35 Burst results for "Hubble Space Telescope"

NASA Returns Hubble Space Telescope to Science Operations

John Bachelor

02:07 min | 2 weeks ago

NASA Returns Hubble Space Telescope to Science Operations

"Your generosity towards Bob's behind the Black during fundraising July is extremely appreciated. However, we go to one of Bob's four books, his biography of the Universe and Amir Hubble. Because Bob can help us understand the latest. We know of the patch or fix or remedy offered for hubba. Bob, Can you offer us a moment to believe that Hubble can be well again? Uh, no. I can tell you what's happening right now. But until it's done, we have no idea. NASA as now. This is actually engineers Goddard Space Flight Center in a Space Telescope Science institute that operate Hubble. They have now think they have determined exactly what caused the computer problem that shut the telescope down on June 13th more than a month ago, and they think it's a component in what in their science, instrument command and data handling unit that's computer, essentially And it's what they call the power control unit. Basically, think of the power supply unit and your desktop computer, which you can normally just take out and replace. But in this case, they can't do that. They have a backup for it, but it's part of a backup for the whole computer. Essentially, at least this whole command and data handling unit. And so they need to switch more than just the power control unit. Things may need to switch several units at once, and that's a complicated procedure. They've done a complete simulated test of that switch. On the ground successfully. They actually did a similar switch on Hubble back in, Oh, eight, and so whoever they and they have now begun began on Thursday, the 15th of July. They began that switch on the telescope. It's going to take several days to complete it, and then they once they completed they will do some additional tests, hopefully to make sure everything's working. And then put the telescope back an operation Now one will the test this switch work? We don't know until they've got it, too. Even if this does work, be prepared, be recognized that the telescope will no longer have backups to this computer computer data handling unit. So that

BOB Amir Hubble Space Telescope Science Instit Goddard Space Flight Center Nasa
Hubble Space Telescope Is Working Again  After NASA Fixes Odd Glitch

Tim Conway Jr.

00:16 sec | 2 weeks ago

Hubble Space Telescope Is Working Again After NASA Fixes Odd Glitch

"NASA says engineers have successfully switched to backup equipment on the Hubble Space Telescope. About a month after the telescopes, payload computers shut down. Hubbell's been in space since 1990 sending back photographs of the universe, NASA says If everything goes well science observations because should resume

Nasa Hubbell
NASA Revives Ailing Hubble Space Telescope With Switch to Backup Computer

Anna Davlantes

00:33 sec | 2 weeks ago

NASA Revives Ailing Hubble Space Telescope With Switch to Backup Computer

NASA Set for Attempt to Fix Hubble's Trouble

WBZ Morning News

00:33 sec | 2 weeks ago

NASA Set for Attempt to Fix Hubble's Trouble

"Engineering teams have just reviewed plans to fix and reactivate the Hubble Space Telescope, which has been out of commission more than a month after a computer failure Also really exciting. Um At this point where we're at this critical point where we have identified an issue wanted to telescope, but we we feel confident that we're going to be able to fix it and get right back to doing this Amazing. Hubble Science Master's Zynga toll says they will transmit commands to activate backup systems, but that's complicated. Astronauts last upgraded the 31 year old Hubble in 2000 and nine and can't repair it anymore since the retirement of the shuttle fleet.

Hubble Science Master Zynga
A Trip to Space: This week's space news

A Trip to Space

01:07 min | Last month

A Trip to Space: This week's space news

"Talk stoop down thousand. Sign up to fly to space watching us virgin license. Nasa is trying to fix the hubble space telescope after a memory module failure forced the agency to shut down the conic orbiting observatory. The problem is with the payload computer which halted on june the furtive stopping the spacecraft from collecting science data the telescope and instruments or working as expected but they rely on the payload computer to operate over the next week. The team continue to assess hardware to identify if something else may be causing the problem. European space agency's looking to six astronauts. Join its core as well. As twenty reservists the will operate from academia. They will travel to the international space station. And one day onto the nasa lunar gave. it'll be in orbit around the moon. A total of twenty two thousand five hundred and eighty nine people have applied and submitted a medical certificate in the hype of to the next round. The six will be confirmed late. In twenty twenty two

Space News Astronomy Science Nasa European Space Agency International Space Station Academia
Automatic Identification of Outlier Galaxy Images

Data Skeptic

01:50 min | Last month

Automatic Identification of Outlier Galaxy Images

"Shamir from kansas state university. I invited you on to talk about the paper automatic identification of outliers in hubble space telescope galaxy images. So a lot of fun stuff to get into maybe to start. I think everybody knows a little bit about the hubble telescope. Could you tell us about the data we get back from it. Are these just. Png files or what are you. Start from caso. It will happen space. says civil instruments on hubble space telescope not just the main camera but it collects all sorts of the we know the hubble deep field which is when freeing that was one segment of the sky was going for civil days very long exposure goldie but other surveys done by hubble space telescope and i was i into the cosmos survey of several shirley lodge survey covering a relatively large part of the sky explains the cosmos was to score degrees. Doesn't sound but in help terms this. Because bill goes really deep deeper than guam-based those scopes. So that's what. I covered the data that you get his image data that i used incomes informants feats debts former. That is very common in a strong meets. Not very common outside feels strongly but that's the standard format of astronomy eats. Uniqueness is that it allows to make the metric measurements for the day dining j. peg form. It's like that we often use. I know in image netease like that. We cannot remake safety for to metric measurements because the dynamic range. Compression away the feeds. That's a each week. Salihi is represented by in algebra. Be in one by twitch channel but actually it's quite a day name. Acquaintances allows medical measurements.

Shamir Kansas State University Shirley Lodge Salihi
NASA Reports Trouble With Hubble Space Telescope

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:35 sec | Last month

NASA Reports Trouble With Hubble Space Telescope

"Hubble space telescope has been hit with computer trouble with all astronomical viewing halted did the russians hacking maybe put the orbiting observatory has been idle since sunday when the nineteen eighties era computer that controls the science instruments shutdown possibly because of a bad memory board flight controllers at nasa goddard. Space flight center in maryland tried to restart the computer on monday. But the same thing happened. Oh there now to switch to a backup memory unit. If that works the telescope will be tested for a day before the science instruments are turned back on. observations can resume for now. The cameras and other instruments are in a so-called safe mode.

Space Flight Center Nasa Maryland
A Record-Breaking Flare From Sun's Nearest Stellar Neighbour

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

02:18 min | 3 months ago

A Record-Breaking Flare From Sun's Nearest Stellar Neighbour

"Astronomers have detected one of the most violent still aflame ever recorded in the galaxy exploding out of proxima centauri the nearest star system that the sun the massive flare reported in the estra physical journal is the largest ever recorded coming from proxima centauri a small special tie. Game red dwarf star located just four point two five light years away. Proxima centauri has twelve percent the mass and fourteen percent the radius of the sun. It is a surface temperature of thousand seven hundred and seventy seven degrees celsius and is better thousand times less luminous than the sun. it's known to have. At least two orbiting planets one of which proxima b. is similar in size to the earth and orbits within the star's habitable zone. That's the region around a star with temperatures would allow liquid water central for life as we know it to exist on the planet. Surface red dwarfs are the most common type of star in the milky way galaxy making up about three quarters of all the stars in the galaxy. And because they're relatively dim it's easy to find orbiting except planets around them consequently the most common known source of exoplanets. And for this reason proximus story has long been a target for scientists have been defined life beyond the solar system. However there's always been a problem with red dwarf stars and that includes proxima centauri. They produce violent flares spilling out huge amounts of energy and plasma into the surrounding space. Eventually this would erode away any atmosphere around by planet. A would also radiate anything on the planet surface and that includes any hope of finding life on the surface of proxima b. The study's lead author assistant professor mcgregor from the university of colorado. Boulder says red dwarfs flare a lot more than stars like the sun and astronomers are only now beginning to understand the magnitude and character of their flays mcgregor and colleagues observed proxima centauri for forty hours using nine ground and space based telescopes including the square kilometer. Ray pathfinder as gap nassar's hubble space telescope the atacama large millimeter submillimeter array radio telescope alma and nasa transiting exoplanet survey satellite tests. This marked the first time. Astronomers have had this kind of multi wavelength coverage of a stellar flare.

Estra Physical Journal University Of Colorado Mcgregor Ray Pathfinder Gap Nassar Boulder Nasa
Lego is Releasing New Space Shuttle Set

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:21 sec | 4 months ago

Lego is Releasing New Space Shuttle Set

"The space shuttle Discovery and the Hubble Space Telescope. The set will be released in April and was created in partnership with NASA to mark the 40th anniversary since the first space shuttle flight on April 12th 1981. The shuttle model costs $199 and has more than 2300 pieces. Looks like a doubt will give back some of

Nasa
Interview with Phil McAlister

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

06:53 min | 6 months ago

Interview with Phil McAlister

"Hello and welcome to the skeptics guide to the universe. Today is sunday january seventeenth twenty twenty one. And this is your host. Stephen avella joining me this week. Or bob novella. Everybody cara santa maria. Howdy joy novella. Hey guys and evan bernstein skepticism. On a sunday. I love it. This is a rare sunday recording. We're doing this because of the twelve hour show next saturday. The saturday this show comes out. I probably will be posted in this up right before we begin to twelve hours. Show so if. You're listening to this on saturday that it comes out. We're probably in the middle of the twelve hour show. Why aren't you watching that instead. Leaving this to console you on sunday or monday because the twelve hour livestream is over priorities. So we're not keep saying like we're trying to get away from doing the covert thing every week but there's always stuff to talk about that has to recover recovered. Schwab one thing about it. Obviously it's still raging the numbers that getting scary high still is crazy but david kessler which was announced as the covert czar for the incoming biden. Administration you guys remember who he is. Yes cast that. He was in From london movie right cutler no he was a former head of the fda in the ninety s and after his stint in the at the fda in the nineties the president for a while of yale school of medicine. That's how i. I know you have on speedo him personally. But you know the commissioner of food and drugs for h w bush and clinton muslim sounds nonpartisan. I like that a he. He was very much opposed to the shea. Dietary supplement health and education. Act which was a terrible loss stills eternal and he was he was completely right correct in his opposition to it so hopefully because a lot of experience. Hopefully he'll will prove to be the right person for this job. And we're hoping to shift into high gear will along that line steve in three days. Yeah did you hear. That biden is elevating. He's making a cabinet of science. Yes yes scientists. -nology whatever is now going to be cabinet. Level is a cabinet level position for the first ever cap which will not be in the line of succession by the way. It's a cabinet level position. But it's not a cabinet position. I thought he was building a cabinet filled with cool science thing like curio cabinet closet of mystery. I remember that from what is this endless fascination with forbidden closet of mr really cool i mean. It's the first time the president has ever put somebody at that high. A level in science position which conferences shows his commitment to evidence based policy and also francis. Arnold who i'm super excited about you guys remember. She's caltech scientist who recently won a nobel prize. She's going to be within his his group. I'm not really sure how everybody's designated quite yet but within that group of scientists which is very exciting. I think it should be like the bridge of the enterprise. D where you've got the president the vice president and you've got the czar of science right up there with the big boys because that's where belongs in the position that the council the troy was in. That's what i'm saying. Sitting do truth be told captains left. I am kind of glad that it's not a. I shouldn't say this i don't know i don't know if i would want it to be a cabinet position because then because then they enter into the line of succession and i do worry that whoever is appointed could potentially be. Isn't that a worry about every single cabinet level position. Never i mean. Is there a cabinet member. You guys ready to become president on day one. I mean unless you've watched the survivor soul survivor. Some of those people have served in previous administrations have worked in government. It's obviously it's never happened. I it's so unlikely that i don't think someone's going to pick or not pick a cabinet member because they don't think that they're ready to be president. Yeah i mean why. Scientists are science minded person. Good as president. I think that's what we want. They wouldn't necessarily be it would be but they would still need to be somebody who has executive leadership skills all right. Let's get right into some news items. Is it true that astronomers were wrong about the number of galaxies in the universe. a what. Yeah they're often wrong about stuff like that so yeah. The estimated number of galaxies in the universe was recently cut in half. You are correct steve. So how the hell did this happen. And and more importantly what is the worst title for a news item covering this discovery. All all will be revealed So this all started years ago when the hubble space telescope did some deep sky surveys and it came up with the estimate for the number of galaxies which was two trillion lots of galaxies two trillion in the universe. It did this by using by doing deep field observations. These are observations. That take a really long time looking at the same patch of sky. So you're you're building up the photons right you just building up. The photons. seeing what's revealed and that would that reveals after a while that reveals the very very very faint galaxies. And then then it's easy. Yes sir but can we clarify. Are you talking about the observable universe so you just just just a good point to a good time to clarify that. The the observable universe is a subset of the total universe because like because some of the universe has moved beyond the on the einstein limit rights even traveling at the speed of light. The universe is not old enough for light to travel from there to here so we can't see it's outside of our bubble our light bubble right. It's a little complicated. But yeah i think primarily although not necessarily implies that it's it's just it's just observable we'll we'll see maybe we can. Let's revisit at the end okay. So then so then. Once you have this patch of sky that you've looked at for a while Then you and then you then you know how many galaxies right then you just multiply that little patch by how many similar how many patches in the in the sky are there. And that's and that's basically. What hubble did but we knew that. That wasn't quite accurate though that that's because there has to be other galaxies that are out there that are just too faint to be directly detected even with the best deep field observation that the h. The hubble space telescope could muster onto those super faint galaxies though they do create a suffused glow. Just a general glow in the galaxy and now this background glow that i'm talking about is called the cosmic optical background which is a term. I hadn't i hadn't seen before which is fascinating because it reminded me of maybe was well the cosmic microwave background which is the first light of the universe when it became transparent to electro-magnetic radiation the cosmic optical background that was the glow of all the

