37 Burst results for "Hugh"

Fresh update on "hugh" discussed on It's Been A Minute

It's Been A Minute

00:38 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "hugh" discussed on It's Been A Minute

"Do you do more than just see a place How do you go somewhere in actually go there and be there I think that it you know it has to do some of it has to do is just observation Don't just snap a photo Observe Take in the space in your surroundings You can do that by talking to locals The people who live there It takes humility and also if you're a person who loves to plan everything in advance it probably sounds a little bit scary The locals can guide you to good places that you didn't plan for For me like talking to strangers is a really big part of it I'm asking people asking strangers for recommendations is so different than having things recommended to you algorithmically because people have personal reasons for enjoying things They have context around that Leaving enough unplanned space to acknowledge that the meaning is going to come from the place not from you ahead of time planning your trip That's impossible You're listening to it's been a minute from NPR I'm Elise Hugh and this is a conversation from life kit about the art of travel Both our experts Tori deroche and Jenny Odell emphasized shifting our mindset to experience the newness and surprise you can get from travel We are sort of like culturally used to applying one type of a mindset in one situation and then we kind of have a different mindset that we apply at home And I think very quickly you will be humbled by the things that you don't know about that are sort of right in your backyard What is it about our mindset that changes when we go very very far away and how would you recommend we take that mindset from far away and apply it in our own rose gardens or in our own backyards I think it has just a lot to do with what you're looking for and what you're looking for has to do with what you think you're doing Jenny reminds us that you don't have to pack a bag at all to see a place with new eyes And that's our last tip Take that fresh eyes mindset home You can take a different way to work find a new jogging route or just take a moment to appreciate the view from your own porch a little longer If you think you're on vacation then.

Elise Hugh Tori Deroche Jenny Odell NPR Jenny
"hugh" Discussed on The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

05:26 min | 1 d ago

"hugh" Discussed on The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

"Guns at school. Alex Padilla, senator Alex Padilla, cut number 6. We're outraged. And no. Putting more armed adults in schools is not the answer. If more guns was the answer, the United States of America would be the safest nation in the world. But it's not. It's the only country where students go to school, fearing for their safety. It's the only country where people wonder about their safety, going to a house of worship. I've heard enough of Alex Badia, the answer is indeed more guns at school than the hands of highly trained, courageous, police who are ready with back up there, so I say to it every school, it's 262,000. People and the federal government can get bread, red flag laws pass tomorrow. They use the approach they used with raising the speed limit to 55, here's the money for your highways, but only if you're at 55. Here's the money for your policeman at school, but only if you have a red flag law I do think that that's got super majority support in the United States. And we ought to focus on what is possible and the fact that the Second Amendment is in the constitution. You can try and amend the constitution if you want that will not happen. So I'm trying to be just perfectly down the middle with you folks. Bad, bad, bad news all around as we study this. What do you think? Give me a call. I'm Hugh Hewitt. Welcome back, America. I'll get back to the slaughter of the massacre next hour, but I want to talk with Sonny bunch about Top Gun because it's in theaters and people are wondering whether they're going to go. I think they're going to go. And I want to know what Sonny bunch thought. Good morning, Sonny bunch. How are you? I am doing well, Hugh, how are you? Good. It's a grim week for talk radio. And I'll go back to the grim stuff. Will this be good escapist theater for people? I think so. I think so, look, I have always been a little bit skeptical of the original Top Gun. I think three or four when that movie came out. So it was not a huge part of my teenage years, right? It was not a seminal seminal moment for me. So I came to it a little bit later. And the thing about Top Gun is that it is, it has a lot of great amazing visuals, right? It is people joke about it being military kind of military recruitment ad. But it is basically that. And it's a very successful version of that. But the story itself is somewhere between mediocre and nonexistence. I mean, the story of the original Top Gun is stitched together entirely with voiceovers with character saying like, all right, here's your mission. You got to do this. And then this. And then we're going to get you on the top of the leaderboard. In this movie, Tom Cruise returns as maverick, Pete Mitchell, captain Pete Mitchell. He has to go back to Top Gun to train a bunch of pilots who have previously won the Top Gun competition to do a very dangerous, very difficult mission against the enemy, quote the enemy. This is one of those movies that does not pitch America against Iran despite the fact that this is a mission to take out a legal and illegal uranium enrichment enrichment plant. It's a fairly, if you're looking at contemporary enemies that it might be. It's pretty clearly a stand in for Iran. But nobody, nobody wants to even Iran anger there Iranians. So they're just referred to as the enemy the whole time, which is very funny. But it's a story. It's an actual story. It's an actual plot with you have a problem. You have people who are trying to solve the problem. And then the problem is either solved or not at the end. I don't want to spoil it. I haven't seen it. Don't tell me. But look, it's an amazing looking movie. It is much like the first Top Gun in that it is at its best when you're playing around with big giant airplanes doing enormously fun, the big airplane things, big dogfights, big bombing runs, this movie, this movie culminates in what amounts to Luke Skywalker's attack on the death star. They have to make a very tight run down a very narrow valley that is surrounded by Sam sites and their 5th generation fighters in the air trying to fight them and blow them out of the sky, blah blah blah. It's really it's a lot of fun. This movie is this movie is the sort of thing where I saw it with probably a slightly older audience than your average blockbuster upper 30s, lower 40s, definitely some folks in the 50s and 60s and it's the sort of movie where every once in a while people will occasionally just start clapping because it was so. So.

Alex Padilla Sonny bunch Alex Badia United States Pete Mitchell Hugh Hewitt federal government Iran Hugh Tom Cruise Luke Skywalker Sam
Fresh update on "hugh" discussed on It's Been A Minute

It's Been A Minute

00:31 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "hugh" discussed on It's Been A Minute

"Come to believe And that just enriches my life and my experience of life A note here while all this enrichment is uplifting we have to remember that getting to travel at all is a pretty privileged situation A lot of us can't afford to get away Has a really great quote which is the real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes but in having new eyes So even if you're in a state of grief and you're struggling with your life go somewhere new and try to see it with new eyes try to be there in that moment with that experience right there and see what you find You're listening to it's been a minute from NPR I'm Elise Hugh and this is a conversation from life kit about the art of travel This whole idea of going away without going very far at all is why I called up Jenny Odell Odell is an artist and author She lives in Oakland and loves nature She wrote a book called how to do nothing And we caught her in her favorite rose garden I'm usually here at least a couple times a week I live in an apartment building So I don't have a yard And so I kind of consider this my backyard She's going to help us dig into the why of travel because understanding the purpose and being true to that can bring us more satisfaction Let's take away number three remember the why Why Why should we go Why should we get away Yeah Oh are you asking me that Yeah yeah It might be different for you but try on this framing We travel for perspective and surprise You know if you live with a pretty solid schedule or routine there's certain things that you can start to take for granted And just simply removing yourself from those circumstances wherever you might end up removing yourself too is really helpful for getting some kind of new perspective on yourself and your life You said perspective but also surprise Yeah I mean I think the other thing that comes with routine is that you kind of expect things or you kind of maybe don't perceive things outside of what you're expecting And I think the experience of traveling is for a lot of people opening yourself up to being surprised like you're willing to be surprised you're expecting to be surprised And I think that's a very different mentality than you have.

Elise Hugh Jenny Odell Odell NPR Oakland
The Timeline of the Uvalde Massacre

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:02 min | 1 d ago

The Timeline of the Uvalde Massacre

"He crashed the truck at 1128. 9-1-1 was called at 1130 with reports of a man carrying a gun around the school. At 1140, he entered the school, so by the time I'm talking, he crashed the truck at about the time. I started talking to you and he will enter the school at the time I go to commercial break, to give you a sense of how long it is. He's walking around the school. He shoots at the funeral home. At 1142, after he entered the school, a Facebook notice comes from the school that there's an active shooter. At 1143, they say the school's locked down, excuse me, 1143. One report says that 1144 shots are exchanged between law enforcement and the killer. At noon, kids are breaking out and getting out of windows and running from various parts of the school.

