35 Burst results for "Hubble Space Telescope"

"hubble space telescope" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:56 min | 5 months ago

"hubble space telescope" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Was really just complete all the testing, fixing a few issues, getting it integrated and shipping it and launching it. So I had a little doubt, however, we still have to get it over gold on. Some towns in the red zone that gets harder to score. And it will certainly get me harder and of course budget and schedule were really a big deal at the time. So you got to go to the go along without a doubt. We've all seen some of those amazing images now, really gripping into it, just at the same time, one question I have is we have the Hubble Space Telescope and out there for a little over 30 years now. Is this different in degree from Hubble or is it different in kind? As you're going to do things all together different from what Hubble a lot is to do. Oh yes, it's going to do a lot more than Hubble is doing. And Hubble has been amazing for 30 years. And at the time the Hubble came along, it was by far the state of the art and it showed us a lot about our universe that we had no clue about. And of course, web with its infrared capability, large 21 foot mirror, and extremely powerful instruments, it's showing us a lot more than Hubble could ever show us, including looking at some of the same areas of the universe, it's just a lot clearer because of the infrared. And of course, one of the big things we're looking for and one of the reasons we built web was to look back as close as possible to the formation of the universe, you want two, 300 million years after the Big Bang. And based on what we're seeing today, the capabilities there. So I think we'll get there. So as you said, Hubble was been up there for something over 30 years. How long is this supposed to last? And over that period of time, whatever it is, what are the, I guess I would say, deliverables for the scientists, because this really is a science project. Yes, so we build all of our missions except the technology emissions

Hubble
"hubble space telescope" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:40 min | 5 months ago

"hubble space telescope" Discussed on WTOP

"Launch day December 25th and is working perfectly as the first image showed. And the best is yet to come. Can you describe that first image for people who haven't had a chance to look at it? Is widely circulating and we even have it up on our site WTO dot com. What are some of the takeaways you get from it? The biggest thing that people have to realize is we have imaged this area of the sky before with Hubble Space Telescope. And with James Webb, we are now seeing it brighter, clearer, better detail and farther back in the history of our universe because of the capabilities of James Webb. It is a picture that is the deepest view to date that we've had of our universe. And I think we're going to be able to push even further with James Webb. So people see these galaxies. They see these rings and these rings or let's just say arcs. Arcs of light are stretched out galaxies that lie behind this galaxy cluster that we see. And that's the nugget. These arcs are among the oldest galaxies we have ever seen. Yeah, what struck me was how busy it looked out there in space. I wanted to ask you, we understand, part of the image is light from not long after the Big Bang, which was 13.8 billion years ago. How are they able to determine that timeline? By studying the universe, we're able to determine how old things are by their chemical composition, what we know about physics and chemistry, the lives of stars and galaxies, and a very, very important quality is we're able to sit there and gauge how far things are away from us by something called the redshift. And all that is is light, ordinary light that has been shifted to deeper red color because of the distance that it is, the light as it travels to us gets shifted to the red, which is where the power of web comes into play because it can discern very, very faint infrared light from 600 million years after the Big Bang, which is what we saw in this image. Okay, final question now. I understand we're going to see more some more images. What are we expecting to see? We get another set of images at ten 30 a.m. that are going to show a life cycle stars, intergalactic collisions between galaxies. We're going to get the first chemical fingerprint

James Webb WTO
"hubble space telescope" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:15 min | 7 months ago

"hubble space telescope" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"To the foreign desk. You're listening to the foreign desk on monocle 24. Joining me now is Nicole stott, a veteran NASA astronaut aquanaut artist and author of back to earth what life in space taught me about our home planet. Nicole flew two missions aboard the space shuttle discovery and spent a 104 days living and working in space as a crew member on the International Space Station and she's joined by Christina corp and astronaut manager space adviser and the president of purpose entertainment. Christina also leads space for a better world. Christina I'll start with you on May 3rd at the London science museum, you're helping to put on the aim higher gala, which is marking the 50th anniversary of Apollo 16. Denoting that anniversary is obviously important, but how much of the event is also about reminding people of the importance of space as a collaborative venture. I founded this foundation called space for a better world because I have been a fly on the wall of the lives of the Apollo astronauts lives. And I have heard thousands of moon landing memories and that is something that I think that this generation doesn't understand. So when we're celebrating the 50th anniversary of Apollo 16, the 5th moon landing, I am always reminded of a quote that I like to bring up from John F. Kennedy, which is we celebrate the past to awaken the future. I think it's really important to remind people of our successes and how those missions also united the world. And then now we're looking to the future space, which is a much, much more diverse, inclusive space, including female astronauts, and this event at the London science museum is very heavily female oriented and focused on purpose to showcase what has happened since Apollo and what we're looking to in the future of space. Nicole at the time of the Apollo program, of course, and in the early days of the space program, it was very much a competitive business. It was nations attempting to get one over on each other. I mean, obviously in the early stages, the United States and the Soviet Union. But in your experience as an astronaut, is there any of that at all among actual astronauts, even when you're dealing with each other on the ground never mind working in space does national competition figure as a thing in your thinking at all? No, I think as astronauts, it really doesn't. I think there tends to be a competitive nature and people that are a type personalities and wanting to do their best at everything, right? But I think it's more of a positive uplifting kind of competition. In fact, you know, in order to survive in space, you've got to be supporting each other all the way, even though you're always trying to do your best. I think what I experienced was absolutely an environment of cooperation. Even if we were reflecting on the times where there was serious competition trying to drive who got to space first doing whatever it was. And then you look even historically at that and you see how along the way the scientists and the engineers were really working together to bring these missions to life..

London science museum Nicole stott Christina corp Christina Nicole International Space Station NASA John F. Kennedy Soviet Union United States
"hubble space telescope" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:19 min | 8 months ago

"hubble space telescope" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"After we talk they set off again A mother and her two little ballerinas pulling that pink suitcase through the park Brian Mann and PR news lviv Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have confirmed the largest comet ever seen The icy heart of the mega comet is about 80 miles in diameter we're told which makes it larger than the state of Rhode Island NPR's deepest shiver on reports It's called the sea 2014 UN two 7 one which is a pretty short name given its gargantuan size This comment is 50 times bigger than average So it really is big compared to the average comet that we've seen And in fact it's the biggest one that's been seen so far That's David jewitt and astronomer at UCLA He's one of the scientists who confirmed this comet's record breaking size And he says even measuring it was a feat It took him 8 months That's because what he's really focused on is the icy core called the nucleus So the important part of a comet is kind of the solid bit in the middle But it's the hardest part to measure because it's surrounded by kind of an atmosphere that swamps the brightness of the nucleus But jewett and the researchers were able to solve this problem using the Hubble Space Telescope and their own modeling that allowed them to extract the light coming from the comet's nucleus and separate it from the light coming from the comet's tail The comet is barreling at a speed of 22,000 mph but it won't ever get close to Planet Earth In fact the closest this comet will even get to the sun is 1 billion miles away You know nobody should expect to go outside and see this thing through a pair of binoculars or just by naked eye and it's not going to be really spectacular nighttime object But jewett says the discovery underscores that our solar system is still an unknown and unfamiliar place with thousands of comets left to be discovered There are tens of thousands maybe hundreds of thousands of smaller bodies in the outer solar system that we haven't discovered yet because we haven't looked hard enough It might be the largest comet discovered to date but for jewett he.

Brian Mann David jewitt jewett NPR NASA Rhode Island UN UCLA
"hubble space telescope" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

03:29 min | 9 months ago

"hubble space telescope" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"They're asking for They're lead negotiators today said that Ukraine would likely be asking for reparations to help rebuild all this damage that has been caused by the Russians And then on the Russian side there have actually been sort of some mixed messages coming On one hand you had a Kremlin spokesperson who said today that the Tuesday talks had not actually resulted in anything promising was the word he used But then on the other side you had the chief negotiator for Russia had a very positive statement a little bit later about how Ukraine had outlined in writing It's readiness to quote fulfill a number of important conditions to basically rebuild the relationship with Russia as they put it And so what's next is that negotiators are going to go home from turkey They're going to take a few breaks Take a few days to take a break They're going to come back with new official positions from zelensky and his counterpart Vladimir Putin And it does seem more and more likely that zelensky and Putin will finally have that face to face meeting that zelensky has been calling for for the last few months Though there's still no details on winner where that might happen All right that is in purest Becky Sullivan in Kyiv Ukraine and Ampere's Tom Bowman Thank you to both of you You're welcome Of course 13 billion years That's about how long it took light from a newly discovered star to reach the Hubble Space Telescope NPR's now Greenfield Boyce reports on the most distant star ever seen When astronomers want to see far out into space really far even farther than the Hubble Space Telescope can see on its own They can take advantage of a kind of cosmic weirdness When you have a very massive object So in this case it's a cluster of galaxies That actually warps the space around it Brian Welch is an astronomer at Johns Hopkins University He says when light travels through this warped space It seems as if the light is bending around the massive object It's like a natural magnifying glass that can reveal things like faint background galaxies Recently Welch and his colleagues were looking at one region of warped space to search for distant treasures and they realized that the spot of greatest magnification contained what looked to be a single star I would say we didn't quite believe it at first It was kind of so unusual to find something like this This particular star is so far away scientists see it as it appeared when its light began its journey 12.9 billion years ago That's only 900 million years after the universe began and that makes this star the long distance record holder There are definitely galaxies that have been found at greater distances It's just in this one we're able to actually pick out the light from this one individual star A report in the journal nature says this star is at least 50 times the mass of our sun And being within the first 900 million years of the universe it's likely that it's going to look quite a bit different than stars that we see in the local universe today One astronomer who studies the early universe says finding this was quite the lucky break Garth ellingworth is with the University of California Santa Cruz It's remarkable to find an object like that right on the most highly magnified part of a cluster So that in itself is sort of an astonishing discovery More information like what this early star is made of should come from planned observations with.

zelensky Ukraine Becky Sullivan Tom Bowman Russia Greenfield Boyce Brian Welch Vladimir Putin Ampere Kyiv Putin NPR Johns Hopkins University Welch Garth ellingworth the journal University of California Santa Cruz
Levi Lusko: Hubble Space Telescope as a Spiritual Metaphor

Focus On the Family Daily Broadcast

01:46 min | 9 months ago

Levi Lusko: Hubble Space Telescope as a Spiritual Metaphor

"You like to talk about the Hubble telescope, how do you use that as a spiritual metaphor? It's a great story because the year is 1990 and Hubble has just been launched and they spend a billion and a half dollars on it. A lot of people thought it wasn't worth the money. But they said, no, if we can get this thing out there above the atmosphere, it can see the heavens and broadcast back to earth what it's seeing on obstructed and will have a greater understanding of our solar system and universe. And so they get this thing launched and they fire it up and everyone's sitting at NASA in the first image loads and it's blurry. Second image blurry, third all the images are blurry. It's worthless. It's very good at a lot of things. It just can't see very far because they miss calibrated the primary optical component, making Hubble basically nearsighted. Hubble needed glasses, guys. So what they did was they loaded up the same lens, but with the same problem backwards, and they loaded it up on space shuttle endeavor. They caught Hubble. Now mind you, it's moving 17,000 miles an hour, 366 miles above the earth, and they put the basically they put a contact lens in front of it. And when they fired it up afresh, all the images became crisp, and until James Webb telescope gets launched, presumably in the next 12 months or so, Hubble has been and remains the gold standard in telescopes that have ever reported images back of the deep space field, et cetera, et cetera. The story is cool because it shows us this. When Hubble was looking at the universe and sending blurry images back, the images it was seeing were in 3D. They were beautiful. They were crisp. The problem was the lens. And the lens it was looking through. And I think for a lot of us, when we look at our lives and we look at the pain that we face, we see blurry. And it's not that the things we're looking at are the problem. It's to how we're seeing them that is.

