19 Burst results for "Howard Law School"

"howard law school" Discussed on UnCommon Law

UnCommon Law

04:35 min | 3 weeks ago

"howard law school" Discussed on UnCommon Law

"27th sleep magazine story by Mark Joseph stern. Along with his efforts to help diversify the federal judiciary, Ben said he'll continue his leadership roles on several nonprofit and corporate boards once he retires. So I was on the board for many years of the legal counsel for legal diversity headed by Robert gray, former ABA president. And here we have general counsel, managing partners who are pushing for change. We've had close to 10,000 lawyers, go through that program. And so we think that's been a great change in all credit to our board and to Robert for what they had done in our various members. I'm leaving that board. Active with a minority corporate counsel association and their terrific leader, Jean Lee. But there are three things I hope to continue. I am going to stay with the environmental law institute where I've been the chair for 5 years now. And we're bringing diversity to environmental law and we want to bring the rule of law to environmental issues across around the world. We want to address climate change. We want to address climate justice and environmental justice. And so I'm invested time there. Again, working with others, we teach environmental law, environmental justice, at the Howard law school, and 7 of our students are going to be working for the environmental law institute. And we found funding for those Howard law students. So they'll have that exposure in that opportunity and they are doing amazing work. I also work with others on the D.C. bar foundation, in addition to the generosity of lawyers, the District of Columbia government, historically, has given us about $11 million. This year, mayor Bowser and our council up that the $22 million. And that money is going to go to legal groups who serve the poor. Who serve the indigent. And now, coming out of this very difficult time of the pandemic, people need those legal services. And so that's important. And I'm also on a judicial nomination commission. So we choose our judges for the D.C. superior court and D.C. Court of Appeals and I have 6 wonderful colleagues on the board where it's led by judge Emmett Sullivan, who's been the judge of about just everything in the District of Columbia. And we've found some amazing people willing to serve as judges and, you know, juris make all the difference. And because they're the ones that establish the respect of the law, the integrity of the process is in their hands. And then in terms of my for profit board service, I'm the lead director for the Northwestern Mutual life insurance company, the quiet company. Very proud of Northwestern Mutual. We're making a significant.

environmental law institute 27th sleep magazine Mark Joseph stern Jean Lee Robert gray Howard law school D.C. bar foundation ABA District of Columbia governmen mayor Bowser Ben Robert D.C. superior court D.C. Court of Appeals judge Emmett Sullivan Howard District of Columbia Northwestern Mutual life insur
"howard law school" Discussed on UnCommon Law

UnCommon Law

04:35 min | 3 weeks ago

"howard law school" Discussed on UnCommon Law

"27th sleep magazine story by Mark Joseph stern. Along with his efforts to help diversify the federal judiciary, Ben said he'll continue his leadership roles on several nonprofit and corporate boards once he retires. So I was on the board for many years of the legal counsel for legal diversity headed by Robert gray, former ABA president. And here we have general counsel, managing partners who are pushing for change. We've had close to 10,000 lawyers, go through that program. And so we think that's been a great change in all credit to our board and to Robert for what they had done in our various members. I'm leaving that board. Active with a minority corporate counsel association and their terrific leader, Jean Lee. But there are three things I hope to continue. I am going to stay with the environmental law institute where I've been the chair for 5 years now. And we're bringing diversity to environmental law and we want to bring the rule of law to environmental issues across around the world. We want to address climate change. We want to address climate justice and environmental justice. And so I'm invested time there. Again, working with others, we teach environmental law, environmental justice, at the Howard law school, and 7 of our students are going to be working for the environmental law institute. And we found funding for those Howard law students. So they'll have that exposure in that opportunity and they are doing amazing work. I also work with others on the D.C. bar foundation, in addition to the generosity of lawyers, the District of Columbia government, historically, has given us about $11 million. This year, mayor Bowser and our council up that the $22 million. And that money is going to go to legal groups who serve the poor. Who serve the indigent. And now, coming out of this very difficult time of the pandemic, people need those legal services. And so that's important. And I'm also on a judicial nomination commission. So we choose our judges for the D.C. superior court and D.C. Court of Appeals and I have 6 wonderful colleagues on the board where it's led by judge Emmett Sullivan, who's been the judge of about just everything in the District of Columbia. And we've found some amazing people willing to serve as judges and, you know, juris make all the difference. And because they're the ones that establish the respect of the law, the integrity of the process is in their hands. And then in terms of my for profit board service, I'm the lead director for the Northwestern Mutual life insurance company, the quiet company. Very proud of Northwestern Mutual..

environmental law institute 27th sleep magazine Mark Joseph stern Jean Lee Robert gray Howard law school D.C. bar foundation ABA District of Columbia governmen mayor Bowser Ben Robert D.C. superior court D.C. Court of Appeals judge Emmett Sullivan Howard District of Columbia Northwestern Mutual life insur
"howard law school" Discussed on Think 100%: The Coolest Show

Think 100%: The Coolest Show

04:31 min | 5 months ago

"howard law school" Discussed on Think 100%: The Coolest Show

"Wanna do something else and that's okay right and so one of my favorite people that i helped bring him clinton james he was the director of the sierra student coalition has gone on and now he and his wife. Stephanie started collective pack right and they're out there. They're out there helping. You know black folks get elected. I'm at clinton to our good friend. Jack patterson conference in oklahoma city. He was a student on the national board. Petitioned man woman that shark tank somebody. I wanna meet right so dads how you need folks. That's an end to mentor them and support them and if they're interested helped him get in and i've had a lot of support and help over the years church so it's been an adjunct professor at howard law school very protestant of my former students who are justice who already pa law firms. I one is a state. Assemblywoman in maryland right now so trying to find those opportunities to do that and We've gotten some very good interns Over the years from howard and you dec- locally and other places ported the hugh climate jeff initiative every year. We support the University of maryland Ej conference coming up docs. Kobe wilson is coming up august. I think nineteen to twentieth and all those students and so they're really great places that people can support Going forward and get support as well. And i'm very proud to death. News one of our interns And i'm just afraid. I remember when she did Earth she did an event when she was at howard and it was fantastic. Okay and so We also had a labor program and we've had Great people come through there. We have a really labor director now. Derek eaters Brother who came out of eight t- and he's going to be really During his program up phil's intersections of economic justice in environmental justice right so we formalize that No i and.

clinton james sierra student coalition Jack patterson national board howard law school Stephanie Kobe wilson oklahoma city Assemblywoman clinton howard pa maryland University of maryland jeff Derek phil
"howard law school" Discussed on Amicus with Dahlia Lithwick

Amicus with Dahlia Lithwick

06:36 min | 5 months ago

"howard law school" Discussed on Amicus with Dahlia Lithwick

"She couldn't even be contained by that and so then she really is doing the sit ins and an end. I wonder if there's some. It's really striking that years before rosa parks. She refuses to move to the back of the bus. She gets hold off the bus and put in jail. She connects with the double acp. There's a moment in which it looks like. She could be the plaintiff. And in the case. Just vaporizes it's dismissed on other grounds I wonder if there's a way in which even when she's trying to be visible by resisting injustice sometimes she gets erased. It's just such an interesting story vet even when sometimes when she's trying again to go back to patricia opening to just be seen and heard so frequently you get the sense. She doesn't even get the merit of having protested. these things. This is betsy. I mean i think the the bus arrest is such an interesting story. Because it starts out with paulie and a friend just going to visit polly's family and as police says we did not intend to protest these segregationist laws but there are times when you just have no choice. Polly saw the injustice. Being asked to go sit in a broken seat when they were available seats and and so polly was going to stand up for herself and for her friend. The dismissal of that case is kind of interesting. I mean the resolution of the case thurgood. Marshall was involved in defending her. There's been some question about whether or not Polly and her friend were perceived to be too odd. Perhaps to make a good test case. And there's also the question of the the the judge himself who who saw that. Maybe i don't wanna go there so he dismissed the charges that would have given the acp grounds to take take to a higher route. But yes that was a sort of missed opportunity. Paulie then went on to actively protest The segregation of restaurants near howard university Howard law school which was another you know activism and again these things were covered in the black press but they weren't nobody else knew about them you know so many years before the movement gain the traction and and people started to pay attention. I don't know that's because of the of television of the pictures that we could see of the the protesters in the nineteen sixties and. We didn't have that earlier or you know. I'm sure that historians have many other factors for why these earlier protests and pauling wasn't actually the only person doing this. There's evidence that that many african americans had refused to go to the back of the bus had had had protested injustices but these they were sort of considered isolated incidents a before the i guess the modern civil rights movement. This is patricia of one of the things. That impressed me when i as i followed the story of pauly's Life as a lawyer was that she reached the point where she was reviewing. Her career reviewed her career as paul review to korea as a lawyer and wrote In a journal that she had gotten to the point where she was questioning how Much of her time and energy she put into being a lawyer because in not to say that she wasn't very appreciative of all the strides they had been made but she said that Lawyers are focused primarily on the facts and writers or poets which is which was the her dream would the dream job. She she she preferred. Her identity was poets Were focused on the truth. Sell as opposed to lawyers. Who were focused on facts. And if you read the collection of polly's poetry. I think that is where she comes. Closest to expressing the fullness of her identity because you do not have to read too closely to see her Love of another person presumably a woman. You don't have to read too closely to see her disappointment in in prior relationships. It's all. I think it's all there. And it was in the creative writing where you see her working very seriously in diligently to the on the expression of issues of identity and feeling that the law is can can be a restraining force. And i think I think so often now About the fact that as paulie moved into mid life the the career or the job that she coveted most was a position on the supreme court. Now let me ask you. What do you think the court would be like if we could be so privileged to have a pauli. Murray associate justice. She very much wanted to and felt that she was qualified and deserved to be considered for such a post and wrote president nixon and said oh when they were considering when there was a a position open that she was ready and available and that if he wanted to nominate a woman that she was ready and available. Probably nixon wasn't her guy. Yeah.