Facebook
The Truth About Vice President Mike Pence

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:52 min | 2 d ago

The Truth About Vice President Mike Pence

"Marriage. Now, I never, ever in all these years talked about you and George, because I think people's private lives and their family lives, especially when children are there, are just not on the table for discussion. And so you bury your soul in this book, and people want to read about that can, but I want to go to something I didn't know. And as I read a book, I make my notes, I make my questions, and I wrote when I got to page the first time you mentioned Mike Pence, you were his pollster and political analyst for 5 years. And I wrote down for my notes. To ask Kellyanne, did he do the right thing on January 6th? But then I get the page four 67 and you tell us for a week. The media quote was working overtime to suggest vice president Pence would ruin his reputation to destroy his own political future by exceeding to his boss and refusing to certify the results. So you answered my question before I got to ask the question, that's why you got to read the whole book before you interview someone. Mike Pence is one of the best men I've ever met. And I don't know what his political future is. Are you back working for him, Kellyanne Conway? Well, I've one of the few people in the country who talks to Donald Trump and Mike Pence fairly regularly and I'm very grateful that that team one in 2016 stopped Hillary and her corrupt machine from taking over. And being in power and also just delivered amazing accomplishments. And I think that team is very important to recognize all that they did together as a team. I write about that because it's a good example here, and there are many throughout the book of the media just presuming they know what's going to happen. They always presume they know who someone is. What's in their heart? What's in their mind? What motivates them? And that's just not true. It was not true in that example. It certainly wasn't true about Russia collusion. It wasn't true about Hillary beating Trump handily. And so again, again, they fail upward without accountability. And look, I think that the break between the former president and former vice president is regrettable, but people should remember everything they were able to do together.

Mike Pence Kellyanne Kellyanne Conway Pence George Donald Trump Hillary Russia
Kellyanne Conway on Her New Book 'Here's the Deal'

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:20 min | 2 d ago

Kellyanne Conway on Her New Book 'Here's the Deal'

"Welcome back, America. Why am I playing blueberry hill for Kellyanne Conway, whose new memoir here is the deal is the bestseller everywhere in America. I hope you saw her in the view this week. I hope you are reading Kellyanne Conway's here. The deal. She's friends with Frank luntz as I am. So she knows the lunch rule that you've got to save the title of a book 7 times to make the book memorable. So I've said, here's the deal three times Kellyanne. Now I'm going to turn it over to you. I like Kellyanne one stuff. A lot more than Kellyanne two stuff, 'cause I didn't know much of Kellyanne. One stuff, but it's all there and here's the deal. Congratulations. Oh, thank you so much, Hugh. It's been a labor of love to write this memoir. Even though I'm 55, hopefully I have decades of life ahead of me. People are always asking me about the story behind the story. And I think in many ways I've had unique opportunities, crazy wild dramas and traumas, but it's really just everybody's American Dream story raised by a single mom very modestly for Italian women in the household never a political conversation I can recall, but raised to be a conservative because they were all hardworking small business owners believed in faith and family and freedom. We had military and veterans in our family union members in our family, obviously. So it's been a great journey. And you've been a part of that. We started on this radio show in 2000. My goodness, and you would have me on for a weekly segment on polling, which I think is still the grossly misunderstood. Oh, well, that was.

Kellyanne Kellyanne Conway Frank Luntz America Hugh
A Discussion on How to Prevent Mass Shootings in Schools

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:27 min | 3 d ago

A Discussion on How to Prevent Mass Shootings in Schools

"Is in Virginia. Hi yoni. How are you doing, Hugh? Good. What is this, Israeli system that the guy called about it isn't just that there's lots of people with a lot of training people with a lot of weapons in Israel to shoot terrorists dead when they show up. Well, first of all, we got a lot of people with a lot of guns. But in addition to that, the last school shooting mass school shooting in Israel. Happened, may 15th, 1974, when you were trying to figure out who to take to the prom, okay? I mean, seriously, that's how long ago it was. It resulted in 31 dead Israelis, 70 wounded at a school. As a result of that shooting, a couple of things happened. Number one, we created what is today the national counter terror unit, your mom, part of the border police. And secondly, we put at every school armed personnel. All we have to do in America to end this. We don't need to violate people's constitutional rights by restricting magazine capacities or outlying guns. We need to put at every school, armed officers, armed with not just with handguns, but with AR-15s because allegedly this guy yesterday hasn't been confirmed yet, was engaged with law enforcement in a gunfight before he went into the school and he was wearing soft body armor.

Hi Yoni Israel National Counter Terror Unit Hugh Virginia Border Police America
Democrat Pollster Suggests Bloody Midterm for Biden

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:15 min | 4 d ago

Democrat Pollster Suggests Bloody Midterm for Biden

"Don't know if you've been talking about it. Have you heard about this new memo from Doug sosnik? No. Doug sosnik being very senior respected democratic pollster strategist was in the Clinton White House. That's where he became well known and in the 90s. Written this new memo to Democrats. And it's incredibly pessimistic. It says, look, basically, unless we can make something huge about a Supreme Court roe versus wade decision, unless we can pull a rabbit out of our hat. We are toast. And what he does was he lays out the mistakes that the Biden administration has made to bring Democrats to this point and I'll just the real short version is he starts off with a Biden honeymoon. Then July 4th of last year, Biden holds this Independence Day, freedom from COVID event in which he kind of declares the pandemic over and of course we know what happened then. There was a delta variant and then there was omicron. Let's just say COVID wasn't over. The next month is the disastrously bundled withdrawal from Afghanistan and people begin to question these are independents, some Democrats obviously Republicans, whether the Biden administration can confidently handle issues. So when inflation becomes really huge, Americans are worried and Biden suggests that don't worry, we're in control, we're in charge here. We know what to do. They're very skeptical about this because they have already seen what happened with COVID, and they've seen what happened in Afghanistan. Now they're watching it with the economy and they just have absolutely no faith in Biden or democratic efforts to handle things now. And he also said, do not think that voters are going to make their decision in the last couple of weeks before the election. They're making their decision right now. And as a matter of fact, it may already be made right now. This may already be said in stone. It's one of the more pessimistic democratic documents I've seen in quite a while.

Doug Sosnik Biden Administration Biden Covid White House Wade Clinton Supreme Court Afghanistan
Conservatives Fight Back Against Corporate 'Wokeness'

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:16 min | 4 d ago

Conservatives Fight Back Against Corporate 'Wokeness'

"With this whole corporate wokeness thing, I think a lot of conservative share my view that if you are a corporation who embraces this woke agenda who, among other things, subsidizes an assault on children and parents in public schools, which is what this gender bizarre nonsense really is. You are my enemy and I want to use all our political power to hurt you in retaliation to ensure that you don't do this again. It's not just live and let live. If you cross us, we're going to crush you. And that's what Ron DeSantis did in Florida. And frankly, I don't understand arguments that say corporation can use their culture and political power against us to achieve bizarre and damaging cultural goals. Yet I am we are somehow restrained from using our political power to defeat them. What do you think of that theory? Because I think a lot conservatives are beginning to subscribe to it. Well, there's been a long history of activist groups using boycotts to change the behavior of corporations. I mean, Jesse Jackson in the last 40, 50 years has spent most of his time doing that sort of thing challenging boards of directors, pressuring them, threatening boycotts. Companies do respond to that kind of stuff. And there's no reason that conservative groups couldn't do the same sort of thing. When you see something like this State Farm stuff and I think what we've seen is kind of a lot of business operates on fear, right? I mean, you've seen other businesses get swallowed up when some other company comes in does something better has a better idea, et cetera. So they will respond. So I think that this is actually kind of a healthy thing that we've seen after State Farm did this ridiculous thing that they've boom. They've completely 360 because they got some public exposure and pressure.

Ron Desantis Jesse Jackson Florida
Which Republican Will Hold Pennsylvania Senate Seat?

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

00:58 sec | 4 d ago

Which Republican Will Hold Pennsylvania Senate Seat?

"Look, it's going to be Doctor Oz, or David McCormick. And they're going up against John fetterman. And the conventional wisdom is that either one of these guys can take him. Am I reading that right? I think the conventional wisdom is correct given the political atmospherics and just how competitive it Pennsylvania is in the year 2022, let's say versus the year 2002. Right. So 20 years ago, Pennsylvania was always just competitive enough for Republicans to challenge for it. Let's say in presidential contests. And it did send Republicans to Congress as a part of their Senate delegation. But the state really has become super competitive and the atmosphere for Democrats is just as bad as an atmosphere I've seen for a political party. I guess it's 2018 when it was that almost that bad. Well, look, but that's why I think Oz or McCormick is very likely to win the general election. Well,

Doctor Oz David Mccormick John Fetterman Pennsylvania Congress Senate Mccormick OZ
What's the Latest on the Pennsylvania Primary Race?

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:31 min | 4 d ago

What's the Latest on the Pennsylvania Primary Race?

