how to be yourself and so if you only see one form of representation of women than that only teaches you in one way to be and you know if that's always the i'm super competent until there's a crisis and then i suddenly become incompetent so that the guy can save a day. That's so upsetting That that that teaches teaches. You a thing that you internalize and you carry with you and you don't mean to it just it just these layers of crete over time so for me. What i want is the thing in one of the people. I guess that i'm writing for is a younger version of myself. It's like what did i need to read I'm writing for adults. But it's like what did what do i need to see in a book. What did i need to see in a book a lot of times. I'm writing stuff. That is including lessons that i've learned very painfully and trying to to give someone else a roadmap for this is how it can be thank you. Here's here's the. You know. The situation that i encountered but with my character.

ince jane austen ibm
"hugo award" Discussed on Read Between the Lines

Read Between the Lines

07:38 min | 1 year ago

"hugo award" Discussed on Read Between the Lines

"No. It was not a failure added. Eighty percent accurate. I think want your mentor. He was house amazing. He was great. It was great in the next time. You you try to get something right. It's like okay. Well i've got this eighty percent right. So i'm going to try one hundred percent and if i get eighty percent of that thing that i had gotten wrong previously You know that that edges me closer to to to getting it right each time each iteration. Yeah and so you do puppetry right. You do voice acting. Do you feel like kind of feed into each other. And just into forms of stories halley. Yes that is exactly what i think about my career that i am a storyteller and that i just have a bunch of different mediums. And it's for me. It is all about The the space between the storyteller the audience. There's an puppets in books. Two great examples all of them are but there's a thing that happens where it's like. I have a story in my head Put it down on paper and hand it to you and you read the string you get images in your head and some of those images overlap with the things that i had my head and some don't but there's this story that exists in the space between us that is unique and it is. It is a story that is specific to you as an audience member. Because you brought part of yourself into that story and it's not a story that i can tell by myself and i think that's why the why we do storytelling instead of just daydreaming these because of that magical limited space that exists between us definitely as an actress too. I find that when i'm working with other people like it's it's different just doing like a monologue or you can't do a one side and seen by yourself alone in a row yet exerting you other people you can play off of patent really creates magically retiring. Yeah so when i was doing. Puppet tours toured with a show called sleeping beauty and it was a pre-recorded show which meant that all of the dialogue was Was prerecorded and Suit the timing of the show is exactly the same every single show. The delivery of the lines was exactly the same every single show. The thing that differed was the body language of the puppets and the audience and the difference that an audience makes is so huge some days. We would have fantastic shows and it wasn't because we were funnier with our delivery of the lines body. Language could do a lot. there were some lines. It's like if i move at this point. I get a laugh if i don't do it. Do not get a laugh but for the most part it was all about the energy that the audience brought into the room. And that is something that is i think so Special end Re really is extraordinary. Gift that audiences bring when they come to to show is is their trust in their their interest. Yeah i know. I've been some shows before. Sometimes the audience would be all people who do not know what we were talking about. We would sit in there and just feel like we were falling apart but the show is still really good. Yeah sleep we would have to bring in lake. My parents are people will be like. Hey you laugh a lot. Yes kinda amp up the energy. 'cause this show is 'cause we don't have the proper yeah. I am one of my one of my memories from High school and junior. I can't remember which I was in a a teen improv group. And would they sent us to a retirement home and normally we played in was great. And i remember arriving and we had been doing the show and we weren't getting a lot of reaction and this voice from the audience said when i'm going to start and it was the most demoralizing thing. Oh my gosh. yeah. I know with comedy especially sometimes older audiences can be trickier to yeah and and in you know in hindsight some of it was. I don't think that they could hear us. Well because we weren't amplified and but some of it was just that we were doing a form of theater that they weren't familiar with and so they didn't know the rules. They didn't know they didn't know that it was common. They didn't know improv was so it was like we were doing a show for the wrong audience. Oh yeah. I've had that happen a lot yet. Your are correct. Audience can make or break anything but yet how do you find that place. Endear writing like 'cause writing is very much a. I'm going to sit down at like my computer or typewriter or wherever you right and just be alone and right you have to have somebody with you when you writer. Kind of What i do is a little odd. Because i come out of live theater and and i'm a ham i I like having people read along with me. I i know other writers. I describe my process. They're like oh that would that would kill me. But what i do is I have a. I have my my ideal reader. Which is the person that i'm kind of telling the story to The the person that i think about and for me. This is my assistant. Alshon mecum right now And so i'm writing to her. And so i'll finish it seen and chapter nine immediately. Show it to her. And we have a set of very clear parameters of what i'm looking for and after she's read it i'll make some adjustments and then i will Let my baiter readers. C. beta readers are getting it a little bit later so the beta readers in trying to stay like three like vice finish chapter three they get chapter one some two chapters ahead head of them and the parameters that i give them is that i wanna know if something's awesome so they don't accidentally fix it I want to know if something's boring. I wanna know if if they're confused Or they don't believe something and what i'm looking for these and basically i want to know if the scene is playing i don't care you know how my languages i don't care if things are misspelled i think of it as i'm going to invite you to watch To sit in on this rehearsal of the scene. And just tell me if it's playing and it's it's much so for me that that kind of back and forth helps me Hosts me hone and no okay. This story is going in a direction. I wanted to go where the story's not going in a direction i wanted to. It helps enormously with that. I just want to circle back to maneuver saying you see something playing and that definitely is also true at. I don't know about puppeteer.