Hubble Nasa James Webb
"hubble space telescope" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"hubble space telescope" Discussed on WTOP

"Who takes the dulles greenway on your daily commute there may be some good news coming Drivers might be paying less for tolls in the coming year Virginia lawmakers would consider a bill that would reduce current toll costs on the greenway and create distance based pricing They'd senator Jennifer boysko and delegate David Reed say that the green way is the only privately owned toll road in the state and the owners request increases that often exceed the cost of inflation Their bill would bring loudon county supervisors into the loop to no details of negotiations between the state and greenway owners the CEO says that they support distance based pricing and welcome the chance to work with a General Assembly Vita and loudon county Neal log didn't stay in double UTL pi news Well here's something More people are leaving D.C. percentage wise than in any other place in the country The U.S. Census Bureau says the districts population fell overall by nearly 3% in the last year That's almost twice the percentage of people leaving New York City Since us numbers show 23,030 people who call D.C. home in July 2020 no longer did one year later while the district gained nearly 3300 people in that time It wasn't nearly enough to offset the loss which the Census Bureau blames on a decrease in net international migration and fertility along with a rise in deaths due in part to the COVID-19 pandemic Matt small wtop news Hey did you watch the launch yesterday of the James Webb space telescope How awesome was that right Well it's the most powerful telescope ever made by the way Space reporter Greg redfern explains it's supposed to be replacing the Hubble Space Telescope Hubble Space Telescope is 30 years on in age but it is still functioning They're really hoping to be able to combine Hubble Space Telescope and James Webb space telescope in observations of the universe So they complement each other Nobody really knows how much longer HST has to go But the important thing is that we now in 6 months will have two functioning space telescopes that can complement each other as we try to find out more about the universe in which we live That is our space reporter Greg Redford and coming up in money news how the pandemic is changing the way we get food It's 7 23.

loudon county senator Jennifer boysko Neal log David Reed Census Bureau D.C. COVID Matt small greenway James Webb Virginia General Assembly Greg redfern New York City us Greg Redford
"hubble space telescope" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"hubble space telescope" Discussed on WTOP

"Space telescope off the coast of French Guiana the rocket took off to outer space holding precious cargo a $10 billion telescope the web telescope is designed to look at a crucial stretch of the early cosmos known to astronomers as the dark ages the telescope will be able to capture ancient light emitted from 13 billion years ago This will allow scientists to hopefully solve some of the mysteries of the Big Bang The birth of physical existence And what about the good old Hubble Space Telescope Hubble space telescope is 30 years on in age but it is still functioning They're really hoping to be able to combine Hubble Space Telescope and James Webb space telescope in observations of the universe So they complement each other Nobody really knows how much longer HST has to go But the important thing is that we now in 6 months will have two functioning space telescopes that can complement each other as we try to find out more about the universe in which we live Space reporter Greg Redford Hundreds of people spent part of Christmas walking in front of The White House but this wasn't a demonstration Just people enjoying a big tree Here at the national Christmas tree you can see onlookers sporting shorts and t-shirts because of the weather It's a nice day out for a walk and enjoy the sights Yeah the weather's nice today so Over 50 other trees surround the big one each representing a state or territory and even a tree for the Department of the Interior's bureau of Indian education Janet from Damascus has been coming for years And it's this bad 5th or 6th time coming down here So it's a great idea I just love it Her husband Paul That's like seeing the different decorations for the front of the different states You know try to try to pick things up from the state Their favorite was of course the Maryland tree Here at the ellipse wishing you a Merry Christmas Luke Luke or WTO news Still ahead NFL superstar quarterback Aaron Rodgers has been controversial at times this year but in terms of his play on the field on what his team is doing it really is something else Frank will fill.

French Guiana Greg Redford James Webb Department of the Interior's b White House Damascus Luke Luke Paul Maryland WTO Aaron Rodgers NFL Frank
"hubble space telescope" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"hubble space telescope" Discussed on WTOP

"A tropical rainforest to the edge of time itself James Webb begins a voyage back to the birth of the universe That's the sound of the launch of the James Webb space telescope off the coast of French Guiana the rocket took off holding precious cargo attend $1 billion telescope It's designed to look at a crucial stretch of the early cosmos known to astronomers as the dark ages The telescope will be able to capture ancient light emitted more than 13 billion years ago This will allow scientists to hopefully solve the mystery of the Big Bang the birth of physical existence So with that what will happen to the Hubble Space Telescope Space reporter Greg redfern explains Hubble Space Telescope is 30 years on in age but it is still functioning They're really hoping to be able to combine Hubble Space Telescope and James Webb space telescope in observations of the universe So they complement each other Nobody really knows how much longer HST has to go But the important thing is that we now in 6 months will have two functioning space telescopes that can complement each other as we try to find out more about the universe in which we live TOP space reporter Greg redfern Authorities on one of Spain's Canary Islands have declared a volcanic eruption that started in September officially finished The announcement came after ten days of no lava flow seismic activity or significant sulfur dioxide emissions But officials say the emergency in la Palma is far from over due to the widespread damage that that eruption caused Just ahead how the Pope is celebrating Christmas It's three 33.

James Webb Greg redfern French Guiana Canary Islands Spain la Palma
"hubble space telescope" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:02 min | 1 year ago

"hubble space telescope" Discussed on WTOP

"Greg Robinson the program's director says everything went as planned We all know journey thanks to this tremendous partnership Say the world gave us this telescope and we handed it back to the world today Space reporter Greg redfern joined me this morning to talk about this amazing achievement What a great Christmas present the world got today with the launch of James Webb space telescope Really Quite a Christmas gift for the team that's worked so hard and long on this project right Spend 30 years coming sandy I mean it used to be called the next generation space telescope when they were fleshing out the designs And then they said all right we're going to put a 6.5 meter telescope on a space based plane and we're going to build it to fit into a rocket the area on 5 was the biggest available at the time And here we are 30 days later And can you believe sandy James Webb is already almost 46,000 miles away from earth and over 5% towards its million mile journey towards L two that to me is pretty amazing Wow Well tell us what this telescope is programmed to do and what's the timeline for it to actually go into action The trip to this special orbit called L two and we explain all that on our WTO P live block slide It's a 29 day journey to cover the million miles and it takes 6 months for the telescope to cool down sufficiently to get the -400°F The telescope has to be that cold sandy in order to intercept and collect light that is traveling from 13 and a half billion years ago to get to the instrument So we can find the first stars the first galaxies to form We're going to be able to look at all these 4000 plus planets beyond our solar system called exoplanets We're also going to be able to do science in our own solar system from the planet Mars all the way out to the dimmest recesses of an area we call the Kuiper belt It's just fascinating stuff It's amazing And briefly Greg what happens to the Hubble Space Telescope which it is meant to replace Hubble space telescope is 30 years on in age but it is still functioning There really hoping to be able to combine Hubble Space Telescope and James Webb space telescope in observations of the universe So they compliment each other Nobody really knows how much longer HST has to go But the important thing is that we now in 6 months will have two functioning space telescopes that can complement each other as we try to find out more about the universe in which we live You can read more about this historic launch on Greg redfern's blog at.

James Webb Greg redfern Greg Robinson WTO Greg
"hubble space telescope" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"hubble space telescope" Discussed on WTOP

"Schedule your free estimate today It's 1111 NASA's James Webb space telescope the world's largest and most powerful rocketed away today from French Guiana and South America's northeastern coast Greg Robinson is the program director and says everything went as planned We are now journey thanks to this tremendous partnership Say the world gave us this telescope and we heading back to the world today Joining us to talk about this amazing achievement is based reporter Greg redfern Greg Merry Christmas Merry Christmas And what a great Christmas present the world got today with the launch of James Webb space telescope Really Quite a Christmas gift for the team that's worked so hard and long on this project right Spend 30 years coming sandy I mean it used to be called the next generation space telescope when they were fleshing out the designs And then they said all right we're going to put a 6.5 meter telescope on a space based plane and we're going to build it to fit into a rocket the area on 5 was the biggest available at the time And here we are 30 days later And can you believe sandy James Webb is already almost 46,000 miles away from earth and over 5% towards its million mile journey towards L two that to me is pretty amazing Wow Well tell us what this telescope is programmed to do and what's the timeline for it to actually go into action The trip to the special orbit called L two and we explain all that on our debut live block site is a 29 day journey to cover the million miles and it takes 6 months for the telescope to cool down sufficiently to get the -400°F The telescope has to be that cold sandy in order to intercept and collect light that is traveling from 13 and a half billion years ago to get to the instrument So we can find the first stars the first galaxies to form We're going to be able to look at all these 4000 plus planets beyond our solar system called exoplanets We're also going to be able to do science in our own solar system from the planet Mars all the way out to the dimmest recesses of an area we call the Kuiper belt It's just fascinating stuff It's amazing And briefly Greg what happens to the Hubble Space Telescope which it is meant to replace Hubble Space Telescope is 30 years on in age but it is still functioning There really hoping to be able to combine Hubble Space Telescope and James Webb space telescope in observations of the universe So they complement each other Nobody really knows how much longer HST has to go But the important thing is that we now in 6 months will have two functioning space telescopes that can complement each other as we try to find out more about the universe in which we live Okay thank you very much Greg and enjoy the rest of your holiday Excuse me go James Webb and thank you very much sandy more detailed at WTO Okay thank you very much Greg WTO P space reporter Greg Redford and as Greg said you can read more about the historic launch and Craig's blog on wtp.

