35 Burst results for "Houghton"

Biden ups vaccine goal to 1.5 million shots a day, says vaccine to be widely available by spring

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

02:58 min | Last month

Biden ups vaccine goal to 1.5 million shots a day, says vaccine to be widely available by spring

"Big announcements about vaccine distributions from the biden administration. Dr peter hotels who specializes in molecular virology microbiology at baylor. College of medicine says that the newly increased goal of one and a half million vaccine shots per day. The old goal was a million shots a day. Now president biden's has a million and a half shots per days. The goal dr houghton says even that might be enough. He's now arguing in the pages on the op-ed pages of the washington. Post that to get closer to what we need. We need to three million doses a day. How possible is that. And why is that the right number to aim at star peter. Hotels is co director of the center for vaccine development at texas children's hospital. He's dina the national school. Tropical medicine at baylor dr hotels. It's a real honor to have you back with us tonight. Thank you for making time. Thanks rachel great to be here so these are big numbers. And it's hard to sometimes conceptualize what they mean. I know that we just got to the point as a country where we can do a million point one. Maybe one point two million shots day. Why do you say that that number the number we need to be aiming at is actually triple that we need to be up to three million a day. I first of all. I think it's really important not to diminish the the accomplishments of the biden administration. We've now got a national plan in place. We have a national vaccination strategy. We didn't have that before so In a matter of a week we've already got a national vaccine plan in place that's so absolutely important. So i give a lot of credit to the biden administration. I'm a little concerned. However that we're not picking up the pace fast enough. The reason i say that is our estimates. Indicate that in order to stop virus transmission remember. There's two things these vaccines do they keep you out of the hospital. In the icu. But if enough americans get vaccinated we could actually hold virus transmission potentially and we think that number is around three quarters of the us population of two hundred and forty million people. Most of the vaccines are two doses. So that's about half a billion immunizations that we have to take care of. And i want to do that by the beginning of the summer. Not the end of the suburb. Erase ahead of the virus variants. So the simple back of the envelope. Numbers are five hundred million over five months. That's a hundred million a month three million a day so we're only a striving for half of that and it's not good enough because we have the according to the centers for disease control now the uk variant may be the dominant variant in the united states by march or april the transmissions. Go way back even up way back up even though we're down by about twenty thirty percent now from where we are. That's only temporary. I think we're in the eye of the hurricane in those numbers are going to go back up. So i feel like even as ambitious as the plan is the biden plan is still not ambitious enough and we can have to vaccinate of half a billion people by the summer in order to prevent that terrible number of six hundred thousand. That's that's the bottom line. I want to save

Biden Administration Dr Peter Hotels College Of Medicine President Biden Dr Houghton Center For Vaccine Development Texas Children's Hospital Baylor Dr Hotels Baylor Dina Rachel Washington ICU United States Centers For Disease Control UK Biden
Why some Black Americans are skeptical of a COVID-19 vaccine

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

03:56 min | 2 months ago

Why some Black Americans are skeptical of a COVID-19 vaccine

"How do you feel about the comeback team as my excellent even have my children american community. We must trust me because we do feel like the first they wanna test on and we're being experimental. We used to be mistreated. We use the ban experimental role and we used to be last any category when it comes to healthcare to words to start off here remember tuskegee public. Health officials are focused on countering distrust toward this vaccine particularly in black communities in our country. Michelle norris from the washington post puts the conundrum this way quote vaccine. Hesitancy from black americans is different from an anti vaxxers stance. It's not that black. Americans don't believe in vaccines. They don't trust a public health system that has in too many cases engaged in grievous harm by experimenting on black bodies without consent or ignoring the specific needs of black people here to talk about we. Welcome to our broadcast tonight. Dr peter hotels he's a vaccine scientists working with a team to develop a low cost cove at nineteen version for global distribution. He happens to serve as co director of the center for vaccine development at texas children's and he is the dean of the national school of tropical medicine at baylor college of medicine also with us tonight. The reverend walker. We are proud to say she started as did a number of us in local news notably as the first african-american weeknight news anchor in boston. And is now senior pastor at roxbury presbyterian. She's been at the center of an effort. Enlisting dr rao cheese help and others to build trust in the vaccine among members of her congregation and the larger city at large Dr houghton. Says i'd like to begin with you and your reaction to this. Fda authorization tonight well it certainly important news Critical first step towards backseat our way out of this epidemic. you know. We're hoping not to have to completely rely on biotechnology solutions but in the absence of a national cove nineteen strategy by. This white house backed us into a corner and now we pretty much have no other major tools now to halt the screaming epidemic. Where we're looking at two hundred thousand new cases a day in three thousand deaths per day. So we're in a dire situation in. Having this vaccine is going to be an absolutely critical tool. And i hope it's going to be the first of four or five ac scenes that will have in the coming months because i don't think we're going to be able to vaccinate the us population with these two marnie vaccines alone. So a major first step but a pretty long road ahead here here on time is of the essence of reverend walker. It's great to have you. I'm looking at pew. Research polling says sixty one percent of white americans are prepared to have the vaccine forty-two percent of black americans. I'm gonna make a sweeping assumption about all of our viewers. The folks smart enough to watch this hour every night. Know their history so we have established the fear and distrust. Tell us what you're hearing in your congregation. However some people are saying they wanna wait it out and see what's going to happen which gives me a little hope. This is a very tragic situation. If we don't take vaccine a lot of people as you have already pointed out simply do not trust systems a not just because of history but because of their daily experiences people who feel that they have been abused and they have been disrespected. They have been ignored by. Hospitals are in general. So you know getting that to change is not going to be an