halley sleeping beauty Alshon mecum
"hugo award" Discussed on Read Between the Lines

Read Between the Lines

07:01 min | 1 year ago

"hugo award" Discussed on Read Between the Lines

"I'm your host molly southgate today. I'm interviewing mary robinson coho doing today. I'm doing really well thank you. How would you doing pretty good. I'm excited for this interview. Excellent so can you tell me about what you've read sure. So i've written a bunch of novels and short stories. The thing that is most recent is my lady astronaut novels in these i described them as apollo era science fiction. That's women centered so slamming asteroid into the earth in nineteen fifty two and kickoff the space race at a time when computers were still women. So if you want to send a computer space you had to send a woman. That is an amazing premise. I think i folks. I actually might actually my questions actually kind of feeds into that. So what inspired you to write it out. Lady astronauts i am. I was born in nineteen sixty nine so When apollo in the moon missions and my parents are very proud of the fact that i was able to sit up. I don't really start remembering the space program. Even though i was conscious for some of the Some of the the missions leading up to that. I don't really start remembering it until Until sally ride goes up. I saw the shuttle. The first ever member would big deal. That was But when i really start paying attention to it is when sally is up and so for me. Most of my conscious awareness of astronauts has been with women going into space. But the more i kind of looked at it and got into it the more i realized how many women should have already been up and how how rare they still are You know to have have women in space so a lot of times. I think that i write about things that i want to do. Can't love to be an astronaut. I'm not even remotely qualified of. I feel like everyone. At least little thinks that nostra would be awesome. Yeah yeah although. I don't wanna leave the planet and i'm like what. Why wouldn't you want to do that. I know it would be amazing. I mean there would be somebody. Lesson doing Yeah yeah yeah so you are also a professional puppets year which is so cool and actually. Today i was looking through as like on your website and everything and you this one show i can. I can't remember what it was called but it was like this kid's show is to watch that when i was a kid and my pin obsessed with lazing town. That was yeah. I was an assistant puppeteer lazy town. So what that means is that i was mostly doing the hands of characters So is it's it's called live handing or right handing So these are characters like ziggy from lazy. Town has live hands. The mayor has live hands on those basically person's hands in gloves and you have to think the goal is to try to think with the same mind that the principal puppeteers thinking with said it's just one character And i i absolutely love doing that kind of thing. It is the closest. I think that i come to experiencing what telepathy is like. Because there's no verbal communication between us. It's all just feeling it and trying to intuit what this character would do in this moment. Tell so cool. It's really cool. Yeah so with that. Did you feel like that has influenced your writing in any way like the lake. Your career is a puppeteer. There's a number of different ways that it's done. That one of the the obvious ways is that. I spent twenty five years doing it before i came in so into writing suit. It's taught me a lot about audience and how to read and react to an audience. Think the other thing that it really taught me that. I talk in a lot of these other interviews about What it taught me about body language. But i honestly think that one of the most important thing that it taught me was the importance of Doing iterations of a thing niche you. You try it and if you don't get you try it again. And then he tried again You break into smaller pieces while you're learning new technique that that it's not It doesn't have to be perfect the first time that you can. You can home something And i had a mentor. who said Every show is another chance to get it right and what he meant was when you when you mess up on stage. You can't dwell on the fact that you messed up. You've got another show that's another chance to get it right and and you can take the lessons that you learned from how you made a mistake. Previously apply them to the next thing. You're doing and that has been just invaluable to everything that i've done since then. Yeah that's such a beautiful. Last that i had someone on here and she said about right admit if after five years you look back and you still think the writing wrote five years ago is really good something wrong. Because that means you haven't grown or changed or like if you're writing then is not better than what you wrote. Yeah so i i. I agree with that. And at the same time i also think it is okay to look back at something that you've written in the past and go. Oh you know what. There's some good pieces here. A lot of times think that we have to disdain our own work And i think that it's it's fine to look at something and go. Oh i could have done that better But i also think we should celebrate the things that we got right which was another thing. My mentor said He peter hart was my mentor at the center for puppetry arts in atlanta. He said you always wanna shoot for one hundred percent but learned to be happy with eighty percent. It's like having eighty percent of a thing right. Yeah you you you know. That's definitely a passing grade. So i think that a lot of times we tend to do is we dwell on that twenty percent and think that something is a failure because of that. It's like no.

molly southgate mary robinson coho sally ziggy center for puppetry arts peter hart atlanta
"hugo award" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:32 min | 1 year ago