polly Polly howard university Howard law s rosa parks patricia paulie betsy Paulie pauling Marshall pauly korea paul supreme court Murray president nixon nixon
"howard law school" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

01:59 min | 7 months ago

"howard law school" Discussed on KPCC

"Gives me some hope, a little bit of compromise on both sides of the court Very quickly. Do you think we'll see that more of that going forward? I certainly hope so. If any, if last week is any indication, I am definitely keeping my fingers crossed because I think it's best for all of us if you can see that compromise. I've been talking with Tiffany right, a professor at Howard Law School, where she is the co director of the school's human and civil Rights clinic. She previously clerked for Justice. Sonia Sotomayor. Thanks so much for your time, professor right? Thank you for having me. And coming up. We will switch gears and talk with the author of a new book about tennis legend Serena Williams. I'm Sarah McCammon and you're listening to one A from W A, m U and NPR. Mm. Mm. The first time I heard KPCC. I think I was driving in Los Angeles. And there's a lot of great stations in Los Angeles. But I turned to kpcc and they were actually talking about something that was really interesting. Hi. I'm Lisa Loeb, kpcc listener and members. I'm a person who likes to think a lot and I like to discuss issues a lot like you sure of yourself. Like you know where you're going? Oh, my gosh. This is really worth a lot to me. If you could count up the minutes that I listen and how much it plays into how I look at things I'm entertained by KPCC. I'm.

Sarah McCammon Sonia Sotomayor Lisa Loeb Los Angeles Serena Williams Howard Law School Tiffany last week kpcc both sides first time KPCC NPR one Rights clinic W A
"howard law school" Discussed on Brewsing Banter

Brewsing Banter

04:12 min | 8 months ago

"howard law school" Discussed on Brewsing Banter

"Donations lease in giving them pretty much a quick fifteen minute you know slide deck of why it's important. Why why this matters why they should You know support the fund funding respect. Yeah yes yes to all the things I haven't done it as such as well of distinct. In organizers you articulated cells. We're working on. But i love it. Thank using you. But yeah even with a with a crowd. Putting him that pain that we did on our Which is a platform. That's created specifically for independent filmmakers. Yeah i was hitting up directly particularly the burris like in the raleigh. Durham chapel hill kind of area About this and i'm really An on really encouraged by the response by you know folks like full steam. Durham pony stories. You know who you don't know about ponies stories. Then venue i don a sore i about my little pony as dina saucers is Yeah great great. Great folks out to nick. In team there in durham Who've been super super supportive and Yeah so continuing to have those conversations with brees. And i'll say you. All the brewers that met and talked with like thinking about mahalia. Who's she's a female latina brewer in wilson north carolina which is about twenty three minutes south of rocky mountain eastern north carolina. has a beautiful buri My god was the name of the halle berry. Cannot of us up my head sita's because he does and so you know she. That's her hometown in back. Open his hurt. They open their berina pandemic beautiful space. But yeah i mean there's been a lot of just generally a lot of support but still i think a lot of opportunity to have those really direct conversations with with aubrey community particularly north carolina. Because it is so large I'm in a lot of folks are having these conversations about race. Then this is actually going to throw off the whole conversation. Because it's it's gonna go left. But i think i read in the bio that that you were a lawyer or law on hold you can do seeking to jordan played basketball play baseball. Why go hey documentaries. Tough right as wire own boss so you know what my interesting when i was applying for law school. You know you have threat essay and mono blog along future. You told me you got ready adamant so. My essay was focused on a quotation from a gentleman by the name of charles. Hamilton houston Who among many things was Dean of howard law school and in the nineteen fifties. It was a believe the nwa c. p. sent him to south carolina With a camera to document video cam. Whatever the video camera. But it Format five millimeter. Fifteen million. I can't remember but he because this camera to south carolina to shoot record footage of the disparities between white schools in black schools in south carolina and this footage he took this footage and brought it back to howard where he was teaching people like their marshall. He's probably taking..

Fifteen million north carolina south carolina jordan Durham chapel hill five millimeter charles wilson north carolina durham fifteen minute Hamilton houston about twenty three minutes latina rocky mountain eastern north c nick mahalia nineteen fifties Dean brees raleigh
Civil rights leader Vernon Jordan has died at 85

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:24 sec | 11 months ago

Civil rights leader Vernon Jordan has died at 85

"Activists in Washington Power broker Vernon Jordan has died. He worked in civil rights law after Graduating from Howard Law School, then became head of the National Urban League in the seventies. He never held public office but did form relationships with lawmakers and corporate leaders to create economic and political opportunities for African Americans. His friendship with a young bill Clinton paid off later when he became one of President Clinton's closest advisors, D

Howard Law School Vernon Jordan National Urban League Washington Bill Clinton
Vernon Jordan, Civil Rights Icon and Former Clinton Adviser, Dies at 85

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:09 min | 11 months ago

Vernon Jordan, Civil Rights Icon and Former Clinton Adviser, Dies at 85

"In Washington power broker Vernon Jordan is dead. Jordan grew up in segregated Atlanta, worked in civil rights law after graduating from Howard Law School and became head of the National Urban League in the seventies. He's been a long time Washington D. C. The resident. He used that position to become one of the city's most imposing figures. He never held public office, but formed relationships with lawmakers and corporate leaders to create economic and political opportunities for African Americans. His friendship with a young bill Clinton paid off later when he became one of the president's closest advisors, D. C delegate Eleanor Holmes. Norton spoke with us earlier about Jordan. In a real sense. He's a real inspiration to young people and especially the African Americans to what they Can't achieve. He's in American life. He will certainly be unforgettable. I'm on Lee, hoping he will not be your irreplaceable. In a statement tonight, President Biden says Jordan knew the soul of America in all of its goodness, and all of its unfulfilled promise. The president says in order to honor Jordan the work of fighting racism has to continue. Vernon Jordan was 85 6

Howard Law School Vernon Jordan Jordan National Urban League Washington D. C Delegate Eleanor Holmes Atlanta Bill Clinton Norton President Biden LEE America
"howard law school" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

06:38 min | 1 year ago

"howard law school" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"But we knew when we were writing that we were standing on her shoulders. Yes that's another ruth bader ginsburg speaking to the filmmakers margot guernsey and llewellyn smith. Back in two thousand seventeen. Rpg is also featured in my name. Is pauline murray. So julie cohen. If you can take us back what is astounding about this. And i'm sure for many around the world who are watching or listening to this or reading about it right now is. This is the first time they are hearing pauli murray's name yet named by our bg as one of her. Inspirations and then go back in time to thurgood marshall and before that as well yeah. That's right i mean certainly. There is a growing awareness among progressives in the us fiscal piscopo. People who live in durham north carolina. Pockets of extreme interest in academics. Who are interested in pauli murray but the fact is most of us off were not taught about pauli murray in our elementary school history classes as perhaps we should have been or or later in our schooling and yet this is a person who influenced so many different movements in the us. Not only as you were talking about the fight for gender equality but also the fight for racial equality pauli murray was at howard law school in the early nineteen forties pauley wrote a paper making the argument that plus versus ferguson should be overturned on that 1896 notorious 1896 supreme court case laying down the role of separate but equal the feeling of the early civil rights movement at that point was what we should be fighting for in the separate but equal realm is to sort of you know improve the conditions in segregated institutions. Pauli murray's argument was no no this whole construct is faulty separate but equal by definition is unfair and by keeping people separate. Your are treating them unequal. You're creating a stamp or a badge of in theory artie. Tout telling people that you you have to you know people going to their own. Corners hall leans teachers and classmates at howard law. School thought this idea too radical in police description there was laughter and mocking hawley. Said i think that plessey is going to be overturned within twenty five years was pauly's gas a. Her what a police professors of made up made a ten dollar wager. Say like no absolutely no way of course ten years later one thousand nine hundred before the brown versus board of education supreme court ruling came out saying exactly that separate but equal is unconstitutional and pauly's law professors had been in but were were involved in that case spotswood robinson who was polly's professor at howard. Thurgood marshall teaching at howard all the great civil rights icons were very much circling around howard university and in fact police paper was used in developing the arguments that went into the brown versus board of education. Briefs they're sort of specific points. That paulie make that actually find their way into the formal brief and then into the supreme court. Roy i want to turn to an audio clip of pauli. Murray speaking in nineteen sixty six at the harvard law forum cure bust where she distributes brains intellect talent drive. She simply scatters these with the recombination of the league's up in some ways. I might have been disadvantaged to have been born. They negro white america. A woman in a man's profession left handed and right handed world. And i might throw in even an orphan at an early age. But it was surfing advantages in this status which i didn't see then. But i see in retrospect i therefore i came to sex discrimination much later than i came to rights discrimination and having fought the battle of race discrimination i began to see how incre girly these two discriminations were since. I cannot split myself since i had to be a unified human being. I decided that it was not. I was wrong. But the society's excellence wrong and that any time a society penalizes individual because of a biological attribute whether it be race per se or rather it be sex per se that society is going to be challenged. that was pauli. Murray speaking at harvard law firm forum pauli murray went to howard law school in the forties. Pauli murray wrote a letter to harvard law school after being rejected for a further degree at the time the school only accepted men. Paulie wrote quote. I would gladly change my sex to meet your requirements but since the way to such change has not been revealed to me. I have no recourse but to appeal to you to change your minds now. This is not a minor point. She is prevented from going to harvard. Law school because of They said they would not accept women to harvard law school she would go to the university of california berkeley than get another degree at yale. Now a building is named for pauli. Murray the first african-american named on building a building is named for betsy west. If you could talk about a lot of what's embedded in what she's in what pauli murray is saying now pauli murray at the time referred to herself as she But this is a time when she had asked for.

