20 Burst results for "Howson"

"howson" Discussed on Creatively Christian

Creatively Christian

05:55 min | Last month

"howson" Discussed on Creatively Christian

"And we'll put your links in our show notes To people can connect through That and you know yeah. We're going to look forward to That song coming out in. Would you say your next big thing coming out in your space right now. it's exactly yeah so The next few weeks will be will be working on it in the studio and once it's already Working on a release. That's another thing that i've i've been pushed to i. I really struggled with As a christian how to navigate doing the merch doing all the things you know. It feels like it self promotion. But that's where this song like the right time for me to use the system. That's in place. Because i really believe it's to get out there. Something i can share with competence and I'm excited to pull in and share other people's stories and have a whole kind of game plan of how to do this on instagram news. The system that's there but in a way that Was helping build people up. So it's it's going to be my first real official release with merchant stories and videos and I'm excited sir. Really get get dumb. Get going with that very cool. Yeah we look forward to that and we'll have to follow along. I love it right. Well i would love to just close out by Praying for you and what you're doing and yes let's just go to god father. God thank you for this time to have this conversation with amy lynn and Thank you for her heart For other creatives and lord. Thank you for drawing her into her. Songwriting it is. It is such a blessing for us to have her songs Her healing music As part of the art in this world and we just thank you for drawing her in Through the journey that you you brought her on lorded is such an amazing story of Just how you drew her in how you called her into what she's doing and we pray for Any linda's to pursue the things that you want her to say yes to and Help her to walk forward in confidence and in In an understanding you are doing something bigger than she can even imagine and Thank you for her obedience. Her example of obedience loret in building community around Artistry and Her heart for being a good listener and a cheerleader. For others lured richest. Were thankful for people like milan. Go before her. Lord bless Efforts as she records this song and shares it with those whose hearts truly do need to hear it To hear the truth of your love and your ever character lord May we be reminded of that today as we seek to walk forward in the journey ahead it can often look Hard and just help stuff like amy's music and our other. Just our communities of being creative christians together lord may we empower each other. May we encourage each other. And i just thank you so much for what amy's doing and again so thankful for this conversation today and the blessing that it was to my own heart and i know the blessing that it will be to those that tune-in we pray this in jesus name amen thank you so much andrea think you and i always love to end with just tossing it right back to you. What what do you think. And this is maybe a little prophetic. But what do you believe. God really wants his creative people to know and understand. I think.

andrea amy lynn first today milan jesus instagram linda God christians next few weeks amy official Lord christian
"howson" Discussed on Creatively Christian

Creatively Christian

03:33 min | Last month

"howson" Discussed on Creatively Christian

"If those screw we speak to long answers. I can't tell you why you're walking your own thinning. I know for sure. I know you are not alone. And you're saying just how you don't tell you why you're walking your own with no the sun no tubi nealon not alone. There will come a time will.

"howson" Discussed on Creatively Christian

Creatively Christian

04:34 min | Last month

"howson" Discussed on Creatively Christian

"I thought to be in tennessee and i'm thirty two years old. I should be independent anyway. God's word on my heart nine now so grateful So i'm not paying any rent. So i'm in the position where i can work four days a week and have tuesday's off Eight or work on my master's in my homework because now it's crunch time but also like i. I just had a chance to start the tracking for a song at a studio down the road before i came to talk to you today so you know and it was interesting because back in november. I it fulltime monday to friday. And i was like burnt-out and i felt like i was like i'm asking you to surrender one day a week of pay to dedicate to what i know what you know you need to be working on And fortunately with my job we do on call hours. So there's a couple times a month where i have to work weekends and bounces anyway. So my situation's probably little unique where habit of flexibility right now But in that you know it it does take some determination carving out maybe a physical space especially if you're a parent you're busy. Can you say. Hey this little corner of this area. This is my. This is my creator space. That's where you can put your post. It notes of your goals setting little goals of i wanna work on one song this month and setting a little time line. I think that really being intentional is so important. Time just passes. And that's how i used to be i'd just put on the net flex in my night shifts and i didn't do that much i just created when i felt like it So and so you need to be able to set apart some time. That's that goes creative moments. But i also think using. Maybe you're evenings to maybe half an hour of planning for social media. If you're someone that's sharing or doing a little bit of that you know working on a logo for something to do it little bit every day..

friday today november tuesday monday nine thirty two years old one song tennessee one day a week this month four days a week half an hour Eight couple times God
"howson" Discussed on Creatively Christian

Creatively Christian

04:56 min | Last month

"howson" Discussed on Creatively Christian

"It goes. You never know that. Yeah and i think that's really good advice to not because i think we can tend to be a little disappointed sometimes if certain things and we may have our own idea of what a successful creative career might look like and As christians we really need to lean into that truth that god knows and he he's writing each of our journeys in a way that we can understand and an love. How you talk about leaning into locally you know starting with your the people just around you. And i have a tendency to say yes to every opportunity in that may be my demise sometimes but this true it's amazing you know if i just stay open minded And i'm sure you've felt the same thing staying open minded and just walking forward in doors that god opens Yeah it's really powerful. And you know his plan than what's better than his plan so like a exhibit a. Like this again this podcast and getting to share with you This came up because one of the your team members came saw the ad for the christian creative gathering called the circle the circle gathering and he was i like First person to come. Join one of those thursday night meets. That was not invited by us. He was our first person to see. Hey i'm going to go. We were like this is so great when he shared about this and then he shared about. How the podcast. And here's the. Here's the contact if you want to be featured so if i didn't have that confidence to say i want to share what what god's doing this wouldn't be happening right now so also learning to own you know what i'm an artist i create not based on what the world's definition is what because i just do and so i'm qualified to talk about what i'm doing even if i don't have one hundred thousand followers even if i don't have anything on the radio I really i really just kind of want to just touch on what you were saying because.