"hugo award" Discussed on KCRW

"Month. Zhao adapted the story from Jessica Broder's non fiction book about American seeking new, Lively hoods. After the great recession of 2007, the film stars Frances McDormand and Variety says Joe was a contender for best director, which would make her the first Asian woman to be nominated in that category in Oscar's history. The speculative fiction genre has historically been dominated by white men. But my next guest has played a huge role in changing that. NK Jemison became the first black author to win the Hugo Award for best novel, then the first person period to win that award three years in a row for her Broken Earth trilogy. It's sort of like winning best director at the Oscars for three years in a row. She's also contributed to the New York Times Book Review and Time magazine and was just named a 2020. MacArthur fellow, commonly known as the Genius Award. Welcome to the show. Thank you for inviting me. So I'm an unabashed fan girl. So I'm not even gonna try not to pretend. But you wrote in Time magazine about fantasy as quote away to train for reality. And what do you mean by that? You know, a lot of people think of fantasy as escapism from the real world, but I think of it more is And this is a truism of science fiction, too, that it's not really about the past or it's not really about the future. It's actually about the world we're living in right now. You know, I think kind of most famously toking who You know, went after war came home, saw many of his friends die in the war and so on, you know, kind of wrestled with the resurrection of a better world from the ruins of the world that he saw, you know, And of course, you see that all throughout the Lord of the rings. And so, really, it's just about you know, how are you wrestling with the real world problems that you're coping with in the moment and what do your alternative solutions for them in order to see the world become better? I want to get to your broken Earth trilogy. But first I just finished listening to the audio book of your novel The city we became, which is about New York, and it's fantasy, and it's brawling like the city, but it also has boundaries like the city. And a ton of personality. So tell us about that book and why you wrote it. I had intended it to be kind of a break after the broken Earth was kind of an emotional Drain and labour of love. But you know very much a labor, so I wanted to write something fun and maybe a little bit silly. New York is going through some changes, so I wanted to honestly address that I also wanted to engage with. I've done several short stories that were basically like city magic based set in like New Orleans or Birmingham. About how kind of uniquely magical it is to live in a place with so much human energy collected into one place, and I just wanted to explore that a little further. Now let me turn to your broken Earth trilogy. What made you start it and tell us about it. Honestly, When I started writing the broken earth books, I was just trying to express something. I was feeling wrestling with the literary idea of Is it possible to create A fantasy story set in a world that is not based on another culture. And then the other part of it was I wanted Really? Just to tell a story based on a dream that I had had Ah, better woman who in the dream was walking towards me with a furious look on her face and a mountain floating behind her. So I was trying to explain that dream and as I was working, it turned into other things. It turned into me kind of wrestling with the imminence of my mother's death and my own feelings about black family and motherhood and Part way through the first book. Ferguson kicked off So I started. You know, kind of processing that in the idea of a world that hates people so much that it will just constantly do everything possible to keep them down and destroy them in and denigrate them and everything else. Even to its own detriment. You know, some people describe one genre that this is a part of is the dying earth genre, the dying planet genre. It has a whole lot of climate crisis woven into it, though not in a kind of On the nose. Direct way. How did that affect what you wrote? I wasn't really as much interested in the environmental aspect of things. Um and you know, I've heard people describe the broken earth books is an environmental parable or or some kind of examination of climate change. But you know, that wasn't my goal. You know my interest was Maurin coping with how well the human driven aspects of climate change human beings like I said, destroying themselves, destroying their own world just so that they can maintain Priority over other groups of people, even literally, to their own detriment, even to the point of destroying the world. Your rise as an author has also, I don't know if coincide, It is the right word. But there's been this whole tapestry of kind of this all right esque contingent of science fiction fantasy Fan's staging. You know, block voting to try to block People of color from winning. What do you make of they say that That's not the goal. Oh, tell me more. They insist that somehow people of color and women and all these marginalized groups were the ones who somehow gamed the system and created some kind of weird, conspiratorial thing to take over the award. So they were just retaliating. They were just doing unto us what we had apparently done under them. You know, I'm always remain. Find it of that, saying that when you're used to privilege equality feels like oppression, you know, for a couple of years there the group of all writers in the science fiction community because, Yeah, you're pointing out that there's a tapestry.

director Time magazine New York Hugo Award NK Jemison Frances McDormand Oscars Jessica Broder Zhao New York Times MacArthur New Orleans Oscar Ferguson Joe Maurin Birmingham Variety
Octavia E. Butler born - June 22, 1947

This Day in History Class

03:01 min | 2 years ago

Octavia E. Butler born - June 22, 1947

"June twenty, second, nineteen, forty seven. Science fiction author Octavia e Butler was born in Pasadena California. Butler addressed themes of gender sexuality and race through her speculative fiction over the course of her writing career. She received several awards, including the Hugo and Nebula awards. Butler's mother was a domestic worker in growing up Butler recognised racism and economic inequity that affected her family. By the time she was ten. She was already writing her own stories anti. She was interested in science, fiction, magazines and stories. As a young adult Butler pursuit pass besides writing and work temporary jobs, but she wrote when she wasn't working. Through the open door program at the writers guild. Butler was able to attend a class taught by science fiction author Harlan Ellison. He encouraged her to pursue writing further by attending clearing and science fiction writers workshop in Pennsylvania. Though Ellison had offered to publish one of her stories in an anthology. That anthology was never published. When she left Clarion, she began working on the novels that became part of the pattern EST series. The book in this series published by Doubleday. Nineteen, seventy six was patterned master in the book. telepathic people known as pattern EST are dominant over mute spor, non telepathic humans as well as over mutated humans call Clark's. The next two books in the series mind of my mind and survivor or published, nineteen, seventy, seven and nineteen, seventy eight. The books sold will, but she took a break from the series to right kindred. In the novel, a Black Woman named Dana travels back in time to slavery era Maryland there she meets a white ancestor, whom she has to repeatedly rescue to make sure that he survives. But her trouble, placing the book with the publisher, because it didn't fit neatly into the science fiction category, but in one thousand, nine, hundred ninety nine doubleday published kindred as fiction. The book was received well when it was published, and it became a text that students read in high schools across the US. After kindred Butler continued to publish books in the pattern master series, including wild seed and clay's Ark. Many of her characters were black women, and she explored themes like control and post colonialism in dystopia settings. In one, thousand, nine, hundred four, she won a Hugo Award for the short story speech sounds and blood child when the Nebula Hugo and locus awards. But worked on Zeno. Genesis trilogy in the late Nineteen Eighties and in the one thousand, nine, hundred ninety, she published parable of the sower and parable of the talents, which followed the protagonist Lauren Amina as she escapes a walled community in Fouls Inoue. Butler once said quote I don't write utopia science fiction because I don't believe that imperfect humans can form a perfect society. Fledgling a science fiction vampire novel published in Two Thousand Five. Was Butler's last publication. She died of a stroke in two thousand and six.