Paulie margot guernsey llewellyn smith julie cohen Roy pauli Murray ruth bader ginsburg pauley twenty five years 1896 early nineteen forties harvard law school ten dollar harvard african-american ten years later durham north carolina spotswood robinson ferguson
"howard law school" Discussed on Iron Advocate

Iron Advocate

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"howard law school" Discussed on Iron Advocate

"And i can see myself in them. And i ensure that we have an ethnically diverse. Admissions team you've got people from the south we've got people from the north we've got women we've got man we've got right. Look we are just make your as inclusive as we possibly can be when we are reaching out to schools and recruiting students so that we are ensuring that we are in image presenting the same thing that we're saying in terms of message about. This is a possibility for you. And when you look at my admissions recruiting folks. Guess what you're going to be able to find somebody who you have some commonality with in that other schools have to do a better job of doing that. I wanna pivot here. Rene away from us we could. We could talk about that. You know all day. I have a question I want to talk about your litigating. But before i leave i'll just say my wife met at howard law school runway Who's african american says to me. Times white people to police white people. You guys aren't enough job with yourselves. And the record rene clapping right. And it's true and it's oftentimes something that you know. Well-meaning white folks don't even know what that means and it's something that that is like tell you 'cause my friends my network will come to me because they think i'm like a embassador the black community and asked me questions like what are we doing. How do we do it. So it's a bigger conversation. Maybe i'll come back to that one because it's it is so it's so clear when he looked at the stats on who were lawyers now. It is just predominantly white male profession and the world is changing and that's drastically and i think that that so my question on lead bob ask you about your litigation because the fact that you're still litigating not comes back to the the issue about how you doing it and that makes all the difference for a student. I'm a leave out to bob. My last question to just said is how do you mythical law school when you trying to to safeguard democracy on you're trying to and people's rights and really making the system that we have at theoretically should work if say for the biases that run through like a river..

bob howard law school Rene
"howard law school" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:45 min | 1 year ago

"howard law school" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Well, it was the news heard round the Internet. After weeks of speculation, Joe Biden announced he was picking California Senator Kamala Harris as his running mate, and you had a lot of feelings about the nomination. I think it's the greatest thing in the world. I was hoping Joe would take her the whole time. My wife was hoping so to Camilla is fierce, and she is a rising superstar, not a big pair of her policies or any work. She's she's done. Former resident of California here left the state because of the terrible issues not not not, including the justice system reforms that she claimed she made. Which ah lot of California's are still suffering through wound. Kamala Harris was not my first choice for a Democratic right presidential nominee now that Joe Baden has selected her He is my first choice. I'm very pleased and will fully support their ascension to the president and vice president. Regardless of feelings. It's an historic nomination. Harris is the first black woman and the first person of South Asian descent to appear on a major political party ticket. And she's a Howard University alum, making her the first major party nominee to graduate from a historically black college or university. So we wanted to talk about Senator Harris's routes to see how that shaped her into the person and candidate that she is today for that. We're joined by Robin Givens, staff writer at The Washington Post Robin welcome. Thank you for having me also with US Commission Granted, She's a political science professor at Howard University. Welcome the one egg Misha. I am happy to be here. So Robin, let's turn back to the early 19 eighties, Kamala Harris was a high school grad deciding what college to go to. What was her life like before? Howard? Well, she had really been going Tio majority white schools Before then, particularly, she went to high school in Montreal on one of the things that wass of particular interest to her wass to sort of step into a world that wass Peacefully surrounded by black culture. And you know, she very well could have gone Tio, a Stanford or to a Berkeley because her parents had connections there, and it just sort of, you know, logically might have made a bit more sense. But she was looking for that kind of deep cultural surround sound that a place like Howard would provide. And she also was very interested in the law. And she had said that Thurgood Marshall Waas, a hero, and he had attended Howard Law School, and she also had a family friend who had attended Howard. So all those things would have combined. Teo lied her across the country. Talk a little bit more about her parents in how her early years maybe shaped where she is today. While her mother had come to the states from India. Her father was from Jamaica. They met at Berkeley and one of the things that I found interesting, as described by a friend of her mother's was that At that time. Heritage wasn't really sort of dissected to the degree that it is today. And so there was this sort of sense of you know you either black or you're white. I'm speaking up. Sort of. You know, the sixties and seventies, And when her parents were divorced, Kamala Harris, his mother was really the primary caregiver. And she really raised them to be Carmela and her straw. Maya, Teo, be As she would put it, You know, strong, confident black women with both Indian and Jamaican heritage. So she decides to go to Howard University. What was how we're like in the 19 eighties? What was she walking into? While she was walking into Ah University that had a very long history of educating some of the most renowned figures in black culture. Josh was walking into a place where you know the 1% of black society sent their Children, but she was also walking into a place that was full of first time are first generation college students. One of the things that she remarked on was that while she had well, she understood that there was a very wide diversity of black people on black experiences. What she had an experience Wass this sense of just being surrounded by them in great numbers. And so it wass this feeling of walking into a place where there was just this incredible abundance off black diversity that I think she found very welcoming and very exciting. And she also spoke about the fact that black history or African American history wasn't a separate department or wasn't a singular class within a larger history programme, but that it was woven through the entire curriculum. It was at the core of what Howard Wass Anisha. How do you think that time at Howard shaped the way, Kamala Harris. Views herself. I think Robin made a good point about the history being woven through the various parts and her acknowledgement Harris's acknowledgment of that I think that how university shaped her in there. We did that at the time that she was there and still do that. I teach political science. But if I'm going to teach you about how local government works, I'm also going to teach you about how black people experienced local government. It's okay. I can imagine a scenario where she was at Howard University and thinking about the law and thinking about lawmakers and not just learning about what was happening in the moment when she lived, but also learning about a Barbara Jordan or Shirley Chisholm or Learning about Fannie Lou Hamer is she was thinking about activism and organizing. And so I suspected those things have followed her throughout her life on have made a difference in the way that she does her governing and her politics. We're talking to commissioner Grant, political science professor at Howard University and also Robin Givens, staff writer at The Washington Post. We're talking about Senator Kamala Harris is Howard University roots. Anisha. When you think about how politics come into play for students at Howard and HBC News in general, how active it's one thing to learn in the classroom. It's another thing to take that outside of the classroom and move into activism. I think Hbcu students are among the most active college students anywhere in the nation and potentially in the world. Not on ly. Do the students learn about politics as I talked about, but they actually get out and do it. And so it was not uncommon for us to have assignments that send them out into community to do various work and is even very common for how university students today and I think when she was in school To have their own ambitions to seek their own internships to make their own connections throughout D C and the rest of the nation that take that politics. They're learning in the classroom and push it out a bit so that they are doing the activism and organizing work, not just on our campus but around the nation. Robin Howard is of course in Washington, D. C..

Senator Kamala Harris Robin Howard Howard University Howard Wass Anisha Robin Givens Howard Law School California Robin Joe Biden Teo Berkeley Joe Camilla staff writer professor Ah University Montreal Jamaica Joe Baden Tio
"howard law school" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