James Webb Greg redfern Greg Merry Greg Robinson French Guiana NASA South America Greg Greg WTO Greg Redford Craig
"hubble space telescope" Discussed on Unexplainable

Unexplainable

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"hubble space telescope" Discussed on Unexplainable

"And still have to go how far we hundred eighty one mile above the earth. We see socks gloves. Felix voting in orbit the hobbled telescope which far we have when the hubble space telescope launched in nineteen ninety. It was a gigantic leap forward. Hubbell was something that scientists dreamed about having for decades reporter. Brian resnick on earth. You know we can put telescopes on mountain tops but space Putting telescopes and space as kind of like the ultimate mountaintop and from its orbit around the earth hubble revolutionized our understanding of the universe puddle taught us that the universe is expanding faster and faster all the time it helps us determine about how old the universe is then. This is not a small thing giving us these ridiculously beautiful images. The orion nebula the deep field the pillars of creation. But now we're on the verge of a new era. This is the future nasr's james webb space telescope. The web telescope which is named after a former nasa administrator is the biggest most powerful space telescope ever built. It's grand scientific undertaking space telescope so sensitive it compared deeper into the cosmos than any previous orbiting. Observatory a reporter. Brian's been talking about the web since we launched this show and he's been speaking to tons of astronomers who all have research project lined up. This is really the reason why why to bring it to the show because this is the machine for answering unanswered questions. I definitely think that well will be a paradigm shift telescope. We're going right up to the edge of the observable universe. The web represents the culmination of decades if not centuries of astronomy we will find things that completely surprise us. It'll give us a view of parts of the universe. We've never seen before things. That fundamentally changed the way that we understand the universe. I'm no i'm hassenfeld. And for the next two weeks on unexplainable will be diving into question.

Brian resnick Hubbell Felix james webb nasa Brian hassenfeld
NASA Returns Hubble Space Telescope to Science Operations

John Bachelor

02:07 min | 1 year ago

NASA Returns Hubble Space Telescope to Science Operations

"Your generosity towards Bob's behind the Black during fundraising July is extremely appreciated. However, we go to one of Bob's four books, his biography of the Universe and Amir Hubble. Because Bob can help us understand the latest. We know of the patch or fix or remedy offered for hubba. Bob, Can you offer us a moment to believe that Hubble can be well again? Uh, no. I can tell you what's happening right now. But until it's done, we have no idea. NASA as now. This is actually engineers Goddard Space Flight Center in a Space Telescope Science institute that operate Hubble. They have now think they have determined exactly what caused the computer problem that shut the telescope down on June 13th more than a month ago, and they think it's a component in what in their science, instrument command and data handling unit that's computer, essentially And it's what they call the power control unit. Basically, think of the power supply unit and your desktop computer, which you can normally just take out and replace. But in this case, they can't do that. They have a backup for it, but it's part of a backup for the whole computer. Essentially, at least this whole command and data handling unit. And so they need to switch more than just the power control unit. Things may need to switch several units at once, and that's a complicated procedure. They've done a complete simulated test of that switch. On the ground successfully. They actually did a similar switch on Hubble back in, Oh, eight, and so whoever they and they have now begun began on Thursday, the 15th of July. They began that switch on the telescope. It's going to take several days to complete it, and then they once they completed they will do some additional tests, hopefully to make sure everything's working. And then put the telescope back an operation Now one will the test this switch work? We don't know until they've got it, too. Even if this does work, be prepared, be recognized that the telescope will no longer have backups to this computer computer data handling unit. So that

BOB Amir Hubble Space Telescope Science Instit Goddard Space Flight Center Nasa
Hubble Space Telescope Is Working Again  After NASA Fixes Odd Glitch

Tim Conway Jr.

00:16 sec | 1 year ago

Hubble Space Telescope Is Working Again After NASA Fixes Odd Glitch

"NASA says engineers have successfully switched to backup equipment on the Hubble Space Telescope. About a month after the telescopes, payload computers shut down. Hubbell's been in space since 1990 sending back photographs of the universe, NASA says If everything goes well science observations because should resume

Nasa Hubbell
NASA Revives Ailing Hubble Space Telescope With Switch to Backup Computer

Anna Davlantes

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

NASA Revives Ailing Hubble Space Telescope With Switch to Backup Computer

"hubble space telescope" Discussed on NoCo Now ? 1310 KFKA

NoCo Now ? 1310 KFKA

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"hubble space telescope" Discussed on NoCo Now ? 1310 KFKA

"Science. There is no science done anywhere in the world while the hubble telescope was down apparently by news This was actually this. That's why this story sounds last week when when we'll get to the news or not segment where we call out media for. Well was this a good. Was this really news that needed to be written or not so much. This was a story that Angel padilla brought in Last week for the news or not. And i did say this was news obviously in following up with it so it must have been must've been news But they do get the hubble. The hubble space telescope should be back in action soon Following a tricky remote repair job by nasa the orbiting observatory went dark in mid june with all astronomical viewing halted nasa initially suspected nineteen eighty s era. Computer is the source of the problem. Really we had a nineteen eighties era computer up on the hubble but my iphones done after six months what is wrong with that. I mean seriously this thing as soon as the new model comes out search dropping calls left and right but we have a nineteen eighties era. Computer there were not a lot of computers back in one thousand nine hundred and it's still up and functioning on the hubble space telescope They also after the backup payload computer also failed flight controllers at maryland's goddard space fight center focused on the science instruments bigger and more cups in command and data unit installed by spacewalking astronauts in two thousand and nine. The engineers successfully switched to the backup equipment. Thursday and the crucial payload computer kicked in nasa said friday that science observations should resume quickly. If everything goes well what if they just turn back on and then there's just alien ships everywhere and it's like oh that was the by. There's our movie guys. That's the movie we need to produce aliens come in cut out the hubble telescope. They can't scare. We can't see them coming boom. They're here by hit. We in we in tell you what Dailies are in here today. And they're not going to be here this weekend so you might as well go enjoy. Terry bison ranch. It's fun for the whole family. At the terry bison ranch resort in cheyenne america's only bison trained to her cabins and pull through. Rv spaces so you don't even have to rent a room. Bring your camper on atv tours. Fantastic horseback riding trails and tours great restaurants for dining as well all of that information is on terry bison ranch dot com terry bison ranch dot com. Let them know when you get up there where you heard about them. It is pretty cool all the different animals that they have up at terry bison ranch you got the campbell's up there obviously there's by sit up there But check it out terry. Bison ranch appreciate sponsorship on this program coming up our number two we've got. Let's see here. We'll get into the sports world. I give my predictions for the nba finals tonight. trevor story. Is he going anywhere. Or is he gonna be here We'll talk. Sports will talk to shine shop with david. Pennington the owner of the shop. The garvey cinnamon spirit. The apple gavin cinnamon spirit. Check it out. They've got some fun stuff coming up this weekend as well and then Agent joins me for news or not all that coming up our number two. You don't wanna miss it. Keyboard here on northern colorado's voice thirteen ten. Kfi gay back in a flash..

Angel padilla nasa goddard space fight center terry bison Terry bison terry bison ranch resort maryland terry bison ranch Bison ranch cheyenne america campbell terry trevor nba Pennington david apple colorado
NASA Set for Attempt to Fix Hubble's Trouble

WBZ Morning News

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

NASA Set for Attempt to Fix Hubble's Trouble

"Engineering teams have just reviewed plans to fix and reactivate the Hubble Space Telescope, which has been out of commission more than a month after a computer failure Also really exciting. Um At this point where we're at this critical point where we have identified an issue wanted to telescope, but we we feel confident that we're going to be able to fix it and get right back to doing this Amazing. Hubble Science Master's Zynga toll says they will transmit commands to activate backup systems, but that's complicated. Astronauts last upgraded the 31 year old Hubble in 2000 and nine and can't repair it anymore since the retirement of the shuttle fleet.

Hubble Science Master Zynga
Automatic Identification of Outlier Galaxy Images

Data Skeptic

01:50 min | 1 year ago

Automatic Identification of Outlier Galaxy Images

"Shamir from kansas state university. I invited you on to talk about the paper automatic identification of outliers in hubble space telescope galaxy images. So a lot of fun stuff to get into maybe to start. I think everybody knows a little bit about the hubble telescope. Could you tell us about the data we get back from it. Are these just. Png files or what are you. Start from caso. It will happen space. says civil instruments on hubble space telescope not just the main camera but it collects all sorts of the we know the hubble deep field which is when freeing that was one segment of the sky was going for civil days very long exposure goldie but other surveys done by hubble space telescope and i was i into the cosmos survey of several shirley lodge survey covering a relatively large part of the sky explains the cosmos was to score degrees. Doesn't sound but in help terms this. Because bill goes really deep deeper than guam-based those scopes. So that's what. I covered the data that you get his image data that i used incomes informants feats debts former. That is very common in a strong meets. Not very common outside feels strongly but that's the standard format of astronomy eats. Uniqueness is that it allows to make the metric measurements for the day dining j. peg form. It's like that we often use. I know in image netease like that. We cannot remake safety for to metric measurements because the dynamic range. Compression away the feeds. That's a each week. Salihi is represented by in algebra. Be in one by twitch channel but actually it's quite a day name. Acquaintances allows medical measurements.

Shamir Kansas State University Shirley Lodge Salihi
NASA Reports Trouble With Hubble Space Telescope

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

NASA Reports Trouble With Hubble Space Telescope

"Hubble space telescope has been hit with computer trouble with all astronomical viewing halted did the russians hacking maybe put the orbiting observatory has been idle since sunday when the nineteen eighties era computer that controls the science instruments shutdown possibly because of a bad memory board flight controllers at nasa goddard. Space flight center in maryland tried to restart the computer on monday. But the same thing happened. Oh there now to switch to a backup memory unit. If that works the telescope will be tested for a day before the science instruments are turned back on. observations can resume for now. The cameras and other instruments are in a so-called safe mode.

Space Flight Center Nasa Maryland
"hubble space telescope" Discussed on KPRC 950 AM

KPRC 950 AM

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"hubble space telescope" Discussed on KPRC 950 AM

"Fox Nation. A lawsuit is filed in Indiana over the state's plan to end federal unemployment. Pandemic benefit challenge brought in part by Indiana Legal services is based on state law. If there are funds in the federal unemployment Trust fund that it's the policy of the state to go get those benefits for eligible Hoosiers attorney Jennifer Terry, though the state says that it's completed all required steps to end of participation in the federal program, and but If it's that Indiana governor Eric Holcomb also says are no longer needed, signing a hiring problem amid Indiana's 116,000 job openings. Jeff Man ourself. Fox News leader of North Korea has been seen in public for the first time in a while, and he looked noticeably different, noticeably thinner. Kim Jong UN addressed a party conference this week, raising some concerns about the North Korean leader's health. You had weighed in at over £300 and is heard to breathe heavily. When he walks he lost about £50. In fact, experts believe it could be just an effort to improve his health. Ironically, he was addressing a meeting looking at food shortages around the nation hit hard by tough covid restrictions and natural disasters needed food imports have been shut down during the pandemic. Was only a brief mention of the current international situation, referring to the ongoing conflict with countries illegal nuclear weapons program in London. Greg Palkot Fox News the Hubble Space Telescope is having some computer trouble, NASA says it's been off lines in Sunday when a 19 eighties era computer that controls its instruments shut down, possibly due to a bad memory board. Flight controllers are now trying to switch to a backup memory unit. The Hubble telescope was launched in 1990 is showing more and more signs of aging despite the series of repairs during NASA's shuttle era. I'm Lee Sela, Sarah, and this is Fox News..