Octavia E Butler Harlan Ellison Nineteen Eighties Hugo Award Lauren Amina Hugo Pasadena Writers Guild California United States Clarion Clark Fouls Inoue Zeno Dana Publisher Maryland Pennsylvania
"hugo award" Discussed on Read Between the Lines

Read Between the Lines

12:59 min | 2 years ago

"hugo award" Discussed on Read Between the Lines

"I had it. Talent wore that was kind of above and beyond Talent that I had for anything else and I think that sort of a wagons the same awakening that someone has when they pick up a guitar. And all of a sudden there'd been able to play with more facility than like some of the friends or drawing or any of that sort of thing And at fourteen I was very sort of bloody minded about it as well. This is easy and everything else is hard. So I guess I'm going to become a writer now And I just told him I'm going to be a writer and everybody's like yeah. No that seems to make sense for you And went to win through high school. Writing Short Stories got off to college started working on the College newspaper and just went straight through. So yes from eight fourteen honors. That was when I said I'm going to be right and everyone was like okay. Yeah sense for you right. So yeah. That's what I do. So of course. Some of your favorite science fiction authors like Pedroia inspiration from Earth that you just like to read so when I was looking when I was a kid and when I an ad I went through life before I became a fiction. Writer Myself Robert Heinlein because he read a lot of what they call juvenile's back then but would be like the Kremlin doing why now so. I read a lot of those Susan Cooper Again. Who DID THE Dark is rising series mangle. Who DID A wrinkle in time? Those books and then as I got older New Game in Neil Stevenson. Who Did snow crash A woman named Sheri Tepper. Who wrote a book that was called brass? Which is just tremendous world building and from a From a feminist point of view that I'd never considered at the time when I started writing. reading it Folks like Dan Simmons with his appearing Kontos Enders game by Orson Scott Card A lot of those sorts of books. But also what's important to to say and I think it's really important to make this note. Is that all the time that I was reading science fiction reading science fiction. I was reading widely outside of it so one of the great. Inspirations of my writing isn't sciences at all but The humorists from the algorithm around it will be like Dorothy Parker and James Thurber and Robert Benchley and the way that they playfully used language for example. The also really like newspaper columnist. I was a newspaper columnist for for a while so I would People like Minkin or Molly Ivins or Mike Royko and then also I love movies. My first job out of college was movie critic and so the great screenwriters and Lane May Wearing Goldman did the princess bride people like Ben Hacked and the way that they used dialogue and make things move and the thing that I think is really important people even if you love science fiction or even if you love fantasy or even if you love romance whatever it is you love you have to read outside because all the stuff that you love gets brought into your writing no matter what genre working how involved the process of adapting your for Film and TV so these days actually very involved when we option A book for Film TV. We usually have me attached as an executive producer. And what that means is even. If I'm not writing the script they show me the script and they you know and I give them notes and I talked to them about that. You oversee the process. I don't oversee the process but I am part of the process and this is important to know because like when I'm writing a novel it is me and I write the whole thing and then I give it to an editor the editor notes but I am overseeing that whole process when you are a writer and you option a book you become a cog in a much larger machine and you are an important cog because it is your stuff that they are building their story and their movie and or TV series Out of but there are so many other people involved That you have to recognize that it is no longer just a solitary effort but it is genuinely a team effort and you have agreed to become part of that team and that the film that ends up is going to be as much credit to a director and to its stars and to all the other people put in the film Then the person who originally started the story and this sometimes is very difficult for writers because they had had sole possession of this book for so long or the story for so long the idea to open it up and give it up to so many other people can become difficult. But when I'm part of this process one of the things that I do is I tell. The people are adapting it know. We are part of a team. Now I know that it's the story is not necessarily going to be exactly what is in the book that it will have to be adapted to film and TV and I want to help make that happen because I originally thought up the story but I also want to make sure that what comes out at the end is the best adaptation or film or for TV or video games or anything else that it can be that the people who loved the book who go see the movie will be like okay. I see why they had to make changes. But the core of the story. The thing that I loved about the story is still there. And that's where my participations important. Yes and it's also interesting since it's very different like in for most things. I don't know about your adaptations by Bob. Ross things they're very different even like they re potter movies which are very close to the books. It's a different animal right. You have to look at it that way. Otherwise it won't work right and this is the thing that I think is very important because There's one time we'll so way back. When I was on a protected for Jurassic Park and I met Michael Crichton who is the writer of the book and he said something. I thought was really important. I remember when it came time to To option my own stuff he says a script is forty thousand words. You know or and a novel is our excuse. Me Is about ten or twelve thousand words in the novels