08:23 min | 1 year ago

"howard law school" Discussed on KPCC

"For a party to say We want to go back to exactly what we did in 2016 you're going to evolve from this one way or another. The question is. How also is covert 19 contributing to a rise in gun violence on the next morning edition from NPR News weekday mornings on 89.3 kpcc. This's one, eh? I'm Jen White and Washington. Well, it was the news heard round the Internet. After weeks of speculation, Joe Biden announced he was picking California Senator Kamala Harris as his running mate, and you had a lot of feelings about the nomination. I think it's the greatest thing in the world. I was hoping Joe would take her the whole time. My wife was hoping so to Camilla is fears and she is a rising superstar, not a big fan of her policies or any work. She's she's done. Former resident of California here left the state Because of the terrible issues not not not including the justice system reforms that she claimed she made which, ah lot of California's are still suffering through wound. Kamala Harris was not my first choice for the Democratic rights presidential nominee. Now that Joe Baden has selected her she is my first choice. I'm very pleased and will fully support. Their ascension to the president and vice president will regardless of feelings. It's an historic nomination. Harris is the first black woman and the first person of South Asian descent to appear on a major political party ticket. And she's a Howard University alum, making her the first major party nominee to graduate from a historically black college or university. So we wanted to talk about Senator Harris's routes to see how that shaped her into the person and candidate that she is today. For that. We're joined by Robin Givens, staff writer at The Washington Post Robin welcome. I thank you for having me also with US Commission Granted, She's a political science professor at Howard University. Welcome to one taken Isha! I am happy to be here. So Robin, let's turn back to the early 19 eighties, Kamala Harris was a high school grad deciding what college to go to. What was her life like before? Howard? Well, she had really been going Tio majority white schools Before then, particularly, she went to high school in Montreal. And one of the things that was of particular interest to her Woz to sort of step into a world that wass fully surrounded by black culture. And you know, she very well could have gone Tio, a Stanford or to a Berkeley because her parents had connections there, and it just sort of, you know, logically might have made a bit more sense. But she wass looking for that kind of, um deep cultural surround sound that a place like Howard would provide. And she also was very interested in the law. And she had sat that Thurgood Marshall Waas, a hero, and he had attended Howard Law School, and she also had a family friend who had attended Howard. So all those things would have combined. Teo lied her across the country. Talk a little bit more about her parents in how her early years maybe shaped where she is today. While her mother had come to the states from India. Her father was from Jamaica. They met at Berkeley and one of the things that I found interesting, as described by a friend of her mother's was that At that time. Heritage wasn't really sort of dissected to the degree that it is today. And so there was this sort of sense of, you know you're either black or you're white. I'm speaking up. Sort of, you know, the sixties and seventies. And when her parents were divorced, Ah Kamala Harris. His mother was really the primary caregiver. And she really raised them to be Carmela and her straw. Maya, Teo, be As she would put it, You know, strong, confident black women with both Indian and Jamaican heritage. So she decides to go to Howard University. What was how weren't like in the 19 eighties? What was she walking into? While she was walking into Ah University that had a very long history of educating some of the most renowned figures in black culture. Josh was walking into a place where you know that the 1% of black society sent their Children, but she was also walking into a place that was full of first time are first generation college students. One of the things that she remarked on was that while she had well, she understood that there was a very wide diversity of block people on black experiences. What she had an experience Wass this sense of just being surrounded by them in great numbers. And so it wass this feeling of walking into a place where there was just this incredible abundance off black diversity. That I think she found very welcoming and very exciting on. She also spoke about the fact that black history or African American history wasn't a separate department or it wasn't a singular class within a larger history programme, but that it was woven through The entire curriculum. It was at the core of what Howard Wass can issue. How do you think that time at Howard shaped the way, Kamala Harris Views herself. I think Robin made a good point about the history being woven through the various parts and her acknowledgement Harris's acknowledgment of that I think that how university shaped her in there. We did that at the time that she was there and still do that. I teach political science. But if I'm going to teach you about how local government works, I'm also going to teach you about how black people experienced local government. It's okay. I can imagine a scenario where she was at Howard University and thinking about the law and thinking about lawmakers and not just learning about what was happening in the moment when she lived, but also learning about a Barbara Jordan or Shirley Chisholm or Learning about Fannie Lou Hamer is she was thinking about activism and organizing. And so I suspected those things have followed her throughout her life on have made a difference in the way that she does her governing and her politics. We're talking to commissioner grand political science professor at Howard University and also Robin Givens, staff writer at The Washington Post. We're talking about Senator Kamala Harris is Howard University roots. Anisha. When you think about how politics come into play for students at Howard and an hbcu use in general, how active means one thing to learn in the classroom. It's another thing to take that outside of the classroom and move into activism. I think Hbcu students are among the most active college students anywhere in the nation and potentially in the world. Not on Ly. Do. The students learn about politics as I talked about, but they actually get out and do it, And so it was not uncommon for us to have assignments that send them out into community to do various work. And it's even very common for how university students today and I think when she was in school to have their own ambitions to seek their own internships to make their own connections throughout DC, and the rest of the nation that take that politics. They're learning in the classroom and push it out a bit so that they are doing the activism and organizing work not just on our campus but around the nation. Well, Robin Howard is of course in Washington, D. C. What did you learn about how politically involved Harris was during her time in school? Well. It was a time when there was a great deal of activism.

Senator Kamala Harris Robin Howard Howard University Howard Wass Robin Givens Howard Law School California Robin Washington Joe Biden Teo Berkeley Jen White staff writer Ah University Joe Baden Joe Montreal professor Jamaica
"howard law school" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

06:58 min | 1 year ago

"howard law school" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"She announced an open debate that she would use executive orders to ban assault weapons. She said she would ban fracking. She attacked Justice Brett Kavanaugh as a purported rapist and judge Brian Butcher for his Catholicism's Harris is unpopular with many black Americans. As a prosecutor, she was fond of pursuing heavy sentences for like charges as well as civil asset forfeiture. And then she bragged about smoking marijuana during her campaign. She has similarly alienated moderates attacking Biden himself as a vicious racist. For his unwillingness to support for school busing in the 19 seventies and suggesting that she believed Biden sexual harassers this or accusers there is, there is a reason Harris utterly flamed out in the primaries. Aside from her bizarre habit of breaking into a joke, a rescue group when asked difficult questions. One more thing that I found out this morning reading. One of these columns that I shared was that she was one of the senators in Ah, who voted against an act that would force a physician. To provide aid to a baby who survived an abortion. Let me spell that out for you right now. Doctors don't have to render aid to a baby who survives an abortion. And so they were trying to pass a law and Kamala Harris voted against it. In my opinion, that's infanticide. If you're gonna let a baby lay there and die because that baby's inconvenient for the mother that's infanticide. I mean, we could argue all day long about the morality of abortion. But infanticide is wrong. Can we all just agree that that is wrong? She did not agree. And I have an issue with that a real issue with that. I do have a line now let me give you the flip side of this. This is from the New York er. Now, you guys, This isn't ostensibly positive Colon about Kamil Harris. Okay, you ready? Pollsters will tell you that. Despite Biden's long career in politics, his candidacy has been undefined. It lacks a clear economic message. For starters build back better. I guess that's his campaign slogan. Is it winning any propaganda awards at his campaign events back when there were campaign events, his focus often wandered at times. He sat down before the end and let a surrogate deliver the closing case for him. In contrast, Harris came through vividly and her cub campaigns version of her biography on early life adjacent to the political militancy of Oakland with a Jamaican American father and an Indian American mother, both academics participating in civil rights marches as a child. And as a young woman at Howard Law School at the University of California and as an an effort as San Francisco's district attorney to reform the criminal justice system from the inside. And finally as a politician, the practice of eternal crusade. Other contenders in the Democratic primaries Liz Warren, Julian Castro dove deep into policy mastering it. It was often hard to understand. Just what Harris is. Plans were, she went back and forth about whether she supported Sanders vision of Medicare. For all, she tried to argue that she had fought his California's attorney general for ordinary citizens against predatory financial institutions. But that was Warren's turf. Her effort to position herself is a criminal justice reform ER was undermined by the party's activist wing. Which pointed out her consistence preference for policing and Carson rolls solutions in a chaotic race, eventually decided by black voters. Harris threw such little interest in money that she dropped out nearly two months before the first primary. You guys, this is a positive Positive column. Do you just feel the warm and fuzzies on that? One day I began you just feel the passion and enthusiasm. That's a good one. Oh, you're Max after day. So I read that I was like, Wait a minute. This is supposed to be good, right? That's the positive one of the positive ones. Wanna hate boy. The negative must be really what What crimes is she could committed in the past. Wow. Yeah, we'll we'll hear the other positives in there are positives for the campaign. And this actually in these two respects made it. Ah, little more understandable. One of them are means again. If you were going to take that last thing that you've read from the New York Capsulize it Yeah, And it would basically say she doesn't suck much. That that's that is correct. That's that's the endorsement currently is. She doesn't endorse. You see, now that's an unfortunate phrase for you, Teo use. And I did not again mention her relationship with Willie Brown. But if you don't know about that, do you know about that, Dave? I really I've heard the name but I don't know. Willing. Brown is the man in San Francisco in California politics for many, many years and Camilla Dated him. When she was 30. He was 60. He was married. She was not, and he has taken credit for the beginning of her political career. Because of that. He sounds like a charmer. That Willie Brown. He does not really. I mean, I would imagine she has had nothing to say about this. No. Well, I don't know. I don't remember. But it's very interesting to me that the party of feminism finds women that somehow glommed onto a man. Hillary Clinton. I mean, why was Hillary Clinton elected Senator? Of New York. Cause she was married to Bill Clinton. Let's be riel. Are there any other qualifications? I'm missing? Of New York senator From Arkansas doesn't make any sense yet. They keep elevating these women and don't get me wrong. Kamala Harris is very smart. She's very smart. We saw that in the kind of browbeating interrogation Sze we've witnessed over the years. She's very intelligent, but she definitely got a leg up there. So in any case, they also pointed out something else. We're really short on time, Dave. Ah, another aspect of this that I did not consider she is very chummy with Silicon Valley. And Silicon Valley has not been very friendly to Biden and said, Essentially, if you pick Elizabeth Warren, who wants to dismantle the tech companies were not going to give money to you. So this is expected to open the silicone. Valley coffers for Joe Biden. We will talk more about this and I'll get your thoughts and opinions. Whether it even matters. I will say this. I am sort of stoked for the VP debate now. Way more than any presidential debates because I think there might be some substance in that VP debate. Not that it matters or anything. You know whatever was there, Doug. It's like a useless job. It's like thankless. Who wants to be vey vey not me. Oh, the other part about this. One thing this does 100%. This position's Kamala Harris beautifully for 2024. Whatever happens. Beautifully. She is set up perfectly for the next election cycle. And that has to have Andrew Cuomo and Jared Polis really mad. I'm just saying, although Pulis does have the gay thing going for him. Check the box. Just throwing that.