Cabinet Stephen Avella Bob Novella Cara Santa Maria Evan Bernstein From London Biden FDA David Kessler Yale School Of Medicine Schwab Cutler Steve Clinton Arnold Bush Francis Troy
Prof. Jack Burns, Professor of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences at the University of Colorado in Boulder - burst 01

Scientific Sense

29:14 min | 8 months ago

Prof. Jack Burns, Professor of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences at the University of Colorado in Boulder - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we explore emerging ideas from signs policy economics and technology. My name is gill. Eappen we talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation be color a wide variety of domains. Rare new discoveries are made and new technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society and help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation v seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide edited content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do a companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense dot com and displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics guests at other ideas please send up to info at scientific sense dot com and i can be reached at gil at eappen dot info mike. Yesterday's a jack boone's who's a professor in the department of ece fisa goal in planetary sciences unto colorado boulder. He is also vice president images for academic affairs in blue sage for disuse system system. Jack while thank you. Joe is good to be with you. Thanks for doing this so you at your team. On deeply involved in the upcoming nasa missions to the moon including The designed to place radiofrequency absolutely on the far side of the moon and be kevin deemed really back there for almost fifty years. Now i know that china s landed. I was actually looking at some photographs that just gained today from From their lander. I israel in india. Almost got there but Fleas land properly. And so so. What's our interest. What's sudden interest in going back to the moon after fifty years. Yeah i don't know that. I would characterize as a sudden interest i think on the part of the science community and really the exploration community interest has been there for a while but what has changed in the last decade is the cost doing missions And the accessibility of the moon in this new era in which we have now. Private companies like spacex and like the blue origin company. Jeff bezos company They've put considerable private resources in developing new rockets of with reusability to lower the launch costs and also technology which was extreme in the nineteen sixties to try to get to the moon. All hannity vetted from scratch now is relatively straightforward at gill as you mentioned Even a small countries like israel Private companies have contracts with nasa to fly payloads. Now it's it's it's realizable to Envision going to the moon at a relatively modest cost certainly in comparison to the sixties and seventies. Yes so that's a. It's a very interesting phenomenon. Now it's it's almost like a business model question. Space is Blue blue horizon blue origin. Laura gin and that is another company. Lakers peterson things. Well lockheed you ally the united launch alliance which is the lockheed and boeing Company as well they all have these new generation of launch vehicles that are capable of going to so nasa in some sense outsourcing Some of the transportation right to so captain made a selection or are they going to do essentially multiple companies. Do it the the plan is to have monk multiple companies just like the commercial crew program To the space station there's boeing and spacex And for the case of the moon for the un crude landers that Landers that are just carrying payloads nasa has identified a out a dozen companies To be able to transport a payloads to the moon and at the same time. They're also undergoing competition right now. They selected three companies to design as part of a public private partnership the next generation of human landers. So that's the same. Mostly the same group that has spacex blue origin and the third one is is dynamic which is a company in huntsville alabama rate. So it's nassar's goal here is They are they going to take contracts from other other countries do send pedal to the moon in these companies. The the way this is working now is nasa is buying services so they're no longer buying rockets or landers which they will then own operate Instead the philosophy is To buy a ride for example a seat On a human land or or by space for a payload so these companies that are responsible for indemnifying Making sure they have a proper insurance for losses They take A bit of the risk and and then proceed along those lots now. What that means is that the companies then they own the intellectual property they owned landers they rockets they own the The other transportation devices. So that means they can sell seats. They can sell payloads to for example a european space agency Or the russian space agency or individual companies. That might want to puts a payload on the moon Investigation in this kind of a lower gravity environment so it's much more entrepreneurial than what we had before and it lowers the cost to the taxpayer for doing all these things by the artist program. Which is the new human programs. The moon the Recently released cost to get the first woman in the next man to the moon by twenty twenty four is a factor of ten less than the apollo program. Yeah it's interesting. I remember jack I was involved a little bit on the economic side of the next generation. Space legal program two thousand two thousand one two thousand two timeframe and this was a program was supposed to replace the shuttle and we did not go forward with it and i guess so. What was the arranged with the russian system to get their astronauts into space station. Yeah the the problem was that you might recall The shuttle accident that occurred in two thousand three And then president. George w bush declared that the shuttle really wasn't safe And that needed to be replaced and it took a while. We're still in the process of of fully replacing it. The last shuttle launch was twenty eleven If i remember correctly so in the meantime in order to get to the space station What we did is contract with the russians to use their soyuz spacecraft to go back and forth the space station so we. What we did is the buy seats. Those seats cost about seventy five or eighty million dollars so they weren't cheap but eventually got us back and forth. He said before we get the details of the Admission stack help philisophical question so way we have technology advancing the about conflict. Television's really taking off machines. Getting lot smarter What does sort of the basis for sending humans Could be not accomplished thing that human could do with machines if that's a good question i'm glad you answered that you ask that question because Excuse me i think what we're looking for now is is Really different mode for doing work on services like the moon or mars. Excuse me in that. We unlike apollo you had a single astronaut. Geologists such as astronaut harrison schmitt on all seventeen doing classic field geology. With a shovel to now advance unit twenty-first-century. We're gonna to do. Is i like to say we're going to bring Silicon valley with us to the moon. So we're going to bring advanced robotics. Be telly operated. That will use a machine. Learning artificial intelligence And will team with the astronauts so that they will these. These rovers advance scouting. They will identify interesting places and then the role of the astronaut is to make critical decisions on what to investigate What the samples. Look like i. i still think it's true. I've been told from my colleagues who are geologists stromer But who are uninsured. Scientists in that the difference for example between. Let's say the The curiosity rover on mars. And what it's been doing and having a human on mars that the work that the curiosity rover has done last seven years could be done in two days by geologists. a that's the difference and to also bring back. You know better selected samples and so forth. So there's no replacing humans and that's not going to happen anytime soon but you you do your point being. You only wanna use humans when you actually have to. Because their time is valuable and they're expensive and also Walking around even on the surface of the moon is dangerous. Because the you know the a space where the asian micrometeorites another possible dangerous but going into this new environment. I think what we're going to be able to do is reduced risk and improved efficiency. The i don't remember the numbers but a human Mission is about ten x the cost of a non human mission. Obviously the the efficiency and like you say what begin out of it different but guess on the cost side. It's about the fact of a magnitude different you know. That's hard to say because robots still are very limited in what they can do. They're just so many things that only humans can do is a little bit of apples and oranges but yet you're probably right that on the ballpark about a factor of ten. Maybe even more. But there's also much more than a factor of ten improvement in efficiency. So you know. Those costs will balance out and obviously the advantage of a human is You know they've been. The unexpected happens in michigan learning in As long as you have heard of data to teach a machine but then the unexpected happens machines. noel exactly. The rover gets stuck. It suffers a mechanical problem. That If you have a human there at least in the vicinity can help fix it. And move orders you know i think about for example servicing of the hubble space telescope and that was done five times by human astronauts and The astronauts such as john grunsfeld did to the servicing missions was very clear that the telescope could not have been repaired in upgraded by anything other than humans because the tab the complexity of the task the ability to be able to get in and To make repairs Make on the spot. Decisions just You know there was no replacing that so hopefully humans have a few more years of Do i think we've got many years to tell you the truth. I think it's going to be you know in reading some of the literature. I think it's going to be a quite a long time if ever that. We have truly Intelligent self aware machines can operate with the same decision making kick be very good at repetitive calculations outstanding job of there but You know making creative innovative entrepreneurial. Decisions were We're nowhere close to that yet So i do that. A multiple missions being planned An international collaboration so he's the first one that is supposed to take off as leave. Yeah artists is the new name for the human missions to the moon Artemis in greek mythology was the sister of apollo The twin sister of apollo. She's the goddess of the moon. So that's very appropriate. Since nasa has already declared bet up for that first landing which nasa has been planning for twenty twenty four would Would have that first woman in the next man on the surface the first expedition by humans to the moon in the twenty first century. So optimistic applaud. Its name the program programming program. Yeah exactly right so so andrade damasio multiple things going on And so do we have sort of a space station like that is going to orbit the out. Yeah in fact. That's honored design. And we'll be under construction in the next few years has called the gateway lunar gateway. And it's it's not like the space station in the sense of being gigantic And being really limited to that single orbit the gateway is really more of a spacecraft is going to have a pulse in system using a new generation of solar electric bad is ion propulsion That will be piloted for potential for optometry use in going to mars. I have just a couple of modules that will be there it will be a place where astronauts coming from the earth on on the orion spacecraft which is a it plus the space launch system is a heavy lift vehicle that will take astronauts the moon they will dock at the gateway and then they will get into a reusable lander go to the surface. Come back in that lander and then the next crew that comes in will do the same thing so you don't throw everything away like we did during hollow in the nineteen sixties again. The reusability idea is Is key to keeping the costs down so so it is more dealer so can't be attached as as alright right. Ds change in the future. Cab edge more against it. We can in fact The japanese space agency jaksa recently committed to fly a module And nasa has invited others such as the russian space agency to think about them attaching A module as well so it definitely is modular. That way you can add habitats you can add laboratories And can can grow over time. But it's also the the idea is that it's going to be long duration spaceflight and it's away way from the earth's magnetic field so you've got the full range environment of what you would have going to mars. So i think nasa all also looks at. This is a prototype of the vehicle that would be sent to mars. Lucchese david some Conversations yet again. Remember that To go to mars you would rather start off. Start off from the moon. Is that still thinking or that. Exchange i don't think that's been decided but there's this potential real advantages of a loon. First of all launching from the moon versus the earth requires much less thrust. What what we call delta the. That's the change in velocity to Get off there. Because there's only one sixth gravity on the moon and secondly if we're successful in mining water from the minute we know now there's considerable amount of water at the polls of the moon That's hydrogen and oxygen. We can convert that potentially into rocket fuel. You wouldn't have to bring that from earth so the costs associated with launching some could be substantially reduced in doing this from the moon versus from your so people are actively working that right now and seeing if that might be the way to go i of think that might end up being How missions to To mars or undertaking so under optimus Are there plans to actually create a habitat a big enough habitat for people to stave or extended period of time. So nasa has designs. And once again i should mention this is. This is all international Insa is involved. The european space agency is involved in providing a module for the service module for the orion. It also will be working on the gateway. The canadian space agency is providing the robotic arm And the same will be true on the surface The idea is that the first few missions will of just get started That first nation in twenty twenty four is planned to go to the south pole of moon. Will we've never been to before and look at the water. Ice situation there but Over time by the end of the decade the expectation is that will have multiple habitats. And we'll have people staying there for long periods of time like the arctic station. It's run by the national science foundation. The mcmurdo station as called in which you have a number of scientists come in and visit for anywhere from a few weeks to staying for year here so salama but when the next generation space program was in progress space. Too big big project. I would imagine spacex Others cab this business plan so what's the clamps time Do that The gay yes. So it'll be somewhere between three and five days to get from the earth and you're right about. The tourism spacex already has a fide a japanese businessman. If i remember correctly who has bought a A ride not the surface of the moon but to orbit the moon on a spacex vehicle. Sometime in a in a few years but the it'll be in a three to five days to get to the gateway and then Another day to get down to the surface. So i fully expect by the end of the decade especially given the accessibility to the moon by the private sector and by isa companies That they will be selling seats to wealthy individuals to spend a A summer holiday on the moon is so if the if the gateway is expandable perhaps Taxpayers can make some money nasa. Well it might be. Yeah but but once again this is. The transportation for the most part is probably not going to be through nasa but by these individual companies who own their own rockets their spacecraft and now they will sell seats to to wealthy tourists. yeah and so You you mentioned the european space agency. You mentioned the canadian space agency of so. Is this like the space station. A larger collaboration or those are the three major ones. Yeah it is and you're right. There are Oh gosh there's probably a dozen or so. Companies countries rather involved in the international space station and nasa envisions this much the same thing And i to. I order all the countries that are involved in. The international space station have been invited to become involved with the gateway And so as i mentioned several have accepted with With enthusiasms others are still keeping that around and take a quick break jack. Benny come back to talk about the radio. Frequency of savitri on the far side of the more that you're designing you bet sounds good. This is a scientific sense. Podcast providing unscripted conversations bit leading academics and researchers on a variety of topics. You like to sponsor this podcast. Please reach out to in full at scientific sense dot com back Jack you're talking about upcoming missions to the moon Some of the manned mission some of some of the technology that you're sending up there there is a gateway bridges like the space station but attested propulsion its zone. Sorta are based entity source. And it's more dealer things could be attached to it. That may be subject is imploding. Creating that a launchpad so to speak to go to mars perhaps habitats that a large announced a mining for water mighty for hydrogen and other things and so he the program is called autonomous. So could be portal light program and underneath optimists. There are various things being planned right. So what are the The primary objectives all of those radius approved betas projects. I should say under under optimus. Yeah we'll go. let me let me start off by just looking at the difference with The apollo program because the apollo program ended fairly abruptly once the political goals were reached and it was never Really a sustainable program so Nasa and i think all of the governmental space agencies are looking for is for arsonist to be the beginning of a sustained presence on the moon and in space and using the moon as a stepping stone for human and robotic exploration of the solar system including getting the mars so the philosophy of artists is really quite different. So you're there the stay So you need to figure out how to live off the land. So that does mean as you're saying mining's water being able to grow crops being able to manufacture Equipments the habitats themselves from the From the of the regular or the soil material so using the the kind of advanced manufacturing capability three d. printing Electrolysis so that's a really different approach. And it means that what will be worked on is not just get there but a flag in the ground rather in full of soil and return on instead it means You know how do you figure out how to be there for the long haul so that means than learning how to to excavate how to build How to really maintain a life in a in a certain sense of independence. Part of the reason you want to do all that is because that's exactly what's going to be