one hundred thousand followers first person one each christian First person circle the circle gathering thursday night christians
"howson" Discussed on Creatively Christian

Creatively Christian

03:46 min | Last month

"howson" Discussed on Creatively Christian

"I look at my own store again. A little different. It's going to be different based on where you're starting from I want to encourage if you're just starting out. You know. I had acoustic demos that you know would never hold up with. What's on the radio. Our what's hot on spotify but it was something real so right. What's rail for you stick to what's real for you or what you know. Even if it's if you make beats or you do different things you do. What makes you happy. Do it comes from that place of joy. If it's sad songs inside some somehow bring me joy so stick with that and stay true to that Work with what you have. How can you make a polish recording. Just with where you're at you know. Use your garage band but maybe a simple. Us mike usb to record better sound but it doesn't have to be much And then from that. I would say get involved. You know i. I'm now so much more proactive about it. But when i think back to god. Neil guard and just trust the lord. God knew. I was shy got new. I was insecure. God knew where i was at in my personal spiritual emotional journey so he kind of gave me a big shove into christian creative community and i'm so grateful But you know for example. Come check out. Facebook site for christian creative collective for on facebook or instagram. Come join us thursday night. Come getting bald. Meet people It really networking is so big. And you'll hear this. I hear this from people that are You know doing music full time and but it's one of those things where you know. It's it's not to be manipulative. That's not what can you get from people you know it's it's really just Get to know people serve them. How can you serve them. How can you support them. Encourage them You know comment on another musicians post on instagram. And give them encouragement. I had i got someone who I liked one of their poster followed them and they sent me a personal little memo of. Hey thanks for following. Check out your song to know. They're going that extra mile but really it's all about just meeting people because you don't know a call right that you do that. Someone else is going to hear. Hey who was on that. I wanna to know who that person is so and also start local even though the are lockdown. Do you have a songwriting association in your area. Do you.

thursday night spotify Facebook instagram facebook Neil guard christian one one of those things god God
"howson" Discussed on Creatively Christian

Creatively Christian

04:12 min | Last month

"howson" Discussed on Creatively Christian

"Those sorts of things have been big parts of my my journey. Good do you remember. What vocal program. It was that you jumped into sure. So the one. I got introduced to was actually out of nashville. But that's online called singing success by brett manning I have done back in twenty seventeen. I did do a couple of did like one person one. When i was in nashville. And they do zoom as well Really well renowned effective He's also a believer of strong faith there and He's actually done some demos and things at the extreme tour events so there's a bit of a connection but and this is something that i am. This is the kind of those you know. You never stop learning and growing things. I have it on my phone now. And i don't do it regularly enough but i have a thirty five minute commute to work so i. My goal is kind of moving forward to do some vocal exercises on the way to work on the way home from work just to keep it up especially for anyone out there. That's bible -cational. That's working monday to friday and struggling to find that time to still keep up their vocal chops They've got a great program called three sixty program that you can download. You've got all these little bite sized things of different practices that can help strengthen your vocal chords because it's the muscle you gotta keep it working. You've got keep it strong and it will deliver for you when you need it to the really cool and you said that it's so. Is it just an app that they they provide or it might have an app now. I don't know this one that i bought I just it was a download. I downloaded back in twenty seventeen or twenty eighteen. And it's all these little Sound files throw at thirty seconds of each one for us the male and female vocals. There's and there's like whole chapters of it. It's it's really comprehensive doable. You can just pick a couple work on them..

nashville thirty seconds friday thirty five minute brett manning monday bible each one twenty seventeen one person twenty eighteen one three program couple sixty
"howson" Discussed on Creatively Christian

Creatively Christian

04:47 min | Last month

"howson" Discussed on Creatively Christian

"In guest speakers encourage creatives Through that build relationships. So i just know that i wouldn't be where i am today. If god had put community around the people to call out the gifting biden even know to to give feedback to encourage and even help with the artistry of it So it's something. I'm really really passionate about. Yeah and i. I love that. I'll have to check out. What what you and mandy are doing sounds like a. It's just so helpful. I know we're we're building a community of creatives through this podcast in through theophanous media And it's been really fun to see people already come in and ask questions and engage with the other. The other people that are jumping into the community. It's it's so good. We're so good for each other and And i love what you said about being a listening ear Yeah i think if more of us had a listening ear someone to encourage forward in our giftedness. I don't i think there'd be a lot more beautiful art in the world if we if we had people to cheer us on so yeah good for you. Okay let's shift again. Let's shift into our educate section. You've mentioned university young like learning how to write chord charts and get your john. You know your folksy style into a barge while bar I hear you there. It's kinda hard to almost like when when i create anything instrumental And i and i get ready to play with another group trying to put it down on sheet music always so painful. Because i'm like oh. This doesn't really make much sense right here. So it's it's the kind of funny but how you know. I know you've had some major pivots in your life. And so what did you not know. When he first got started in songwriting. even back. you know prince edward island jumping into the studio. What what were some things that you really had to learn as you as you discovered your songwriting..

today mandy first prince edward island
"howson" Discussed on Creatively Christian

Creatively Christian

03:58 min | Last month

"howson" Discussed on Creatively Christian

"Because there's times where i've been like. I keep writing the same chord progressions. I need to learn something new. Any either right with someone else and you can pick up something fresh on ceiling stagnant. What i'm writing you know. That's different versus. Oh this is. What i do is what people expect from amy. I can keep doing that. It's gonna change as i keep growing but it's still going to be true to me. I think that's awesome. I think that really I'm learning the power of correcting right now Actually later today. i'll be wrapping up a co right with a new friend in florida. So i'm all the way in alaska for those that don't remember that and it just so fun. That technology gives us the opportunity to reach out across the whole nation. Like that time zones are a little tricky for us but we make it work but the power of co writing i do. I sometimes feel very stagnant and stuck in my in my lane maj-gen. Nra and the minute we started working with each other. I could feel i could feel even just a slight shift and to where i would have wanted to keep a song a bit more mellow. She was like no. Let's build here. And now that i've been working with the song a little bit longer. I love it. And i'm i'm so excited about what i've learned just in partnering with somebody like that. It's it is pretty pretty powerful the Yeah collaborating we're together right. Yeah and speaking of that. I know you love to mentor. Other songwriters is that A little bit about what that looks like for you sure. Yeah that's still something. I'm sort of growing into as opportunity comes up When i was writing all those years and recording i really didn't have creative community at all. that was part of what the shift to memphis and music. College was about was kind of going back to basics on some hand. Learning to to write a good core chart learning..