about one hundred thousand words. Ninety percent of what's in a novel will just have to be thrown out right and some of it. Will you show on the screen? But it's still going to be compressing. Still going to be that adaptation. You have to accept that the story is going to change. And if you can't do that then you're not helping Now it doesn't mean that you just randomly change things that you changed this characters now talking monkey or something like that. That has to make sense to do this or but you do have to recognize it. Even in the best case scenario a novel is going to be cut down tremendously to fit into two hours or at most two and a half hours. And that's just kind of the nature of the beast you have to be accepting the fact. It is a different thing entirely. I agree yeah. Otherwise you'd have to do like five. Movies are movies or TV series. And that when you do. Tv series is actually kind of the opposite thing. I have a book series. Now the Enter interdependency that is now being Adapted into TV series and in that case the novel is not long enough so we are looking for places where we can expand the story that makes sense to expand the story In the context of ten hours of storytelling for season. And to make sure that it's still the same book right leg tonight. Partly change no not completely changed Shaw Pot and to make sure that when the places that you do change make sense again for the medium and that you're not betraying the fundamental story that people love when you make those changes the same with Lord of the rings movies like there were things that were taken out. There are a couple of things that were added in but at the end of it it was an experience that was something that people who loved the books could say yes. This was another retelling of the story that I love. Yes this is another more like personal questions about how you read outside of science fiction. We've talked about that a lot today. so who are three authors that you love outside of science fiction a one of the authors that I really loved particularly grain up was Carl Sagan was a scientist and Strana Mer And he wrote Cosmos and he wrote lots of books about the universe our place in it and for someone who is growing up at wanting to have been an astronomer still loving science as much as I do just that The way that he approached it being so trouble and so Friendly and open and full of wonder was incredible again I loved a lot of newspaper columnists and their takes on how the world wise So I would read a of those one that sticks out less in my mind was summer from the nineteen twenty s guy named H L Mencken and his style of writing was sort of the Template for a lot of communists who came after and he wrote in the twenty S. He's the world was different than there's many ways that he would be considered to be problematic personality now and you have to accept that you know someone who lived one hundred years ago. Has Those different worldviews that you might disagree with or even thank are kind of a heinous but at the same time Cana can look at the work and say this is actually something. That's really interesting to me. How you did it. The things that you use to make that happen And then and think currently There is a writer whose name Susan Orlean and she writes expansively on on topics that I don't think that most people would think would be necessarily really interesting. The last of our most recent of her books is a book about libraries and how they are part of our communities and culture and the thing about it is if you just thinking about on Harare book a nonfiction book on libraries and like how k. but the way that she writes so engaging That you know you're just sucked into the story that she's telling about libraries or any a or any of the other topics that she decided to approach this. She's just a fabulous writer for me trusting. All right so I think I've got. I've got one last question. Sure you what advice do you have for young writers device that I have is simple? The first is do. The writing actually do the writing on a regular basis. It doesn't have to be every day although every day is good But enough that you develop the muscle of writing and that you get used the idea that okay. I'm going to sit down and I got to produce words. That's the first thing but the second thing and I think this is really important And I've written a piece about this before was give your south permission to suck give yourself permission to be not good because It's often very difficult for people who have ambitions to be a writer or who believe that you know they had something important to say to get through that phase where your ambition outstrips your ability and the way that I talk about it is if I gave you a guitar right now and you would never touched a guitar before. Are you going to be able to play a song? Not at all not at all and the answer is because you haven't learned the cord you haven't learned how to place your fingers. You haven't done all the services up you've appreciated music. You may have sung before but you haven't written are you haven't played the guitar same with writing even if you've written before Even if Britain before you get to the point where you have to learn the form you have to learn how to do it. You have to learn to be patient and the process of writing the stories so you have to be accepting that when you first start. You're not going to be any good at it but that's also supreme because means you can try all different sorts of stuff now rain about whether or not you're going to be good but just to try it and see what you like and then eventually you do it enough you keep putting your butt in the seat and keep writing you eventually learn how to be good just as would become better at guitar if you spent an hour a day learning the scales so give yourself permission to be not great And just do the work and as you go on you will just get better. And then suddenly one day you'll read something that he wrote and it will be exactly what you meant to write and that is a great thing when it happens well thank you so much for being on. Do you have anything.