Policy Technology Economics Science Nasa Eappen Jack Boone Department Of Ece Colorado Boulder Gill Laura Gin Boeing Company Nassar Spacex Harrison Schmitt United Launch Alliance Israel Jeff Bezos John Grunsfeld Landers Hannity Andrade Damasio
What Did NASA's Hubble Telescope See on Your Birthday?

Innovation Now

00:59 sec | 8 months ago

What Did NASA's Hubble Telescope See on Your Birthday?

"On april twenty fourth nineteen ninety the space shuttle discovery lifted off from earth with nassar's hubble space telescope securely in its bay the following day hubble was released into orbit ready to peer into the vast unknown of space this is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shape our future. Hubble was the first major optical telescope to be placed in space above the distortion of the atmosphere far above rain clouds and light pollution. Hubble has an unobstructed view as it explores the universe twenty four hours a day seven days a week. If you're curious about what. Hubble might have been looking at on your birthday. You're in luck. Nasa has set up a website where you can see the image that was captured on a specific day of the year. Just select your month. And the date then hit submit

Nassar Nasa
As the Hubble Telescope Turns 30, What's Next for Space Telescopes?

The Naked Scientists

05:15 min | 11 months ago

As the Hubble Telescope Turns 30, What's Next for Space Telescopes?

"Has been looking at a project that set to be the successor to the Hubble Space. Telescope arguably one of the famous telescopes of all time. and. The. Hubble Space Telescope is iconic sent into space in nineteen ninety, the images Hobo sent back are amazing and captured the imagination of millions, but it is thirty years old. It's getting on a bit. So a new generation of telescopes are being clowns to attempt to fill herbals sizable bids. One of them is the Nancy Grace Roman telescope named for the first female executive of NASA. This telescope will seek to continue hobos legacy. I spoke to Dominic Bedford Program scientist for the telescope. We designed the Roman Space Telescope to be able to conduct the kind of survey that astronomers haven't been able to do with any of the sets of tools they have. Had during the past generations and that is to focus on being able to take very sharp images of wide areas of the sky with tremendous sensitivity being able to see very very distant objects and also optimized in the near infrared, which is wavelengths just slightly longer than what our eyes are sensitive to because the near wavelengths penetrate dust better. So we will allow us to see further into our own galaxy and also we'll. Be. Able to see the red shifted light from very very distant galaxies. So we've been able to see farther and so this combination of being able to see far into our own galaxy and far out into other galaxies and to be able to do this very quickly very efficiently means that we can start conducting surveys where instead of looking at a few objects, a few galaxies refused ours we can start studying monitoring and understanding. Millions even hundreds of millions of galaxies and millions of stars all the same time to be able to conduct surveys that are more demographic where we really understand the whole the entirety of these aspects of the universe all at once. That means the Nancy Grace Roman telescope is designed to be more like a wide angle lens for space instead of a Zoom Lens. But how is it going to carry out its mission? The Romans Space Telescope surveys are designed to be able to answer pressing questions both in cosmology. And in Exit Planet Science for Cosmology, we will take number of surveys of the distant universe so that we can understand the distribution of galaxies and how the universe has expanded over cosmic time from a time when the universe was only a few billion years old to the present when the universe is now thirteen point seven, billion years old. And through watching the way, the galaxies evolved how they form how they move towards an away from each other, we can infer the effects of dark matter, which is a a large unknown components of the mass of the universe and dark energy, which is a recently discovered mysterious force that appears to be pushing the universe apart and therefore pushing all the matter in the universe away from all the other matter. and. It will be able to take definitive measurements of this kind to understand the effects of these so that we might understand better the fundamental physics that drives the universe in its evolution. What about our own galaxy? What can be achieved when the telescope is pointed to the center of the Milky Way we plan on conducting where we will look at the Galactic Bulge of Milky Way, which is where most of the stars in the galaxy can be found. So we'll stare at a wide patch of our Milky Way Galaxy tracking the brightness of millions of millions of stars. Taking images every roughly fifteen minutes over of course, many many months. And we will look for the chance encounter when a star happens to pass in front of some other background star. and. When it does because of general relativity the light from the background star, we'll be focused much like a lens by the foreground star and focused on us. As the stars move slowly through the galaxy and that brightening is something that we can measure and by measuring the Brighton time, we'll be able to infer. What the the foreground star was like. If the foreground star has planets, we'll see brightening from those as well, and in fact, even if these planets have a large moons will be able to see the writing for the moons planets around those stars and by doing with millions of stars will be able to track enough plants thousands. We think of planets around other stars that we'll be. Able to make a complete demographic census, all what planetary systems are like in our own solar system we have the eight planets and that we can see essentially all planets like that around another star, maybe not mercury because it's very small enclosed in but certainly every other planet even planets like Mars we'll be able to detect around such stars be able to answer the question definitively. Our solar system common in the galaxy is it rare the galaxy or may even be unique? and. Doing this, you'll understand our own place in universe Harris or got to be the way it's.

Nancy Grace Roman Telescope Hubble Space Telescope Roman Space Telescope Romans Space Telescope Hobo Nasa Dominic Bedford Harris Scientist Executive Brighton
"hubble space telescope" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:09 min | 11 months ago

"hubble space telescope" Discussed on KCRW

"Some traffic there pretty much jammed through to Mescal Canyon Road. In Pacific Palisades. It's by 50. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Elsa Chang. The Hubble Space Telescope is whizzing around our planet at 17,000 MPH. This is the telescope that has shown us things like super detailed images of Saturn and gorgeous stellar nurseries where thousands of stars are born. Scientists who use Hubble eagerly await the images that are beamed down. But as NPR's now Greenfield Boys reports, they sometimes get a surprise. The Hubble Space Telescope launched back in 1990. When Mike Brown was just getting started. As a professional astronomer. I've been using it pretty consistently for most of the last 30 years. Round works at Caltech, and recently he had an experience with Hubble that he's never had before. He got permission to use Hubble to do a detailed study of Jupiter's four largest moons. These moons are called the Galilean moons since Galileo spotted them in the year 16 10 Ganymede is the largest. It's actually the most massive moon in the solar system. It's bigger than the planet Mercury and Brown says Ganymede has a huge magnetic field. It is bizarre that it has that huge magnetic field. No other moons have magnetic fields that are measurable. We really don't have any idea why would have such a strong magnetic field. Why would have a magnetic field at all? And then there's the three other moons of Jupiter that he wanted Hubble to peer at Io, Europa Callisto. I always got the volcanoes like who doesn't love volcanoes. It's the most volcanically active place in the solar system. Europa has more liquid water than the earth does, and Callisto well. There's cholesterol. Callisto is just a boring created moon. But still Hubble was going to look at them all. After Hubble was supposed to have checked out Ganymede. The data got beamed down, processed and sent to Brown by email. He eagerly opened it up. There was nothing there pretty much. What you always do is a scientist when you see something that didn't work you like what did I screw up This time? He checked and rechecked the instructions he sent to Hubble. They were fine. So was Ganymede. Just inexplicably gone. Did a death star obliterated, it might seem like anything is possible. This is after all the year 2020. But the reality is mundane. Hubble was just pointing at the wrong patch of sky, Brown says. This kind of error quickly happened Two more times. I don't know if three times in a week is unusual or not, but it seems pretty unusual to me. I called up the head of the Hubble mission at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore. Tom Brown. No relation to Mike Brown told me that yes, Hubble does sometimes just aim in the wrong direction. So it usedto happen on the order of about 1% of the time In these days, it happens more like 5% of time. This is an aging telescope after all. A couple of years ago, when a gyroscope on Hubble failed, researchers activated one of its onboard spares so called gyroscope three. It's been glitchy from the get go. It tells you the telescope is moving around, even when it's not telescope operators compensate for this error, but sometimes it gets out of whack before they're able to adjust things. A disappointed researcher can submit a request to have a do over so they'll get their data eventually assuming they weren't trying to see some once in a million years. Brief, cosmic event, Brown says no one really knows why. Gyroscope three is such a pain. And conceivably, it could get so bad they might have to turn that one off. The biggest downside then is instead of having the entire sky available at any one time, we would have to sky available at any one time. Still, Hubble would remain enormously popular. Hundreds of teams get to use the telescope every year. They are the lucky ones. There is so much demand, the majority of proposed observations have to be rejected. Hubble is being used for fields that didn't even exist when it was launched, like studying planets that orbit distant stars. Hubbell really is a very unique resource for humanity, and once it's gone. I mean, a lot of people are not You know, already dreading that day, but I think when it's gone, it's going to hit people even more hard. He says Hubble could keep going for at least another five years. NASA has another big space telescope called the James Webb in the works, but it's not exactly like Hubble and won't launch before late next year. Nell Greenfield Boyce NPR news Over the centuries, Europeans have suffered plagues and pestilence. And when Italy became the first Western country hit by the Corona virus pandemic in March, the city of Florence discovered that one of its architectural quirks is perfect for social distancing NPR's Sylvia Poggioli reports. Walk through Florence is an outdoor lesson in Italian.