florida alaska later today memphis
"howson" Discussed on Creatively Christian

Creatively Christian

05:48 min | Last month

"howson" Discussed on Creatively Christian

"It just means that. I'm talking to god about it as going. Screw it and and i like the curiosity because my dad is shared some of my songs. This co workers before he retired. You know one of them. It's about the light. There's something to alight and and it doesn't talk at the name of jesus doesn't stand name god bonus. Coworkers stopped like what she really singing about. So so there that. I think some of that came from for myself as well early on in my face. I think i haven't really gotten the courage to be upfront about my faith yet in my songs. But i think god used that in a way where my writing does have that welcoming as my faith is grown. Nasl my testimony can come out war clearly. But i also have the flexibility to play for a secular audience and And hopefully creek that welcoming space for just reflection and see what god wants to do with it. Yeah absolutely yeah. And i remember that song the light. I just listened to it this morning. And i was. I was struck. By how i. That's one of my biggest a repetition in my own creative work right now. Is the difference between the light and the darkness and enjoy listening to your lyric. I'm like wow. This could really cause. I'm much more upfront. In my writing about What i believe the light is and and that's great like you said. There's there's room for all of that but i was just so struck by how just beautiful subtle hints Into your faith. And i just yeah i. I think it's got a really powerful platform potential. I'm so powerful. Potential are well. Let's shift a little bit. We kinda spent some time inspiring everyone. Let's inform everyone so i mentioned a little earlier. Your guitar playing but What what would you say is your style of songwriting. What what style of music flows out of you naturally so for me. It's definitely soft heartfelt. Folksy music You know a little bit of working with some others working on a new song as an old song but bringing it to life and it's fun to add other instrumentation to at and But there's just something about sitting with my guitar and the finger. Picking style comes up more. Naturally strumming is something. I still struggle it. Usually people say it's the other way around but it's hard to sing and pick but for me there's something with the finger picking and that softness That just that naturally flows out and it's and single walk lot from the places of pain And i've had to come to terms with that. Sometimes you know. I hear seeing some happy songs. You should see no. And i'm like i always have the hope in.

jesus one this morning single
"howson" Discussed on Creatively Christian

Creatively Christian

04:58 min | Last month

"howson" Discussed on Creatively Christian

"So i was nineteen when i started writing for the first time. Really what guitar During that gap years. When i when nursing happens i hadn't even done grateful biology because i never believed i would be good enough to do science university. I just always had this inferiority issue and and not believing. I myself from such a young age. Something that god has really worked on this music journey Because he's always doing something through the gifting that it's helping us grow so it's been a big part of my story But so much happened. I ended up loving it and So through university kept writing moved up to prince edward island for my first nursing job. I didn't know anyone there. But they were hiring new grad. I thought let's go. I love the ocean and so when you're done university who suddenly your free time is your free time when you don't have homework to for the first time since childhood. I was like wow. I've got money and time. And so i looked up local studios and started recording Before that had just used garage bent on my computer just to get some things. Lay down so with those tracks that did in the studio. They were simple acoustic live recordings. I didn't know how to work with the metronome. Just what. I had the moment. But i put them on soundcloud for my friends and family to listen to so they had boat. Eighty know twenty lessons thirty listens at most but one night in the fall of two thousand fifteen. I got an email alec. Eleven o'clock at night and it was something from the extreme tour who had never heard of in my life but they asked. Hey we We like what you're doing. We think we might have something in common when it comes to what you're seeing about your love for the lord Would you ever want to come to nashville. And be part of a of a creative weekends. And then i ended up actually being awarded a slot doing showcase when i never even performed more than a pub night open mic while people are watching toronto. Maple leafs klay the montreal canadians you know like i'd never had a captive audience before So when i got that email andrea. I think i told you in our little prep meeting but like i bawled my eyes out. There was something that like. There'd been this whisper all along despite the insecurity despite the doubts despite not knowing what it was i was even doing but that i just kept writing But there was that little whisper believe was the holy spirit thing. There's something there's a reason you're doing this. There's something there's there's something going on here and so that email was that first real confirmation of okay. There is something here that i have to share something. I have to give and i remember thinking god. You love me this much. Love me much. You have something like this for me. It.

andrea nashville first nineteen prince edward island one night Eleven o'clock at night thirty listens toronto Eighty first nursing alec soundcloud first time canadians two thousand metronome fifteen montreal twenty lessons
"howson" Discussed on Creatively Christian

Creatively Christian

04:47 min | Last month

"howson" Discussed on Creatively Christian

"This is andrea sandifer with creatively christian interviewing. It's really fun today. Emma songwriter and i get to interview another songwriter today. So i'm thrilled to have amy winehouse with us today. Amy i'm gonna toss it right back to you. Can you tell us a little bit about who you are where you're from and maybe some creative work highlights for us absolutely so i am canadian. I currently live in the capital of canada in ottawa ontario I have grown up throughout ontario. Spent a few years on the east coast of canada. And then actually up until cova hit was living in memphis tennessee for a year. And a half and down. Some of my highlights have been touring with the extreme tour in two thousand seventeen for three weeks and then twenty nineteen for two and a half months and so those were really an exciting informative experiences. I also then attended visible music. College in memphis took a little break from being a nurse actually and went and worked on some songwriting and had a chance to be part of a creative community in memphis tennessee. So those have been some highlights for me very cool. And i can't wait to tell everybody a bit more about the extreme tour and maybe a bit more about your college too but and just because i love this part of your story so you say eastern part of canada but where were you when you got to live over there. It's so cool. I lived on prince edward island and it's the smallest province of canada an island and it is the home of the fictitious but though some would like to say very real green gables those nineties yeah and i got to live there by the ocean for about four and a half years and So i really went into the studio for the first time and got into recording and started things off and love that. Yeah and let's just dig into that part of your story. Because i know you've had some major shift in your In your story. But what triggered your move toward songwriting..