Kamala Harris Joe Biden New York Liz Warren Willie Brown Senator Brett Kavanaugh Hillary Clinton California Dave marijuana San Francisco prosecutor assault executive Bill Clinton Brian Butcher Silicon Valley Andrew Cuomo VP
"howard law school" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

09:16 min | 1 year ago

"howard law school" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Langston, the dean of Howard Law School, Douglas was order of the day and Amy Bishop gives in You know the the opening So, but I think that ground in the rarest of cases are their monuments rendered important by a speech at its unveiling most unveiling speeches I want our either forgettable or repulsive. In this case, Douglas gave the second greatest speech of his life, the first being the Fourth of July speech, but his treatments memorial speech, all 13 pages of it was a masterpiece. The first part he took on Lincoln directly dead. Honestly, he said, a rambling was the White man's president Abraham Lincoln, and his prejudices. Assumptions was a white man. He was not our president, meaning our black people's president. And then came that famous line. My wife, fellow citizens, you are Abraham Lincoln's Children on My people are his stepchildren. Incredible metaphor, step Children by adoption by necessity and circumstance. And then in the middle of that speech comes apart. And his ship. He's just not celebrating Lincoln. But, he says with a refrain three times Under his rule and in due time under his rule, and in due time, Lincoln found the method the way to create the policy by which we became free. David blacked his book, Frederick Douglass. Profit of Freedom It honors Lincoln's essential kind of political pragmatism. At the same time, Douglas had been generous, honest about what most black folks had thought of Lincoln in the first year and 1/2 or more of the war, including Douglas and last point That speech is really directed at the audience in the 1st 2 rows because he had president Grant members of the Cabinet justices of the Supreme Court members of the House and Senate. The entire government said in front of him, and Douglas is telling them you're losing reconstruction. They're falling apart and you don't act now you'll never have another chance. I'm sorry, went on too long about this speech. But I do know the imagery of that monument is offensive to many people, but not all people. And I'm now in dialogue on email more than I want to be. But with people who live in that neighborhood, African Americans who live in that neighborhood who are of different opinions about this, maybe breaking down generationally, I don't know, but it's interesting how people respond to that particular image was just such 1/19 century image Well, You know for me, I This is what I disagree with David on. I think I think the statue should probably I know. Museums hate it when they say they should be put the museum. They're like we're gonna keep this going Put it put it. I think the National Museum of African American History would be a wonderful place to put it with. Douglas, his speech and everything put into context. The difficulty, you know, I'm impressed by the fact that this was black people who raise the money for this, but they didn't get the opportunity to say what the image should be. And it's not a surprise that the image would be that of a white savior and a new slave. I mean, I'm not. I'm not one of those people who says Abraham Lincoln didn't I got shot in the back of the head? I was martyred for coming up with that policy. And having people think that they were when he was creating black citizenship, So he sacrificed all so I know I'm not one of those people, you know? Put Lincoln in a corner. Ah, but African American man bled and died for freedom as soldiers, African American men, women and Children, you know, ran away from plant left the plantation. End of the plantation system. Black people brought about their freedom contributed to brought bring about their freedom and the idea that they would raise money. Give it to whites, and their answer would be A white saver motive and you said, this is the 19th century is not 1/19 century thing. If you want to talk about race, we could talk about today. The image of the white savior film movies everywhere. This this notion that you can't have blacks and whites can't exist equally, not a statue with them standing with the person standing next to him, maybe not shaking hands. That might have been too much, maybe a gesture towards it. Or their joint effort to end slavery. So this is it said before about the Confederacy, this thing sort of going off into nowhere. The notion of the white savior exist today and people who are white to see themselves as progressive and our allies still haven't easier time dealing. With us when you are in a position of superiority. That's a comfort that level. Even if you're doing something good. It has to be white here, blacks down there. And so I think seeing that image is the symbol of feeling that I felt going on Central Park West with Teddy Jr. Thie, the Native American and the black person on either side. I'm probably if they could just sort of get a welder to separate those two people up and did have trom the horse. That would be fine, But it's sending a message in if that message were something the emancipation messes if that was something that had gone If the notion of the white savior did not exist today that I might have a different view. But the 19th century is still president here in the 21st century, and so I don't I wouldn't want my kid walking past that. And I felt the same way taking my kids into the American Museum of Natural History to say. Explain that statue. What is that saying about who you are and who you have been? Ah, let me just add here that My proposal is to build an additional emancipation monument next to the Freemans Memorial. And it was actually Douglas a suggestion which we only recently had verified by the intrepid research of Scott Sandage and John White on the clippings in the past. Yeah, yeah, in the past week. To my knowledge of Douglas. Five days after that, unveiling in the national Republican on this paper in D. C. Douglas said he didn't like that kneeling slave. He wanted a standing strong image of emancipation, and he's himself suggested. An additional monuments should be. Yeah, I guess my point of view on this is why not have both. What incredible teaching one. Khun do because how many people are going to really see this in a museum? You're right. If it's in a good space in the African American Museum, it may indeed be seen by a lot of people because a lot of people go there. A lot of people have that juxtaposition there that shows the then and the now the past and the present and celebrate Douglas to speeches. Well, why not a Douglass statue there, So would that be your solutions? I mean, let's let's extend this problem. I started off by saying, What's wonderful about the work that both of you do. Is that the two of you present historical figures is complicated people. Yes, Some. Here's too complicated People. General Sheridan, Philip Sheridan. In general all over Otis Howard heroic figures in terms of their role in the Civil war. Somewhat less heroic in terms of their role in killing and removing the native Americans after the civil war. So, David, you're solution would be any time we have a statue of Phil Sheridan. We put another statue next to it that somehow commemorates Help us to remember the other things. He How do we deal with the complexity? People live 567 decades. How do you deal with the complexities of their lives? Don't feel shared. Maritz, that kind of worry and concern there are shared and monuments. Clearly, there's factors of Sheridan's Square and Indians Me and think that Dorcas well, there's one in New York. He's down in the village. So yeah, and most Americans don't even know Oliver Oda's Howard was unless they know In Howard University supposed but, you know, Yeah, this is a mess. It's complicated. It always is going to be, But I do think people need a reminder. That you just can't purify the past and you can't purify your memory. You're gonna have to make choices about these things, and some monuments.

D. C. Douglas Abraham Lincoln president David National Museum of African Ame Frederick Douglass Lincoln Otis Howard Howard Law School American Museum of Natural His General Sheridan African American Museum Langston Dorcas Amy Bishop Senate Maritz Freemans Memorial
"howard law school" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

06:47 min | 2 years ago

"howard law school" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"What about friends by? TLC This is democracy now. I'm Amy Goodman is we can return to are rare joint interview with the squad congresswoman swimming Ilhan Omar Minnesota Alexandra Cossio Cortez of New York an Presley of Massachusetts and repeat it to leave of Michigan Democracy. Now's nermeen shake spoke to them on Friday at Howard Law School at an event organized by the rising majority you'll have a presence constitutes a form of resistance and of protest and that's one of the most remarkable things about your entry into Congress. I mean it's a transformative moment in American politics because suddenly the social justice activism and the resistance that you all represent moved from outside the corridors of power to the very center of state power. So if you could talk a little about and how you think that movement has altered the resistance and also its effects. I'm afraid I'll begin with hugh again congressman not choose. Who Goes I I think for many of us? Two Thousand Sixteen Sixteen was going to be An election year where we were going to decide what kind of country we were going to be. It was very clear that on one side there was someone running for president who presented rented an extreme danger not only to our democracy but to the very lives of the American people and I was running for the first time for State Rep in my home state and I remember Mburu on election night. We stayed a little too long after my results came in and we celebrated to unfortunately learn what the state of our country entry was going to be and I remember saying to the young people who are in in this room some of them that I could not believe that the hateful fool message. He was delivering found partners in the hearts of so many Americans to be able to now become successful in the election. And I know that at that moment really for many of us. There was a decision that we had to make a decision on whether to take and and receive everything that was going to happen or resist restore and re imagine what could be possible and so our presence really and our elections were not only to resist the harmful policies. That are coming from this administration that have now become the the norm but it's to restore hope it's to restore American values. Values is to restore generations of of what could have been possible to re imagine the America that we all know we deserve and so I am a quite excited actually about the kind of opportunities we we have been presented because of the current challenges. We have as as someone who's had a very challenging life I always find an opportunity opportunity in every challenge and I know that at this moment we have had an opportunity to see every every broken system reveal. We have had an opportunity for people to recognize that that they are not only losing but what they could gain. We have had an opportunity to AH allow for the race in the biggest to fully tell on themselves and we have had an opportunity. You for people. Who've never really imagined themselves fully powerful in the corridors of power to recognized that they cannot be muzzled intimidated and silenced? That we are not ever going to be dismissed unless we allow ourselves to be dismissed and they think the shock that our presence really he has. Broad is that for too long people have gotten used to having mediocre white man show up and think they own the day without anybody ever questioning their credentials their qualifications -cations and their vision for a broken America. And for the first time you have. Aw Women who should be Apologetic who should feel small. Oh who might visibly be small who come in and know their place understand their power foolishly phooey execute their vision and never never really look.