Hubble Space Telescope Mike Brown scientist Space Telescope Science Instit NPR Mescal Canyon Elsa Chang Pacific Palisades Nell Greenfield Boyce Caltech Greenfield Boys NASA Hubbell Florence Sylvia Poggioli researcher James Webb
Is Space Junk Cluttering Up The Final Frontier

Short Wave

05:36 min | 11 months ago

Is Space Junk Cluttering Up The Final Frontier

"We are tackling a question from listener. Rachel. Weiss space-junk this growing population of manmade objects cluttering up Earth orbit so Does that happen? Okay I. Let's consider what satellites are made out of metal plastic glass powered by batteries or solar panels, and when they're placed in specific orbital highways, they stay there moving. So quickly that they don't fall towards the earth kind of like, you know if you had to put a boat in a body of water, you want to avoid fighting the current kind of thing that's more. But jaw who we met earlier, he says that from sputnik onwards, our satellites have been creating debris shedding spent rocket bodies pieces becoming glued satellites have been known to explode when unspent fuel is on board, and of course, they can cross flightpaths and collide with one another and whenever satellite shed pieces they. Tend to not should one but many many pieces, hundreds of thousands of pieces depending on the type of collision. These collisions rarely destroy the satellites, but they can alter their operation and send pieces jettisoning off into space affected not only by gravity, but other physical forces. So we're pressure thermal radiation charged particle, environment interactions with you know magnetic fields, and all of this makes it very difficult to predict what space junk will do next the little that falls back to Earth, which is one object that day on average burns up or falls into the ocean. So space junk is probably not going to land on your head. Have you calculated that probability because you're GONNA ask me this question I haven't. But there's a scientist mark. Matinee, at NASA orbital debris program who has it's one in several trillion honestly I still like it but okay Mattie the people you should worry about more astronauts right? The International Space Station actually has a tracker to monitor for collision risk and they will maneuver out of the way when the risk is too great. Wow. But I feel like if there was a major collision, I would hurt about it, right? Yeah. There hasn't been a major collision you know the US military NASA and other agencies and groups around the world they tracked debris and Warren of potential collisions but there's been a few scares in recent decades. So in two thousand, fifteen, for example, the crew. On. The International Space Station had to hide in their Sawyer's capsules. Basically, the stations lifeboat when debris from an old Russian weather satellite came dangerously close. I don't like that no spacecraft and satellites will routinely maneuver out of harm's way but only if they have ample warning so the whole spacefaring community was pretty rattled when in two, thousand, seven, the Chinese military destroyed one of their own weather satellites they were testing out anti-satellite. Technology. Brian Weeden, remembers tracking this big explosion for the US air. Force. I personally was sort of shocked. It was of like wow Brian was part of a squadron that counted the resulting debris and in the end ended up cataloging more than three thousand objects. So that one. Got turned into three thousand things and that's just the things we can track wasn't space junk a big part of the movie gravity you are remembering cracks lake. From the missile strike has caused a chain reaction hitting other satellites in creating desgris two thousand eighteen Hollywood movie begins with a chatty George Clooney and Sandra bullock servicing the Hubble space telescope gays, and contentedly back at Earth. When this huge cloud of debris from missile strike grips through communications blackout it's a bad situation happen North America's laws individual. Dramatic portrayal definitely raise the profile of space junk. Even if the portrayal wasn't very accurate I, think navy on the whole it has been a good thing for for the issue. Even, if I might grumble a little bit scientists love to grumble. That's Brian Weeden again he's now the director of program planning for the Secure World Foundation thinks a lot about sustainability in space, and he says that opening scene gravity doesn't capture the true problem over the breath catches him was portrayed as sort of a nuclear chain reaction. Right there's one event that sets off this series of things that will happen very fast. The reality is sort of the opposite where it's it's like climate change. The problem with space junk is it's a long relatively slow accumulation over decades with a big negative impact down the road. Got It. Yeah. So Brian says. The risk of space junk involves convincing people, launching satellites, governments, and companies to change their behavior. Now mindful of the future and maybe have a little inconvenience or a little more cost now to forestall bad things in the future, and that's a really difficult argument to make because we humans just aren't engineered to kind of think like that preach especially when nothing truly catastrophic has happened yet but space junk is already proving to be problematic in the short term, it's translating into real world costs a satellite. Field alerts about potential collisions. Do Do I change my satellites orbit because that costs fuel and that will shorten the lifetime your satellite, which isn't good for the commercials base economy, which is Kinda booming right now. Yeah. We did that episode all about how SPACEX IS GONNA put a bunch of satellites up there. Right you know in the long term space junk has the potential to not only collide with manned spacecraft like the International Space Station, but threatens satellites at all levels of orbit like those used for imaging and whether data collection, which then could mean our climate models are less accurate or we don't have a good way to track the mirrors and that could have negative

International Space Station Brian Weeden United States Nasa Cluttering Rachel Weiss Spacex Cracks Lake Scientist Mattie America Hollywood George Clooney Navy Sandra Bullock Secure World Foundation Director
See Hubble Telescope Pictures Taken on Your Birthday

Innovation Now

01:16 min | 1 year ago

See Hubble Telescope Pictures Taken on Your Birthday

"On April, twenty fourth nineteen ninety, the space shuttle Discovery lifted off from Earth with Nassar's Hubble Space Telescope Nestled. In its bay, the following day Hubble was released into orbit, ready to peer into the vast unknown of space. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shape our future Hubble was the first major optical telescope to be placed in space above the distortion of the atmosphere far above rain clouds and light pollution Hubble has an unobstructed view as it explores the universe twenty four hours a day seven days a week. If you're curious about what. What Hubble might have been looking at on your birthday. You're in luck NASA has set up a website where you can see the image that was captured on a specific day of the year. Just select your month, and the date then hit submit behold the wonders of the universe and share your results with friends on social media using Hashtag Hubble thirty as we help NASA celebrate thirty years of cosmic discoveries while saying happy birthday Hubble here's too many more.

Hubble Hubble Space Telescope Nasa
Hubble Space Telescope still going strong after 30 years

WGN Nightside

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Hubble Space Telescope still going strong after 30 years

"Tomorrow marks thirty years since the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope Hubble blasted off on April twenty fourth nineteen ninety it's provided stunning images and also help determine the age of the universe and revolutionized humanity's understanding of it in the early years Hubbell experience problems including an imperfection in the primary mirror that made images slightly blurry the Hubble Space Telescope was named after astronomer Edwin Hubble the university of Chicago graduate back in nineteen twenty nine he proved that the theory of the universe is

Hubble Space Telescope Edwin Hubble Hubbell University Of Chicago
"hubble space telescope" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"hubble space telescope" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Wrong so I mean this was just an incredible mistake and people have been making very accurate telescope mirrors for a long time and the fact that all of a sudden up in space. What we're GONNA do now. You know this this. Incredibly valuable instrument was launched. There was this this tremendous problem. The first pictures that NASA saw here on Earth where fuzzy and distorted and it was all because of an incredibly small almost undetectable aberration a tiny error from when the mirror was constructed. Hubbell's vision was blurry but the telescope was still technically doing its job. At least as far as astronomers like Michelle were concerned the spectograph graphs still worked. Just fine. The images were out of focus. But all of the data you know the really detailed data about the universe was still coming in through these spectroscopy instruments so For for for people specifically doing my science hubbell started working beautifully. We were making incredible discoveries but of course we wanted to get those clear images to see the universe without the distortions of the atmosphere to see at beautifully beautifully. Clear from the beginning. Hubbell was designed to work hand in hand with the Space Shuttle Program. Nasa had anticipated that Hubbell would need to be modified and expected to send astronauts to do so in the coming years. What was not anticipated? Was that the first images coming from the Hubble Space Telescope. Were quite disappointing. There was obviously a problem telescope system. Conclusion we've come to from that as there's a significant collaboration appears to be president the optics and the optical telescope the Mirror on Hubbell had been ground beautifully but to a slightly incorrect formula. And this had not been caught in testing. This incredible idea was raised. The why don't we fix it? And then this is one of the Grand Adventures of NASA NASA set out on a daring rescue mission to save the Hubble Space Telescope. And they came up with a very insightful solution. Basically in some sense it's been described as putting glasses on Hubbell. These glasses were actually an instrument which was designed to correct. Hubbell's flaw a team of astronauts were prepared to service the telescope in Space..

Hubbell Hubble Space Telescope NASA Michelle president
"hubble space telescope" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"hubble space telescope" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"Crowning as well awesome. Oh my God. The baby is coming in second up truck. This is a little too graphic. Let's think a little late listing toddlers. Alright because what? These telescopes are seeing are the first after the first gasa formed from the first atoms. Which I from the from the first subatomic particles you finally get enough gas to form stars and the stars and gas Coalitions if you will are what we call the first pro galaxies and that's as far back that's what the Web Telescope. We'll be seeing in overtime. These these little baby. Galaxies began to merge together and form bigger galaxies and these grew over cosmic time into the galaxies. We know and love today like our own Milky Way which is the product of several mergers over time right and has been any recent collisions that we have seen a galaxy takes a long time for galaxies to actually merge but Hubble actually that's one of the one of the wonderful discoveries of the Hubble Space Telescope is that merging is common in was more common in the early universe so with Hubble. We've looked out into distant space looking back in time. And we've seen quite a few cases where galaxies are either in the process of merging or they've already merged and that merging process creates distortions in the shapes of these galaxies because of the tidal pools and the gravitational polls And it's quite interesting. We believe that our own Milky Way is set to merge with our nearest neighbour big spiral grand spiral the Andromeda And we're on a head on collision course that's something. Hubble helped us Find did axelrod so sky was going to look a lot different in a few billion years right but it won't be for quite a long time. Billions of you are right there right the With with the future here Team Fourth Site Observatory wants to know this. Hi Neal Jennifer Chuck Would it be possible if NASA ends funding for Hobble or It comes to its regular end. Someone like Elon. Musk could buy the rights to the scope and sent his own repair missions thereby.