Greg Palkot Sarah Lee Sela NASA 1990 London Jennifer Terry Fox News Sunday Kim Jong Indiana Fox Nation about £50 this week Eric Holcomb over £300 first time Indiana Legal services Jeff Man Hubble Space Telescope
"hubble space telescope" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"hubble space telescope" Discussed on AP News

"The erosion fight there is in the marshland. It works well in South Louisiana, because you're like it's we like a slow pace. So if we can Slow things down. It has a really positive effect. Land manager Heath Romero says. The strategy is to grow grasp. It forms a barrier so it catches the sediment behind it. So you get the other grasses that take off behind it. And as it builds up, you know you reclaim March. Osborne says The effort is probably a standoff, but Avery Island is slowly rising. I'm Ed Donahue, Katie News. I'm Ed Donahue, President Biden and Putin have ended their summit in Switzerland. The AP Soccer Madani has the story President Biden called it a meeting of two great powers face to face discussions at a lush villa overlooking Lake Geneva. It began with a handshake and quickly turned awkward. The two men appeared to avoid looking at each other during a brief appearance before jostling reporters. They ended up spending nearly four hours together, first in a smaller session would just their top diplomats and interpreters and then, in a bigger meeting with other officials, neither side came in expecting any breakthroughs. Sagar Megane, Washington Born travelers start packing your bags. European Union members agreed to add the U. S to the list of countries they should gradually removed restrictions from on non essential travel. Alexander de Croo is Belgium's prime minister. Let's look at science and let's look at the progress. Let's look at the numbers and when it's safe, we will do it. Japan is expected to ease a coronavirus state of emergency in Tokyo and most other areas by this weekend. The Olympics in Tokyo are starting in just over a month, The Mexican resort of Cozumel welcomed the first arrival of a cruise ship carrying passengers since the coronavirus pandemic essentially collapsed. The industry. The cruise line required all passengers, 16 and over to be fully vaccinated. But the governor in Cozumel says about 5% of passengers on board. Largely young people or those with chronic health conditions haven't been vaccinated. Israeli airstrikes hit militant sites in the Gaza Strip and Palestinians responded by sending a series of fire carrying balloons back across the border for a second straight day. The moves pose further test to a fragile ceasefire that ended last month's war between Israel and Hamas. NASA says the Hubble Space Telescope has been hit with computer trouble with all astronomical viewing halted. This is a P news Many Americans.

Ed Donahue Heath Romero Alexander de Croo NASA Putin Hamas Gaza Strip South Louisiana European Union Switzerland Tokyo 16 Lake Geneva Olympics Avery Island two men Israel Cozumel Hubble Space Telescope last month
A Record-Breaking Flare From Sun's Nearest Stellar Neighbour

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

02:18 min | 1 year ago

A Record-Breaking Flare From Sun's Nearest Stellar Neighbour

"Astronomers have detected one of the most violent still aflame ever recorded in the galaxy exploding out of proxima centauri the nearest star system that the sun the massive flare reported in the estra physical journal is the largest ever recorded coming from proxima centauri a small special tie. Game red dwarf star located just four point two five light years away. Proxima centauri has twelve percent the mass and fourteen percent the radius of the sun. It is a surface temperature of thousand seven hundred and seventy seven degrees celsius and is better thousand times less luminous than the sun. it's known to have. At least two orbiting planets one of which proxima b. is similar in size to the earth and orbits within the star's habitable zone. That's the region around a star with temperatures would allow liquid water central for life as we know it to exist on the planet. Surface red dwarfs are the most common type of star in the milky way galaxy making up about three quarters of all the stars in the galaxy. And because they're relatively dim it's easy to find orbiting except planets around them consequently the most common known source of exoplanets. And for this reason proximus story has long been a target for scientists have been defined life beyond the solar system. However there's always been a problem with red dwarf stars and that includes proxima centauri. They produce violent flares spilling out huge amounts of energy and plasma into the surrounding space. Eventually this would erode away any atmosphere around by planet. A would also radiate anything on the planet surface and that includes any hope of finding life on the surface of proxima b. The study's lead author assistant professor mcgregor from the university of colorado. Boulder says red dwarfs flare a lot more than stars like the sun and astronomers are only now beginning to understand the magnitude and character of their flays mcgregor and colleagues observed proxima centauri for forty hours using nine ground and space based telescopes including the square kilometer. Ray pathfinder as gap nassar's hubble space telescope the atacama large millimeter submillimeter array radio telescope alma and nasa transiting exoplanet survey satellite tests. This marked the first time. Astronomers have had this kind of multi wavelength coverage of a stellar flare.

Estra Physical Journal University Of Colorado Mcgregor Ray Pathfinder Gap Nassar Boulder Nasa
Lego is Releasing New Space Shuttle Set

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:21 sec | 1 year ago

Lego is Releasing New Space Shuttle Set

"The space shuttle Discovery and the Hubble Space Telescope. The set will be released in April and was created in partnership with NASA to mark the 40th anniversary since the first space shuttle flight on April 12th 1981. The shuttle model costs $199 and has more than 2300 pieces. Looks like a doubt will give back some of

Nasa
"hubble space telescope" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

05:48 min | 2 years ago

"hubble space telescope" Discussed on KPCC

"How will our knowledge of possible life on Mars affect the way we think about ourselves? And I would love to hear from both of you on this, Nadia. Yeah. So I think when When we're thinking about ourselves. What we really want to know is how common is life. How common Is it for life forms to evolve and be intelligent, like humans or communicating? And so When we're looking for life elsewhere beyond Earth. There are two answers one. It's there or two. It's not and either. One of those answers is incredibly profound. It's going to tell us something really, really important about ourselves about life on Earth about how common it is. And so when we look at Mars, one of the reasons why it's really interesting is because Multiple billions of years ago. We think Mars was much more like Earth that it had the right conditions for life to evolve. So if we go there, and we look at it, and we say, Hey, so the prebiotic soup of stuff that somehow evolved into life on Earth was also on Mars didn't give rise to life. If the answer is no, that tells us something pretty important about life on Earth. If the answer is yes, that also tells us something pretty important about life on Earth. And so either way, you answer that question. It's going to be profound. Michelle, What about for you? Absolutely No. We were talking about different places in the solar system to go looking for life. And, you know, I think on Mars the focus is, you know ancient microbial life, possibly current existing microbial life. But then you know what? Let me go out to the outer solar system. You don't want to give people the impression that we're only focusing on Mars. You know, we there's AH, There's a moon of Saturn called Titan that has actually open open lakes and rivers, and it's raining, but it's not raining water. It's actually raining liquid methane, natural gas organics. And you know, we are currently making a doctor copter the size of a car called Dragon fly that said, that's going to go get it actually go around that moon and again search for the chemistry. What is an Octa copter? You have to explain that they think about you. For better or for worse. One of these little drones, right? It has basically eight, You know, blades that are all going around. And and and so you know it zit like a large version of one of those little mini tries, drones you can control and take pictures with and all of that. And, you know, we also have a mission scheduled to go up to Europol, which, as I mentioned, has vast under ice ocean, probably at least twice as much liquid water as the Earth. And we found out recently by using the Hubble Space Telescope that there are cracks in the ice or water vapor is actually venting out of so we may be able to sample these oceans even by orbiting around your open. We may not even have to land there. We did the same thing for Moon of Saturn called Enceladus, where we did sample the oceans again from from vents in the ice and found out that there is this wonderful warm salt water and they're organic molecules in it. Today. So you mean all of those things beckon us. And the question is not just, you know. Is there life or not? Which is incredibly profound, But how similar is it to us? Does it use something like Edna to actually code? It's information. Is it totally different. How would you recognize life? This was a question you asked earlier in the hour, which is fascinating. How would you recognize the very beginning of life or life with a substantially different chemistry than our own? If you can't actually bring a microscope and look for little things moving around, So you know, I mean, I I've been chilling a bottle of champagne for 10 years now in my refrigerator, hoping that we will have real concrete scientific evidence of life outside the earth. And I still got it and I want to drink it. And I'm hoping in the next decade, I can pop that bottle of champagne. I'm Jenn White. You're listening to one, eh? Talking to Michelle Thaler, assistant director for science communications at NASA, and Nadia Drake, a contributing writer at National Geographic. We got this question from gyro who says with up and coming private companies in the space industry. How do you see spacecraft related projects becoming privatized or commodified? As we move towards planetary exploration, and I'd love to hear from both of you on this is well, Michelle. I think it's wonderful. I mean, you know, I mean, basically, the more information the more data, the more people that that that think of using space for technology. I mean, all of these things that the more the merrier. And and here again, I think that there's sort of this false idea of competition where, In fact, there's collaboration. You know, I mean, recently you hopefully in the news, you saw that it was space six rockets that we're launching our astronauts to the International Space station. We certainly don't think of Space X or any of the private space companies now as competitors. We we think of them as new collaborators that could help us. Find better solutions that how to get to the space station or how to get to Mars. So you know, this is something that you NASA is very interested in very encouraging of. You know, we talked about more nations in space. But more companies and spaces well, absolutely And and and hopefully if we have companies building rockets that NASA could buy and use and fund the development of We can actually make this even even less expensive. Not in your thought. I agree with Michelle completely. I just wanted to add that I think, as we see more of the private sector, taking a role in exploration that it's important to really think about the ethical framework in which that's happening. When I think that's a little bit trickier when you're dealing with private actors, and so my slight concern is that we might Commit some of the same mistakes in space that we've made on this planet..

Michelle Thaler NASA Hubble Space Telescope International Space station Europol Octa gyro Edna Jenn White Nadia Drake assistant director National Geographic writer
"hubble space telescope" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"hubble space telescope" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Then what if your parents were gone and never came back? You'd only have us Disney. All right. Camera, The nation let out a collective sigh of relief today as astronaut Dr Ryan Stone safely returned to Earth after a harrowing accident during maintenance of the Hubble Space Telescope. NASA spokesperson described her journey as quote seemingly impossible from a scientific perspective. I believe we're talking about gravity prequel to the Martian that, Zach Yeah, exactly right where we find out that Space underwear is boy shorts. That's what I took away from the entire movie I was with. Here's the thing. I was with it the whole time. And I'm not against seeing Sandra and underwear. But I was like, really, guys, You're just sitting here like here's a great movie. Are you guys bored? You know, just like, Wait. I don't remember. Why did she have to get was no reason for it. Oh, this is it's really important to acknowledge here the cinematic history behind putting a woman in her underwear in space at a time that it is not helpful are necessary to the story. Perhaps the root of that entire cinematic trope is the end of the movie Alien where the river is about to go in the pot and take a long snooze, but then gets down to What are the closest underwear to a thong that you could wear besides a being of all underwear and a crop top and the next one alien comes back. And so for some reason, For its shoved out the airlock. She's fighting it in her all the way New these e think there's like some famous Carrie Fisher conversation of when she first got Past his Princess Leia in Star Wars that she was told that in in space, there are no bras. Oh, sure, right, And she wears that There's no gravity. So just that's next. That's next movie. All right, Beth. Here is a question for you. Or rather, here's a fake newscast for you. Yeah. New information today on the monsters terrorizing the planet. Reports indicate that they're blind with incredibly sensitive hearing. In fact, it is probably not a good idea for me to be loudly reading this report, and I should switch to print journalism..