Ilhan Omar Minnesota Alexandra America Mburu Amy Goodman TLC Howard Law School New York State Rep Massachusetts Presley hugh congressman Michigan Congress president
"howard law school" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

10:31 min | 2 years ago

"howard law school" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Disappoint yes they have you know I also had some less like last disappointments I mean the funny thing about these these you know somebody like looks at a resume and has all these great jobs on it and it doesn't have all the jobs you didn't right so there were plenty of jobs I didn't get along the way that I thought I wanted but I don't know I think what I tended to discover and you know the the the example that you gave about my DC circuit judgeship is actually a pretty good example of that is that you know when a door closes someplace a window opens and that might be magical thinking but it happens to me often enough that I really believe it and that sometimes the disappointments are really the best thing that ever happened or could ever happen to you and that was true for example of the judge if I was I was nominated to be a judge when I was out of thirty nine so I would have been very young and I would have spent really my entire life on on the court and I I love the work I do but when I look back on it I think you know instead I had a decade where I did many other things were I developed lots of different sorts of skills now I am a judge so I get that to us so so it was really a good thing I think that happened that I had an opportunity to explore some things I never would have had a chance to I had that come about in the way I thought I wanted can you conventions of of that at the time or is it hard to convince itself is probably hard to convince yourself of it at the time but then something happens that worked out alright you know just I went back to to teach and I love teaching I love I've always loved it and then just a few years after that I had the opportunity to to become Dian of of of Harvard and and I learned so much in that role I learned how to do so many things that I never would have thought I never you know that I did requires you to be a person that I had I didn't really expect myself to be and and to develop all kinds of different skills and it was a really very steep learning curve which are the jobs that I like the jobs that require you to learn all kinds of new things and it was it was it was it was it was a great you know decades that for I got to to where I am now justice Kagan with a George Mason University professor Steven Pearlstein Monday law and about judging from justice Marshall and I should say that you were one of justice Marshall's last clerks Roger Wilkins was one of I think his first job out of law school was working for Thurgood Marshall before he was a justice when he was a legal defense legal defense fund so so the line goes from Roger to the from Marshall to Roger to you too Elizabeth and and I hope beyond so what what the what did you learn from justice Marshall both the law and judge you know mostly what you learned from justice Marshall was how people can advance justice and I don't think anybody's ever done so much of it as as he has I mean I view him as their greatest lawyer of the twentieth century in part because he did the most trusted in his time and and and and and apart because he was just a great lawyer he was more accurately skilled at all kinds of different things you know you don't see lawyers like this anymore people who were great trial lawyers people who are great appellate lawyers he to criminal cases he did civil cases he did you know one day he was arguing before the Supreme Court and the next day he was on a train down to some small segregated town in the Deep South where you know he was fighting to to defend somebody and his friend hello a lot of the cases he did when death penalty cases in front of all white juries it was hard to win cases and in everything he did whether it was the big cases the kind of brown V. board and developing that entire strategy and mother was a small cases which was just you know making sure that individual defendants not so small individual defendants got the justice they deserve you know everything he did was all about bringing justice to this country and in particular to the African American community but to the whole country and he was a great storyteller and he he he told stories about his life I use that I a clerk for him in one of his last years and I think by that point he was not in the best of health I think he knew that he didn't have all that much time left and he he will he would look back sometimes on his life so we would go into his chambers and we would do all the usual things that Clarkson judges still and we would talk about the cases and then at some point he would segue into storytelling and we would hear about his childhood in segregated Baltimore and we would hear about his time at Howard law school really developing with Charles Hamilton Houston than the DN of that law school the strategy that led to brown V. board and that led to the eradication of Jim crow we would hear about all of his many cases and he never repeated the story and he had hundreds of them and it was a lesson in American history and it was a lesson in American law and it was a lesson most of all and how one person can do justice and you know nobody's ever going to be Thurgood Marshall I'm never going to be Thurgood Marshall and probably nobody in this room is ever going to be Thurgood Marshall but still you can take away lessons about your own life about what makes something worthwhile about the kind of goals that you want to set for yourself and about the kind of good that people can do did anything about judging of being a justice the true learn for him that perhaps now you can see more clearly now that you are one you know if you know there are different times and and we're different people and I would never say that on the same kind of judge as he was it's just yeah different times different circumstances different personalities but I suppose one thing that I really appreciated at the time was the way he treated his clerks I mean he was a taskmaster too I say too because you can tell from Elizabeth's conversation about it I'm kind of one but he really you know easy you know you never in you never didn't know who was boss in that chambers he had a couple of sayings that make you remember that one was sometimes you would say to him only a half to do this you know in this kind of twenty six year old way you know you have to vote this way or you have to join this opinion or something like that and he would say there are only two things that I have to do stay black and die we just sort of fecha in and sometimes he would you would say something and he was saying you see that commission over there and was the commission where without Lyndon Johnson's name on it making him a Supreme Court justice and he would literally make a sort of get out of the chair and walk over to that commission and the repeat which name unless I'm that but at the same time but at the same time he really respected his clerks and and and he thought that we were people who were going to do great things and and the interaction that he had with all of us it's something I think none of us will ever forget and you know I don't have the stories that he has and and nobody should treat me the way people treated Thurgood Marshall but but I like to think of that when I when I talked to my clerks Marshall aside is there some justice in history that's not you know if it's not on the court today this not Marshall that is your model and if so why yeah Louis Brandeis is the person I'd pick for that he was he I I actually sit in the same share as Louis Brandeis on on the on the diet maybe it's not not really on on on that because we all change here is as we get more senior but the court actually has this tradition where you you know who sat in each chair sent and it sort of depends on who replaced whom so so from my seat it's me and then the justice I replace who is John Stevenson absolutely superb and judge and man who unfortunately passed away last year but at the age of ninety nine so unbelievable life and then prior to John Stevens was William O. Douglas and who also served as the court for many many many years I actually cool this chair that I sent in not cool at the longevity chair everybody who holds it seems to be on the court for thirty plus years and then just like three justices back is a justice Brandeis who was nominated to the court and the time of a little bit after World War one and and served there very in a very.

twenty six year one day
"howard law school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

08:23 min | 2 years ago

"howard law school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Presented by with them. Advisers accountants. Let's welcome in Esther limb. She is a partner at Finnegan Henderson faribault Garrett and Dunner, and is the president of the D C bar. Thank you for taking the time with this. You've got more than twenty years of experience in patent law. And you'll be able to talk to us about some of the latest intellectual property, trends and patent issues that are going on right now. And what we want to start off with is just a closer look at your role as president of the DC bar. What that entails good afternoon? Thanks for having me, a pleasure to be with you this afternoon, as president of the DC bar, which is the largest unified bar in the country with over one hundred eight thousand members in all fifty states. Dates in an eight in over eighty countries it's been a real privilege and a pleasure, working with both the board of governors and the DC bar staff. There's a over one hundred and sixty DC bar staff members that oversee the daily operations of the par including running a technology institute like the one today. The DC bar is committed to serving its members to be successful lawyers, and to do that. We provide excellent programming and continuing legal education technology is one of those key areas in which it is constantly evolving, and demands. Constant attention and learning by the lawyers to understand the impact on the law, and how it impacts client representation. In addition to that, we are also committed to supporting the local DC courts that DC court of appeals, and the DC superior court in its administration of Justice and providing our part in, narrowing the access to Justice gap. We have a DC bar pro Bono center. That is dedicated to serving the community, especially those who are low income, who cannot afford legal services, and the DC bar has an abundance of talented at experienced lawyers who can provide proponent services in conjunction with the pro Bono center, and it's been a distinct privilege and an honor to witness all of the wonderful work that's going on in and around our community. Tell us a little bit about the walk in legal clinics. You have the DC bar pro Bono center runs a monthly. Legal clinic that is hosted by the bread for the city in two different locations on second Saturday of every month both in north west and in south east. Every week every month. We see probably over one hundred twenty clients in both of those sites at we typically have over seventy clients at the north west facility and over forty clients at the southeast facilities for those who are low income and qualify for a pro Bono legal services. They line up on early Saturday morning and so long as show up by ten o'clock, I believe you can see a lawyer, and the volunteers come from large law firms small and solo practices. Government attorneys and also other legal services providers. We are trained and mentor by subject matter mentors in each of the areas that we may represent clients on, for example, housing, consumer law. Bankruptcy. And other family law issues, and so each volunteer at Terni we are able to see about two to three clients per day, and we take all of the clients and we stay until the last client is served. There's probably no better or more rewarding way of spending a Saturday morning than seeing these clients would otherwise have no lawyers to deal with very pressing and important legal issues in their lives, and walking away knowing that you've made a direct and immediate impact, because we are at the conference of technology and the law, and how that does impact the legal profession. I gotta ask, if you find the that also helps enhance the importance of tech in your role, not just as the president of the bar. But in that the pro Bono work that you that you advocate. Absolutely. There's a wide crossover between technology. And also access to Justice and how we can leverage pro Bono services using technology, really there has been a lot of studies by the ABA and other legal services provider of, how do we deploy technology to provision, better more efficiently, and more widely legal services that are so critical and in need? So, for example, are there better ways of using technology to make court filings or accessing information from the courts, more efficient? Are there better ways of assisting individuals access a legal resources, for example, to provoke a research, a promotional center provides a lot of online legal resources that are acceptable and easily understandable, by people who need those legal issues addressed and not only online, but also telephone consultations and every month the pro Bono center gets around eighty? Thousand calls on lock that they're able to process, and also very high traffic in visits on its online resources so definitely courts and legal services providers are continuing to look at how do we deploy technology and better leverage that to provision legal services? I want to turn to an important area that you are committed to when you became the head of the DC bar, and that's increasing diversity, tell us how you're doing that. Diversity has been unimportant issue of mine. I am an immigrant to this country. I came over when I was twelve years old. Nice speaking English and had experiences with my family early on in not having access to the law, and how that can be a significant barrier for people with limited means regardless of what your background may be. And so growing up as the first lawyer and of the family, I realized that mentoring and diversity are key issues that have really shaped Hawaiian and helps me to connect to the community as a whole, I, especially focusing on increasing diversity in the legal profession, one of the ways that I've been doing it long term has been to teach at Howard law school. I've been an adjunct professor, they're teaching pan policy, chorus and introduction to patent law since two thousand three. And because of the history and the values and principles upheld by the law school. It's been one way that I can directly impact and foster and mentor promising. Students of color, who are trying to use the law to make a difference in terms of the bar. One of the things that we do on a regular basis to outreach to voluntarily bar associations around the community, there, twenty to thirty voluntary bar associations, and we hold regular meetings, and collaborate on events and programs and identify areas in which we can support voluntary bars. We have different topics every month and one area. That's important is supporting lawyers and practices, including lawyers assistance program, and so interesting topics that we cover all right? As dilemma going to have to leave it there. It's been a pleasure. Thank you so much dilemmas, president of the D C bar association, much more to come on Bloomberg politics, policy, power, and law. This is Bloomberg business news of, let's say you just bought a house. Bad news is you're one step. Closer to becoming your parents, which means you're going to start telling your kids to clean up before the cleaning lady comes doesn't make sense, but you're the parents and the kids are going to start telling.