Hubble Hubble Space Telescope Neal Jennifer Chuck Fourth Site Observatory Elon Musk NASA axelrod
"hubble space telescope" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"hubble space telescope" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"Of a okay. I'll do this. Yeah cosmic collaborators. Yeah Brilliant idea to rob a projectile kick up the dust and then look through what through it with ground based telescopes or or so. Yeah Yeah I got a smart. Thank you good. I the case. No one's told you. Wow really smart man NASA people who do so we're GONNA wind. Could I add one thing? I Miss Check if I did not bring a huge topic of interest for the coming decade. Which is the whole topic of exit plan and saw and this is where telescopes. We'll be working very co-operatively We didn't even know back when I was in graduate school. If there were planets orbiting other stars stars other than our sun now because of telescopes on the ground and telescopes Kepler in space we know of thousands of star systems that have planets and so now we can presume that most stars have at least one planet. Hubble will be being used in the coming decade to do more analysis of the atmospheres of these exoplanets. Complementing work from a telescopes like test. That's looking around for nearby. Systems have planets and mine. Then there's the hand to Hobble to analyze this. Yes also the James Webb Space Telescope that will be launched in twenty twenty one will be looking at exit planetary systems in the infrared part of the spectrum and that will complement. Hubble's observations of these extra planetary systems. Hubble can see a little in the infrared but mostly in visible and ultraviolet light and. So we'll be getting this wonderful suite of information by using Hubble and complement with other telescopes about the nature of EXO planets. Excellent just think about I. You GotTa know that it exists. Then you have that catalog and now you go in with a whole other layer of questions right and then that might open other questions. You didn't even know to ask at the previous round so let me take this. Now you're saying well I wouldn't want to the atmosphere of the planet. You're not happy just knowing. There's a planet rare day when that was a banner headline there's a planet right right. So what a luxury to even have that ability to make that measurement gotta take a break when we come back. We'll finish out our thirtieth anniversary costs..

Hubble James Webb Space Telescope NASA Kepler
"hubble space telescope" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

12:56 min | 1 year ago

"hubble space telescope" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"Can say is it took some really pretty pictures of some stuff and I need better ammo for those of us not literate in astrophysics three lovely questions science care with that. Well I'M NOT GONNA rank rank order because there's a lot of between but no one else has to know but I would say there are some profound Discoveries in in different realms of astrophysics that Hubble has really made a groundbreaking if you will or space breaking if you will a contribution I like James Duh. He's breaking I think the one of the first things. Hubble did was to confirm that there are in fact supermassive black holes in the cores of galaxies. There were it was theorized that that was the case perhaps but one of the first observations Hubble did was to Look at the core of another galaxy M Eighty-seven for example is is one of these other galaxies. That we knew was kind of active. We could see that there was like a high speed jet coming out of the core but we weren't sure what was causing these these types of things. Hubble looked at another external galaxy and saw that the gas moving around the core of that galaxy was moving very fast and so when you have something orbiting very fast but you don't know what it's orbiting you can pretty easily calculate what the mass of that material is based on the distance from the core that the material is moving in its velocity and the only thing that could be that massive in such a small volume had to be a supermassive black hole so hubbell then became what we call our supermassive black hole finder because with subsequent instruments on Hubble we actually looked at the cores of lots of other galaxies and confirmed over and over again that supermassive black holes are often if not always perhaps in the cores of galaxies. What what what went on an implied but not stated there isn't you needed Hubble to do that because Hubble has very high resolution telescopes as just a smudge and. You can't find something so close to the Chinese center exactly. Yeah that's that's a point that needs to be made. The reason humble is there at all is because we put it above the atmosphere. The atmosphere has a blurring effect on light coming through and even filters out some types of light. So Hubble being above the atmosphere gives us very high resolution observations exactly and that's why We were able to use Hubble to just to discern this gas right around the cores of other galaxies on on one side. It seemed to be moving away from us very fast. That would be the. The red shifted a gas and on the other side of the center of this. All those galaxies. We'd see stuff that appeared to be moving toward us very fast. Blue Shifted Light. And so you can tell that the material is orbiting very fast and from that calculate that the only thing that would create orbits. That fast would be a lot of mass convinced an very small volume and the only thing that answers that question massive black hole. So let me ask you when you as you talk about. This process media comes to my mind is the process. How long does something like this? Or is it that you are doing mathematical interpretation or making extrapolations from a period of time that you're looking out the the Information that your resources what take just the whole yet. Discovery Discovery and observations deal proposal to promise paper right. How long does that take? Well I have to say it all depends so so an observation depending on what you're doing like I mentioned that deep field took several days of observations others. If it's something bright if it's just one pointing you can do it. Maybe in an hour or two. Oh but then you need to go through some processing time for the data comes down but it needs some data processing You know in that case usually we can get images out if they're just simple snapshots within a few days. Wow but if you're doing scientific analysis like you're you're doing a proposal to answer. Some questions that requires quite a lot of analysis may be comparisons with data from other telescopes. These kinds of things that can take months or a year Sometimes even years so it just depends on the complexity of the question. That's being asked. And that's be in the data how the data are being used and then you submit. The paper gets peer reviewed. Okay all right then. Maybe they want adjustments to it lands. You didn't dot your eye or crush. Not then you do that. Satisfy the the the reviewer then it gets accepted for publication then it gets scheduled right and so that that adds a chunk of time. It's the end there as well but see now. Have we got to wrap it up right? I know but now I got another question which is and we'll come on. I got adults. Dan has got a real quick real quick. I gotta ask so with that being said considering the process has anyone looked for something right and then peer review finds no no no but then something even better was found from the information. Well sure I found found from the press. I don't I can't call mistake. What do you call have time to answer your question? Okay all right. We'll come back all right. I'll give you remember after Britain Star. Talk. 'cause Macquarie's Hubbell's thirtieth anniversary died today a broken back. Macquarie's thirtieth anniversary edition. We last left off with chuck in the middle of question. What happens if whatever issues of first proposed research paper confronts right they they they discover something even better right about the peer review. Says Oh no. That's not the case. And then they find something like wow viewers or they're both either why anybody goes what they missed. They missed something and then they go. Oh my goodness I just want to know if that ever happened. Like I'm I have a thing for that. Gillette like radio character me like die cut design and goes wait. I can say well who do like I love that. Okay Okay let me try part of that so again. The these observations typically go through to peer reviews. One is to get the time to use Hubbell in the first place. So so that means that the they generally had a pretty good idea of why these observations would be useful. And then there's the second one the after they've done the analysis of the data and they submit their analysis to the the professional journal of what they think they found and true enough. The journals can actually say You know we don't actually think this is this is right or profound and maybe choose not to publish it or but usually they do. What's interesting now? But what's interesting? Is that that data that may have been used for the initial proposers purposes is now available for other researchers to us and as we discussed about the archaic they can pull that data and find something that the original proposal didn't even think of this data and that has happened quite a lot. Let me tell you why because the whole research and the reason is because Hubble has been around so long thirty years now often taking sometimes repeated observations of the same areas in the sky for different purposes We can now look back and see things that have changed over time which is very interesting. In particular in our solar system looking back at images of let's say Jupiter overtime year after year after year. And then starting to compare these images and saying well as we look back at this data that maybe even taken for different purposes in earlier years but we can see trends. Let's say that big a great red spot on Jupiter. It's a big storm but as we look over. The decades officials know Jupiter's red spot. Okay come right so you know you can stay with the lingo under the fans. We're trying to make it clear. The great is is there but it is red tape Eh. It is shrinking as we look at this damages year after year after year. It's like well. This storm is changing. It's changing in color. It's getting smaller. We see new storms. Cropping up So this is one of the benefits of having a telescope operating so long and being able to look back in that archive at data. That may have been taken for some other purpose but then stringing it all together and we see how things have changed are changing over time. Did you find the monolith in the red spot next rescue? Uh undetectable. Okay Ashley now. I'm seeing a conspiracy. All Right Robert. Weaver from Patriot wants to know this. What does the most interesting Explained thing we have observed with Hubble. Is there something that astrophysicist are still trying to work out love at Hubble who Robert Weaver Robert Weaver Waco Robert? You're you have impressed. The rooms Robert. That's a terrific question and A couple of things come to mind. Hubble is observing a lot of effects of what we call dark matter and so we can't really see dark matter and we don't know what it is it's a mystery but Hubble can see where it is because it's distributed pretty heavily In these clusters of galaxies. We can see the galaxies. But we know there's a lot more stuff in there because Hubble sees was called lenzing of light coming from behind those clusters of galaxies. That's traveling through that cluster. And it gets distorted it gets magnified and stretched out and sew background galaxies. Look Kinda strange when they come through these regions and we can because of that. We can map out where the dark matter is. But it's still a mystery as to what actually is and even more mysterious is something we call dark energy because this is a surprise we were looking at. We've been for all all Hubbell's mission we've been measuring very carefully the expansion rate of the universe. That was one of the original goals of hobble but just a few years ago original reasons why it was named Hubble well exactly so discovered the expanding universe exactly. If this telescope was GONNA go all in on that you might smoke. Name it after the guy who put it on? So Hubble was one of the first goals of Hubble was to measure better the rate of the expansion of the universe. We expected that as we were became better able to look at more distant galaxies which is looking back at time and measuring the expansion rate at that time and comparing it to the expansion rate in the current epoch that we would see that the expansion rate of the universe has been slowing down. That was the expectation because gravity. Basically trying to pull things together and PR perhaps slowdown this expansion. The surprise in recent years was that by comparing Hubble observations with also told observations from good telescopes on the ground and looking at the difference between the expansion rate in the distant universe meaning far in the past with the expansion rate in our current epoch. That the universe expansion rate has has actually in recent epochs meaning in recent billions of years. been getting faster. It's accelerating it for it was first decelerating and now it's accelerating We don't know what's causing that. Hubbell's a big player in this in this discovery. It's not the only player but it's a big player. And so now this is a whole new enterprise in astrophysics is trying to understand. What is it that could be accelerating? The expansion of universe will get better with age. That's all all right. Tackle a billion years. You look looking better. That's right that's right. Look at that all right. Cool man all right. So let's go to Cameron Kessler from facebook says does Hubbell have any sufficient technology to keep up with the needs of today's understanding of the universe? And Will there ever be telescope with a three hundred sixty panoramic view like Google Street maps?.