Zach Yeah Hubble Space Telescope Sandra Disney Dr Ryan Stone Carrie Fisher NASA sensitive hearing Beth
Interview with Phil McAlister

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

06:53 min | 2 years ago

Interview with Phil McAlister

"Hello and welcome to the skeptics guide to the universe. Today is sunday january seventeenth twenty twenty one. And this is your host. Stephen avella joining me this week. Or bob novella. Everybody cara santa maria. Howdy joy novella. Hey guys and evan bernstein skepticism. On a sunday. I love it. This is a rare sunday recording. We're doing this because of the twelve hour show next saturday. The saturday this show comes out. I probably will be posted in this up right before we begin to twelve hours. Show so if. You're listening to this on saturday that it comes out. We're probably in the middle of the twelve hour show. Why aren't you watching that instead. Leaving this to console you on sunday or monday because the twelve hour livestream is over priorities. So we're not keep saying like we're trying to get away from doing the covert thing every week but there's always stuff to talk about that has to recover recovered. Schwab one thing about it. Obviously it's still raging the numbers that getting scary high still is crazy but david kessler which was announced as the covert czar for the incoming biden. Administration you guys remember who he is. Yes cast that. He was in From london movie right cutler no he was a former head of the fda in the ninety s and after his stint in the at the fda in the nineties the president for a while of yale school of medicine. That's how i. I know you have on speedo him personally. But you know the commissioner of food and drugs for h w bush and clinton muslim sounds nonpartisan. I like that a he. He was very much opposed to the shea. Dietary supplement health and education. Act which was a terrible loss stills eternal and he was he was completely right correct in his opposition to it so hopefully because a lot of experience. Hopefully he'll will prove to be the right person for this job. And we're hoping to shift into high gear will along that line steve in three days. Yeah did you hear. That biden is elevating. He's making a cabinet of science. Yes yes scientists. -nology whatever is now going to be cabinet. Level is a cabinet level position for the first ever cap which will not be in the line of succession by the way. It's a cabinet level position. But it's not a cabinet position. I thought he was building a cabinet filled with cool science thing like curio cabinet closet of mystery. I remember that from what is this endless fascination with forbidden closet of mr really cool i mean. It's the first time the president has ever put somebody at that high. A level in science position which conferences shows his commitment to evidence based policy and also francis. Arnold who i'm super excited about you guys remember. She's caltech scientist who recently won a nobel prize. She's going to be within his his group. I'm not really sure how everybody's designated quite yet but within that group of scientists which is very exciting. I think it should be like the bridge of the enterprise. D where you've got the president the vice president and you've got the czar of science right up there with the big boys because that's where belongs in the position that the council the troy was in. That's what i'm saying. Sitting do truth be told captains left. I am kind of glad that it's not a. I shouldn't say this i don't know i don't know if i would want it to be a cabinet position because then because then they enter into the line of succession and i do worry that whoever is appointed could potentially be. Isn't that a worry about every single cabinet level position. Never i mean. Is there a cabinet member. You guys ready to become president on day one. I mean unless you've watched the survivor soul survivor. Some of those people have served in previous administrations have worked in government. It's obviously it's never happened. I it's so unlikely that i don't think someone's going to pick or not pick a cabinet member because they don't think that they're ready to be president. Yeah i mean why. Scientists are science minded person. Good as president. I think that's what we want. They wouldn't necessarily be it would be but they would still need to be somebody who has executive leadership skills all right. Let's get right into some news items. Is it true that astronomers were wrong about the number of galaxies in the universe. a what. Yeah they're often wrong about stuff like that so yeah. The estimated number of galaxies in the universe was recently cut in half. You are correct steve. So how the hell did this happen. And and more importantly what is the worst title for a news item covering this discovery. All all will be revealed So this all started years ago when the hubble space telescope did some deep sky surveys and it came up with the estimate for the number of galaxies which was two trillion lots of galaxies two trillion in the universe. It did this by using by doing deep field observations. These are observations. That take a really long time looking at the same patch of sky. So you're you're building up the photons right you just building up. The photons. seeing what's revealed and that would that reveals after a while that reveals the very very very faint galaxies. And then then it's easy. Yes sir but can we clarify. Are you talking about the observable universe so you just just just a good point to a good time to clarify that. The the observable universe is a subset of the total universe because like because some of the universe has moved beyond the on the einstein limit rights even traveling at the speed of light. The universe is not old enough for light to travel from there to here so we can't see it's outside of our bubble our light bubble right. It's a little complicated. But yeah i think primarily although not necessarily implies that it's it's just it's just observable we'll we'll see maybe we can. Let's revisit at the end okay. So then so then. Once you have this patch of sky that you've looked at for a while Then you and then you then you know how many galaxies right then you just multiply that little patch by how many similar how many patches in the in the sky are there. And that's and that's basically. What hubble did but we knew that. That wasn't quite accurate though that that's because there has to be other galaxies that are out there that are just too faint to be directly detected even with the best deep field observation that the h. The hubble space telescope could muster onto those super faint galaxies though they do create a suffused glow. Just a general glow in the galaxy and now this background glow that i'm talking about is called the cosmic optical background which is a term. I hadn't i hadn't seen before which is fascinating because it reminded me of maybe was well the cosmic microwave background which is the first light of the universe when it became transparent to electro-magnetic radiation the cosmic optical background that was the glow of all the

Cabinet Stephen Avella Bob Novella Cara Santa Maria Evan Bernstein From London Biden FDA David Kessler Yale School Of Medicine Schwab Cutler Steve Clinton Arnold Bush Francis Troy
"hubble space telescope" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"hubble space telescope" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Do we have to go back. Detected again. So if you go back and detective again and we can't well, then it can't be confirmed. Georgie. Exactly. How would you compare the Hubble Space Telescope to the receiver? Radio Telescope Angel? Well, the Hubble was that was a reagent invention Eyes at least after the after the first day, they had a big day, Dad or ah, huge problem at the beginning, but The Hubble telescope is great because You know when you're using a a A nautical telescope from Earth that miss fear and and you know the atmosphere. Well, well, well, if it Diffuses some of the signal. So the Hubble telescope went out into into space and did this. But then again, the Hubble telescope is a reliant on the optical wavelengths. Unethical wavelengths again. We have to. We're here. We're depending on this light coming into the telescope, Whereas a radio telescope we can penetrate you know, through the atmosphere. Is there anything else? This is why I think I can talk to you. From inside my my home office here to you in in California because radio waves penetrate everything okay? And so that we don't be 10 on life. Reaching our eyes. We can actually go to this through there to the furthest depths of space with a radio telescope. George, That's amazing work. We're going to take a break pretty soon, but Let me ask you what has been the most unusual thing the telescope has spotted. I've seen a picture, for example of the spider stars that heresy Bo found which are these eight prawn stars. They look amazing. But what would you say is the most amazing thing? Well, you know, I'm kind of biased on a couple of these things here, But there were there were a few things that let me guess the real quick here. You know the observatory actually, you know, way we knew, uh, way established that the rotating later Mercury was not what it what it was. Everyone. It turns out to be 59 days, rela rather than everyone estimate was 88 days. Okay, But then my, uh then in during the first upgrade And you know the doctor Joe Taylor and the road tolls discovered a binary binary pulsars system. Okay, now that now that to me That it was. That was incredible. We also found the first uh,.

Hubble Space Telescope Georgie Joe Taylor California George
Prof. Jack Burns, Professor of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences at the University of Colorado in Boulder - burst 01