DC president Bono center D C bar D C bar association Howard law school Finnegan Henderson Bloomberg Terni partner Justice gap faribault Garrett ABA Dunner adjunct professor twelve years
"howard law school" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

14:55 min | 3 years ago

"howard law school" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"And you wonder why she was run out of Memphis. In may of eighteen ninety two wells wrote her famous editorial, the Memphis, free speech. Eight negroes Lynch since the last issue of the free speech. She wrote three for killing a white man and five on the same old racket the new alarm about raping white women. The same program of hanging shooting bullets into the lifeless bodies was carried out to the letter. If southern white men are not careful, they will overreach themselves and public sentiment will have a reaction a conclusion will then be reached which will be very damaging to the more reputation of their women. Editorial was published when wells had already left on the long-planned trip to Philadelphia and A M E conference there from there. She went to New York. And where she is met by. The great editor t Thomas fortune transplanted Brooklyn. Right. He says to her well. We bid a longtime getting you to New York. But now that you are here I'm afraid that you have to stay. We'll says what are you talking about? She didn't understand why he said that then she learns that all hell broken out in Memphis after that editorial. Our newspaper have been destroyed her business partner threatened with castration and forced to flee the city, a former co owner of the paper pistol whipped and forced to sign. A letter denouncing the editorials a slander against white women. Wells herself was threatened with lynching. And there are folks posted at the railway station to interceptor. She was told that a local black militia group would protect her if she returned. But either concluded that doing so would mean more bloodshed, more widows. I had to be wells was now in exile. She would not set foot in the native south for the next thirty years. Having destroyed. My paper had a price put on my life and been main exile from home for hinting at the truth. I wrote I felt that owed it to myself and to my race to tell the whole truth. Now that I was where I could now that I was where I could do so freely. She would do so in a front-page editorial published on June twenty fifth in the New York age entitled the truth about lynching. It's first study the practice include all the elements that Mark that miss this new thinking, I was talking about at a new age of protests. A thousand copies of the mission was sold in Memphis alone. Beck in Memphis, so-called Representative colored folks many of whom she personally new in some of whom she had dated we won't go there right now. We're condemning her. Many blacks even moderates, like her minister who had been publicly critical wells were forced to leave the city just because of their association with her that same Benjamin is who was so hopeful soon had a nervous breakdown. So wells now was planted in Brooklyn. So now, I'm going to talk a little bit about just very descriptive. Descriptive elmo's about Brooklyn. I loved researching Brooklyn and understand the context of where she came to. It was a new experience for a southerner to be in Brooklyn. Well, Memphis, head population of thirty four thousand Brooklyn residents numbered seven hundred ninety five thousand period. Nevertheless, Brooklyn had a black population of only ten thousand. Out of seven hundred ninety five thousand and Memphis had a black population of fifteen thousand. Although the majority of blacks held low wage positions in both the north and the south a difference. I'd observed was that of the south restrict restricted blacks in many personal rights. They were not excluded from working in many trades vocations. Whereas by contrast northern blacks may have had more individual rights, but we're largely excluded from such work by labor, unions and employers. One of the biggest issues in Brooklyn at the time. Was that of surprise surprise housing? Tell me about it. There were great fears on the part of whites that having blacks move into its neighborhoods that the property values would decline. Just before I'd arrived in New York Times reporter investigated this issue and fan was startled to find African Americans who lived in Brownstone employed, white servants and rode in carriages driven by liveried Coachmen. They took this accumulation of wealth stuff seriously. One can only imagine ida's emotional state wall in the city. And again, it's so important how the city embraced her. First of all. Thomas fortune found her a place to live near where he lived. On gold street known as the vinegar hill section of town. He lived there. His lawyer lived there and his co publisher lived in that area. Fortune would be very good friend to her. Of course, his newspaper of the New York age was the most important black newspaper in the country and the most widely read, and he was the most brilliant entered. He was really brilliant has a difficult time later on in his life comes an alcoholic and. It has problems financial problems with the paper. But he's he's a man who was self taught still gets into Howard law school. Changes and becomes. Journalists. And. Publishes the great New York age. Professor Paula Giddings this week on American history on C span radio discussing anti lynching activist either be wells either would also see day she went to she was participated in lyceum in Memphis. But boy, the lyceum in Brooklyn. Where something there was the Brooklyn literary union. These are all black the Concorde literary circle the progressive literary union and the star lyceum among others. Educated African Americans like Ida Riffa millier with Shakespeare dickens Alcott Nebraska sisters as a teacher in Memphis. She was a member of the lyceum in that city as I mentioned now in this period, though, this is not littered literature for literature's sake. African Americans were promoting literature those deem valuable for power to redefine and enlighten. The race. This is the period. Energy. You Cooper's voice from the south the first feminist black feminist tract. This is a period the poetry and novels of Francis Ellen Harper and a Frederick Douglass. All of these forms were so well attended that. The Brooklyn daily eagle a white newspaper noted in eighteen ninety two that quote, no other group of people refunder of literary pursuits that African Americans and quote, Idaho, self was invited to speak on afro American literature to open the season at the concord literary circle and the concord Baptist church, and drew the largest audience that ever attended a literary meeting in that city as a newspaper the Washington bee. Which is always hypercritical everything said Ida completely captivated the large cultivated audience. She also in this period. Debates goes into a debate with a really wonderful figure Marija. Lions who some of you may know in Brooklyn. She was born of a prosperous free family in New York City, her father so business was ruined. And the draft rights of eighteen sixty three. You know, you look at history. Ours is not a history of never having is things being taken away. Thousands of hundreds of business and insert black business institutions were destroyed in that. Riot. At least one man was lynched Clarkson street. And torched while hanging from a tree lions family moves the Providence Rhode Island. Where she will not they will not admit her into the high school, which is a white high school. So she sues and get admission into the school. She returns to New York. And she's been tapped at this point to be the first assistant principal of a formerly all white school PS eighty three which consolidate its pupils and teachers with all black PS sixty eight. The education board's decision to consolidate rather than separate students was largely due to the effort of fortunes lawyer team McCain Stewart who is a member of the Brooklyn board, and who had gotten support of the Brooklyn literary union. In this debate. We're rich bests either. And this is typical audit, and you could get reflected a little bit of her personality is that she goes to lions and says teach me to debate. And lions tutors her, and she will in when idle leaves Brooklyn, she's going to be one of the best speakers, and she's gonna leave and she's going to be on a speaking tour in England. And this bodes very well. Her. I'm gonna go quickly about some other people. She meets and this great one. This this great moment in support of her. She meets people like, Sarah, Garnett New York's first black public school. Principal and widow the famous abolitionists Henry Highland garnet. She she meets Susan McKinney in eighteen seventy graduate of New York Medical College for women. The first black woman to practice medicine in New York state and the third black woman to do. So in the country. She meets Victoria Matthews who has an unbelievable story. Matthews a year older than Ida had more in common with her than some of the others. Matthews was also a journalist rose in the profession. Her mother had been a slave Virginia. And the master had treated everyone so badly that the mother leaves her children there. But she comes back and sues to get them back. And she regains possession of them are some kind of people. It is Matthew suggestion. That to organize a testimonial for item almost done and lions readily agrees. The idea was not the only show support for wells and to raise money the publisher age aditorial as a pamphlet, but also to use the occasion to bring women activists together from Philadelphia, Boston, New York and Brooklyn Brooklyn, New York with two separate entities at this time for a common cause very much on the minds of the two. Organizers was the issue of the less than cordial relations between black women in New York. And those in Brooklyn. Wells offered no further insight into this. But blacks in the two cities had a long rivalry the tension between the two groups first appeared after those rights at eighteen sixty three when more affluent families began, abandoning New York, Brooklyn, New York city for Brooklyn. The trend continued in one thousand nine hundred ninety s as soon as black New Yorkers, quote, amass a considerable fortune. They move across the East River into Brooklyn as a newspaper noted. Lions and Matthews had calculated rightly attributed to wills would generate enough mutual interest for the women to overcome their differences. In fact, the idea was met with so much enthusiasm that there was no house large enough to hold those who came funny a committee of two hundred and fifty women were appointed from both places to organize a testimonial. In October eighteen ninety two. Picture this new in a place called lyrical, the stage was emblazoned with gas just gas jets that spilled across the back of the platform her pen name was sewn onto the look badges worn by the ushers, which was Ayatollah who passed out the programs..