Hubble Hubbell James Duh Jupiter Robert Weaver Macquarie Dan Gillette chuck Britain Cameron Kessler facebook Ashley
"hubble space telescope" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

09:01 min | 1 year ago

"hubble space telescope" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"Your personal astrophysicists and I got with me check nights. Yuck Yuck in the house he'll Brisa cosmic queries edition absolutely. And we're celebrating thirty years of the Hubble Space Telescope how thirty was launched in Nineteen Ninety April. Look at that. Yeah and we're talking across someone right here. I know Edwin would leave so so we have Jennifer Jennifer welcome. Thank you first time visiting. It's wonderful we go way back but your first time. So it's long overdue. And I I get your pedigree here. Senior project scientist for the Hubble Space Telescope at the Nasser Goddard Was the full guards because we have. We have got here. We have absolutely steady. Yeah we have a Goddard Institute for space guys got her got around it so you got around so the Goddard space flight center in Greenbelt Maryland right outside of Washington. Dc and you're primarily sponsor for Making sure is as scientifically productive as possible. Wow and sure enough. That's what it has been. We're GONNA get into that. Yeah there's an and your professionally. Which would you say is your your cosmic especially interested in how stars continue to form in interstellar clouds so pictures from hobble with stuff with the clouds. That's her well personally. Not Exactly. This is called inflation. You know there are people all over the world studying different aspects of how stars and Planetary Systems around them presumably are continuing to form But it's in the right place to be fed APPS. We're just We're we're blessed to be fed with all this new information from the Hubble Space Telescope and also telescopes all kinds of other telescopes in space and on the ground. We use them all together in complementary. Fashion Layer the information to put it together and get a a career. I see it a better picture. Exactly I think of it like a Symphony Orchestra that conductors pulling out some parts of the music from the trumpets and some from the percussion and some from the violins and so forth. But all together it gives you the full piece of music. So astronomers use some information from the Hubble Space Telescope some from other space telescopes some from telescopes on the ground. They all have some different niece. You know they they get some different colors or parts of the wavelengths spectrum or a different types of fields of view and precision and we use all that together to answer the questions we have about galaxies or stars or planets or whatever. We're interested in so tell me you don't just happen to be at the Goddard Space Flight Center. That's where Hubbell's controlled. The Hubble Space Telescope Control Room is yes at the NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center. Then what's that Hubbell building on the campus of Johns Hopkins at Johns Hopkins? We have the Space Telescope Science Institute. Which is a wonderful place with hundreds of scientists and other specialists who work with us at Goddard to help us manage the daily science operations of Hubble to help with the selections of which proposals that are sent in from around the world. Actually get the time on the Hubble telescope and people think much about that took the data just show up right but somebody had to do an American idol version though. I need hub. The next big show coming the Fox. I need help. Show me your proposal right right. That's that's a really good analogy but it's not done quite the way it's done in terms of the TV shows what's done is that scientists around the world will write a written proposal for why they want to use the Hubble Space Telescope. Why are the observations? They WANNA do so important to advance science. And why do they need the Hubble Space Telescope to do that? Okay fine for time on rights. You don't you don't WanNa waste I think this is true for the allocation committee. They're not going to give you time for a proposal that you could do on a ground based telescope because the base may Celsius so expensive and so precious every moment of observing time so you have to make the case. Why is it important that we use this precious time with the Hubble telescope to observe this particular galaxy or this particular EXO planetary system? And why do we need? The Hubble telescope or the particular instruments on Hubble to do that and that goes through a pretty stringent peer review process. We have specialists come in and review all the proposals and rank them and and the end basically one in four one in five get Time on the Hubble Space Telescope American idol is one in five A little a little less than that. So you better. If applying for winning America probably are probably not although I should add that. We're pretty good about storing this data so once the observations are done with Hubble the the data are put in an archive that's easily accessible and so scientists around the world often go into that archive pull out data. That's already there but they can use it for something else and in fact about half of the results. The peer reviewed published science discoveries in results coming from Hubble now are based on data that scientists have taken out of that archives. So if you if you use the telescope then everything that you glean from using it is now open source. So it's been on that I think is it better. No no no. Because it's I had my own motives rights for observing that part of the sky right but may be you have another thing. You could extract from the day that I haven't thought of yet right. That's exactly right proprietary. Well there is for some types of observation. Now that's all I care about. Who gets who gets proprietor. There's some types of proposals where the proposing team you Mike. This is Michael now. Nobody owns anything in the universe. Personally but We're going some of that. Some of the proposals. The proposing team gets a few months of time to do what they actually propose to do it. Well because we want them to have the time to do it. Well and then the data gets put in this archive and then is open to everyone and so and there are other types of observations that are Generally done like big surveys and things that the. Let's say the director of the Space Telescope Science Institute. Desai's would be a good general purpose use of Hubble and that data immediately goes into public Purview so so it can be immediately used by scientists around the world but anybody in the public can reach the archive. We also have an image gallery that I think is probably of more interest to most general people in the in the science interested public and that You can find it Our websites NASA dot gov slash Hubble bubble site dot org but these have the images that the things that you really think about when you think of Hubble's galaxies or desktop screensavers interesting. That's where you go. And that's just all free to anyone around the world to use and enjoy and and that's something. I'm very proud of about the Hubble mission is that we've made all of this data and all of these images free for anyone around the world firing every. Thank you before we get to the questions. I got one more one more inquiry here. So is it still true that the director can just say? Here's a good idea. Everyone will benefit. Let's just do this. It's not going through the telescope allocation committee. Okay so it's a director's discretionary time. Does that still exist? It does so that the director of the Space Telescope Science Institute. Who currently has? Dr Kenneth Sim. Bok can has a certain allocation of of time with Hubble each year that They can use for what they think is the most some scientific purpose that might not come through sort of the general competitive process with with scientists around the world. And usually this time is done is used for. Let's say a kind of big survey or a general purpose observation that will be of use to people for many years to come Could could it be used for something? That's a little quirky little Albert Bell Quirky. You would have to have a great deal of trust in that director when.

Hubble Space Telescope Space Telescope Science Instit Hubble Space Telescope Control Goddard Space Flight Center director Goddard Institute Hubbell NASA Goddard Spaceflight Cente Goddard Jennifer Jennifer Edwin Dc Johns Hopkins Nasser Goddard Planetary Systems Symphony Orchestra Dr Kenneth Sim project scientist
How Does Saturn Work?

BrainStuff

07:37 min | 1 year ago

How Does Saturn Work?

"The Planet Saturn takes its name from a Roman God of agriculture and of all the planets revolve around our sun. It's cultivated if you will the greatest ring system by far shining rings filled with ice dust and rock orbit its equator. The whitest one called the phoebe ring has an outer edge. That's millions of miles away from Saturn itself. For comparison the average distance between Earth and our moon is a paltry two hundred thirty nine thousand miles or three hundred eighty four thousand kilometers once again. Astronomy PUTS THE HUMAN EGO IN CHECK. Saturn's rings get all the attention but we shouldn't ignore its other attributes the sixth planet in our solar system. It's also the biggest after Jupiter. Those two are in a league of their own. If you mushed every planet from Mercury to Neptune together Saturn and Jupiter would account for over ninety percent of the cumulative mass of that planetary mass but despite its immense size Saturn is the least dense planet in the sun's orbit and the spherical to. We'll need to look at. Its physical makeup to understand why research published in two thousand nineteen showed that a day on Saturday and lasts just ten hours thirty three minutes and thirty eight seconds. It's spin rate helps explain one of the ring. World's stranger qualities is he. Saturn is ten percent wider than it is tall. A difference of over seven thousand miles or nearly twelve thousand kilometers. Astronomers call that kind of disparity an equatorial bulge every planet in the solar system has one but Saturn's is the most extreme saturn rotates around its axis at a very high speed. Hence the brevity stays. And here's where density comes into play like. Jupiter Saturn is a gas giant such worlds predominantly consists of hydrogen and helium and whereas Earth is solid on. The outside gas. Giants are not they may however have hard intercourse now. Saturn is downright huge in terms of volume. Some seven hundred sixty four earth sized objects could fit inside of it and the planet is ninety five times as massive as our home world and yet relative to its size. Earth is eight times more dense. In fact water yes. Plain water is denser them Saturn although that doesn't mean the planet would float. It's not cohesive enough so thanks to its low. Low density zippy rotational. Speed Saturn's been deformed into a oblong world that looks kind of squished in profile Jupiter's southern hemisphere famously has an ongoing storm called the great. Red Spot Saturn's answer to. This is the great white spots which are periodic tempests that arise every twenty thirty Earth Years I detected in eighteen seventy six. These weather events are colossal scale ness as Cassini spacecraft spent thirteen productive years hovering around Saturn on December fifth of two thousand ten. It witnessed the most recent iteration of the great white spot phenomenon. The storm was about eight hundred miles by sixteen hundred miles long when it first began. That's about thirteen hundred twenty five hundred kilometers but over the next six months. The spot expanded Longitudinal early until it had looped itself around the planet in a gigantic circle. Some researchers think the great white spots might be part of a cycle that sees the outer layer Saturn's atmosphere slowly lose heat allowing the warm air from lower levels to burst upward. Meanwhile Saturn's North Pole. There's a cloud pattern shaped like giant hexagon. This pleasantly symmetrical jet stream spins counterclockwise measures about twenty thousand miles or thirty two thousand kilometers across and includes a hurricane. That's been swirling right over the poll ever since it was discovered back in Nineteen eighty-eight. Of course it's not the hexagon earned Saturday. A place on. Chucky festers T. shirt you know from rugrats anyway. The gas giant is most famous for the spectacular ring system encircling it a planetary rings aren't rare per se Jupiter Uranus and Neptune. Have the well yet. In terms of sheer scale network around Saturn is totally unrivaled. Most of the primary rings come with letter names. The closest one to Saturn is called the D ring which has an inner radius of about forty two thousand miles or sixty seven thousand kilometers a lot closer than our moon. It's surrounded by these C B A F G and earrings in that order by the way. The rings aren't arranged Alphabetically. Because the naming system reflects the dates of their discovery Abmc recited before the rest when measured from its outside edge. The earring showcases an impressive. Three hundred thousand mile radius or four hundred and eighty thousand kilometers. Or at least that looks impressive until you get to know the big bad fearing that. We mentioned earlier. I spotted in two thousand nine. This one was named after one of Saturn's moons untold trillions of ice rock dust particles. Make up these rings. Some bits are the size of a sugar grain. Others could probably Dwarf Your House in any case. The ring material is stretched. Remarkably thin Saturn's rings may be as thick as two miles or kilometers wide. Found just thirty two feet or ten meters wide so proportionately. The gas giants iconic rings thinner than a typical sheet of writing paper as noted by Astronomer. Phil plait whereas Saturn itself is probably around four point five billion years old. The age of its rings isn't as clear. Some scientists think that they were formed ten million to a hundred million years ago when an icy comet or some ice covered moons came too close to the planet. The visitor or visitors would have met a grisly end. Getting ripped to pieces by Saturn's gravity as those fragments collided they grew smaller and multiplied giving rise to the skinny but brilliant system. We all know today on the other. Hand a twenty. Nineteen paper argued that the rings might have originated at an earlier stage in the history of our solar system. We'll have to see how the debate unfolds as new evidence arises. There's lots about this planet that we're still learning in October of two thousand. Nineteen the international astronomical. Union heralded the discovery of twenty newfound moons orbiting the gas giant with these bodies added to the mix. There are now eighty two verified. Saturn moons altogether no other planet in the solar system has that many natural satellites not even mighty Jupiter. You can find Saturn's moons in around and beyond the ring system before Cassini was retired in two thousand seventeen it revealed that some of them gather clumps of ice and dust. From the Rings Saturn's Moon Titan is especially well-named it's our solar system second-biggest moon overall and it's dotted with seas lakes and rivers of liquid methane and pain. There's only one other body within the Sun's orbit that has standing pools of liquid that we know about. And here's a hint. You're sitting on it right now. Tighten is also noteworthy for having an atmosphere and it's theorized that there could be ice volcanoes that spew water instead of lava like Earth Saturn gets auroras at its poles. They're invisible to the unaided human eye. But the Cassini spacecraft and the Hubble Space Telescope have captured footage of them using infrared and ultraviolet

Astronomy Giants Cassini Phil Plait Chucky Festers Hubble Space Telescope North Pole Union Abmc
Satellite almost on empty gets new life after space docking