andrea sandifer Amy three weeks Emma ontario memphis canada prince edward island today ottawa ontario about four and a half years two and a half months a year first time nineties twenty nineteen two thousand seventeen memphis tennessee canadian years
Painting Exterior Brick

A Beautiful Mess Podcast

05:19 min | 5 months ago

Painting Exterior Brick

"You're listening to the beautiful mess podcast this week. We're talking all about painted exterior brick. I've learned so much from painting three howson row and this last time we things a little bit differently and learned even more. I know the painting brick can be controversial but we're passionate about how much it can improve home like my nine thousand nine hundred ninety s half brick half stucco home. The difference is night and day. it's magical also answering a listener question about wedding registry. Must have this. Week's episode is sponsored by leah lonnie. We'll chat more about them later in the sewed all right. Let's talk about painted brick. This is very controversial. Like you know the comments get heated. It's funny to me that it's even do people care a lot about painting brick and they care a lot about how you store display. Your books are some controversial topics universe. Okay i saw. How many times have you painted the exterior brick of a home. Not one not two but three times all right so first of all about five years ago. We painted our first home when we moved to nashville and we painted about a year after we moved in and we lived there for four years with the brick painted nowhere and tear except for the front porch where we step down on it and it's like also rains on and little bit different. That would touch every year but the rest of the brick nowhere and tear whatsoever and also like painting. A floor is very different from painting a wall. Yeah we all know the obvious and then our last home so you know that we famously moved into a house and moved out four months later so we painted that home it was it was it was an unintentional flip as soon as we realized we needed and wanted to sell it quickly. I scheduled my local painter to campaign to any came the next week and painted it and he did a great job It was very quick. It made it faster mo- We'll talk more about that later in the episode Whether or not it adds value is definitely like a big question and then our current home where we just moved to. We had it painted a couple of weeks ago. And we used a new material that we've never used before romo bio paint and it is a lime based paint so it's natural it's nontoxic it's not actually paint but it's like painting brick with brick is how they say that if you feel it still feels like brick there's no gloss to it all there's no sheen to it all it's perfectly mad and it said to age really well over time and we thought it was cool that it was environmentally friendly and lasts a little bit longer so i also like that you've kind of tried a bunch of different so you can i mean i just feel like that lind's to your with painting brick so people are interested it's like oh well should i use this type this type or what's the most affordable way to go about it or whatever for shar so on that note let's get into some common things that people like to ask Are your neighbors okay with it. You're in a little bit of a cold sack. Yeah your neighbors are fairly close. Not like right up against your house but you can definitely see their houses from your house and yours is the one white one. Everyone else has unpainted brick. So every where we've lived out of these three houses it's been mostly brick homes and our home kinda stood out why it was never the only like especially where we live. Now there's quite a few brick homes in the subdivision but not right next to ours. So i think that it. I think that it does stand out but one of our neighbors ran right over the next after we did it and said to jeremy that they had always nicknamed our house the institutional looking house and now it looks way better so funny. That's a really nice really really nice osei and we also like yeah. We wanted to make sure that they liked it so it felt good to know that like they were cool with it. Our houses a little bit tucked back. So i didn't feel like it doesn't really like show like you have to be right. It is a little it to see it. it's not a house you would like to drive by when you were like out on a drive. Let's put it that way now. It's kind of tucked away in the hold a sack. But i also just my own perspective. Even if i have a neighbor who paints their house exterior something. That maybe i wouldn't have chosen. I always just seeing. When people are taking care of their homes. I feel like most neighbors feel that way. Of course you want to check if you haven't hoa and they have rules or your neighborhood rules and you're not allowed to paint certain colors or whatever of course check into that. That's very important. Because i think your neighbors might care on that one but on that i really think just like when you have neighbors who are taking care of their house. They mow their lawn. A take care of landscaping. They don't let things become kind of broken or in disrepair even if they painted a caller. That isn't my choice. Which love white. But if i didn't i would still feel like well. At least they're you know spending money on their home in up keeping it in like that's gonna make the neighborhood. Nice place overall just that people care and are putting love and money into their property.