writer College newspaper Sheri Tepper Susan Cooper Dan Simmons Robert Heinlein Michael Crichton Pedroia Neil Stevenson Dorothy Parker Kontos Enders Britain Kremlin Carl Sagan Susan Orlean Ross Bob Robert Benchley Orson Scott Mike Royko
"hugo award" Discussed on Read Between the Lines

Read Between the Lines

10:50 min | 2 years ago

"hugo award" Discussed on Read Between the Lines

"I'm your host Molly Southgate. I'm interviewing John. Sculpting a low so you're an author I am an author. Would you like to come about some of the books you've read so I write mostly science fiction books and the most famous book that I've written Sapar is called old man's war which came out in two thousand five and is now a book series or six books in that series. I also wrote Red Shirts which won the Hugo Award in two thousand twelve for best novel and currently I mostly involved with a series of books. It's called the interdependency of which the third book Which is called the last emperor will be coming out on April Fourteenth Nice? Yeah that's what I do all right so now this question's more like just a personal question. You deal favorite book that you've read. Oh One that you've written So of the books that are bred growing up one of my favorite series was the dark is rising series by Susan Cooper. Which for me. I had the same reaction to that. I think a lot of people in a younger generation had with the Harry Potter Books Right Because it was about magic about Britain it was about good versus evil stuff. I ended up. You're just wonderful books as an adult one of my favorite books Was a book that was called. Winter's Tale Mark Halperin and it's a it's a fantasy book. They made a movie about it which was not a particularly Good approximation of what? The book was but book was the way I describe it to. People is a book that I loved so much that I couldn't finish it for the first ten times I read it. I would get halfway through the book and it'd be like if I keep reading. This means that the book will be over so I literally took me ten times before I can finish it and the language was so wonderful and everything about it was just so good Among contemporary authors. There too that I like to have written really good books nor Jemison who just did the broken earth series which is tremendous And then my Mary Robin Call. Who won the Hugo and Nebula last year with a book the calculating stars which I think is terrific so those are the books that are on the top of my list. I know it's very hard to answer like for just one so I always end up getting like five looks so hard. It's like you know. Pick your favorite child snow. I can't Oh yeah especially probably for a writer to. Yeah because I mean because you learned from the books that you have read and then today So many of my friends are writers and so many of them are very good. Writers That you know being able to look at their books and just see like Oh. This is so terrific and I'm in love with his book now and I'm in this new book now It just be. It's you know it's very very difficult to have a favorite book. Yes I agree. That's why I ask the question. Sure no question so. Do you have a favorite book character? Character Actually these two questions. I did not introduce them properly. I asked us to everyone and they are. They sound very similar but intrigued. They're very different. So it is your favorite book character. And do you have a book? Character the most relate to So favorite book character There's a book that is called change in strange land by Robert Hyland in his character. In a called jubal harsh. Aw and for a very long time. He was the fictional character. I must admire because he was kind of a straight shooter. Tell as it is but he was also sarcastic but it was also you know wise and it just seemed like this was wouldn't be the character you would want to be but this would be the character you would want giving you advice like in the best frat like we're like the contemporary example that I would give would be like an Avatar. The last air bender the uncle you know the younger and disorders thing is like you will mess up and he will go. Well you messed up. And then he will give you some advice in the move on from there and so for. Very Long Time. That was sort of the character. I found the most intriguing and So I think these days I'm more interested in the characters and there are a lot of them who are Doing the things that they need to do. Even though it's a struggle for them to do and for example the main character and the calculating stars is someone who is training to be an astronaut. And she's also grappling with a number of other things including the fact that She's having like mental issues right. And how does she Move Forward and actually resolve those mental issues which include medication and all that stuff and still Do the things that she wants to do. Including being an astronaut. And the fact that you know. It's very realistic of the fact that sometimes you need help. Sometimes you need pharmaceutical help and to do all the things that you WanNa do it just resonates for me Because as you get older I'm fifty. Now the idea of being a continuing doing things that are necessary even though the frailty of human existences thing is actually really interesting to me. Yes I agree with you on that. So what is your favorite medium to write him? What do you mean like so I was on your website and it? You said that you have written a video game before Britain all these different typewriters versus computers. Also ask that to answer. I mean I can I can answer so the medium that actually writing the most is novels. Novels are the ones that My brain seems to work at that length so when I'm storytelling that is the one that allows me to do the complexity of the characters complexity of the story have an actual story arc. It's much easier and this sounds weird but it's true. It's much easier for me to write a novel than it is for me to write a short story of like twelve or fifteen thousand words because when you write a novel you have eighty thousand words to fix whenever it is that you are doing right to solve the problems. But if you're a twelve thousand word story everything has to get done in those twelve thousand words and so it's a lot more of a challenge. You don't have enough space or as much space you don't have as much time And it really has to hit in a very sort of specific way and my brain doesn't work like that. It works at at at a longer length. So that is the medium that I find the most congenial I have written video games and I have written screenplays And I like those and they're intriguing and I want to do more of them because the more you do it the more interesting in the more comfortable you Become with them But as a medium the novel is the is the medium that speaks the most to me and I found that interesting. Cy also write a lot and the fact is I. I understand his. It can be so hard to fit the entire story. You WanNa tell into a short story like one or two pages right. I would write stories without ending right and in a lot of people do that right. Because that's just part of the normal part of learning to write in the first place where you start off with. This is a great idea and then just kind of goes and peters out at the end because is invested so much time with the beginning. They haven't thought about the now. I kind of had the opposite thing happened with me. Which is that I will think of an ending right. Like I've seen that I know is like an end of a book or an end of his story and then I have to work backwards from that. To what is the beginning that will also be compelling can get to the point where I can actually do that ending and I and again? That's all the things that you have to learn how to do. I mean writing is an exercise in a challenge. And the more you do it the better you get at it. And that's when you learn to write the endings and also the beginnings yeah So what interests you about the science fiction genre? I've noticed that a lot of your books are science fiction Well I read a lot of science fiction when I was growing up and so I was very comfortable with the genre when it came to the point. Where is like I want to write a novel diverse? First novel ever wrote. I wrote it about twenty years ago. My twenty three now And I couldn't decide whether I wanted to write it. In science fiction or like thriller which is the other genre. I read a lot of so I literally took a coin is flipped it to decide which John that I was gonNA write that novel in and it landed on heads which was science fiction so I decided to do that and I often think about if it had landed on tales and I decided to try to write a thriller instead How different my life would be. Yeah you wouldn't be known as much as a science fiction author you would be breath thriller and horror author. Well not only that but not only that but the other thing is because I wrote Science Fiction. I got involved in the science fiction community in science fiction. Fandom which means like going to conventions such as the one that we're at now to eat too and And I think about the people I know who are writers most of whom are also fanzine and science fiction writers who I have also become friends with because I bought into that community. So not only would I be writing different things but I would know different people and I would have a different set of friends and all that sort of stuff. So the that coin flip twenty three years ago Was much more important to my life than I than I often give credit for. That's fascinating did you always want to write like since you were a kid or I originally wanted to be an astronomer when I was a little kid And then I got goes with the science fiction kind of goes with the science fiction But then I realized about like in junior high. I kinda maxed out at the quadrant equation and after that math just became sort of difficult for me Which made it very difficult to go on to become an astronomer. Because you have to know mouth when you do that for practical physics and stuff like that But around age fourteen I discovered that I really enjoyed riding and it was something that I wanted to do and more than that. It seemed to be something that.