Liftoff

06:49 min | 1 year ago

Satellite almost on empty gets new life after space docking

"An interesting idea. It's from a division of Northrop Grumman and what measures one is is. It's a satellite that has a grappler so we can grab other things in space and a lot of fuel and the idea of the program is you can extend the life of satellite that has run out of fuel and his either GonNa be parked or de orbited depending on where it is And and here's the challenge. Satellites are not made with gas caps. They're not generally built to be serviced by other satellites. That doesn't generally happen So you can see what's going on here. North Grim thinks that there is a market in building a satellite that is cheaper to launch and use to extend the life of an older satellite than it would be replaced. That satellite right. It's just it's simple economics here. What if we could make that satellite of yours? That's about to die last another five years. How what would that be worth to you? And if that number is lower than or higher than the price we would charge. Let's say or something like that. You do the math you know like. Oh that's better. Let's do that. So that's what that's what one did a demo with an eighteen year old satellite from. Its until nine one What Intelsat did is moved into a different orbit? So was up there. They actually moved. Until set up to the mid one orbit taking it out of service in doing so and meth one docked with Intelsat nine and one so came a few grabbed it with its grappling system. It's docking system and is now in the process of or over the next month or two is going to push Intelsat back into an operational orbit it will go back in operation and it will have five years more life this eighteen year old satellite with with a buddy satellite attached to it at the end of the five year period when it when Intel sat thinks it's reached the end of its operational. Life is then going to raise it up to a graveyard orbit like we talked about last time where where it's higher orbit above Geo Stationary Orbit. Where there's not a lot of stuff and it doesn't matter if there's dead stuff up there it's not a big deal so they're gonNA they're gonNA push up to a graveyard orbit So that's awesome five years extra life by adding a buddy satellite that can keep it operational and That's not all the plan then is after five years is one will grapple and can go somewhere else and do it again with a different saddling. Reasonable Buddy satellite right as long as it's got propellant and it can grapple stuff it can get to what it needs to grapple. It could do this so you have to is also coming later this year. They're going to use it for a different intelsat satellite and the goal. This time is because you know they wasted propel underuse propellant in taking it out of service and taking it somewhere else to try this the next one. They're going to do it in place. They're literally going to just drive over to wear that. Intelsat. Satellite is while it's operational and just grab it and then extend its life by having new propellant ability to move and even though because generally what seems to be happening. I mean if something breaks something breaks this is not something with like robot surgery to fix up circuit board or something. Although I think a future this stuff is that but in the short term. It's this satellite is cost us. Hundreds of millions of dollars is incredibly expensive electronics. And the only thing. We're missing is propellant. Well that's what the system is. Basically doing is like we will send up a thing full propellant and attach and move your satellite around for you. The great idea until sat says the economics work for them. Which if the economics and work for until SAT IN FOR NORTH OF GRUMMIN? This is really cool. Because you're extending the life of this stuff. It's almost like recycling in outer space. Like you're extending the life of this and you can see how this could get way more complicated down the road in terms of allowing tele presence cars of satellites there. You know the further out. They are the more of a delay. There is but when when you think back to the Hubble missions where they had to fix the Hubble Space Telescope over the course of decades say that was a user serviceable astronaut serviceable thing or I s space walks. You can see and you and I actually saw at least one of these at at Johnson Space Center the experimenting with a robot that can crawl around on the outside of the space station and do repairs. You could also see that. Same kind of thing. Po- possibility for one of these mission extension vehicle satellites to be able to potentially even do repairs. Come you know come by do a repair mission. And if that costs less than replacing the satellite. It's totally worth it. So it was very exciting. There's a lot of this being talked about. Nasa has a plan to do a spacecraft. That's GonNa Attach to an old land sat satellite in low-earth-orbit and and do a connection these. The mavs are built for geostationary orbit. I believe there's a Japanese company that we've mentioned on this before that wants to make like a sticky like web or arm satellite. That can actually just kind of like run into space junk and a ten. Yeah stick to it so that it's no longer space debris so there's a lot of this. We're entering a phase where one of the opportunities business opportunities in space is and from a different angle. You see it with spacex reusing. Its vehicles reusing. Its its first stage is that you make this incredibly expensive satellite and you leave it up there and it's got a lifespan. And then it dies. And it's like a disposable satellite and now there are companies coming along and saying what if we could take that disposable satellite and make it recyclable instead and extend its life and then move it out of the way. It's it you know it makes access to space cheaper right because it means that the stuff is serviceable and presumably over time. My mind started to raise as I was reading the story like presumably over time you would end up with things like perhaps some standard equipment like standard actual docking attachment. And things like that. Where it's like can we all agree? That the satellite's going to have this thing on it so that one of these buddies can come up later and refuel it maybe or or attached to it and move it around but there's so much that's already up there so is they figured it out. Like where do you grab on? How do you hold on? Is it GonNa work and it seems to work. It's awesome

Intelsat Northrop Grumman Hubble Space Telescope North Grim Johnson Space Center Mavs Intel Nasa Low-Earth-Orbit
"hubble space telescope" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"hubble space telescope" Discussed on KTOK

"The Hubble Space Telescope and held in the construction of the international space station that's your look back at this week in history sign of the o'reilly update message of the day the truth about the current radicalism in the USA your trump actually obscuring the exact nature of what's going on in the house of representatives concerning the for radical laughed congresswoman he's of securing it by attacking them personally at issue here is not so much racism in my opinion but truth and fanaticism let's run it down the star of the far left is Alexandria Ocasio Cortez a congresswoman from New Yorker district is in queens and the Bronx miss Cortez has staked out territory way beyond liberalism the media loves her she's photogenic energetic and comes across well on camera her view of the country is that it is essentially a nation that persecute minorities migrants and other people you'll remember that she called the detention centers on the southern border concentration camps offending many many people because real concentration camps in **** Germany were places that have never ever been even considered in America yet the congresswoman said there are concentration camps the second woman is a lot Omar she is an immigrant from Somalia I was elected to Congress and she basically says quote Israel has hypnotize the world may outlaw a week in the people and help them see the evil doings of Israel it's all about the Benjamins baby well miss Mars accused of antisemitism certainly she despises Israel which is her right but she is a radical leftist as well then there is Rasheed telly she is a Palestinian she was elected in Minnesota one of our first name is was quote we're going to go in there we're going to win peach the M. ask for calling a president of the United States an obscene name Mr leave also diminish the Holocaust somewhat saying quote when I think of the Holocaust and the tragedy of the Holocaust and the fact that my ancestors Palestinians wash their lan and some lost their lives your livelihood their human dignity their existence in many ways have been wiped out so she's comparing what is happened in the Middle East in Palestine Israel to the extermination of between six and ten million people during World War two final radical of Congress woman is are Jana Presley and here's what she said about the president trump traces in bigoted lies are discussing an unsurprising we will not be dismissed and we will not be bullied by a Twitter thog unquote so what do you agree with the liberal line or not you have to concede if your rational person that these for radical Congress women are something that the nation has rarely seen now president trump is confronting them in a way that I do not believe is most effective if Mr trump wants to win reelection he can easily demon eyes the radical left by just running their quotes he doesn't have to tell on the go back where you came from because then the media which likes the radical left jumps on the president of securing the issue and that is the message of the day for more fact based on its analysis please visit bill o'reilly dot com I think you'll like it the Riley update will return with something you might not know the housing.

Hubble Space Telescope
"hubble space telescope" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"hubble space telescope" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Hogan's only lasted for a very tiny time so I am just worried about this is you know NASA's track record on big expensive project is visible in the last two decades and this is their their planetary project record is pretty good but they might be getting over confident and I'm just being now the devil's advocate skeptic here that I have to be that a luminous blue giant star ET etec Karina I had a career this this this photograph comes to us via the Hubble Space Telescope which Bob has written a biography a university mayor of Hubble Bob this is spectacular what made it for anyone who's read universe in the mirror and also knows the history of possible understands how important edit Karina is to the history of hobbles well and to astronomy because when they fixed Hubble Anna Karina was one of the very first images released and it was proof positive without question that the telescope has been fixed and here we were looking at something we've never seen before a star exploding so over time Hubble produces a new image of Anna Karina I am compelled I used it in my book as a theme to show how well the telescope fixed but I'm compelled to Paul Paul sedition l'image is always spectacular jet luminous blue giant which means that it's a big star and it has had a corruptions and with those off a great deal of material and the picture shows an explosion it's very clear you've got two gigantic lobes of material flying out on opposite sides as well as kids coming out of the equator and a new image includes ultraviolet data from Hubble which gives us a better idea of the gases that are in these lobes and so forth it is a lot of details this stars thought that someday become a super Nova you know that's what they think but we really don't know the hostel revolution.

Hogan NASA Hubble Space Telescope Bob Anna Karina Karina I Hubble Paul Paul two decades
"hubble space telescope" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"hubble space telescope" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Observations and within wrong galaxy and distant galaxies. So any Annella Bama taken away any go ahead. Any thank you for taking my call. Steak or sound? Phone is not working any try to call back with a different phone if you would. And it's just remarkable what's out there in the universe. But like you were We don't know much. We don't know much. But it's also amazing. What what we do? Now. I think it's amazing that we can determine the age of the universe. You know from from telescope observations, and you know, and we have discerned the contents of the universe and that we're only four percent of that content. I think it's amazing what we have learned from in astronomy over the years and with better and better telescopes and the Hubble space telescope and the James Webb space telescope that will be watched a lot of delays. It's going to cost a lot of money, but you know. It'll be with a new few people get gravity century. Where can they get it? They can get it on. It's on Amazon right now is that that's probably and it's in bookstores. In fact, it tonight is the watch night of the book from Amazon, and I think that may not be expensive way to get it up gravity century. Amazon. Did you have fun writing the book run? It was a lot of fun. It's I'm almost slow writer was also somewhat painful worrying if I was going to really finish it on time. But it was also a lot of fun because I love talking scientists. I love talking to story in the learned about Einstein. I learned about you know, I talked about Arthur Eddington British astronomer. Hey, let's come back and take final phone calls next on coast to coast AM. The coast website is now streamline for mobile devices. Great news, if you're a coast insider or simply want to enjoy our website on your phone, visit coast to coast AM dot com on your iphone or Android browser. News, traffic and weather camp obeys News Radio WFL, a one hundred and thirty five passengers on board.

Amazon James Webb space telescope Annella Bama Arthur Eddington writer four percent
"hubble space telescope" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"hubble space telescope" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Much. We don't know much. But it's also amazing. What what we do know? I think it's amazing that we can determine the age of the universe. You know from from telescope observations, and you know, and we have discerned the contents of the universe and that we're only four percent of that content. I think it's amazing what we have learned from in astronomy over over the years and with better and better telescopes and the Hubble space telescope and the James Webb space telescope that will be watched a lot of delays, and it's going to cost a lot of money. But. It'll be with a new view where people get gravity century. I'm aware where can they get it? They can get it on. It's on Amazon right now is that that's probably and it's in bookstores. In fact, it tonight is the watch night of the book from Amazon, I think that may not be the least expensive way to get it up gravity century. Amazon. Did you have fun writing the book run? It was a lot of fun. It's I'm on a slow writer office, somewhat painful worrying if I was going to really finish it on time. But it was also a lot of fun because I love talking to scientists. I love talking to historian the learned about Einstein. I learned about you know, I talked about Arthur Eddington this British astronomer. You've got them all in the, hey, let's come back and take final phone calls next on coast.