"Well, David, we have an embarrassment of riches today as far as topics go. I've got this list here. We can go through for an hour, but let's see where we're at. Let's start with Pennsylvania Senate race. David McCormick is a mirror 987 votes behind Doctor Oz and they are still counting. What do you think's going on there? Man, $64,000 question. It's possible that when all the votes are counted and the mcclernand will be on top, even if he's not, and I'd rather be awes of I had to choose at this point. I'd always really rather be the guy in front. Even if I've holds them off, there's going to be a recount because it's going to be triggered under state law. The candidate that's losing at the end of regulation can forgo the recount and just decide to lose. I just don't think that's going to happen here. Of course, the real news here is that the McCormick campaign is suing in state court to compel all 67 counties to count mail in ballots that were received on time and have no other flaw except for there is no gate handwritten on the outside of the envelope as required by state law. Now, they're using a you're the lawyer here, but they're using a decision rendered by the third circuit on Friday that have nothing to do with this election, but at 2021 election at Lehigh county Pennsylvania. It said such balance should be counted

David Mccormick Mcclernand Pennsylvania Senate David Mccormick Lehigh County
Biden Pledges Military Intervention Over Taiwan

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:32 min | 5 d ago

Biden Pledges Military Intervention Over Taiwan

"Let me play for you the president in Japan this morning with the prime minister of Japan at his side. Can we play that cut for him, please? We agree with one China policy. We signed on to it. And all the attendant agreements made from there. But the idea that it could be taken by force just taken by force is just not a crocodile. Are you willing to get involved militarily to defend Taiwan if it comes to that? Yes. You are. That's a commitment we made. I see very smart people like Gerard baker, Jerry dunleavy, saying The White House has already walking this back, Brett Stevens. What do you make of this? I think it's the right call by the president. I'll tell you why. The one China policy is increasingly a dead letter. I wish it weren't, but that was a change that was really brought about by Xi Jinping at the 70th or I guess it was a hundredth anniversary of the communist party last year. And when posed with this kind of direct question in the midst of the Ukrainian war, if he had said anything other than that, I think it would have been a moment like 1950 when ambiguity from the United States invited Korean communist aggression in Korea.

Japan Gerard Baker Jerry Dunleavy Brett Stevens China Taiwan White House Xi Jinping Communist Party United States Korea
President Biden Visits Seoul

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

00:44 sec | Last week

President Biden Visits Seoul

"I was still covering state politics at the time in Virginia. So I didn't, I wasn't down in Florida, but I watched it like everybody else, and I do think you're right. There's some eerie similarities there. Oh my goodness, I've got tattoos from then. Because every day, it was every day was a new headline, 25 different lawsuits. David Boyce squaring off against Ted Olson, Ted Cruz down there. W are running around. James baker in town. Al Gore. It was wild that I think Pennsylvania is going that way. So Michael, the president's in Seoul, Korea. I'm just curious, how did you not draw the short straw and have to go? A lot of people think everybody loves to go on these trips. I'm not sure that's true when you're over 50.

David Boyce Ted Cruz Ted Olson Virginia Florida James Baker Al Gore Pennsylvania Seoul Korea Michael
What's New at the Weekend Box Office?

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:29 min | Last week

What's New at the Weekend Box Office?

"Tell us about something that people can go see. Well, you know, again, it's a very slow weekend here. It's a very slow weekend because everybody was getting out of the way on the one hand of Doctor Strange. Two weekends ago. And coming up next weekend, of course, is Top Gun: Maverick. Top ten maverick comes out Memorial Day weekend. That's kicking off everyone is very excited for that. But I think folks were also scared of that movie. So it's another, it's another slow weekend at the box office. I went and saw this is just it's not going to be a movie you're going to want to see. I'm going to just warn you off of it right now. I don't want to get the dreaded failure to warn, but there's movie out now called men, it's a horror film. Starring Jesse Buckley as a woman who is grieving. They've lost a husband. But grieving is the wrong word. Her husband is killed himself. He was abusive and she was going to divorce him and he threatened to kill himself and then he went through with it. And the whole movie is essentially, I didn't hate it exactly, but I was vaguely exasperated about it because it is what it feels like is sitting through an argument on Twitter where people talk about in the kind of broadest Twitter terms like the problems with men. What's wrong with men? That's basically the subtitle of this movie. Men. What's wrong with them?

Starring Jesse Buckley Twitter
Gas Prices Reach Record Highs, Again

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

00:51 sec | Last week

Gas Prices Reach Record Highs, Again

"A new marker yesterday gas is hit $4 a gallon in all 50 states. In California, $6 and 29 cents a gallon for regular. I'm thinking about someone stuck on the 55 and the 91 coming in from Marino valley over to the coast or someone coming down from Santa Barbara or the one O one into LA and certainly those very long commutes up into the city or Silicon Valley, $6 and 29 cents a gallon. You know, yesterday, Joe Biden invoked the defense production act for baby formula to make it easier to make baby formula. I think he should invoke the defense production act to make more gasoline. Does anyone ask him that in the press corps I'll ask Michael to share that. You know, it was a big deal. The DNP, the DPA, defense production act for baby formula. Why not the DPA for gasoline?

Marino Valley Santa Barbara California Silicon Valley Joe Biden LA DNP Michael DPA
President Biden Signs Ukraine Aid Bill

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

00:36 sec | Last week

President Biden Signs Ukraine Aid Bill

"The United States Senate passed the president has signed the $40 billion in aid to Ukraine. U.S. missiles are being considered for sale to European allies, harpoon missiles that could end the Black Sea blockade of Ukrainian wheat that the entire country needs. The Pentagon official told The New York Times that Russian troops have been forced to fight in smaller formations in the eastern area of Ukraine known as the Donbass because they're getting shattered by western artillery that's arrived just imagine if we had done this last year. It might have deterred everything, the stock market nastiness would have not happened.

United States Ukraine Black Sea Senate Pentagon The New York Times
Mitch McConnell Blames FDA for Formula Shortage

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

00:42 sec | Last week

Mitch McConnell Blames FDA for Formula Shortage

"I want to play for you one clip for sure. Leader McConnell yesterday was on with Brett fair last night and talking about the baby formula shortage, and he said, but I've been telling you for days, but I like it when the leader tells it to Brett bear on special report, cut number 28. Almost total incompetence. They misjudge us from the beginning. It's not a matter of money, the FDA has a $6 billion budget. They could certainly take care of the so called appropriation in the house that they just passed at 28 million. Bureaucratic incompetence, the administration was behind the curve. FDA needed to step up their game and hopefully will solve this problem very quickly.

Leader Mcconnell Brett Bear Brett FDA
Sen. Hagerty Votes Against Ukraine Aid

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:11 min | Last week

Sen. Hagerty Votes Against Ukraine Aid

"Work.

China Strapped With Economic Distress

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:36 min | Last week

China Strapped With Economic Distress

"Financial Times reports this morning that international investors are selling Chinese debt at a record pace. They also report in the telegraph that the Chinese housing market has for the first time in decades gone backwards that they're not able to interest the average Chinese consumer in a small lot purchase in one of the minor cities, which is the canary in the coal mine there. Are we dealing with a potentially catastrophic economic situation in China, Bill haggerty, because that won't stay in China? China, China has got some major problems. I think part of it goes to the demographic situation there. You know they've got just this massive demographic hole because of their one child policy. And they've got an aging population at birth rate that's below replacement rate right now. And they're going to have a very difficult time maintaining support for the elderly population as it moves forward. You sort of you begin to see that manifest itself in the housing market. But I think it's the other reasons for this too. China is certainly going to this zero COVID policy because they have not vaccinated the mobile vulnerable people in their own population. That's caused massive shutdowns massive economic dislocation. That's very hard to recover from. And their way to recover from it in China is to make more infrastructure investment. Well, many of the Chinese infrastructure investments might be good ego projects for Chinese leadership, but they don't have a real economic value. So I think it's a misallocation of resources within the country. It's demographic problems. It's their reaction to the COVID pandemic, which had things been different in Wuhan, maybe not spread it. We might be in a very different place right now. So China is dealing with it in all fronts.

China Bill Haggerty Financial Times Wuhan
A Bipartisan Effort Seeks to Create US Presence in the Pacific

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:08 min | Last week

A Bipartisan Effort Seeks to Create US Presence in the Pacific

"Can you explain a little bit to me what you and senator hirano are up to? Well, I think we see the region in the whole indo Pacific is extremely strategic and vital to America. We see China's very aggressive posture, just look what they recently done in the Solomon island. Signing a security agreement with the Solomon Islands that they are trying to use their typical means of corruption, the debt trap diplomacy they deploy, et cetera, to get more of these smaller nations to fall their way, whether it's to put pressure on Taiwan, whether it's to get more votes in these multilateral organizations like the United Nations. I think the United States needs to be more present and we need to have more connectivity in that region. We certainly have a major presence in Japan. You're well aware of you and I have talked about it many times before, but the largest component of U.S. Military stationed anywhere is based in Japan, why served as U.S. ambassador, most recently, and we have incredible strategic interest in the region. It's a vital area for growth, the busy sea lanes in the world and East China Sea, South China Sea, our interests are very much aligned with keeping a free and open region there in the Pacific.