Science Fiction writer Hugo Award John Britain Susan Cooper Molly Southgate Mark Halperin Sapar Robert Hyland Jemison Harry Potter jubal Cy peters
"hugo award" Discussed on Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

13:18 min | 2 years ago

"hugo award" Discussed on Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

"Well hello there and welcome to a very very special corey Dr a podcast. Probably the most special one of all in the podcast last decade plus history. I'm recording this way ahead of time on Saturday morning to come out on Tuesday morning and that because Tuesday morning is when the Canadian William Broadcasting Corporation is scheduled to announce that my book radicalized is a finalist shortlist title for the Canada reads price. This is the most prestigious National Book Award in Canada alongside the Governor General's Award and as of right now it is public knowledge. That mine is one of five books in the running to win that prize. Shortlist for that and it's on there because it was nominated by Akilah gusting. The Canadian broadcaster Hastert Sports Journalist. Who is the books champion? Each of the five books gets a champion. And he's mind and they will conduct a series of debates and interviews interviews and impassioned pleas and other events coast to coast in Canada on radio and in television and in person in concert with the CBC between now and March when enough final book will be named the winner of the Canada Reads Prize for Twenty Twenty. And I have my fingers crossed. Now this is Tuesday morning that you're hearing this tomorrow night Wednesday at seven PM. If you're in Toronto you can come see me the other four finalists and all five of our champions in a live panel panel at the Toronto Eaton Centre of the Indigo Books at seven. PM Tickets are recommended they're free but there's an RSVP in the show notes you should follow if you wanna come and and that is not all. There's two other important pieces of news for you now. You probably know if you follow me that unauthorized Brad. The first story in radicalized has received critical attention and it is being developed as a television show by topic which is the parent company of the new site the intercept but in in addition to that I can now announce that first second who published my graphic novel in real life is now developing unauthorized bread as a graphic novel for teens to be published in two thousand twenty two which I'm co creating with the amazing Jen Doyle who is best known for their series the knights errant and then second and that Macmillan and tore books have given me permission to put unauthorized bread. The story that's being adapted for television graphic novel. They've given me permission to put the whole all story online and ars Technica has published that story as of just about now just about the time. This podcast is going live so you can go and read the whole story Lori and you know while I'm on the subject. The Hugo award ballot has just opened if you are already registered to attend next year's World Science Fiction Convention in Wellington a New Zealand or if you previously attended the World Science Fiction Convention last year in Dublin Ireland you are eligible to nominate stories books novellas as artists and editors as well as screenplays and Comex podcasts for the Hugo awards and all four of the stories in radicalized are eligible in the novella category. But if you ask me and I fully appreciate that you didn't but if you ask me I think unauthorized Brad is of those four stories. The story sorry that is most worthy of the nomination. I love all my fiction children equally. But that's the one that I think has the The most wide appeal in the most I sort of cultural significance and really is the most cracking as an adventure yarn of of all four of them the most successful of four. What I think is very successful stories? And so if you are nominated for the Hugo were I really hope you'll keep unauthorized bread in mind and again you can read that right now at ars Technica. Now while I'm on the subject subject I have a very special podcast for you. It's not just me crowing about this amazing news. That has me over the moon. It's also that the very nice people at Macmillan audio who who produced the audiobook of radicalized have given me permission to podcast the first half hour of the unauthorized bread audiobook which is narrated by the amazing voice actor. LemMe See sock and which you're about to hear so I hope you enjoy it. It's not available at audible. Unfortunately Amazon will not carry any any of my audiobooks inaudible because they don't have drm on them but you can get it anywhere else. audio books are sold their Google play and there's downpour and there's Libro DOT FM and you can buy for my own website from Crap Hound Dot Com all without Dr am all without a license agreement. Deal is you bought it you own it. You got all the rights to it that you would have got if you bought it on CD instead of having your rights taken away from you by onerous licensing conditions and technology that have come in with the era of digital distribution so. I hope that you will consider listening to the rest of the story. And if you're in Toronto again. I hope that I'll see you tomorrow night. Wednesday night seven PM Indigo books at the center. And thank you to everyone one for your support of this work and thank you especially to McMillan and tour and Aqeel Augustine and the CBC. This is just such wonderful news and now without that further ado I present to you. LemMe sock reading the Macmillan Audio version of unauthorized bread in the way Salima found out that BA LANGE ISM had gone bankrupt. Her toaster wouldn't accept her bread. She held the slice in front of it and waited for the screen to show her thumbs up emoji. But instead it showed showed her the head-scratching face and made a soft. She waved the bread again. Come on she turned the toaster off and on then she unplugged. It counted to ten and plugged in then she menu through the screens Greene's until she found reset to factory default waited three minutes and punched her Wifi Password again. Long before she got to that point she had grown certain that it was a lost cause but these were the steps that you took when the electronics stopped working. So you could call the eight eight hundred number and say I've turned it off and on. I've unplugged it. I've reset it to factory defaults and