Amazon James Webb space telescope Arthur Eddington writer four percent
"hubble space telescope" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"hubble space telescope" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"And if you think if you sprinkle a bunch of ants are on a on the surface of an expanding balloon every point on that balloon every aunt is receding from every other. And we see that and there's other evidence again, this this leftover heat called the cosmic microwave background. There's a lot of operations and within Roane galaxy and distant gal. Z's? So. It away any go ahead. Any thank you for taking my call. The or phone. Phone is not working any try to call back with a different phone if you would and. It's just remarkable. What's out there in the universe? But like you were saying Ron, we don't know much. We don't know much. But it's also amazing. What what we do? Now. I think it's amazing that we can determine the age of the universe. You know from from telescope observations, and you know, and we have discerned the contents of the universe and that we're only four percent of that content. I think it's amazing what we have learned from in astronomy over the years and with better and better telescopes and the Hubble space telescope, and the chains Webb space telescope that will be watched a lot of delays. It's gonna cost you a lot of money. But. It'll be a new view people get gravity century over. We're gonna get it. Yeah. Getting on on Amazon right now is that that's probably and it's in bookstores in fact tonight is the watch night of the book, but it's on Amazon, and I think that may not be expensive way to get it just like gravity century, Amazon's you fun writing the book run. It was a lot of fun. It's I'm almost slow writer somewhat painful worrying if I was going to really finish it on time. But it was also a lot of fun because I love talking to scientists. I love talking to story in the learned about Einstein. I learned about you know, I talked about Arthur Eddington this British astronomer while you've you've got them all in the, hey, let's come back and take final phone calls next on coast to coast AM. The coast website is now streamlined from devices. Great news, if you're a coast insider or simply want to enjoy our website on your phone, visit coast to coast AM dot com on your iphone or.

Amazon Roane galaxy Arthur Eddington Webb space Ron writer four percent
"hubble space telescope" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"hubble space telescope" Discussed on AP News

"The Hubble space telescope is studying the cosmos once again. After a three week shutdown. Nasa says it resumed scientific observations over the weekend. Hubbell's pointing system didn't work when an old gyroscope finally failed. Earlier this month, the backup didn't work either. So flight controllers had to come up with fix. They managed to coax the backup gyroscope into operation with a variety of maneuvers and switches three gyroscopes need to be working on the Hubble telescope in order for it to give optimal performance. Indonesia lion air flight with one hundred eighty nine people on board has crashed into the sea as AP correspondent charlesdale desma reports atop search and rescue official says they're not expecting to find any survivors. Zion says the jet on a one and ten minute flight from Jakarta to an island close to Sinatra was carrying one hundred and eighty one passengers including one child and two babies and eight crewmembers Indonesia's disaster agency has posted photos online of a crush smartphone. Books bags and parts of the aircraft whose lush that had been collected by search and rescue vessels, the weather conditions were normal. But the brand new aircraft had experienced a technical issue on his previous flight. The crash is a blow to the country's aviation safety record after the lifting of bans on his airlines by the EU and the US I'm Charleston with asthma. African nations aren't creating enough jobs for a growing young population. According to a new report, the latest Abraham index of African governance says Africa's overall GDP is risen nearly forty percent over the past decade, but the continents average score for sustainable economic opportunity his increased just a fraction of one percent. The report sounds a warning for continent where the sub Saharan populations projected to double by twenty fifty Africa. Seeing the rise of young opposition leaders in countries like Uganda, Zimbabwe and Cameroon who are impatient. With some of the world's oldest or longest serving heads of state experts warned of turbulence ahead as about sixty percents of Africa's population is under age twenty five. Reaction to Pittsburgh synagogue massacre. I'm Tim Maguire with an AP newsmen to President Trump and first lady Melania Trump will visit Pittsburgh tomorrow to mourn a synagogue massacre that left eleven people dead leaders of a liberal Jewish group in the city in an open letter to the president right that he is not welcome until he denounces white nationalism. Rabbi Jeffrey Meyers with the tree of life synagogue, says he fears the attack is a symptom of something even more sinister symptomatic of a.

President Trump Indonesia Pittsburgh synagogue Africa Rabbi Jeffrey Meyers Nasa Hubbell charlesdale desma Pittsburgh Abraham EU Tim Maguire Jakarta Uganda Zion US president Charleston Sinatra Cameroon
"hubble space telescope" Discussed on Probably Science

Probably Science

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"hubble space telescope" Discussed on Probably Science

"That's right. So you w distance. It goes down by quarter becomes a quarter goes down by quarter. It becomes a quarter to thank you for correcting. I wasn't trying kicking myself now. It's a, it's a seventy five percent reduction twenty five percent reduction because because the signal is going out in older action, so that's right. That's right. So it's just getting spread out. So thin section of it is is a squeak or a sort of aura your compared to a point. That's right. That's right. So that's why it took about a year or so to get all the data back from that Pluto, fly by from twenty fifteen. See. So when you're on the shirt laws, we just composite Pluto, and we were ear excited about the images just starting to come through and then you like we're working on a new targets now as carrying on this thing still we've got a potential likely candidate is right so about a year or so before we flew by Pluto the Hubble space, the Hubble space telescope was just hanging out doing his thing looking across skies, and it was looking down the trajectory of where new horizons would be going, and it is just for two, it's very fortuitous they were looking to see, is there anything else out there. Now. We have. We have our rocky planets than we had the gas giants. We have what, what we now call the Kuyper belt, which is where we're Pluto is now, and the Kuyper goes very far. Many, many, many you like I think I think Pluto's around thirty or so a you from the sun s. round Venus, an astronomical unit just to be click, find it is the distance is the distance one. Astronaut Queen of unit is to the sun. That's correct. That's correct. So Pluto's you say to thirty thirty to somebody you competed, it's it's times further out from this on the rail now. And now that we're three years later, we're about forty times way. Now I think forty four forty five times way from the sun. So the Kuyper belt extends out at least that far. And then there's other objects even further away. But the further out you go the the more sparse space space is big. We talked about that before. So there's a lot of space in space. At some point point, you stop defining it radius being potted, the solar system I won't point..

Kuyper belt Kuyper Astronaut Queen Venus seventy five percent twenty five percent three years
"hubble space telescope" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

03:35 min | 3 years ago

"hubble space telescope" Discussed on Science for the People

"Kent thomas is the second generation space engineer he became a spacesuit project engineer in nineteen eighty nine and his career spanned both the shuttle extravehicular mobility unit program and the lunar mar suit he has taught at central connecticut state university and johnson space center's nasa academy and since nineteen ninety four has worked as a consultant to the national air and space museum's space history department he's here today to talk about his most recent book the journey to moonwalking the people that enabled footprints on the moon ken welcome to science for the people like you very much so your background is spacesuit engineer can you give us like the quick hit about how that started and how you came to get into engineering of the spacesuit will my father was an aviation enthusiast who became a space addict big time i guess was launched nick i was not quite seven but i remember vividly my father dragging me out the front yard 'cause he was very excited because split nick was visible because it had a look tickle orbit and it was decaying and it was just perfectly physician so you could see it in the night sky and my father was just totally wired and he was talking about we were on the verge of having people going into space exploring space and everything else and i mean he's just for him this was the the ultimate and he was into it and unfortunately it's chasing joining the gemini space program which was at that point called mercury mark to he caused us to have to move once and then two years later when that program wrapped up it caused him to have to move again to join what he was hoping to join was the the apollo fuelcell program unfortunately they found he was at expertise is that were more useful to his employer elsewhere and so they paid more money to not be an apollo engineer which made them rather disappointed but he was still very much interested in in space and after you're tired from pratt and whitney he worked on the mainland's of the hubble space telescope and so he was really into it and because we had moved twice in two years when i was a kid i was really into it like he was at all and ironically my head an opportunity it it worked to join the space program and i was considering it and i happen to there about it and he didn't he felt it was a great opportunity and i was kind of reticent because what had happened to me as a kid and i had a stepson and i didn't want to have put him through what i went through and ensuring that unfortunately i in in retrospect i said some things that that i regretted a bit 'cause i didn't want to imply that my father had been a good father 'cause he'd been great father but unfortunately my father just a couple of weeks later ted i last heart attack so that happened to be the last conversation i had and i felt very bad about that and before the end of the year i was a program engineer they shuttle extravehicular mobility unit which is emu it's easier to say him you then then the other thing and that's how i got there so what got you interested specifically in.

engineer project engineer two years
"hubble space telescope" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"hubble space telescope" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"For rocket and f for your imagination i'd say thinking about this are talking about this i am thinking about science fiction writers i'm particularly thinking about octavia butler and her earth seed series in which she is essentially in order to get everybody to care enough about space travel we have to sort of turn the science of it into a religion that that it's an act of faith that there's someplace out there for us i guess i wonder what you think about that is there is there such a big difference in this particular area of science between science and faith well first of all of say the science fiction inspired many of our greatest scientists edwin hubble of the hubble space telescope the person who discovered the expanding universe he read jules verne as a child was fascinated by the heavens and went on to discover the expanding universe carl sagan the astronomer was inspired but the join carter of mars series and elon musk and myself and many young people were inspired isaac asimov's foundation series the creation and rise and fall of a galactic empire that paves the way for people like elon musk who was to create a multi planet species because there's simply too precious to put all the eggs in one basket is better to have you know humanity spread out a little bit in case something happens to good old planet earth and this remember that in five billion years our time is up the sun is going to eat up the earth five billion years from now the poets asked the question how will the earth die in fire ice physicists no the answer the answer is fire we're going to be eaten up by the sun but way before then we will have an insurance policy in place you are you're very confident so what's the what's a plausible timeline for landing people on march the twenty thirties is very reasonable because as i mentioned elon musk who wants to beat desa nasa has is booster rocket the sos believe it or not we have to boost rockets not not one to iraq is that are fully capable of taking us to the moon and onto mars and jeff bezos wants to be the third person with a moon rocket and so we're gonna have a racist some sort of an internal race between a different billionaires wannabe i to go into space and mars so suppose we get to mars we we still can't really live there right i mean it's it's it's not a mmediately habitable climate.

octavia butler carter isaac asimov desa nasa jeff bezos edwin hubble jules verne elon musk iraq five billion years
"hubble space telescope" Discussed on Wow In the World

Wow In the World

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"hubble space telescope" Discussed on Wow In the World

"Michelle hey guys it's mindy here in i am in the smithsonian's national air and space museum with my new friend david divorce in high david only doing i'm good so david you are a curator of astronomy here at the air and space museum that's a pretty interesting job can you tell us what you do i look out for interesting and important thing should weaken poet white the old cameras and fiji should the hubble space telescope and things like that we got them in there on display here therence raced regime wow so when you were a kid were you doing this kind of thing then i was crazy about telescopes and i wanted to build telescopes i think my first telescope natural built thirteen fourteen and would stars the planet's son seeing farther than anybody else and i'll just totally book wow that means you probably remember your first total solar eclipse oh i sure do can you tell us about it march nineteen seventy i was still a grad student hand reformed the yale university observatory the clips expedition and beach party nowadays can you had a celebrate we were turn them talked with oil at all i can members looking up through the dover saying while he was amazing and we had a wonderful time so one of the questions i have for you is what happens to plants and animals during the eclipse like other roosters going to start crowing they do get confused we notice should the birds are now tucker you know like a club which and some of which is walk through road and serb which really roughage indifferent to convene a pigeon but a river particularly a bunch of footage kudo didn't quite know what to do they're were just confused the story.

Michelle david space museum fiji therence yale university observatory
"hubble space telescope" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:31 min | 4 years ago

"hubble space telescope" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And nbn stargate september ten hubble space telescope may get all the attention but it's not an only child it's one of four space telescope's built to study the universe at different wavelengths the great observatories one of them was named for a physicist who was born one hundred twenty five years ago today arthur holly content was born in ohio an eighteen 92 he developed an early interest in science and earned his phd in physics from princeton concened joined the faculty of the university of chicago where he studied x rays experiments proved that x rays and other forms of light can behave like solid particles it was an astounding discovery and it earned him a nobel prize thompson also studied cosmic rays mysterious radiation from outside earth his work showed that the race are actually solid particles with an electric charge so they interact with earth's magnetic field during world war two compton was a key player in the development of the atomic bomb he oversaw the construction of the first nuclear reactor and led the creation of plutonium field bombs decades later when nasa built a great observatory to study gamma rays it's detectors took.

physicist nobel prize thompson world war compton arthur holly ohio university of chicago nasa one hundred twenty five years