Senator Hirano Indo Pacific Solomon Island U.S. Taiwan Solomon Islands Japan United Nations East China Sea South China Pacific
Putin Seeks to Disrupt Food Supply

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

00:51 sec | Last week

Putin Seeks to Disrupt Food Supply

"hugh" Discussed on The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:07 min | 2 weeks ago

"hugh" Discussed on The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

"Join now by the poet laureate of the Hugh Hewitt show tarzana Joe. Good morning, Joe. Good morning, you know, it's been a tough week, but I'm determined to have some fun. Oh, good. The summer's hard upon us, and I'm planning my vacation, but looking at the options I should factor in inflation. I drive, but the assessing what the rising price of gases, all I can afford is just to walk to Calabasas. I'll buy a new electric car to make the summer sunny, but no cars are available, not for love or money. So my road trip is abandoned, isn't that a bummer, but a backyard barbecue is still an option for the summer. I have a special marinade that really is a treat. So off to see the butcher. Have you seen the price of meat? I love a juicy T bone, and I long to have my fill. Alas, I've heard that eggplant is quite tasty on the grill. Perhaps a jet excursion. That's an idea so inspired. I haven't left my kitchen since the day that I retired. But to buy an airline ticket to Philly or to France, there is no doubt about it. I will have to refinance. And then the thought occurs to me that fills me with disgust. My mortgage is adjustable and fixed into adjust. Yes, the country is in crisis. I mean, it's such a crying shame, but thanks to our great president, I know who not to blame. That's inflation by transenna drill. Well, let it not be said that anyone was misled on the Hugh York show eggplant tastes like lead. Yes. Spontaneous. A very spontaneous but eggplant brings that out of me, Joe. Joe, you said in your retirement, don't get people the wrong idea. You're still busy versifying. I've never been busier. I think everyone's getting married in June. Everyone on the planet. And do you have time for one more if anybody writes you a note and says I need a wedding poem? I mean, if they get the better be in July. Charles and Joe at Reagan dot com for your poetry needs commissions and writes a reasonable tarzana Joe at Reagan dot com. And Joe will today's epic be posted over at tarzana Joe dot com. Indeed, it will. Thank you. Good luck with that eggplant barbecue..

tarzana Joe Hugh Hewitt Joe Calabasas Hugh York France Reagan Charles tarzana
"hugh" Discussed on The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

04:17 min | 2 weeks ago

"hugh" Discussed on The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

"Dobbs. We get right back to Alito's Alito's explanation here, which is that the constitution doesn't speak to this. And if you want the constitution to speak to this, then there is a perfectly clear method of having the constitution speak to this, which is to try to amend the constitution to address the issue of abortion. Either direction, right? The problem with that is that you have to get three quarters of the states to agree. Prior to that, you have to have two thirds of Congress agree in both chambers in order to pass it along to the states for ratification. And the real story here is that there isn't anywhere near that kind of consensus for either extreme on abortion. For any position on abortion, which is exactly what Samuel Alito said in saying that since the constitution doesn't mention abortion and there is no grand consensus here and no tradition in law, it's got to go back to the legislature. We're going to talk more about that when we come back. I'm Ed Morrissey, upon here, filling in for you, we'll be right back. Welcome back, everyone. We're partying like it's 18 94 here on the Hugh Hewitt show and that is not a reflection on Hugh Hewitt myself or my guest, my good friend Selena zito from Selena zito dot com and the Washington examiner. Who has this great piece up to she's got a couple of great pieces over the last couple of days at the Washington examiner. She's got a good one about the Trump, the Trump Pompeo debate over mehmet Oz in Pennsylvania. But we're going to talk more right now about the anatomy of a wave election and it's not the wave election that you might think Selena is a great recollection of the worst drubbing a party ever took in Congress. Oh, yeah, the 1894 was just absolutely devastating for Democrats. They lost 35% of the house to the Republicans in that year. Right. And it would be, it would be about the same scale, really. I mean, we're talking about you'd have to you'd have to lose about a 140 seats in this election in order to in order to come up to the same scale as the wave election at 1894, but there were things that were specific to that election, but there were some things there were some similarities that you suss out of that election that really do speak to what's going on in this cycle, Selena. Yeah, you know, I think it's really interesting because that was that was Grover Cleveland's second non consecutive presidency, right? So you would have thought he would have learned a lesson by losing previously as to being really in tune and to what was going on with the electric. No. Absolutely not. He was stubbornly set in his ways. The Democrats were seeing as the party of the elite sound familiar. As a party that was in bed with big business, again, sound familiar. And wildly out of touch with the electorate, in particular, asked right after the great panic of 1893, which had caused the devastating recession, but the Democrats, Cleveland, the Democrats were just stubbornly stuck in what they thought should be done, which was the opposite of what should have been done. And the American electorate let them know that, yeah, we're not down with you. I mean, the amount of they lost 130 seats. That is double almost double the amount that the Democrats lost in 2010. Right..

Selena zito Alito Hugh Hewitt Ed Morrissey Trump Pompeo mehmet Oz Dobbs Samuel Alito Congress Selena Washington legislature Pennsylvania Grover Cleveland Cleveland
"hugh" Discussed on The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

04:52 min | Last month

"hugh" Discussed on The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

"Good morning Matt. How are you? Good morning, Hugh. Thank you for having me. I'm doing well. Thank you. Great to have you. The new book, the right, the hundred year war for American conservatism is a very good read that I hope to encourage everyone listening and everyone who reads the transcript or listens to the podcast at highly concentrated Hugh gets reads absorbs studies makes notes. As I traveled yesterday to the beaches of Normandy with a group of friends, they saw me just deep, deep into the right back and forth on my annotations, et cetera because it's a very unusual book for me. I wonder if many people have told you Matt that it's personal for them because you're writing about my friend's colleagues guest professors of the last of my 66 years in the last 50 of them. How many people have come up to you and said, well, this is like reading an index of my life. It's interesting. You are not the first to tell me that several people have told me that it's like reading about their life. And that makes sense in a way because it was writing about my life as I wrote the history of the conservative movement, especially in its last 20 years where I've been involved in it. There are certain autobiographical aspects that you can find in the book and I think readers can find them too if they're connected to the conservative movement. If they are conservative or even if they've just kind of followed the news over the duration of their life because the book also covers a lot of American history in addition to political and intellectual histories. I made notes for a review that I hope I will write at some point down the road, but Richard Nixon was my first big boss for many many years out in San Clemente in New York, Ronald Reagan, I worked for in The White House. George W. Bush, Donald Trump been guests on this show many times. Harvey Mansfield, they were banfield of professors of mine. Weighing up Buckley introduced me to Charles Kessler. Harry Jaffa showed up in the studio for three hours. Larry arn is taking up more time on this show, probably than any other person in the last 22 years. Bill kristol assessed my thesis, rush cut promos for me. Mark Levin and I worked together for Ed meese at Ray Price gave me my first job. It's really, it is so weird for me to read this, Matt. However, having done that, I will say you are mostly concerned in my view with what happens next. Even though you went back to the beginning, when you sat down to write the right, and that's going to be interesting for people who are listening. The book is called the right. When you set them to write the right, what did you intend to accomplish? I will tell you what I think you did, but what did you intend to accomplish? Well, what I intended, he was to write basically a one volume synthesis of the political and intellectual history of the American right. And in order to provide my students because I teach this material in various settings. I wanted to give them one book that they could read. And so they could learn about all of those names you mentioned in addition to many other names that came before. Your generation. So that was my intent. My second purpose was to figure out where the right arrived at the present moment. How did we get to where we are today? And by researching that, I ended up having to go very far back into the past. Further back than most of the conventional accounts of the conservative movement in America, which typically begin at the end of World War II. I had to start my story about 20 years earlier in order to show what exactly conservatives were defending prior to the Second World War. So those I think were my two main purposes to provide students a handy reference because what I have found to you is that many people on the right don't actually know their own history. They don't know the history of the conservative movement in America. And so I wanted to just provide a place where people can learn about it. And then my second purpose was to try to figure out how did the right reach the present moment. And by to achieve that, I needed to go back into the past. There is a generation of firing line conservatives of whom I am one who cut their teeth on Buckley and watching the old PBS show. But even those my age, we don't know about Richard weaver, right? We don't know about these people that come before Buckley really takes the movement and embodies it in national review and builds it out from there. And so you cover that. And by the way, I want people to know it covers it warts and all. There's a fascinating passage on the John birch society. And I've never much concerned myself with the nutters, Matt, but you had to dive in pretty deep there and to who they were and how they came to be and how Barry Goldwater said, take every copy of that and.