Leah Lonnie Nashville Lind Jeremy
Finding New Antibiotics with Machine Learning

a16z

06:07 min | 1 year ago

Finding New Antibiotics with Machine Learning

"Don't you break down for me? What the machine learning approach that they used here. And what kind of advanced does this represent took this machine learning model that they made and they traded on about twenty five hundred molecules and use that to train binary classification models to predict probability of whether it new compound would inhibit the growth of e coli or not and then turn to the truck library Library of six thousand compounds. That are ready in human clinical development for wide variety of indications and at this point the compared several different models and after narrowing down there's molecules and actually predicting toxicity using different neural networks. They've came up with this particular molecule and Howson and then thirdly lastly in the process they went on to apply machine learning motto after iteration and optimization too much broader set zinc fifteen data set with over a billion a half structures and under machine learning side. What's key here's the deep learning network that the US didn't really rely on any information about the chemical structures of molecules. It actually really built new representations called for years. A lot of people represented molecules with these fingerprint factors reflected things like presence or absence of functional. Groups are descriptors and comparable properties but relying on known fingerprints. Didn't really work that well. And that's why you know. A lot of the old antibiotic screening process gives you a lot of the same classes of molecules over and over again and what they did here they actually have these fingerprint descriptors that were built from. Scratch well you know. What you're describing is still a fingerprint. Right into dimensional vector to describe molecules. I think perhaps what's different is at deep learning approach. You can try to infer what the right descriptors should be. That's the hallmark of all of the deep. Learning approaches for drug design is at the end deep learning in general that recall even when we're just talking about conventional neural nets for image recognition the ideas that CNN's for image. Recognition versus classical computational vision. Is that in the classical approach? That person's defines what the right features are and so similarly. You know it's interesting that you can feed any representation of molecule into computer which parts of the interesting ones. You can have just like old school computer version. You could have a human being say all these in the important ones but a a beauty of DNA approach which is Ucla but also in many precursor works. That helps understand. What are the key aspects? And what are the interesting ones? And that is really. I think the big difference between what you can get in modern deep learning with machine learning versus classical machine learning with like random forest or something like that right so deep learning helps us figure out what we don't know versus focusing only on what we already know or what we think we know what makes Alison an attractive candidate for further research and development. What are some of the properties that they discovered without a doubt certainly a really potent inhibitor of e? Coli and you know. Further investigation showed that Halston has strong growth. Inhibitory effects on a wide following spectrum of pathogens. They tried it on. C. Money and which is one of the highest priority pathogens that is urgently required for in terms of antibiotics and then more. Interestingly it was even able to eradicate equal I persist yourselves that remained after episode and treatment so pretty strong efficacy and pretty low talked based on their screen. It also checks the box of something that is really structurally divergent from conventional antibiotics. And so certainly a very powerful new class of antibiotics that could potentially be strong candidate for further development. Yeah the fact that they found the antibiotic they showed it worked in vitro they showed. It worked in Vivo. And then they also did some experiments together this mechanism of action suggesting that Howson selectively disrupts the Ph potential across the bacterial membrane this saps the Proton motive force which is like the battery of the cell so all antibiotics. It's disrupting an essential cellular function but this appears to be a distinct and new function. That's being targeted super elegant work such a complete well rounded story. Yeah well I mean I think one of the things that really stands out here. Is that full stack of experiments. That they've done where it goes. All the way from looking at they might see in a dish to going through mice and one of the appealing things about studying antibiotics. And this often even pertain. Santa Viral that the animal models are pretty good with something like alzheimers. On the far extreme where animals are generally not very good. And so it's appealing that one could go. Do all of this. You know. Probably not requiring huge budget and therefore get something on the other side of that. Looks kind of intriguing beyond initial discovery? Can this kind of machine? Learning based approach be applied to other aspects of either earlier late stage drug development. Yeah it's it's brought Tommy with the fun thing about it. There's a reason why it's a broad topic because there's a broad range of things you can do. I mean you could talk about identifying targets and there's a lot of work to do there an extra shooting novel targets. It's really interesting. Time to go after novel targets. You could talk about identifying leads. Basically what's been done here that identification leads and then the testing of them. These compounds are leads but presumably. They're not drug like so they have to be optimized so there's these methods helping lead optimization and then along the way hopefully you'd want to also be screening for talks and so there's a ton of methods that are getting really surprisingly accurate basically the beautiful thing about a machine learning approach like this is at the approach for the most part is pretty agnostic to what you're predicting and that the processes you're building up can be useful one last thing and this is maybe the holy grail dream is that if you're predicting a lot of properties for a lot of different systems with a whole bunch of molecules in some multitask like framework where one model is predicting all of it. You can learn from all of it and that you develop even though you might not have a lot of data in any single project or any single area here. The sum of all this data now is huge and helps to regularise your predictions to make them less over fit and more

Howson United States Truck Library Library CNN Ucla Alzheimers Halston Alison Mechanism Of Action Tommy
"howson" Discussed on Behind The Numbers