Scientific Sense

29:14 min | 2 years ago

Prof. Jack Burns, Professor of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences at the University of Colorado in Boulder - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we explore emerging ideas from signs policy economics and technology. My name is gill. Eappen we talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation be color a wide variety of domains. Rare new discoveries are made and new technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society and help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation v seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide edited content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do a companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense dot com and displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics guests at other ideas please send up to info at scientific sense dot com and i can be reached at gil at eappen dot info mike. Yesterday's a jack boone's who's a professor in the department of ece fisa goal in planetary sciences unto colorado boulder. He is also vice president images for academic affairs in blue sage for disuse system system. Jack while thank you. Joe is good to be with you. Thanks for doing this so you at your team. On deeply involved in the upcoming nasa missions to the moon including The designed to place radiofrequency absolutely on the far side of the moon and be kevin deemed really back there for almost fifty years. Now i know that china s landed. I was actually looking at some photographs that just gained today from From their lander. I israel in india. Almost got there but Fleas land properly. And so so. What's our interest. What's sudden interest in going back to the moon after fifty years. Yeah i don't know that. I would characterize as a sudden interest i think on the part of the science community and really the exploration community interest has been there for a while but what has changed in the last decade is the cost doing missions And the accessibility of the moon in this new era in which we have now. Private companies like spacex and like the blue origin company. Jeff bezos company They've put considerable private resources in developing new rockets of with reusability to lower the launch costs and also technology which was extreme in the nineteen sixties to try to get to the moon. All hannity vetted from scratch now is relatively straightforward at gill as you mentioned Even a small countries like israel Private companies have contracts with nasa to fly payloads. Now it's it's it's realizable to Envision going to the moon at a relatively modest cost certainly in comparison to the sixties and seventies. Yes so that's a. It's a very interesting phenomenon. Now it's it's almost like a business model question. Space is Blue blue horizon blue origin. Laura gin and that is another company. Lakers peterson things. Well lockheed you ally the united launch alliance which is the lockheed and boeing Company as well they all have these new generation of launch vehicles that are capable of going to so nasa in some sense outsourcing Some of the transportation right to so captain made a selection or are they going to do essentially multiple companies. Do it the the plan is to have monk multiple companies just like the commercial crew program To the space station there's boeing and spacex And for the case of the moon for the un crude landers that Landers that are just carrying payloads nasa has identified a out a dozen companies To be able to transport a payloads to the moon and at the same time. They're also undergoing competition right now. They selected three companies to design as part of a public private partnership the next generation of human landers. So that's the same. Mostly the same group that has spacex blue origin and the third one is is dynamic which is a company in huntsville alabama rate. So it's nassar's goal here is They are they going to take contracts from other other countries do send pedal to the moon in these companies. The the way this is working now is nasa is buying services so they're no longer buying rockets or landers which they will then own operate Instead the philosophy is To buy a ride for example a seat On a human land or or by space for a payload so these companies that are responsible for indemnifying Making sure they have a proper insurance for losses They take A bit of the risk and and then proceed along those lots now. What that means is that the companies then they own the intellectual property they owned landers they rockets they own the The other transportation devices. So that means they can sell seats. They can sell payloads to for example a european space agency Or the russian space agency or individual companies. That might want to puts a payload on the moon Investigation in this kind of a lower gravity environment so it's much more entrepreneurial than what we had before and it lowers the cost to the taxpayer for doing all these things by the artist program. Which is the new human programs. The moon the Recently released cost to get the first woman in the next man to the moon by twenty twenty four is a factor of ten less than the apollo program. Yeah it's interesting. I remember jack I was involved a little bit on the economic side of the next generation. Space legal program two thousand two thousand one two thousand two timeframe and this was a program was supposed to replace the shuttle and we did not go forward with it and i guess so. What was the arranged with the russian system to get their astronauts into space station. Yeah the the problem was that you might recall The shuttle accident that occurred in two thousand three And then president. George w bush declared that the shuttle really wasn't safe And that needed to be replaced and it took a while. We're still in the process of of fully replacing it. The last shuttle launch was twenty eleven If i remember correctly so in the meantime in order to get to the space station What we did is contract with the russians to use their soyuz spacecraft to go back and forth the space station so we. What we did is the buy seats. Those seats cost about seventy five or eighty million dollars so they weren't cheap but eventually got us back and forth. He said before we get the details of the Admission stack help philisophical question so way we have technology advancing the about conflict. Television's really taking off machines. Getting lot smarter What does sort of the basis for sending humans Could be not accomplished thing that human could do with machines if that's a good question i'm glad you answered that you ask that question because Excuse me i think what we're looking for now is is Really different mode for doing work on services like the moon or mars. Excuse me in that. We unlike apollo you had a single astronaut. Geologists such as astronaut harrison schmitt on all seventeen doing classic field geology. With a shovel to now advance unit twenty-first-century. We're gonna to do. Is i like to say we're going to bring Silicon valley with us to the moon. So we're going to bring advanced robotics. Be telly operated. That will use a machine. Learning artificial intelligence And will team with the astronauts so that they will these. These rovers advance scouting. They will identify interesting places and then the role of the astronaut is to make critical decisions on what to investigate What the samples. Look like i. i still think it's true. I've been told from my colleagues who are geologists stromer But who are uninsured. Scientists in that the difference for example between. Let's say the The curiosity rover on mars. And what it's been doing and having a human on mars that the work that the curiosity rover has done last seven years could be done in two days by geologists. a that's the difference and to also bring back. You know better selected samples and so forth. So there's no replacing humans and that's not going to happen anytime soon but you you do your point being. You only wanna use humans when you actually have to. Because their time is valuable and they're expensive and also Walking around even on the surface of the moon is dangerous. Because the you know the a space where the asian micrometeorites another possible dangerous but going into this new environment. I think what we're going to be able to do is reduced risk and improved efficiency. The i don't remember the numbers but a human Mission is about ten x the cost of a non human mission. Obviously the the efficiency and like you say what begin out of it different but guess on the cost side. It's about the fact of a magnitude different you know. That's hard to say because robots still are very limited in what they can do. They're just so many things that only humans can do is a little bit of apples and oranges but yet you're probably right that on the ballpark about a factor of ten. Maybe even more. But there's also much more than a factor of ten improvement in efficiency. So you know. Those costs will balance out and obviously the advantage of a human is You know they've been. The unexpected happens in michigan learning in As long as you have heard of data to teach a machine but then the unexpected happens machines. noel exactly. The rover gets stuck. It suffers a mechanical problem. That If you have a human there at least in the vicinity can help fix it. And move orders you know i think about for example servicing of the hubble space telescope and that was done five times by human astronauts and The astronauts such as john grunsfeld did to the servicing missions was very clear that the telescope could not have been repaired in upgraded by anything other than humans because the tab the complexity of the task the ability to be able to get in and To make repairs Make on the spot. Decisions just You know there was no replacing that so hopefully humans have a few more years of Do i think we've got many years to tell you the truth. I think it's going to be you know in reading some of the literature. I think it's going to be a quite a long time if ever that. We have truly Intelligent self aware machines can operate with the same decision making kick be very good at repetitive calculations outstanding job of there but You know making creative innovative entrepreneurial. Decisions were We're nowhere close to that yet So i do that. A multiple missions being planned An international collaboration so he's the first one that is supposed to take off as leave. Yeah artists is the new name for the human missions to the moon Artemis in greek mythology was the sister of apollo The twin sister of apollo. She's the goddess of the moon. So that's very appropriate. Since nasa has already declared bet up for that first landing which nasa has been planning for twenty twenty four would Would have that first woman in the next man on the surface the first expedition by humans to the moon in the twenty first century. So optimistic applaud. Its name the program programming program. Yeah exactly right so so andrade damasio multiple things going on And so do we have sort of a space station like that is going to orbit the out. Yeah in fact. That's honored design. And we'll be under construction in the next few years has called the gateway lunar gateway. And it's it's not like the space station in the sense of being gigantic And being really limited to that single orbit the gateway is really more of a spacecraft is going to have a pulse in system using a new generation of solar electric bad is ion propulsion That will be piloted for potential for optometry use in going to mars. I have just a couple of modules that will be there it will be a place where astronauts coming from the earth on on the orion spacecraft which is a it plus the space launch system is a heavy lift vehicle that will take astronauts the moon they will dock at the gateway and then they will get into a reusable lander go to the surface. Come back in that lander and then the next crew that comes in will do the same thing so you don't throw everything away like we did during hollow in the nineteen sixties again. The reusability idea is Is key to keeping the costs down so so it is more dealer so can't be attached as as alright right. Ds change in the future. Cab edge more against it. We can in fact The japanese space agency jaksa recently committed to fly a module And nasa has invited others such as the russian space agency to think about them attaching A module as well so it definitely is modular. That way you can add habitats you can add laboratories And can can grow over time. But it's also the the idea is that it's going to be long duration spaceflight and it's away way from the earth's magnetic field so you've got the full range environment of what you would have going to mars. So i think nasa all also looks at. This is a prototype of the vehicle that would be sent to mars. Lucchese david some Conversations yet again. Remember that To go to mars you would rather start off. Start off from the moon. Is that still thinking or that. Exchange i don't think that's been decided but there's this potential real advantages of a loon. First of all launching from the moon versus the earth requires much less thrust. What what we call delta the. That's the change in velocity to Get off there. Because there's only one sixth gravity on the moon and secondly if we're successful in mining water from the minute we know now there's considerable amount of water at the polls of the moon That's hydrogen and oxygen. We can convert that potentially into rocket fuel. You wouldn't have to bring that from earth so the costs associated with launching some could be substantially reduced in doing this from the moon versus from your so people are actively working that right now and seeing if that might be the way to go i of think that might end up being How missions to To mars or undertaking so under optimus Are there plans to actually create a habitat a big enough habitat for people to stave or extended period of time. So nasa has designs. And once again i should mention this is. This is all international Insa is involved. The european space agency is involved in providing a module for the service module for the orion. It also will be working on the gateway. The canadian space agency is providing the robotic arm And the same will be true on the surface The idea is that the first few missions will of just get started That first nation in twenty twenty four is planned to go to the south pole of moon. Will we've never been to before and look at the water. Ice situation there but Over time by the end of the decade the expectation is that will have multiple habitats. And we'll have people staying there for long periods of time like the arctic station. It's run by the national science foundation. The mcmurdo station as called in which you have a number of scientists come in and visit for anywhere from a few weeks to staying for year here so salama but when the next generation space program was in progress space. Too big big project. I would imagine spacex Others cab this business plan so what's the clamps time Do that The gay yes. So it'll be somewhere between three and five days to get from the earth and you're right about. The tourism spacex already has a fide a japanese businessman. If i remember correctly who has bought a A ride not the surface of the moon but to orbit the moon on a spacex vehicle. Sometime in a in a few years but the it'll be in a three to five days to get to the gateway and then Another day to get down to the surface. So i fully expect by the end of the decade especially given the accessibility to the moon by the private sector and by isa companies That they will be selling seats to wealthy individuals to spend a A summer holiday on the moon is so if the if the gateway is expandable perhaps Taxpayers can make some money nasa. Well it might be. Yeah but but once again this is. The transportation for the most part is probably not going to be through nasa but by these individual companies who own their own rockets their spacecraft and now they will sell seats to to wealthy tourists. yeah and so You you mentioned the european space agency. You mentioned the canadian space agency of so. Is this like the space station. A larger collaboration or those are the three major ones. Yeah it is and you're right. There are Oh gosh there's probably a dozen or so. Companies countries rather involved in the international space station and nasa envisions this much the same thing And i to. I order all the countries that are involved in. The international space station have been invited to become involved with the gateway And so as i mentioned several have accepted with With enthusiasms others are still keeping that around and take a quick break jack. Benny come back to talk about the radio. Frequency of savitri on the far side of the more that you're designing you bet sounds good. This is a scientific sense. Podcast providing unscripted conversations bit leading academics and researchers on a variety of topics. You like to sponsor this podcast. Please reach out to in full at scientific sense dot com back Jack you're talking about upcoming missions to the moon Some of the manned mission some of some of the technology that you're sending up there there is a gateway bridges like the space station but attested propulsion its zone. Sorta are based entity source. And it's more dealer things could be attached to it. That may be subject is imploding. Creating that a launchpad so to speak to go to mars perhaps habitats that a large announced a mining for water mighty for hydrogen and other things and so he the program is called autonomous. So could be portal light program and underneath optimists. There are various things being planned right. So what are the The primary objectives all of those radius approved betas projects. I should say under under optimus. Yeah we'll go. let me let me start off by just looking at the difference with The apollo program because the apollo program ended fairly abruptly once the political goals were reached and it was never Really a sustainable program so Nasa and i think all of the governmental space agencies are looking for is for arsonist to be the beginning of a sustained presence on the moon and in space and using the moon as a stepping stone for human and robotic exploration of the solar system including getting the mars so the philosophy of artists is really quite different. So you're there the stay So you need to figure out how to live off the land. So that does mean as you're saying mining's water being able to grow crops being able to manufacture Equipments the habitats themselves from the From the of the regular or the soil material so using the the kind of advanced manufacturing capability three d. printing Electrolysis so that's a really different approach. And it means that what will be worked on is not just get there but a flag in the ground rather in full of soil and return on instead it means You know how do you figure out how to be there for the long haul so that means than learning how to to excavate how to build How to really maintain a life in a in a certain sense of independence. Part of the reason you want to do all that is because that's exactly what's going to be

Policy Technology Economics Science Nasa Eappen Jack Boone Department Of Ece Colorado Boulder Gill Laura Gin Boeing Company Nassar Spacex Harrison Schmitt United Launch Alliance Israel Jeff Bezos John Grunsfeld Landers Hannity Andrade Damasio
What Did NASA's Hubble Telescope See on Your Birthday?

Innovation Now

00:59 sec | 2 years ago

What Did NASA's Hubble Telescope See on Your Birthday?