Matt Hugh Harvey Mansfield Charles Kessler Harry Jaffa Larry arn Ed meese Normandy Buckley Ray Price Bill kristol Richard Nixon San Clemente Mark Levin Donald Trump Ronald Reagan George W. Bush White House New York America
"hugh" Discussed on The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

06:18 min | Last month

"hugh" Discussed on The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

"The name vijaya Gotti before? No. Yesterday was the first day or yeah, late yesterday was the first day I had to even know that all of those functions were under one single person at Twitter. So if someone is going to serve as the moral authority you and I are both Catholics, you and I both know that the bishop and the diocese and which we reside is the moral authority of the Catholic sewer and communion with the church and I mean real communion, not fake communion. They are the moral authority. And we usually know a little bit, for example, archbishop is probably listening now the retired archbishop of Philadelphia. I know a lot about his moral authority because I have read his three books or four books or 5 books, many of his articles talked with him interviewed him. What do you think about having a moral authority over the world's most influential platform as Molly ball calls it the Time Magazine about whom nothing is known and about whom I've never read an interview. Yeah, just to keep extending the Catholic metaphor here, it would be like finding out that the Holy See is actually being run by some priest in the Woods in Wisconsin, right? That nobody's ever heard of before. And I think that he's the guy that's actually running the Catholic Church and everybody else is looking someplace else. That's exactly what this is like. Sometimes the biggest headline is right in front of you and you don't know. There's a moral authority at Twitter. There is somebody who is in charge of all this. Or there was. Or there was. And she cried yesterday, and I think she cried because she's not going to be the moral authority. She's going to be another rich lawyer in retirement somewhere. Who's going to be a VC startup and her opinions are going to count as much as Ed Morrissey's or Pierre's PR dash on my right or mine. And I just find it it's not anything like Russia cutting off the gas to Poland. That's a big headline today. Those people are cold and in the dark, pretty soon. And there are wars and rumors of war around the world. But I'm stunned that I did not know this person's name, or that she appeared in front of Congress, do you think? I would suspect not. I mean, I don't know that anybody knew that this woman was the moral authority and the one person in charge of both the legal and the speech moderation issues at Twitter. I mean, again, this is, this is news, I think. And the fact that it's news is news. And the fact that it's news is news and that's the key and that it's buried in the Politico and other people don't know that it's news. I mean, I read with a John de thigh, everything about the media, because I know how media works. And I know that on television, for example, it doesn't matter what any of the anchors are saying. What matters is what their producers have been told to do by their presidents of their news divisions. It all goes up. Radio is not that way. Right. Right now, Dwayne is in my ear yelling at me, but if you're on the air, Edward is in charge of Edward, he was in charge of Hugh and the callers are in charge of the callers. And Ben is in charge of whether you get on the air and Dwayne kicks me under the table. Out. And so the kidney is the key is we are actually a free speech, but controlled by the FCC. Twitter is not. It's been her kingdom. Just think about that out loud Edward. What kind of things are you thinking about? Knowing that there is a queen of the kingdom. Well, I'm struck by the fact that the person who's in charge of their legal department is also their moral authority and it reminds me of the end of wrestlers are absent. I don't know if you ever saw this movie. It's very funny movie with Tom berenger Patrick Wayne is John Wayne's son plays this guy who's supposed to be this competing good guy, right? So they're both really good guys and at the end, the movie is 36 years old. So spoiler alert, but at the end, Patrick Wayne ends up shooting upon beringer and time beringer says, I thought you were a good guy and Patrick Wayne says, I'm a lawyer, you idiot. I've never. I've never seen that movie, but I want people to consider as they go about the new Twitter. There's a new Twitter in town. There's a new sheriff in town in the new sheriff is again. Her name is the IJA, YA. Pronunciation check, generally Simone. Iowa says vijaya, vijaya. Gotti. That's probably got a yes. I think this is an anonymous quote. I think everyone at Twitter, regardless of how they feel about the news, is feeling reflective and emotional, said one Twitter employee. We've gone through a lot in the past two years, and I think it's generally instigate a lot of reflection. I think this was more of an acknowledgment of that uncertainty everyone is feeling right now. Do you remember the picture of The White House staff, the day after Donald Trump won in the watching Obama and they were downfallen crestfallen crushed because they were losing power and that's what's happened here. They really think that they're powerful and that they've lost it. Edward, your thoughts on that. I think they were powerful. I think they were exerting a tremendous amount of censorious power on a public debate platform. And that power's gone away. That's the reason why you're seeing Ed Markey, Ari melber, all sorts of people who were benefiting from those from those sensory decisions. Suddenly freaking out because Elon Musk is basically saying, we're just not going to even put our thumbs on the skills anymore. We're just going to let people talk. And free speech, frightens people like that. It frightens authoritarians. That's the reason why you're seeing this freak out. Remember how the Clinton White House reacted as soon as George W. Bush was certified the winner. What did they do in gluing all the W's on the keyboards and all that? I will tell everyone, watch the account numbers go over to Ed Morrissey added Morrissey follow ad, follow radio blogger, follow Kurt schlichter, follow Hugh Hewitt. See if the numbers go up, they say it's organic that many leftists lost tens of thousands of followers. I've never been suspicious of these people. I really have it, but now I am because there's a moral authority behind the curtain. And it's a little guy saying pay no attention to the moral authority behind the Bluebird..

Twitter Patrick Wayne vijaya Gotti Molly ball Ed Morrissey Edward John de Dwayne Poland beringer Time Magazine vijaya Catholic Church Philadelphia IJA Pierre Wisconsin Tom berenger Hugh Congress
"hugh" Discussed on The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

04:03 min | Last month

"hugh" Discussed on The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

"The rest of us might not even find out about it till after the election. Elon Musk says this is all to help you. Morning, glory and bonjour high from France, I am due Hewitt at my side is Pierre. Pierre. In fact, if you turn the camera you can see Pierre with his beret, his baguette and his what do we call that that you have on? We call that an apron. An apron, a dash, a Pierre, and you gotta sit down to see your head though. Mona Lisa. He's totally gone native on me. I don't know if we're ever going to get it back. From Texas comes Ed Morrissey. Good morning, Edward. How are you? It's actually, I don't know what time it is in Texas. What time isn't that 5 a.m. in the morning? Yeah, so people in the world have no idea where we are. So I was off the area yesterday going to the sacred space that is Normandy to Omaha beach to the American cemetery to ponta hakon. We'll talk a little bit about that in a second. And there's lots of news to go over, but Edward, I got to ask you first about Ari melber, I know that Kurt schlichter talked about this a lot yesterday. I've gained about 400 followers overnight at Hugh Hewitt on Twitter, and by the way, I'd encourage everyone every single person listening to this radio show to go and follow me and follow Ed Morrissey and follow radio blogger and follow all conservatives. Let's see if in fact it's true. But I have never believed in shadow banning Edward. I've never believed in it, but Ari melber is now afraid of it. And I know you talked about it yesterday and people, but do you believe a that it's happened be that it's ended and see that it might happen again? What does Ed Morrissey of hot air dot com think? Do I think that shadow banning exists? Yes, I think that what we're seeing is the dials being turned back now that the new boss is coming into town here and they're trying to set the dials back to zero so that it can claim when Elon Musk comes in. See nothing was. We weren't doing anything, so they've said all the dials on the dashboard back to zero. And I think Ari melber understands this, which is the reason why he's panicked that the same tools that the current Twitter management has been using to impose viewpoint suppression on their platform could be turned against them. And the thing is that Elon Musk is saying, no, we're going to make the algorithms transparent so that you can tell whether or not people are tweaking around behind the scenes. But that's not enough. I mean, did you see Ed Markey talk about algorithmic justice yesterday? Yes, I did. Algorithm, by the way, is code for I don't know what I'm talking about. So I'm going to use a word that suggests that I do. When in fact, it's all the stuff in the back room. Dwayne is running the algorithm right now, for example, on the Hugh Hewitt show. Algorithm justice is Hugh Hewitt trying to explain how to do radio. Right. And so there is a technical side to Twitter that involves dials, which is a very funny boomer kind of thing, right? Dials. You turn the dial on the volume. And they don't exist in this world. Getting us onto iPhones with tough enough, right? The boomer generation. But I have to read. I remember the commercial about beer. I don't drink beer, but when I drink beer, I drink whatever it is he drinks. Dulce. Okay, I don't usually read Politico because it's a left leaning left. Biased platform. But I kind of headline on Twitter. So I want to read this to you and get your reaction. Monday was an emotional day at Twitter, even for its executives. Shortly after billionaire Elon Musk bought the powerful social media platform, top Twitter lawyer, vijaya Gotti called a virtual meeting with the policy and legal team she oversees to discuss what the new ownership could mean for them. Gotti was worked at Twitter since 2011 is the key executive charged with overseeing Twitter's trust and safety legal and public policy function. She is seen internally as Twitter's moral authority and the executive task with handling sent to them issues like harassment and dangerous speech. Edward, have you ever in your life heard.