there was a touch screen option on the toaster to call support. But that wasn't working so she used the fridge to look up the number and call it. It rang seventeen times and disconnected. She heaved a sigh. Another one bites the dust. The toaster wasn't the first appliance to go. That honor went to the dishwasher which stopped being being able to validate third-party dishes the week before when dishere went under but it was the last straw. She could wash dishes in the sink. But how the how was she supposed to make toast over a candle just to be sure she asked the fridge for headlines about Bowland Chisholm and there it was their cloud had burst in the night socials crawling with people furious about their daily bread. She prodded a headline and learned. That ba Lange's them had been ghost ship for at least six months. Because that's how long security researchers had been contacting the company to tell it all it's user data passwords log ins ordering ordering and billing details had been hanging out there on the public Internet with no password or encryption there were ransom notes in the database records inserted sorted by hackers demanding crypto currency payouts in exchange for keeping the dirty secret of Balandras shitty data handling no one had even seen them Blanche's hymns share price had declined by ninety eight percent. Over the past year. There might not even be a blend Chisholm anymore. When when Selena had pictured balon Jim she'd imagined the French bakery that was on the toasters idle screen dusted with flour would block tables with serried ranks six of crusty loaves? She pictured a rickety staircase leading up from the bakery to a suite of cramped offices overlooking a cobbled road. She pictured gas lamps. The article had a street view. Shot of Ba Lange. `ISMS headquarters a four storey office block in Poona near Mumbai walled in with an unintended guard. Booth at the street entrance the Ba- Lange Ism cloud had burst and that meant there was no one answering Salima. Toaster Tur- when it asked if the bread she was about to toast had come from an authorized Lange's and Baker which had had in the absence of a reply. The paranoid little gadget would assume that Selima was in that class of nefarious fraudsters who bought a discounted Lange's toaster and then tried to renege Doug on her end of the bargain by inserting unauthorized bread with consequences ranging from kitchen fires to sub optimal toast. Bowland Jasim was able to adjust. It's toasting routine in real time to adjust for relative kitchen humidity and the age of the bread and of course it would refuse to toast bread. That had become unsalvageable. Stale Bill to say nothing of the loss of profits for the company and its shareholders without those prophets there'd be no surplus capital to divert to rnd creating the continuous improvement. That meant that hardly a day went by without Selima and millions of other blanche's stakeholders never just customers waking up with exciting new firmware for their beloved toasters and one of the Ba- land Judaism Baker partners. They done the right thing signing up for a balandras awesome license subjecting their process to inspections and quality assurance that meant that their bread had exactly the right composition to toast perfectly definitely in balandras precision engineered appliances with chrome and porosity in perfect balance to absorb butter and other spreads. These is valued partners deserve to have their commitment to excellence. Honored not cast aside by bargain-hunting cheaters. Who wanted to recklessly toast any old bread Salima new these arguments even before her stupid toaster played her? The video explaining them which it did after three unsuccessful bread authorization attempts playing without a pause or mute button as a combination of punishment and re education campaign. She tried to search her fridge for Lange's impacts and and Blanche ISM unlock codes but appliances stuck together kitchen AIDS network filters gobbled up queries and spat back. snarky no results. It's screens even though Salima knew perfectly well that there was a whole underground economy devoted to unauthorized bread. She had to leave for work in half an hour our and she hadn't even showered yet. Got Dammit I the dishwasher and now the toaster. She found her laptop used when she'd gotten it now. Barely functional channel. It's battery was long dead and she had to unplug her toothbrush to free up a charter cable but after she had booted it and let it run its dozens of software after updates. She was able to run the dark net browser she still had kicking around and do some judicious googling. She was forty five minutes late eight to work that day but she had toast for breakfast. God damnit the Dishwasher was next one. Salima had found the right forum. It would have been crazy not to unlock the thing. After all she'd paid for it and now it was effectively bricked. She wasn't the only one who had the district Lange's double-whammy either. Some poor suckers also had the poor fortune to own one of the constellation of devices made by HP News Corp Fridges toothbrushes even sex toys all of which had gone down thanks to a failure of the company's cloud provider Totta while this failure was unrelated to the District Lange Ism doubleheader pretty unfortunate timing. Everyone agreed the twin collapse collapse of Dishwasher and Bill Lange Ism did have a shared. 'cause Salima discovered both companies were publicly traded and both had seen more than twenty eighty percent of their shares acquired by summer stream funds management the largest hedge fund on Earth with one hundred and eighty four billion dollars under management summer I dream was an activist shareholder and it was very big on stock buybacks once. It had a seat on each company's board both occupied by Galt. Baumgartner a junior partner at the firm but from very good Kansas family. They both hired the same expert consultant from Deloitte to examine the company's accounts and recommend a buyback program that would see the shareholders getting there do return from the firms without gouging so deep into the companies operating capital asked.

ba Lange Salima Macmillan audio Ba- Lange Ism Canada Toronto Bill Lange Ism ars Technica Brad BA LANGE ISM Twenty Twenty District Lange Ism National Book Award corey Dr World Science Fiction Conventi Canadian William Broadcasting Toronto Eaton Centre Bowland Chisholm Lange