"On april twenty fourth nineteen ninety the space shuttle discovery lifted off from earth with nassar's hubble space telescope securely in its bay the following day hubble was released into orbit ready to peer into the vast unknown of space this is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shape our future. Hubble was the first major optical telescope to be placed in space above the distortion of the atmosphere far above rain clouds and light pollution. Hubble has an unobstructed view as it explores the universe twenty four hours a day seven days a week. If you're curious about what. Hubble might have been looking at on your birthday. You're in luck. Nasa has set up a website where you can see the image that was captured on a specific day of the year. Just select your month. And the date then hit submit

Nassar Nasa
As the Hubble Telescope Turns 30, What's Next for Space Telescopes?

The Naked Scientists

05:15 min | 2 years ago

As the Hubble Telescope Turns 30, What's Next for Space Telescopes?

"Has been looking at a project that set to be the successor to the Hubble Space. Telescope arguably one of the famous telescopes of all time. and. The. Hubble Space Telescope is iconic sent into space in nineteen ninety, the images Hobo sent back are amazing and captured the imagination of millions, but it is thirty years old. It's getting on a bit. So a new generation of telescopes are being clowns to attempt to fill herbals sizable bids. One of them is the Nancy Grace Roman telescope named for the first female executive of NASA. This telescope will seek to continue hobos legacy. I spoke to Dominic Bedford Program scientist for the telescope. We designed the Roman Space Telescope to be able to conduct the kind of survey that astronomers haven't been able to do with any of the sets of tools they have. Had during the past generations and that is to focus on being able to take very sharp images of wide areas of the sky with tremendous sensitivity being able to see very very distant objects and also optimized in the near infrared, which is wavelengths just slightly longer than what our eyes are sensitive to because the near wavelengths penetrate dust better. So we will allow us to see further into our own galaxy and also we'll. Be. Able to see the red shifted light from very very distant galaxies. So we've been able to see farther and so this combination of being able to see far into our own galaxy and far out into other galaxies and to be able to do this very quickly very efficiently means that we can start conducting surveys where instead of looking at a few objects, a few galaxies refused ours we can start studying monitoring and understanding. Millions even hundreds of millions of galaxies and millions of stars all the same time to be able to conduct surveys that are more demographic where we really understand the whole the entirety of these aspects of the universe all at once. That means the Nancy Grace Roman telescope is designed to be more like a wide angle lens for space instead of a Zoom Lens. But how is it going to carry out its mission? The Romans Space Telescope surveys are designed to be able to answer pressing questions both in cosmology. And in Exit Planet Science for Cosmology, we will take number of surveys of the distant universe so that we can understand the distribution of galaxies and how the universe has expanded over cosmic time from a time when the universe was only a few billion years old to the present when the universe is now thirteen point seven, billion years old. And through watching the way, the galaxies evolved how they form how they move towards an away from each other, we can infer the effects of dark matter, which is a a large unknown components of the mass of the universe and dark energy, which is a recently discovered mysterious force that appears to be pushing the universe apart and therefore pushing all the matter in the universe away from all the other matter. and. It will be able to take definitive measurements of this kind to understand the effects of these so that we might understand better the fundamental physics that drives the universe in its evolution. What about our own galaxy? What can be achieved when the telescope is pointed to the center of the Milky Way we plan on conducting where we will look at the Galactic Bulge of Milky Way, which is where most of the stars in the galaxy can be found. So we'll stare at a wide patch of our Milky Way Galaxy tracking the brightness of millions of millions of stars. Taking images every roughly fifteen minutes over of course, many many months. And we will look for the chance encounter when a star happens to pass in front of some other background star. and. When it does because of general relativity the light from the background star, we'll be focused much like a lens by the foreground star and focused on us. As the stars move slowly through the galaxy and that brightening is something that we can measure and by measuring the Brighton time, we'll be able to infer. What the the foreground star was like. If the foreground star has planets, we'll see brightening from those as well, and in fact, even if these planets have a large moons will be able to see the writing for the moons planets around those stars and by doing with millions of stars will be able to track enough plants thousands. We think of planets around other stars that we'll be. Able to make a complete demographic census, all what planetary systems are like in our own solar system we have the eight planets and that we can see essentially all planets like that around another star, maybe not mercury because it's very small enclosed in but certainly every other planet even planets like Mars we'll be able to detect around such stars be able to answer the question definitively. Our solar system common in the galaxy is it rare the galaxy or may even be unique? and. Doing this, you'll understand our own place in universe Harris or got to be the way it's.

Nancy Grace Roman Telescope Hubble Space Telescope Roman Space Telescope Romans Space Telescope Hobo Nasa Dominic Bedford Harris Scientist Executive Brighton
Is Space Junk Cluttering Up The Final Frontier

Short Wave

05:36 min | 2 years ago

Is Space Junk Cluttering Up The Final Frontier

"We are tackling a question from listener. Rachel. Weiss space-junk this growing population of manmade objects cluttering up Earth orbit so Does that happen? Okay I. Let's consider what satellites are made out of metal plastic glass powered by batteries or solar panels, and when they're placed in specific orbital highways, they stay there moving. So quickly that they don't fall towards the earth kind of like, you know if you had to put a boat in a body of water, you want to avoid fighting the current kind of thing that's more. But jaw who we met earlier, he says that from sputnik onwards, our satellites have been creating debris shedding spent rocket bodies pieces becoming glued satellites have been known to explode when unspent fuel is on board, and of course, they can cross flightpaths and collide with one another and whenever satellite shed pieces they. Tend to not should one but many many pieces, hundreds of thousands of pieces depending on the type of collision. These collisions rarely destroy the satellites, but they can alter their operation and send pieces jettisoning off into space affected not only by gravity, but other physical forces. So we're pressure thermal radiation charged particle, environment interactions with you know magnetic fields, and all of this makes it very difficult to predict what space junk will do next the little that falls back to Earth, which is one object that day on average burns up or falls into the ocean. So space junk is probably not going to land on your head. Have you calculated that probability because you're GONNA ask me this question I haven't. But there's a scientist mark. Matinee, at NASA orbital debris program who has it's one in several trillion honestly I still like it but okay Mattie the people you should worry about more astronauts right? The International Space Station actually has a tracker to monitor for collision risk and they will maneuver out of the way when the risk is too great. Wow. But I feel like if there was a major collision, I would hurt about it, right? Yeah. There hasn't been a major collision you know the US military NASA and other agencies and groups around the world they tracked debris and Warren of potential collisions but there's been a few scares in recent decades. So in two thousand, fifteen, for example, the crew. On. The International Space Station had to hide in their Sawyer's capsules. Basically, the stations lifeboat when debris from an old Russian weather satellite came dangerously close. I don't like that no spacecraft and satellites will routinely maneuver out of harm's way but only if they have ample warning so the whole spacefaring community was pretty rattled when in two, thousand, seven, the Chinese military destroyed one of their own weather satellites they were testing out anti-satellite. Technology. Brian Weeden, remembers tracking this big explosion for the US air. Force. I personally was sort of shocked. It was of like wow Brian was part of a squadron that counted the resulting debris and in the end ended up cataloging more than three thousand objects. So that one. Got turned into three thousand things and that's just the things we can track wasn't space junk a big part of the movie gravity you are remembering cracks lake. From the missile strike has caused a chain reaction hitting other satellites in creating desgris two thousand eighteen Hollywood movie begins with a chatty George Clooney and Sandra bullock servicing the Hubble space telescope gays, and contentedly back at Earth. When this huge cloud of debris from missile strike grips through communications blackout it's a bad situation happen North America's laws individual. Dramatic portrayal definitely raise the profile of space junk. Even if the portrayal wasn't very accurate I, think navy on the whole it has been a good thing for for the issue. Even, if I might grumble a little bit scientists love to grumble. That's Brian Weeden again he's now the director of program planning for the Secure World Foundation thinks a lot about sustainability in space, and he says that opening scene gravity doesn't capture the true problem over the breath catches him was portrayed as sort of a nuclear chain reaction. Right there's one event that sets off this series of things that will happen very fast. The reality is sort of the opposite where it's it's like climate change. The problem with space junk is it's a long relatively slow accumulation over decades with a big negative impact down the road. Got It. Yeah. So Brian says. The risk of space junk involves convincing people, launching satellites, governments, and companies to change their behavior. Now mindful of the future and maybe have a little inconvenience or a little more cost now to forestall bad things in the future, and that's a really difficult argument to make because we humans just aren't engineered to kind of think like that preach especially when nothing truly catastrophic has happened yet but space junk is already proving to be problematic in the short term, it's translating into real world costs a satellite. Field alerts about potential collisions. Do Do I change my satellites orbit because that costs fuel and that will shorten the lifetime your satellite, which isn't good for the commercials base economy, which is Kinda booming right now. Yeah. We did that episode all about how SPACEX IS GONNA put a bunch of satellites up there. Right you know in the long term space junk has the potential to not only collide with manned spacecraft like the International Space Station, but threatens satellites at all levels of orbit like those used for imaging and whether data collection, which then could mean our climate models are less accurate or we don't have a good way to track the mirrors and that could have negative

International Space Station Brian Weeden United States Nasa Cluttering Rachel Weiss Spacex Cracks Lake Scientist Mattie America Hollywood George Clooney Navy Sandra Bullock Secure World Foundation Director
See Hubble Telescope Pictures Taken on Your Birthday

Innovation Now

01:16 min | 2 years ago

See Hubble Telescope Pictures Taken on Your Birthday

"On April, twenty fourth nineteen ninety, the space shuttle Discovery lifted off from Earth with Nassar's Hubble Space Telescope Nestled. In its bay, the following day Hubble was released into orbit, ready to peer into the vast unknown of space. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shape our future Hubble was the first major optical telescope to be placed in space above the distortion of the atmosphere far above rain clouds and light pollution Hubble has an unobstructed view as it explores the universe twenty four hours a day seven days a week. If you're curious about what. What Hubble might have been looking at on your birthday. You're in luck NASA has set up a website where you can see the image that was captured on a specific day of the year. Just select your month, and the date then hit submit behold the wonders of the universe and share your results with friends on social media using Hashtag Hubble thirty as we help NASA celebrate thirty years of cosmic discoveries while saying happy birthday Hubble here's too many more.

Hubble Hubble Space Telescope Nasa
Hubble Space Telescope still going strong after 30 years

WGN Nightside

00:32 sec | 2 years ago

Hubble Space Telescope still going strong after 30 years

"Tomorrow marks thirty years since the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope Hubble blasted off on April twenty fourth nineteen ninety it's provided stunning images and also help determine the age of the universe and revolutionized humanity's understanding of it in the early years Hubbell experience problems including an imperfection in the primary mirror that made images slightly blurry the Hubble Space Telescope was named after astronomer Edwin Hubble the university of Chicago graduate back in nineteen twenty nine he proved that the theory of the universe is

Hubble Space Telescope Edwin Hubble Hubbell University Of Chicago
How Does Saturn Work?

BrainStuff

07:37 min | 2 years ago

How Does Saturn Work?