Ed Morrissey Ari melber Elon Musk Pierre Edward Hugh Hewitt American cemetery ponta hakon Kurt schlichter Twitter Texas Omaha beach Mona Lisa Hewitt France Ed Markey Dwayne vijaya Gotti Politico Gotti
"hugh" Discussed on The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

03:45 min | Last month

"hugh" Discussed on The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

"Well, attorney general Mike Smith, the Hugh Hewitt radio program, typically does not take a position in conservative primaries. And you've got a couple of opponents who are, you know, fairly regular conservatives, and you've got another one named Eric brightens. And Eric Brighton's was a disaster when about a year ago he came on with you and now Hugh is not a litigator I am. I go, I take depositions. I go to court and try cases. But he just disassembled this guy, brutally, and he totally fell apart. Yet, Eric Brighton still maintains a position in this race. And I'm wondering, are the people of Missouri capable of nominating the one guy who can lose this race in the general? I think once this rate starts becoming more and more dynamic, I mean, because right now, a lot of the polling is named ID course in which I'm very thankful that we're in the lead. But I think having those resources obviously, as I mentioned, will be important to tell the story about how, hey, we are fighting for missourians against government overreach at the federal level, the local level. But once the race becomes more dynamic, I think once more people are aware of reminded of really who he is, and quite frankly, it's a 50 50 Senate. There are no mulligans here. We can not lose a race in November that we should win like Missouri because the Democrats are planning for keeps. They're going to pack the court. They want to add states to the union when a federalized our elections, fundamentally change this country forever. And so we have been on record and with the latest allegations and revelations and sworn affidavit from his ex-wife. Eric, and she get out of this race. But he's in, but I'm confident that people in Missouri will send the real conservative fighter. And I think that based on the support we've gotten, people understand that that's me. Well, attorney general Eric Schmidt, the fact with a guy like writing. And I don't want to spend a lot of time talking about him. But I think it's important. Let's assume everything, he's got an excuse for everything. And let's assume those excuses are true. Who cares? This is about winning the election. This is about what you just said, which is preserving the United States of America in a form that is not alien and repellent to us. And I don't understand why he, who was a fellow commission officer in the United States, is putting his own personal desire in his own personal needs up against this important objective, because whether it's fair or not, and we don't even need to go down that road. He is damaged goods. And he is the only candidate who does not, who provides a chance for the Democrats to take this seat. I just don't get it. Is that resonating with the, is that disconnect resonating with the Missouri electorate? Well, I think his numbers based on the most recent polling would indicate that his numbers are dropping pretty dramatically. And our numbers were on the rise as we lead the race. And so that's going to continue to be my focus delivering that message. But I mean, the sworn affidavit from the XYZ, not even talking about the stuff you mentioned from a few years ago, is their disgusting allegations about abuse. It has a Missouri attorney journal of the top prosecutor who state. I know a predator when I see one, I put predators behind bars. He just get out of this race. But we're going to keep running the race and telling our story and it's a record of not just talking about things hurt because a lot of people can do that. It's about action. In results. And I'm never going to quit on the state, and that's what people want right now. The fighter.

Eric Brighton attorney general Mike Smith Eric brightens Missouri Hugh Hewitt Hugh Eric Schmidt Senate United States Eric
"hugh" Discussed on The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:46 min | Last month

"hugh" Discussed on The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

"Away and thank you, colonel Kirk. Thank you, Hugh Hewitt, this is Kurt schlichter here at the relief actor studio in beautiful Southern California at O dark 30, not zero dark 30 use of billions. You Hollywood hacks. It's oh dark 30. How do I know? Among other things, and I will list my staggering CV. My resume, if you will, I'm a retired United States Army infantry colonel. I am not a jag, though I am a noted Los Angeles trial lawyer. I'm also a senior columnist at town hall dot com. We will be checking in on that. I have a memorable new column that has gone up already today at town hall dot com. You have to check it out. In my own incomparable way, it is titled defending American democracy, requires we start by crushing public school weirdos. So I'm sure we're going to get to that too. Because as you might notice, how do I put it? I was a cavalry officer among other things as an infantry officer. Yes, currently a cavalry battalion commander squadron commander is coded for infantry. So I can be infantry and command a cavalry squadron, which I did. And that's where I met Hugh hughie, he came and he came to one of our cavalry balls, and he drank grog out of a cavalry stetson. I cover, I screen as it were. Hewitt's right Flank. So anyway, town hall dot com columnist senior columnist every Monday Wednesday and Thursday. And I also do a fun little stream of video every Friday and of course I do a podcast for you VIPs. That's out today. I did a long thing on Elon Musk drawing on my legal skills..

colonel Kirk Kurt schlichter Hugh Hewitt town hall United States Army Southern California Hollywood Hugh hughie Los Angeles Hewitt Elon Musk
"hugh" Discussed on The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

04:49 min | Last month

"hugh" Discussed on The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

"And immediately illustrative illustration. Let me ask you, did your path to conservatism have to do with your path back to orthodox Judaism? Sure. Well, I'm not at this point, an orthodox Jew, although my observance has greatly greatly increased, but they have a marvelous rabbi and he teaches about them teach about the politics, but he teaches about teachers about Judaism and ethical behavior. How much time do you spend studying Torah and talmud? Well, the time I haven't got into yet because I got to get the Aramaic for the tollman. But the tour will be the tour fairly regularly. At home and then we read it and show every week on Chavez. And somebody said, I was listening to some I think it was maybe it's on your program. A Christian minister said he said it's not that we believe in the Bible because it happened was because it happens. Very well put. It's also it's a myth maybe, but it's intended to be believed. I will be back with David Mamet, playwright extraordinaire, director, and author of a brand new book the secret knowledge, which when you work through it, you will be rewarded with a surprise at the end, which I'll tell you about in the next hour stay tuned it's for you do it show. Morning, glory anything great, America, it's Hugh Hewitt, special two hours with a huge Hewitt show with David Mamet last hour talking more biography this hour, the craft and the politics in the book, the secret knowledge which mammoth is just issued David Mamet. I am not familiar with how movies are made. I just consume them. And so the appreciation I took away from the book, your new book about what a director does. Indulge me, I want to read this for the audience, so they understand because I think it explains a lot about your conversion to conservatism. This is from page two 18 to two 19 to 19 and two 20. On the movie set there is one person in one person only who need possess no quantifiable skills that is the director. The actor must be able to act the designer to design the Carpenter to build the director needs to be conversant with the technicalities of none of these. His job is to move the project forward, allowing each of the workers involved to do his own job. That of the director is to listen to their suggestions or propose a course of action and to bring the entirety happily and simply to a shared devotion to the course. The rules of behavior on a movie set are largely the unwritten law capital U capital L, who shows deference to whom, when one should speak, when one should be silent how to deal with unpleasantness with an excess of zeal with shoddy work, how to evaluate that which falls short of perfect. The citizen fuse with a sense of commonality and dedication not only to the project at hand, but to training by example the new workers by extending and protecting the precious lessons of the past at another place you write about the fact that fantasy won't help when you've got to get filming done by Sunday. It's a very practical job and it seems to me that you're explaining that the directors in life the workers in life can't afford the fantasies that the role players in the actors and the left can. Yeah, I'm also saying this is kind of my model for president. Yep, there's one need a president who knows how to do everything. Well, nobody knows how to do everything. What we need is a president who knows how to do one thing, which is to recognize that it's his or her responsibility to move according to the loss of the oath that they've taken to move the commonality towards shared goals. And on time and on an efficiently into a success, you also write more importantly a director and you speak as one is directed ten features and quite a bit of television quote is exposed to something of which the actors and writers may not have taken notice the genius of America and the American system of free enterprise. And you expand all these hundreds of people wildly different backgrounds coming together in an unplanned and basically unregulated exercise by the government to produce not just art, hopefully much of it is art. Most of it isn't, but some of it is, but also profit and jobs and employment. It's a profoundly conservative business. Oh, yeah. Yeah, absolutely. In this execution, of course it is. Then why aren't more directors conservative? I think more directors are conservative than actors. And it may be that a lot of people keep their political ideas to themselves. Not because that would cause them trouble because it might cause them trouble. That's their choice. Do you think the secret knowledge will limit your ability to make the movies and stage the plays you want to do? I don't think so. I don't think so. It may, but. It's moved anyway. You know, who's to say why someone didn't want to do your play or didn't want to.