Behind The Numbers

11:05 min | 1 year ago

"howson" Discussed on Behind The Numbers

"Welcome back to behind the numbers We are talking about how to protect your balance sheet with Gregg housing from us. I and hopefully so far so good in making The topic of insurance just a little bit more sexy doing our best as we were joking off camera. So that's why I was laughing when we came back from break so greg I wanted to start the second segment here with with cyber. I've had a couple of guests on the program. Recently we've devoted basically almost the entire program to the discussion of cyber. It's a huge topic Everywhere you go whether you're just in business or just a consumer. What have you impacting? Everybody wanted to get you to weigh in on cyber and in Tim packed cyber is something that again. It's not sexy. It's not something that people are acutely aware of or wanting to look at right away but in my opinion it's one of the most important topics you can have because it is so undervalued so and it keeps evolving on a day to day basis as we know the bad guys seem to be one step ahead of everyone else so let's take manufacture for example and if they make two dollars a profit on each item that they manufacturer and they don't have the proper cyber coverage in place and their manufacturing process the system that they have in place gets hacked and held for ransom and they're down three days that that's a pretty big loss of revenue and they're gonNA have to manufacture six hundred thousand units to make up for that loss of business if they're manufacturing one hundred thousand a day. So yeah the big number. I want you to talk more about that. Because in prior conversations that we've had here in the program about cyber a lot of it's been around data privacy but not specifically drilling into hacking manufacturing process. Talk a little bit more about that. That is important to know because most people think it is just data privacy. I've had many clients. Say All our stuff stored offsite. We're in the cloud. We don't keep any data. There's much more to cyber liability than just data privacy. You mentioned it as we talked about the manufacturing. So that's where hackers come in and they literally take over your manufacturing computer operation and they hold it for ransom and they demand a payment be made to turn it back over back to the company and this this happens all the time and normally when we talk about data privacy a lot of those call them breaches are at the front end right. Maybe an employee gets an email. And maybe they're multitasking. In just a little bit lazy and opening something that looks like. It's a friendly phishing scheme. Yeah so what? What's the method of attack in in terms of getting into a manufacturing process? The they're really just able to hack into the system if you will. It's that simple hack into the system and take over control and they won't give won't release control until payment is made and there's many different other kinds. There's one that has happened to more people than I can count. It's called social engineering and what that is say. You're the CFO Company and I'm the CEO. I'm out of town and you get an email from me or what appears to be from me and it says Dave. Please send a check for one hundred thousand dollars to this vendor. And here's all the new instructions. Just recently changed their bank. Here's the new instructions. Do you say Oh this is from Greg? Better take care of this right away. So off goes to check the vendor calls three days later and says hey we're still at one hundred thousand dollars. You save sent that to you three days ago. We don't have it long story short. That was social engineering. It was an email that looked like it was from me and went to you and you just took it and ran with it. Wow so what? What does cyber insurance actually cover protecting well A? You're protecting that hundred thousand dollars. In the manufacturing process it will pay for that ransom so usually it's some kind of Cyprus currency such as Bitcoin So it will pay for that ransom then. There's a business income component that would pay for at least a portion of that loss revenue from when their operations to shut down. Okay and have you had any circumstances I imagine you have where your clients have had to We'll call enforce that cyber insurance. Yes yes absolutely. And they're grateful that they had it previously. They may not have had it. The business interruption obviously is the opportunity cost but but I heard you say was it. Pays the ransom right. That's really the only way out of this at that. Point is it is and the good news is that once a ransom is paid about ninety. Eight percent of the information and the system is restored. Okay what about the data privacy aspect of it because that was fascinating around the proprietary technology aspect of it but with regard to data privacy whether it's customers or whether to B or C relationship What is cyber due with regard to that data and what might happen for you know consumer who may ultimately get hacked a good question so that that is an area that again most people think of right away when they think of cyber liability so the data once it's gone it's gone but what they can do is it can pay for the credit monitoring it can pay for any kind of help to get your identity or your data back if it's depending on? What type of data is once hackers have it? They usually get it and they sell it. So really. The part is data monitoring and then also Any kind of financial impact that you might see beyond that so if for example if you if your data's hacked in your credit card is stolen and you are charged up a X. number of dollars. Then you go back to the company and say this isn't me. This is because of the data breach it can provide coverage for that as well. Okay so you mentioned when we were talking before we went on about target. It was an interesting little fact that you shared Manuchehr that with the audience your years ago market data breach for a few years ago. It was actually not direct through target. What that was is that they went through one of their vendors out in the western part of Pennsylvania to back door into target. And that's how they got in so a small company. I think the more of the story is a small company may think well. I'm not going to be a target for anyone. I'm a three or four person company. You absolutely are target. Not only for the data but where that a breach could eventually take you who your customers are basically so the tentacles really can be very far-reaching. Yeah well so when you're working with clients and they're involved and interested in cyber insurance. Does that change their mindset it all about the level of vigilance that the applied to their systems to protect or is it sufficient in their minds and say well we're covered if as opposed to let's prevent now they are actually in prevention mode. They really want to prevent it from happening at all costs because as you probably are aware when you have an insurance claim ultimately you're going to see some kind of rate increase in this time right now where. The insurance market is volatile. You're going to do everything you possibly can do to avoid in jeopardy claims. Gotcha Greg. How's the what's the best way for people to contact you if they want to learn more about your work with you? It's Greg House in cell number is six ten seven five seven eight one. Six Zero and my email address is Greg Dot Howson at UCI DOT COM. Call Them Up. We only have a few minutes left here so when just shift gears away from cyber unless there's anything else you wanted to add to that before we move. I think that was great. Okay gaps gaps in coverage. Talk about that. So the standard off the shelf policies oftentimes come with some gaps to consumer may or may not know about these gaps. That's where it's important to have a good consultant and once you explain what they are. Okay I'll give you one for example when we talked about it earlier the business income gap for an extended time period. So one thing that we do well at us. I is when we see a gap or a shortfall in a standard off. The shelf policy will either closed that gap or we'll develop programs with the gaps big enough so for example for a manufacturing client. We have a product called cargo safe which covers everything in the supply. Chain that simple but going back to the business income. Let's say for example that manufacturers same we talked about before is two dollars per unit profit and their business income limit. They have a five thousand dollar shortfall on that. Well there shut down for a few days and that five hundred thousand dollars shortfall is GonNa take another two hundred fifty thousand units to recover that money if they had the proper business income limit. Then that would have been covered in full and really with that is just diligence of the individual that is their insurance broker. Basically making sure that that number is accurate very important to have that number accurate on the other hand I had a client where that number is too high so they were overpaying for something that they would never use so we were able to get that get that limit down and save them some money. Okay do you ever crystal ball with you today when I ask you a question about the future for your industry. It's broken but I'll do my best. Oh okay what's your take? I think we're going to continue in a hard market which means increasing rates through this year and depending on what the catastrophic claims look like hurricanes tornadoes mudslides wildfires etc etc depends. We'll we'll really dictate what we're GONNA look like in two thousand twenty one. We went through about a ten year period of pretty soft market. Where rates were really going down so the market playing catch up if you will hear about market correction on the stock market. Same thing with the insurance industry very good. Well thank you for spending time with us today. I'm behind the numbers. It was a pleasure having Jank for having me. I really appreciate. Yeah we've been talking about how to protect your balance sheet with Gregg Housing. Who'S VICE PRESIDENT IN USA insurance services? My name is Dave bookbinder. If you WANNA learn more about me or want to schedule a conversation feel free to reach out. You'll find me on linked in facebook and twitter. Thank you again for watching and listening if you are enjoying what you're hearing please do. Hit the subscribe button. And you'll be able to stay in contact with everything that we're up to. Thanks again. Everyone till next time take care..