"The Planet Saturn takes its name from a Roman God of agriculture and of all the planets revolve around our sun. It's cultivated if you will the greatest ring system by far shining rings filled with ice dust and rock orbit its equator. The whitest one called the phoebe ring has an outer edge. That's millions of miles away from Saturn itself. For comparison the average distance between Earth and our moon is a paltry two hundred thirty nine thousand miles or three hundred eighty four thousand kilometers once again. Astronomy PUTS THE HUMAN EGO IN CHECK. Saturn's rings get all the attention but we shouldn't ignore its other attributes the sixth planet in our solar system. It's also the biggest after Jupiter. Those two are in a league of their own. If you mushed every planet from Mercury to Neptune together Saturn and Jupiter would account for over ninety percent of the cumulative mass of that planetary mass but despite its immense size Saturn is the least dense planet in the sun's orbit and the spherical to. We'll need to look at. Its physical makeup to understand why research published in two thousand nineteen showed that a day on Saturday and lasts just ten hours thirty three minutes and thirty eight seconds. It's spin rate helps explain one of the ring. World's stranger qualities is he. Saturn is ten percent wider than it is tall. A difference of over seven thousand miles or nearly twelve thousand kilometers. Astronomers call that kind of disparity an equatorial bulge every planet in the solar system has one but Saturn's is the most extreme saturn rotates around its axis at a very high speed. Hence the brevity stays. And here's where density comes into play like. Jupiter Saturn is a gas giant such worlds predominantly consists of hydrogen and helium and whereas Earth is solid on. The outside gas. Giants are not they may however have hard intercourse now. Saturn is downright huge in terms of volume. Some seven hundred sixty four earth sized objects could fit inside of it and the planet is ninety five times as massive as our home world and yet relative to its size. Earth is eight times more dense. In fact water yes. Plain water is denser them Saturn although that doesn't mean the planet would float. It's not cohesive enough so thanks to its low. Low density zippy rotational. Speed Saturn's been deformed into a oblong world that looks kind of squished in profile Jupiter's southern hemisphere famously has an ongoing storm called the great. Red Spot Saturn's answer to. This is the great white spots which are periodic tempests that arise every twenty thirty Earth Years I detected in eighteen seventy six. These weather events are colossal scale ness as Cassini spacecraft spent thirteen productive years hovering around Saturn on December fifth of two thousand ten. It witnessed the most recent iteration of the great white spot phenomenon. The storm was about eight hundred miles by sixteen hundred miles long when it first began. That's about thirteen hundred twenty five hundred kilometers but over the next six months. The spot expanded Longitudinal early until it had looped itself around the planet in a gigantic circle. Some researchers think the great white spots might be part of a cycle that sees the outer layer Saturn's atmosphere slowly lose heat allowing the warm air from lower levels to burst upward. Meanwhile Saturn's North Pole. There's a cloud pattern shaped like giant hexagon. This pleasantly symmetrical jet stream spins counterclockwise measures about twenty thousand miles or thirty two thousand kilometers across and includes a hurricane. That's been swirling right over the poll ever since it was discovered back in Nineteen eighty-eight. Of course it's not the hexagon earned Saturday. A place on. Chucky festers T. shirt you know from rugrats anyway. The gas giant is most famous for the spectacular ring system encircling it a planetary rings aren't rare per se Jupiter Uranus and Neptune. Have the well yet. In terms of sheer scale network around Saturn is totally unrivaled. Most of the primary rings come with letter names. The closest one to Saturn is called the D ring which has an inner radius of about forty two thousand miles or sixty seven thousand kilometers a lot closer than our moon. It's surrounded by these C B A F G and earrings in that order by the way. The rings aren't arranged Alphabetically. Because the naming system reflects the dates of their discovery Abmc recited before the rest when measured from its outside edge. The earring showcases an impressive. Three hundred thousand mile radius or four hundred and eighty thousand kilometers. Or at least that looks impressive until you get to know the big bad fearing that. We mentioned earlier. I spotted in two thousand nine. This one was named after one of Saturn's moons untold trillions of ice rock dust particles. Make up these rings. Some bits are the size of a sugar grain. Others could probably Dwarf Your House in any case. The ring material is stretched. Remarkably thin Saturn's rings may be as thick as two miles or kilometers wide. Found just thirty two feet or ten meters wide so proportionately. The gas giants iconic rings thinner than a typical sheet of writing paper as noted by Astronomer. Phil plait whereas Saturn itself is probably around four point five billion years old. The age of its rings isn't as clear. Some scientists think that they were formed ten million to a hundred million years ago when an icy comet or some ice covered moons came too close to the planet. The visitor or visitors would have met a grisly end. Getting ripped to pieces by Saturn's gravity as those fragments collided they grew smaller and multiplied giving rise to the skinny but brilliant system. We all know today on the other. Hand a twenty. Nineteen paper argued that the rings might have originated at an earlier stage in the history of our solar system. We'll have to see how the debate unfolds as new evidence arises. There's lots about this planet that we're still learning in October of two thousand. Nineteen the international astronomical. Union heralded the discovery of twenty newfound moons orbiting the gas giant with these bodies added to the mix. There are now eighty two verified. Saturn moons altogether no other planet in the solar system has that many natural satellites not even mighty Jupiter. You can find Saturn's moons in around and beyond the ring system before Cassini was retired in two thousand seventeen it revealed that some of them gather clumps of ice and dust. From the Rings Saturn's Moon Titan is especially well-named it's our solar system second-biggest moon overall and it's dotted with seas lakes and rivers of liquid methane and pain. There's only one other body within the Sun's orbit that has standing pools of liquid that we know about. And here's a hint. You're sitting on it right now. Tighten is also noteworthy for having an atmosphere and it's theorized that there could be ice volcanoes that spew water instead of lava like Earth Saturn gets auroras at its poles. They're invisible to the unaided human eye. But the Cassini spacecraft and the Hubble Space Telescope have captured footage of them using infrared and ultraviolet

Astronomy Giants Cassini Phil Plait Chucky Festers Hubble Space Telescope North Pole Union Abmc
Satellite almost on empty gets new life after space docking

Liftoff

06:49 min | 3 years ago

Satellite almost on empty gets new life after space docking

"An interesting idea. It's from a division of Northrop Grumman and what measures one is is. It's a satellite that has a grappler so we can grab other things in space and a lot of fuel and the idea of the program is you can extend the life of satellite that has run out of fuel and his either GonNa be parked or de orbited depending on where it is And and here's the challenge. Satellites are not made with gas caps. They're not generally built to be serviced by other satellites. That doesn't generally happen So you can see what's going on here. North Grim thinks that there is a market in building a satellite that is cheaper to launch and use to extend the life of an older satellite than it would be replaced. That satellite right. It's just it's simple economics here. What if we could make that satellite of yours? That's about to die last another five years. How what would that be worth to you? And if that number is lower than or higher than the price we would charge. Let's say or something like that. You do the math you know like. Oh that's better. Let's do that. So that's what that's what one did a demo with an eighteen year old satellite from. Its until nine one What Intelsat did is moved into a different orbit? So was up there. They actually moved. Until set up to the mid one orbit taking it out of service in doing so and meth one docked with Intelsat nine and one so came a few grabbed it with its grappling system. It's docking system and is now in the process of or over the next month or two is going to push Intelsat back into an operational orbit it will go back in operation and it will have five years more life this eighteen year old satellite with with a buddy satellite attached to it at the end of the five year period when it when Intel sat thinks it's reached the end of its operational. Life is then going to raise it up to a graveyard orbit like we talked about last time where where it's higher orbit above Geo Stationary Orbit. Where there's not a lot of stuff and it doesn't matter if there's dead stuff up there it's not a big deal so they're gonNA they're gonNA push up to a graveyard orbit So that's awesome five years extra life by adding a buddy satellite that can keep it operational and That's not all the plan then is after five years is one will grapple and can go somewhere else and do it again with a different saddling. Reasonable Buddy satellite right as long as it's got propellant and it can grapple stuff it can get to what it needs to grapple. It could do this so you have to is also coming later this year. They're going to use it for a different intelsat satellite and the goal. This time is because you know they wasted propel underuse propellant in taking it out of service and taking it somewhere else to try this the next one. They're going to do it in place. They're literally going to just drive over to wear that. Intelsat. Satellite is while it's operational and just grab it and then extend its life by having new propellant ability to move and even though because generally what seems to be happening. I mean if something breaks something breaks this is not something with like robot surgery to fix up circuit board or something. Although I think a future this stuff is that but in the short term. It's this satellite is cost us. Hundreds of millions of dollars is incredibly expensive electronics. And the only thing. We're missing is propellant. Well that's what the system is. Basically doing is like we will send up a thing full propellant and attach and move your satellite around for you. The great idea until sat says the economics work for them. Which if the economics and work for until SAT IN FOR NORTH OF GRUMMIN? This is really cool. Because you're extending the life of this stuff. It's almost like recycling in outer space. Like you're extending the life of this and you can see how this could get way more complicated down the road in terms of allowing tele presence cars of satellites there. You know the further out. They are the more of a delay. There is but when when you think back to the Hubble missions where they had to fix the Hubble Space Telescope over the course of decades say that was a user serviceable astronaut serviceable thing or I s space walks. You can see and you and I actually saw at least one of these at at Johnson Space Center the experimenting with a robot that can crawl around on the outside of the space station and do repairs. You could also see that. Same kind of thing. Po- possibility for one of these mission extension vehicle satellites to be able to potentially even do repairs. Come you know come by do a repair mission. And if that costs less than replacing the satellite. It's totally worth it. So it was very exciting. There's a lot of this being talked about. Nasa has a plan to do a spacecraft. That's GonNa Attach to an old land sat satellite in low-earth-orbit and and do a connection these. The mavs are built for geostationary orbit. I believe there's a Japanese company that we've mentioned on this before that wants to make like a sticky like web or arm satellite. That can actually just kind of like run into space junk and a ten. Yeah stick to it so that it's no longer space debris so there's a lot of this. We're entering a phase where one of the opportunities business opportunities in space is and from a different angle. You see it with spacex reusing. Its vehicles reusing. Its its first stage is that you make this incredibly expensive satellite and you leave it up there and it's got a lifespan. And then it dies. And it's like a disposable satellite and now there are companies coming along and saying what if we could take that disposable satellite and make it recyclable instead and extend its life and then move it out of the way. It's it you know it makes access to space cheaper right because it means that the stuff is serviceable and presumably over time. My mind started to raise as I was reading the story like presumably over time you would end up with things like perhaps some standard equipment like standard actual docking attachment. And things like that. Where it's like can we all agree? That the satellite's going to have this thing on it so that one of these buddies can come up later and refuel it maybe or or attached to it and move it around but there's so much that's already up there so is they figured it out. Like where do you grab on? How do you hold on? Is it GonNa work and it seems to work. It's awesome

Intelsat Northrop Grumman Hubble Space Telescope North Grim Johnson Space Center Mavs Intel Nasa Low-Earth-Orbit