David Mamet tollman Hugh Hewitt Chavez Hewitt America
"hugh" Discussed on The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

03:06 min | Last month

"hugh" Discussed on The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

"For two years. More on that when we come back for a break, David Mamet is my guess. His wonderful new book is the secret knowledge on the dismantling of American culture it's linked to you at dot com, don't go anywhere you listen to give you a show. What are you prepared to do? Everything within the law and then what are you prepared to do? If you open the bone on these people mister, you must be prepared to go all the way. Because they won't give up the fight until one of you is dead. Here's how you get them. He pulls a knife, you pull a gun. He sends one of yours to the hospital, you say I'm one of his to the morgue. My guess is David Mamet on the Hugh Hewitt show his brand new book, the secret knowledge that, of course, a clip from the untouchables which David Mamet wrote the screenplay for. You were talking at the break about your teachers at Francis Perkins school and their background. Did any of them have any dramatic impact on how you write David Mamet? Did you learn to write from those teachers? No, I didn't, but there were the first people in my life whoever told me I was smart because I spent the life in the public schools before that and they kept flunking me and putting me in remedial classes. I think they thought I had a learning defect because I was just bored to death. I just couldn't force myself to open the books. So I got to the Francis Parker school and these genius teachers changed my life by saying, you know what you're very, very smart. It's actually no big deal to get an a on this test. One guy said to me you said a hole in French grammar is just like a hole in your shoe. Just go fix it. We had a wonderful teacher called the bar mccutcheon. He still may be there. And he used to teach calculus the fourth graders because he just didn't tell him it was calculus. Did that continue at Goddard? You went to college in Vermont, and you went, I assume, in the late 50s, early 60s, was it a revolutionary effort? You've got quite a lot of hard words for the Tom Hayden's and the other radicals of the 60s. But what was your college life like? Well, because there wasn't a college there. I mean, it had this wonderful brochure about learning in the Soviet idyllic environment and being free to choose your own classes. But when one got there, there was nothing there. There weren't any classes. There weren't any books. And then people don't believe me. They didn't come exaggerating, but I'm not. And so we students were left to our own devices and some of us gravitated into the theater for and just stayed there for years or so I did putting on plays. And some of us joined the SDS and the weathermen and ended up blowing up those buildings in New York City and going underground for 30 years. And the Goddard was kind of a locus on the underground railway of looking back of the weatherman and the SDS and the more radical elements of the 60s and href grounds book there in cilk we Carmichael spoke there and everybody spoke.

David Mamet Francis Perkins school Francis Parker school Hugh Hewitt Goddard Tom Hayden Vermont SDS New York City Carmichael
"hugh" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:22 min | 7 months ago

"hugh" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"And it's thanks to the great mass of the moon and its proximity that it indeed stabilizes the Earth's rotation rate, slowed down to 24 hours at exactly the time when the sun had the optimal stability for advanced life. And when you say that you're saying that the gravity of the sun was kind of like acting like a drag on the rotation of the earth so that over the millennia and eons, it slowed it down to where we are now. Yeah, the moon, the sun has an effect as well, but the. I'm sorry, I meant the sun. I meant the moon's gravity upon the earth acted like a drag on it and that it slowed it down to where we are now. So that's true. That's true, and it's still slowing it down. If we were to wait a little few more million years of B 25 hours a day, but 2020. That'll be the day. But okay, so you say it slows it down to about 24 hours per rotation. So how is it that the moon, sorry, that the sun is now better than it would have been three billion years ago in terms of where life is on earth? How is the sun different during this time? Well, stars are kind of like human beings. They're unstable when they're young, they're unstable when they're old. They're maximally stable in their middle age. Only the case for stars is far more extreme. We humans are stable for a long period of time, but for stars, there's this extremely narrow window in their lifespan where they have the stability that makes advanced life possible. We're talking about a 100,000 years in the four and a half billion year history of the hundred that's it. Well, that's where you get the optimal stability that permits advanced global humans. And where are we in that 100,000 year clock at this point? Halfway through. We're about halfway through holy cow, better wrap up our affairs. We're talking to Hugh Ross. My new book is atheism dead. I hope you'll preorder a copy, it owes its existence in some large.

Hugh Ross
"hugh" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

08:06 min | 7 months ago

"hugh" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Heroes and John Lennox and James tour Stephen Meyer and many others. And I wrote it in part to introduce them to you, because the evidence that has been piling up in recent years and decades for a designer for a God is simply astonishing and we need to understand it is astonishing, you should look into it. You should familiarize yourself with it. It is just a wonderful time to be alive when all this stuff comes out. You mentioned that comets are 85% water and that they are replacing the water that naturally evaporates from earth, not much does, but what does is replaced by comets and you're saying it's roughly a one to one ratio? Roughly one to one and keep in mind where we get struck by a lot of miniature comets. So they don't do any damage to us. They come into the atmosphere. They break up and distribute the water quite evenly over the earth. And then we get the asteroids which deliver valuable metals to us. But you're typically taciturn about how amazing this is. I mean, the idea that we lose water, but whoops, it's replaced by these heavenly snowballs that come in at just about the rate we need them to. That just seems crazy. I mean, that's an amazing thing. I don't think I've ever really processed that. Well, you don't want too much delivery because having too much water on the earth is a problem, having too little water on the earth is a problem. We're now finding planets beyond our solar system that are quite similar to the earth. But they got 500 times as much water as we have. And with that much water, you're going to get a layer of ice between the water and the rocky planet, which it basically eliminates the possibility of life. And we have dry planets and we have very wet planets, our planet has just the right amount of water. Well, we talked again about asteroids and things hitting earth. I only learned fairly recently that if not for the extraordinarily massive planet that we call Jupiter, many, many more of these objects would be hitting earth. And so when you tell somebody, do you see that tiny pinprick in the sky, you can barely see it, but sometimes you can see it. That is the gigantic planet, Jupiter, and by the way, it is so massive and has so much gravity that it pulls away 99% of the things that would hit us and make life on earth impossible. That's another argument from design that it's very tough to take in. That's something that far away if it weren't there. We wouldn't be here. Eric was phenomenal is our solar system has a unique distribution of comets and asteroids. When we look at other stars, we see that they either have comet asteroid belts that are a thousand times bigger than ours or they got none at all. And on my next book, I explain why that almost always happens. Earth is the one exception. But we also have these gas giant planets. Jupiter Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. And in order for us to get the optimal gravitational shield, it's crucial that the most massive of these gas giant planets be the closest to us, the second most massive be the next closest to us, and then you want two smaller ones beyond that, that's exactly what we have in our solar system. You also need the right distribution of rocky planets to break up the mean motion resonances that are generated by the four gas giants. We literally need every planet in our solar system to be exactly the orbit that it has the mass that it has so that we could have Christmas dinner or Thanksgiving dinner here on Planet Earth. So when our family celebrates Thanksgiving, we thank God for Mars. We thank God for mercury. We thank God for Neptune. We need all those plan to speak exactly the way God designed them in order for us to be able to enjoy life here on Planet Earth. And it's a good thing there are only 8 or 9 planets otherwise the Turkey would get very cold. Let me simply say that I had not heard the part about the did you say the magnetic resonances of the four gas giants, we need rocky planets to offset that. I wasn't clear on that. Those are mean motion resonances because you're going to get nasty collisions, for example, if you've got Jupiter, making two orbits around the solar system for exactly one orbit of Saturn. That sets up a one tune to mean motion resonance. And that gravitationally destabilizes the common and asteroid belts. But fortunately, the four gas giant planets are oriented just the right way that we don't get any dangerous mean motion resonances. And the small ones we do get are broken up by the rocky planets. And what's unique about our rocky planets, we are seeing rocky planets going around other stars, but they're all smaller than ours and closer to the star to break up these mean motion resonances. You want the rocky planets to be relatively massive and orbiting fairly far away from their star. And our solar system is the only one we found amongst thousands of and what are these huge rocky planets? Is Neptune one of them? No, we're talking earth. We're talking Venus. Because when we look at rocky planets, orbiting other planetary systems, they're either they're typically orbiting really close to their stars, and when orbiting that close, they don't have much influence. Motion resonances. So you're considering Venus earth and Mars to be far enough away to be part of this. And they're massive enough. And by the way, the moon plays a role in breaking up the mean motion resonances. So the fact that we got a massive moon orbiting the earth is a crucial factor as well. That's another design feature of the muno is recently discovered. I mean, when I share with atheists, I talked to atheists frequently, as you know, I tell them you're not convinced today, wait one month and watch the evidence pile up. Every day, scientific research papers are published that make the fine tuning argument more persuasive than it was the day before. Well, that's why people talk about silly things like multiverse theory, which I have to laugh. It's so silly and all it reveals is that some people have anything but that attitude. If God comes into the picture, they're willing to they'd be happy to accept the flying spaghetti monster. Anything but the God of scripture. We'll be back folks. I'm talking to Hugh Ross, my new book is atheism dead. We hope you pre order a copy, don't go away. Hey there folks, I'm talking to Hugh Ross. He is the head of reasons to believe I recommend you visit reasons to believe tremendous resources there. Hugh, we haven't talked about anything on the nano level..