Brooklyn New York Memphis Ida Riffa Lions New York City wells New York Times Victoria Matthews publisher Wells Lynch white high school Garnett New York principal New York Medical College Howard law school
"howard law school" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

15:57 min | 3 years ago

"howard law school" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Hey, everybody. Welcome back to keep up alive with Reverend. Jesse jackson. I'm Santita Jackson. Reverend Jackson is joining us by telephone. We've got a wonderful array of gassed Reverend Jeanette Reverend Dr Janette Wilson of rainbow-push. I one of the foremost civil rights lawyers really up the past half-century, and indeed he has been teaching our young law students, and he has some very interesting news Reverend Jackson to give us about what's what could happen to all of our Hugh law schools, very very dangerous. He's going to bring that to us as well. Reverend excuse me, Reverend. But he keeps his ministerial zeal when he told me about it yesterday. Attorney John Britton Reverend Frank Watkins have rainbow push and so much. He's written so much and Dorothy James national vice president Betty Magnus of rainbow-push. She's a national vice president of a GE the American federation of government employees. She covers Illinois, Wisconsin and Michigan. But Reverend before I come to you. I'd like to go to Don from Florida, Don has called us. And we thank you for calling us, Don going beyond Facebook. So that we could hear your voice how you doing good. Good. Good morning. Yeah. I was I've always been impressed with the civil rights movement of the sixties and the seventies. And how they brought people together, and they work to bring people together and marches were made up not only black people, but all kinds of people because they knew it was an injustice, and they knew it was the right 'cause he knew it had to be corrected brings me to this point with the situation. Why can't we declare that Donald Trump gave in because he realized people were hurting? And why can't we congratulate Nancy Pelosi for sticking by her guns that we shouldn't be using paychecks to negotiate government policy? Then everybody clear a win. It sit down for once at a table and do something together for the American people. I'll tell you what. Fromm quills leadership. Show a woman strength, and courage and character and so same on a Nancy Pelosi. Well, I mean, Madonna saying that he feels that the president was empathizing with people, and he saw the pain that this shutdown and the loss of these paychecks was was really the burden that it was placing upon these families. He tells us against immigrants. We're going to all of his golf courses. His green screen, you know. He guest workers. He's been in hotels where the live. So this just focus on the dignity of workers and keep fighting center. I hear you. Let me get some comments. I. Turney John Britton before I go to you Reverend Reverend Wilson because I know as an educator now, she's a minister at an educator analog. He has some news. I think that would really send a chill up and down your spine in particular has a lawyer attorney Wilson. Attorney John Britton. Good morning everyone. It's jammed Britain. I'm currently the acting dean of the David Clark school of law at the university of the district of Columbia the American Bar say proposes to both tomorrow. On a new standard for prove law schools on the bar pass rate for graduates that threatens to close all of the six HTC you law schools and eighteen more in the area of Trump. This would mean fewer black lawyers in the future, lawyers in general have been the first responders to protecting the rule of law. The issue involved a standard for accreditation that recent bar graduates much pass the bar at a rate of seventy five percent. Currently within a rule of five years, but they want to change that to two years. Show that. Black HPC you law schools, the university district Columbia Howard University that over one hundred years old Florida Southern University Law Center, North Carolina central law school and the Thurgood Marshall school of law in Houston where I was the dean there too. Bar pass rates slightly below the seventy five percent level. The ABA voted down this resolution about two years ago. They didn't give any reason why bringing it back tomorrow under the rules, although with voted down council which actually implemented Troy, the ABA can still implement the rue regardless of what the ABA says, this is outrageous. And dangerous. Yes. It is. Because you know, you think about the supreme court decision. Own resources. This is it came out with. I mean, our will the dignity resources that that's what we've done more with less. Think about the people brought the lawsuit. She's been. One. The what? Because of the wheel to fight back. Well, I think the other thing in and John Brennan this is on Lamin situation. Because now they're using the same standardized tests to evaluate lawyers and law schools that they've used over the years evaluate whether a student is able to is proficient in reading reading a great level. And an interesting thing about the law school exam. Bias, and it depends on whether or not the law school decides to teach you the law or teach you the test some law schools focus their heavily on how the past the, by example. And the fact that every bar exam is very different state by state as John. No. So even though you you do well in law school, you cannot you may not pass the bags on the first time because you're unfamiliar with that state bar and its rules and regulations and for the most racist entity, the ABA, which would not admit glac lawyers for a number of years to now decide whether I schools are qualified in that that's insulting. It also segregationist move. We could not be members of the American by association for years. And as you point out the proposed standard failed to recognize the lack of consistency in state bar examinations across fifty six different jurisdictions and the weight should strength. They give to a single bar pass requirement. Abso you can't say that one set fits all by saying the seventy five percents, it would wipe out all the law schools and Rico. I mean, it's it's just racist is just clearly racist. And we must fight against that. Because with in the world of Trump. This is what happens people feel that. They can roll back the clock to a time. When there were no black lawyers to a time when there were few as any black law schools, and we cannot allow to happen is Reverend Butler service Marshall. The Howard lawyers. We would not have had Brown. We would not have had into we would have not have desegregated facilities and schools at the level that we have if it were not for Howard law school. Students and graduates. Save the voting against the proposal two years ago. The ABA rejected this proposal. Now, this council within the a BA in charge of a law school access and admissions is bringing it back. I wouldn't be surprised by the way to get a little bit deeper into the weeds that if the delegates which is represented in all states by all organizations, many of whom have opposed this measure would kind of secede from the ABA and establish themselves as the gatekeeper of a law school accreditation. But let me ask you this. I mean because I think all of this. I Dorothy James is happening in a certain political environment. Yes, this push against workers rights and dignity. All and and then you know, what I think of the people I know who to Ivy league law schools didn't pass the bar the first time, and I know a whole slew of them. This is stunning to me. I mean, well, let me go to Reverend Jackson very quickly. Do you see happening in a certain context? Yours is this isolated. Hi, this is president Johnson. At the Lincoln. This Trump after President Barack Obama this a broad base ruled back on the right so workers, but no women poor people. That's those. Predicted this shared interests. We believe that based on the data the revive bar package would have a disparate impact of law schools with large minority. Student enrollment and would discourage law schools from using specially recruitment efforts for students from underrepresented groups due to the risks associated with being affected by adverse action that might generate because of the failure to comply with the ABA standards of accreditation. So yes, Reverend this is not only an attack on Laura minority lawyers. It's part of the attack on special measures in colleges and universities that we call -firmative action to increase diversity. This is part of the rollback in housing with secretary Carson on affirmatively furthering fairhousing regulations that the abomination ministration implemented. This is like. The attack in education with now secretary device on measures to increase diversity to enforce and the sexual and racial discrimination in college and universities to stop the school prison pipeline with no section on the disappointing disciplinary actions against children of color, and you name it. It's a rollback. Do you? Well, let me ask you this to gain. I'm asking because we are talking about this. This government shutdown. Dude is this does this fit in. How does this will make the Thai gives us the relationship between this attorney Britain and the government shutdown, particularly I read this earlier federal workers may not participate in a strike. It is the law, and they may not assert the right to strike or even belong to a union that asserts the right to strike against the government of the United States further. It is a felony for them to strike against the United States belong to a union that asserts that right? Furthermore, the office of personnel management can declare an individual who pretentious equates in a strike unsuitable for federal employment. Adver known the south circuits government, some called the civil and they got pod foot, right? That's what they did back the trees. At. Of of that pattern. Of course, we now have a conservative supreme court. That is set to you know, once cases are brought before it to turn back the clock as well. And the lower courts are getting more conservative. I mean, that's. What is the schools recourse to what they're doing court that overturned first reconstruction with us, lower house cases, and others. Reconstruction. And I've thank tried to your point every time we've made progress there have been these both legislative and moved by the executive branch of government to roll back the clock and take us that and what you have here. Sandy within the context of all of this is you have a president who has focused very heavily on appointments to the federal courts is. So when you see changes at the lower court level is because he has put on the bench, these lifetime appointments of right wing. Judges. Some have the Senate control now to the right, which is why the whole shutdown happens is so you have one whole house which is supposed to represent a balance of power an imbalance between the the the Senate, the judiciary and executive branch. I trying to work together to swing us back to a period where we will reduce the number of of lawyers. We will reduce the number of college graduates, Betsy DeVos, and her moves in education are to take us back to a place where charters are the order of the day and public education is more diminished and limited in terms of of of what the curriculum will be. Yeah. Rubber wilson. The other thing is that of course, as Mitch McConnell's obsession is stacking, you know, the district. Appellate and supreme court with these right wing heritage, you know, strict conservative judges the other thing that we need to keep in mind, which everyone I think is forgotten the Steve Bannon ideological commitment, which is he said the mission of the dollar of Donald Trump. And the Trump administration is to deconstruct the administrative state. I mean. More deconstruction. Could you have shut the federal government down and create the crisis in all that that it involved. But that's why I asked Errol Louis when we were going out is this not the right wing dream, the shroud. Collapsing. Well, Dorothy, James, I mean because she is a national vice president f g think one of I think Reverend has been talking about Pat Cohen, how labor did not come to save. Pat, co you know, what the poem close to they came for them. Yeah. Oh, no, no. And ultimately, they come for me. I mean, there's some intersection -ality here..

ABA Reverend Jackson Jeanette Reverend Dr Janette W Trump Dorothy James president attorney Donald Trump vice president Hugh law schools I. Turney John Britton Howard law school Reverend Wilson Santita Jackson Reverend Frank Watkins Reverend Butler Thurgood Marshall school of la Nancy Pelosi