Gregg Housing Gotcha Greg Dave bookbinder greg I Tim Greg Dot Howson Greg House CFO Company USA facebook Jank Pennsylvania VICE PRESIDENT Point
"howson" Discussed on Behind The Numbers

Behind The Numbers

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"howson" Discussed on Behind The Numbers

"I spent some time kicking around some different jobs and from that decided. Sales is really where I wanted to be and so the insurance industry called me and it's been seventeen years at a local broker and now I'm with us. I which is a national broker. Okay so I thought we might start off by getting a frame for what's going on the market and I just want to preface this by saying that most people insurance is not usually a fun sexy topic and I know we're going to try and change that paradigm today Because it is important. That's why I wanted to talk about this from the context of protecting the balance sheet. Because that's really what it is. So what's news in the insurance market? Well first of all you are right. That generally people don't think of it as very sexy topic but it is an important topic everyone needs insurance and everyone has insurance as we should have insurance. That's correct what we like to say is. It's the only thing that you have to buy that you hope you never have to use So the marketplace right now is in a bit of flux for the last seven quarters. There's been a property. There's been rate increases throughout the insurance market. Some sectors being hit harder than others for example property insurance. You can see a property. Owner should expect at least ten to fifteen percent rate increase on their standard portfolio however if they've had losses that's GonNa be higher and then if a catastrophic area for example if they're in Florida or the coast of Texas or California Day should expect that number to even greater thirty five forty percent flood and hurricane risk. Things like exactly right. Yeah in other areas that is increasing right now. Directors and Officers Liability Litigation is higher. Jury awards are greater so public dino and a private company directors and officers liability is higher cybersecurity. That's one area that I know. We'll talk about a little bit later on umbrella pricing again that is increasing as well and last business auto and that has to do with a couple of different factors again which we can touch on later. Okay do you mind if you impact them a little bit not at all? Because I think there's a lot of folks that listen and Watch that are certainly well schooled in these types of things but We've got entrepreneurs and I know that you work with CFO's and sometime CFO's or taking on a lot more responsibility. Insurance is one of them so it may be beneficial if we just talk about each couple of these lines anyway and kind of what they are defined them and why they are important right. Maybe any blind spots. Let me talk first about umbrella insurance. What DOES UMBRELLA MEAN SO umbrella? Think of it as an extra layer atop of what you'd normally by so you have a auto insurance policy. Say It's a three hundred thousand dollar limit on that. You can buy a million dollar umbrella which goes over that so in other words right now with three hundred thousand limits of liability if you had a five hundred thousand dollar claim two hundred thousand coming out of your pocket if you have that. Extra layer of umbrella of a million. It's all going to be covered by the insurance company. Okay Gotcha Dino Director's office directors and officers this pretax the board members of the organization. So in many states they are financially. Excuse me personally responsible for decisions. They make that affect the company to they can be held personally liable so it's important for individual to make sure before agreeing to serve on a board to make sure that the proper limits especially of the dino are in place for them that's going to protect them in the event that they are brought into a lawsuit. Yeah how important is dino in the context of a merger acquisition transactions dreamily important? Can you speak to that because again? A lot of the folks watching and listening or in the deal space or again. Cfo's or CEO's who may be involved in a transaction. Why does this matter so it matters because of the longevity of the program and what I mean by? The program is the directors and officers policy so if a merger and acquisition happens and then five years down the road. There is a problem that goes back to before the merger acquisition happened. Then that policy. If it's not properly extended is going to have expired in there will be no coverage then. So whose responsibility is it to make sure that the dino language and policy is worked into the transaction documents is a purely the attorneys not necessarily Say One thing that I do when a company is looking to a merger acquisition is they will come to us for due diligence on the current insurance program and we will basically unpacked at home. Insurance Program analyze it. Make sure it is where it should be. Make sure it's going to be where it should be but first and foremost and make sure that when we look at something in the future anything that comes back to get them from. The past will be covered as well. So I put the onus really auto broker okay before we were going on the air you started talk a little bit about the US tool the one advantage. I think you called it correct. Yes that's used is brand is the. Us is one advantage..

CFO Us Officers Liability Litigation Florida Director Texas California CEO
"howson" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"howson" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Five hit failed a forty one close at forty one fifty two not a good day for any IPO. Go holiday. Tim sixty gave him be aim seven sixties micro-climate forecast. Cloudy with a slight chance of rain today. Highs in the mid sixties and most areas expect the rain to move in overnight bringing the chance of thunderstorms tomorrow thing to clear out late Saturday, leaving us with mostly sunny skies on Sunday right now, it is cloudy and sixty four in Eskin Dido the Padres open to three game weekend series against the Rockies in Colorado tonight. Eric lower gets the start for the pods at Coors field. There's more Mike Slater coming up AM, seven sixty talk and breaking news anchor funding. Let's get Kevin lines called twenty years. Nineteen nineteen years. I think Kevin's been doing this direct mortgage lender. So want to save some money you own a house, call Kevin lines. One of our listeners called twenty one days later, simple, refinance hassle free for them. Kevin into all the work. They had. Thirty thousand dollars cash in a lower monthly payment. They used pay off nine thousand dollars of credit card debt off their chest Howson's that and paid off the rest of the car and a little bit for new roof as well. Seven three thousand six hundred bucks a year on top of that. Not a good day. One eight hundred three three three fifty one fifty seven. Credit even plus the perfect Kevin access to a ton of programs. One hundred three three fifty one fifty seven one eight hundred three three fifty one fifty seven or anchorfunding dot net. Equal housing lender. California bureau of real estate broker number zero one seven six zero eight seven three six four nine not all applicants qualify pursuant to the department of business oversight, California finance lenders law. Hey, Mark Larson here coming up on Monday, live and local tend to noon the latest from the San Diego city hall and homeless shelter to to see street. What are they're really up to their AM seven sixty talking breaking news now back to Slater. Joseph Riley war veteran. We're talking about him paratrooping in on the d day, invasion.