John Lennox Stephen Meyer James Eric giants Venus Hugh Ross Hugh
"hugh" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:42 min | 7 months ago

"hugh" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Meant the moons, gravity upon the earth acted like a drag on it, and that it slowed it down to where we are now. So that's true. That's true, and it's still slowing it down. If we were to wait a little few more million years, it'd be 25 hours a day, but 20. That'll be the day. But okay, so you say it slows it down to about 24 hours per rotation. So how is it that the moon, sorry, that the sun is now better than it would have been three billion years ago in terms of where life is on earth? How is the sun different during this time? Well, stars are kind of like human beings. They're unstable when they're young, they're in stable when they're old. They're maximally stable in their middle age. Well, the case for stars is far more extreme. We humans are stable for a long period of time, but for stars, there's this extremely narrow window in their lifespan where they have the stability that makes advanced life possible. We're talking about a 100,000 years in the for and a half billion year history of hundred that's it. Well, that's where you get the optimal stability that permits advanced global humans. And where are we in that 100,000 year clock at this point? Halfway through. We're about halfway through holy cow, better wrap up our affairs. We're talking to Hugh Ross. My new book is atheism dead. I hope you'll pre order a copy, it owes its existence in some large.

Hugh Ross
"hugh" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

08:38 min | 7 months ago

"hugh" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"He's someone of whom I've been aware for over 30 years, but I've only got to know him personally much more recently. His name is Hugh Ross. He's an astrophysicist, founder and president of reasons to believe an organization that researches and communicates how discoveries about nature harmonize with the words of the Bible. Well, who knew? I confess that it was probably about 1990 that I discovered the books of Hugh Ross and they launched me on a journey that I am still on. Some of you know, I've just come out with a book called is atheism dead. The first third of which deals with the very subject of science and the Bible and God and all that great stuff. So it's a thrill for me to have Hugh Ross on the program. Welcome to the Eric metaxas show, Hugh Ross, great to see you. Good to see you, too. Thank you. Well, I mentioned in the beginning of the book that it really was you who got me thinking about things, for example, like the fine tuned universe. I had literally never heard about that until about 1990 when I read your book, maybe it was fingerprint of God. I can't remember which book it was. But I was astonished to read this, having never heard about it. And over the decades, I have been quietly amassing more and more evidence as it piles up as science draws us closer and closer to the idea it's obvious and intelligence created the universe there's no way this just happened. When did you in your career first notice these things or become acquainted with the fine tuned argument? It probably goes back to my teenage years. I mean, I started getting serious, but astronomy, when I was 7 years of age and wait a minute. That's no teenager. That's a very early, you're probably the world's youngest teenager, you're smart. You probably achieved teenage dumb at age 7. Okay, so at age 7, what happened in your life to get you thinking about this stuff? Well, I was looking up at the stars and wanted to know why they were hot and my parents said go to the library. And that started me on reading four or 5 books on astronomy and physics per week. And during my teenage years, I actually launched a research study in astronomy with my telescope, looking at newborn stars and different gaseous nebulae. I wound up winning the British Columbia science fair, went on to the Canadian science fair and then I decided, hey, I'm going to continue that. I've been fascinated with astronomy ever since. But I've got struck by the fine tuning, probably beginning at about each 15 is when I realized wow. Now hang on, when you say the British Columbia science fair. How old were you when you won the British Columbia science fair? I was 17. You were 17. So you obviously knew what you wanted to do. What kind of a telescope did you have as a teenager to be able to see some of the things that you saw? I was only a four and a half inch telescope. So I was kind of constrained to the brighter objects. And because I was in Vancouver, I had to stay up late every night to catch a few moments when the clouds would part. That's the problem with Vancouver. Yes. So you at 17 or 15 you said you started thinking about the fine tuned universe. I write about it at length in this book because obviously the evidence for it only increases. That's to me the great irony and the thesis of my book that the more science we know, the more it points to God, the opposite of the God of the gaps theory, which we've been laboring under as a culture for a long time. So what were the first things at age 15 that you noticed along such lines? The structure of our solar system, everything that had to be designed in the different planets or moon, the sun in order to make advanced life possible here on earth. Just looking at our galaxy and realizing all of fine tuning the needs of takes place there. And you talk about this evidence expanding. I think it's exponential. I mean, we see an exponential growth in the fine tuning evidence. And I think it's a thrill Erik to be alive in the 21st century. No other century of humanity has seen such an explosion of new evidences from the book of nature for the existence of God and fine tunic as a remarkable example of that. I mean, we've been documenting this for four decades now. How the evidence for fine tuning gets approximately a thousand times stronger every month. I mean, that's no joke. I mean, I've realized that myself just following your career in your books and what I read, it just gets more and more crazy. When you said that at age 15 or so, you notice that the solar system, which you could see with your four and a half inch telescope bespoke fine tuning or creation being created intelligently created, what are the kinds of things that you noticed with your young mind that led you to think about that? What was it about the solar system, for example? The sun has to be almost exactly middle age. That's when you get the necessary stability and the minimal flaring activity that makes advanced life falls by a particular mass, stars more massive and less massive are more active. So that has to be fine tuned. You need the planets to be distributed in a particular way in order that earth get the just right delivery of comets and asteroids, not too much, not too little. The moon has to be the appropriate distance and mass so that it's stabilizes a tilt of our rotation access. And as I've gotten older, I realize what we call this fine tuning argument has predictive power. That the first thing we discovered about the moon is that it's the fact that it's so very massive compared to our planet, stabilizes a tilt of our rotation axis, but this is evidence for purposeful design rather than accidental design, if we study them with a more detail, we should discover more fine tuning evidence and indeed that's been the track record of the past 50 years is that the more we study the moon, the more features we find must be fine tune to make our existence possible. Give us another example. We can understand how the mass of the moon would stabilize the earth's axis and prevent wild temperature swings and that sort of thing. But what other aspects of the moon have we discovered that bear on life on earth? Well, there is an astronomer in Britain who noticed that, hey, the moon does stabilize the tilt of a rotation axis. But we're at the very top end of where that stability we exist. He says, why are we so close to the top end of the mass? If the moon were even 2% more massive, we'd be unstable. And so he says, there must be something special about the high mass of the moon, any published of paper making a point. That the earth began with a rotation rate of about two and a half hours. And in order for how we to exist on this planet and have global civilization, the rotation rate has to slow down to 24 hours. And it's thanks to the great mass of the moon and its proximity that it indeed stabilizes the Earth's rotation rate, slowed down to 24 hours at exactly the time when the sun had the optimal stability for advanced life. And when you say that you're saying that the gravity of the sun was kind of like acting like a drag on the rotation of the earth so that over the millennia and eons, it slowed it down to where we are now. Yeah, the moon, the sun has an effect as well, but the I meant, I'm sorry, I meant the sun..

Hugh Ross Eric metaxas British Columbia Vancouver Erik Britain
"hugh" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

Sci-Fi Talk

05:58 min | 9 months ago

"hugh" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

"Tomato and welcome to bite here on the f. t. podcast network and so parenting in apocalypse. It's it's not the same way that we would do. You know how it works. Any views usually two to four minutes long but sometimes they can be a little longer. When you when you live long enough. All kinds of strange things happen very right in saying that. The greek heroes. Where the original superheroes in part because of the hopeful nature of genes vision but also because of its message of diversity and inclusion hugh jackman plays nick banister in reminiscence..

hugh jackman nick banister
"hugh" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:11 min | 9 months ago

"hugh" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Miss. The saturday ed's draw. It's all lit de with hugh dog get around much anymore. Thought i'd visit the club as far as the joe's good and barrett with you. I don't get around much anymore. yes paddy last. Why stir up memories owned dates.

Miss. hugh ed barrett joe
"hugh" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

05:54 min | 3 years ago

"hugh" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"Although. Meal. Hugh. And.

Hugh