Kevin Mike Slater Coors field Eric lower Tim sixty Eskin California Mark Larson Joseph Riley Padres Howson Colorado San Diego Nineteen nineteen years Thirty thousand dollars nine thousand dollars twenty one days twenty years
Box plummets on revenue miss and weak guidance

CNBC's Fast Money

01:37 min | 2 years ago

Box plummets on revenue miss and weak guidance

"Back to pass when we've gone earnings alert on box getting crushed in the after our session. Josh San Francisco with more. Hey, Josh, so Melissa reach out to some analysts from quick street reaction to this print spoke to Rashid jewelry from DA Davidson listening says billings fell way short the revenue Atlit was not just below the street, but represented a significant deceleration rish. Making the orchids me that box is still a company with good technology to hinge, this looks like the extended sales execution issues and the bottom line says that turnaround in sales and a reacceleration in growth could take significantly longer. He told me that investors had I expected Brian Peterson over Raymond James. He's telling his clients if you try to look for silver lining. Well, there were solid cost controls in the quarter. But bottom line for him prior indications of growth, accelerating in fiscal twenty clearly in his words off the table. I did the chance to check in briefly with CO Aaron Levy about the corner. As to the guidance weaker-than-expected, he made the point which is making right now in the conference call to that he would point to two broad points of weakness. Few seven figure deals he says did get pushed out in terms of geography told me they continue continued weakness in a mea. He's focused on new sales training and new sales leaders. I did ask him to about competition from dropbox. Remember dropbox drew Howson was just on CNBC last week. He told us he's taking customers from box did ask air Levy about that. He says, that's unreasonable that certainly dropbox desk compete with customers especially in the small business category. But in his words, he is not seeing them show up in the enterprise

Aaron Levy Josh San Francisco Raymond James Sales Training Howson Brian Peterson Cnbc Rashid Atlit Billings Melissa
"howson" Discussed on The MMA Hour with Ariel Helwani

The MMA Hour with Ariel Helwani

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"howson" Discussed on The MMA Hour with Ariel Helwani

"So i just think of these march mason this cheaper you don't even know that's all new she much may not just done all the the only little hole let's start athle influence them i don't think of anyone else they don't scout no well life the way the the main thing that makes me want to have the us she is to build a proper legacy onto just the amount of people what say you know what you do you have she putting on she he needs to see i don't does it get annoying yeah physically you haven't fence things like not beat me on all those lows masters ad was no point in even if she your shit anyone will beat you knew shit ona ola and then a winning fights on then it's just when you own the sheet on shake dockage always isn't good enough for you need to say wasn't isn't don't fund be in a small fish in a big pump right you'd rather be the big dog and in along those lines would something like bill to our interest you because you could be a bigger dog see what moaning the home of the generally go fight for your price fighter you wanna make money i wanna make money i want to be able to live a good life on by howson of kids in sure failed to support them so i might as well and as much money on now if this young age and then in years from even more about we legacy are you big spender like we've seen countless you know fighters you're smiling i'm the opposite okay i got called a dole engine image by white people.

howson
"howson" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"howson" Discussed on KGO 810

"And this is something that when we trainer officers and even for ourselves when we are being trained stay out of that far left lane because a lot of impaired drivers not go wrong away on the on the roadway linked up there in the slowing lane and they're going to correct way though we be a lot of our headon collisions and a lot of are really tragic situation happen when people are driving essentially in the fast lane which would we call the number one language would be the far left lane um and we see a lotta people go ahead on with impaired drivers just due to the fact that they think that on the correct by the road in the slow lane view when we might i would just be day out of that lanes in and get over to the other lanes you you have a lot better chance driving um in those other lanes always heard that people who are um inebriated that they a sometimes they're not focusing real well and so it's nighttime they'll focus on the lights and so if i have pulled over to the side for one reason or another they may think that you're a lane of traffic and drive into you because they think there behind you driving that you know you're not parked there is that an appropriately absolutely and i mean i worked a graveyard shift uh and ethical area tho on one thing we do is we try and take everybody off the phone anyway um if they're coming up bogey down or something some issue we try and get off the free as possible because um that absolutely correct even if you're a of if you think something's wrong with your car you're not sure and you pull over and turn your howson's on through and you can get off that next exit drive off that next x they even if you may have a flat tyre it is safer to get off the freeway in kind of get off that next exit you'll do yourself a lot of stress a lot of trouble and potentially getting hit by a drunk driver yeah and i i wonder if maybe that was what uh what happened with the police officers who were hit one of them killed recently in.

howson
"howson" Discussed on KGAB

KGAB

01:34 min | 4 years ago

"howson" Discussed on KGAB

"To the the howson it got to go scenario where has been a why for fighting is a large kind of people about thirty people outside the house and now we had separate a life gotta in this crowned people holding their back in man american himself in the house with with a gun i'm up on that what's the window the that he was and they treated she had the window and i stayed in the main doorway and now legacy got a corner across us around he was there's a mere and so i could see him matt getting is so on you had a the chamber of the news mess with the chamberlain done so i used to pry loading it or checking make sure is low didn't so yelling at i'm you're not come out pajamas gun first talk and he's he was coming out telling us to leave in many came around the corner yeah yeah she had a gun where we're waiting that it like like this he added over shoulder and i think he was maybe talking mirrors enough like a question always say like if i was asset morning loud and i that's an around made a decision yet clearly should be guy but you know meniscus house this kid you're outside is weiss screaming his toys on the floor first children and family pitchers i just i like under still control the situation so you know yelling you know but now mcdonough kill yeah i get wasn't talking in like a placement on like i'm going to kill you and he's tell me to put now my gun and i'm lurch small but he was six three two hundred and sixty pounds and i felt like i can this arm i'm so i as a walk georgia my grabbed about gonna pushing away from man and i get.

the house georgia matt weiss mcdonough sixty pounds