Reverend Walker Michelle Norris Dr Peter Hotels Center For Vaccine Development National School Of Tropical Me Roxbury Presbyterian Dr Rao Cheese Dr Houghton The Washington Post Baylor College Of Medicine Texas Boston FDA White House PEW United States
Australia records zero Covid-19 cases for first time in five months

Veterinary Podcast by the VetGurus

00:49 sec | 4 months ago

Australia records zero Covid-19 cases for first time in five months

"So for those of you in the know double doughnuts that we've had no new cases zero cases of coronavirus here in victoria and zero debts. Oxides fantastic so we look forward to potentially relaxing a little bit with some of the lockdown conditions. And i think the one that will be looking forward to his if they'll let us not make it compulsory to have the masks on in the panama because coming into osama and that's been a pretty warmed i hate to i. It will be a little bit. Tricky and houghton plus street underneath those mosques smart. So i'm hoping that the change in waco week to suggestion that perhaps we may have to wear masks when my side buildings and shopping centers et cetera.

Victoria Osama Panama Waco
3 win the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2020 for discovering Hepatitis C virus

60-Second Science

02:58 min | 5 months ago

3 win the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2020 for discovering Hepatitis C virus

"Guess we're we're sort of in the middle of the major biology education Charles Rice of the Rockefeller University in New York City I. think that you know the field has definitely changed since days when was a graduate student and I think one of the things that is is very reassuring. Now is really global response to this is pandemic. Of Academic and clinical. In Pharma Communities, the rate of progress earlier today October Fifth Twenty Twenty Rice was informed that he had won the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine for the discovery of the virus that Causes Hepatitis C.. The identification of the virus has led to tests and treatments for the Condition Ri- shared the prize with Harvey Alter of the National Institutes of Health and Michael. Houghton of the University of Alberta, it took US months and months of of toil to sequences single viral genome. Now, people can do that in a matter of hours and the rate at which people have been able to sort of make progress on understanding SARS Gobi to and And covid nineteen is spectacular. Rice spoke this morning on a web press conference from Rockefeller. University. So I think it's it's taught us a lot of things about science in general. There's really a a pressing problem we sort of you know mobilize people all around the world sort of work on these problems. Really you know great progress can be made. You know people would love to have a cure a week or so vaccine and a week I mean that's not feasible but the speed with which good they're. -PEUTIC and and vaccines will be developed for SARS Kobe to prevent covid nineteen is Going to be a spectacular and it's it has a way of I think in a really sort of changing the way science is done to really make it in a sort of more of a community after rather than something that many years ago might have been pursued by a few labs in isolation. So I think the sort of young biologist today just South this amazing collection of tools and capabilities to understand what's going on in virus biology in and the host response at a level that was just never before possible. I'm very. Optimistic on this sort of future of this and I do hope maybe the success with Hepatitis C. and I would predict these eventual success and getting a handle on the current coronavirus pandemic. We face will sort of encouraged us to not only recruit more virologists but also just sort of encouraged people to study these little troublemakers because you never know when they're gonNA pop out and cause trouble. So It's worth a with a small investor.

Twenty Twenty Rice Nobel Prize Rockefeller University University Of Alberta Covid National Institutes Of Health Harvey Alter Graduate Student Gobi Rockefeller Pharma Communities Houghton New York Kobe Michael
2020 Nobel Prize in Medicine Goes to Scientists Who Discovered Hepatitis C

Rush Limbaugh

00:22 sec | 5 months ago

2020 Nobel Prize in Medicine Goes to Scientists Who Discovered Hepatitis C

"The first of the Nobel Prizes has been awarded this year's Nobel Prize in physiology or Medicine awards. The discovery of the hepatitis C virus Americans Harvey Altar and Charles Rice, sharing that prize with British born scientist Michael Houghton. Hep C is a major source of liver disease affecting millions around the world. There are better tests and treatments now.

Nobel Prize Liver Disease Harvey Altar Michael Houghton Charles Rice Scientist
3 win Nobel medicine prize for discovering hepatitis C virus

WBBM Late Morning News

00:22 sec | 5 months ago

3 win Nobel medicine prize for discovering hepatitis C virus

"Prizes has been awarded this year's Nobel Prize in physiology or Medicine awards. The discovery of the hepatitis C virus Americans Harvey Altar and Charles Rice, sharing that prize with British born scientist Michael Houghton. Hep C is a major source of liver disease affecting millions around the world. There are better tests and treatments now. Checking Wall

Nobel Prize Harvey Altar Michael Houghton Liver Disease Charles Rice Scientist
Harvey J. Alter, Michael Houghton and Charles M. Rice win Nobel medicine prize “for the discovery of Hepatitis C virus”

Frank Beckmann

00:22 sec | 5 months ago

Harvey J. Alter, Michael Houghton and Charles M. Rice win Nobel medicine prize “for the discovery of Hepatitis C virus”

"Harvey Altar and Charles Rice and British scientist Michael Houghton have been awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine for their discovery of the hepatitis C virus. Hep C has killed many more people than Corona virus. The disease is chronic and a major cause of liver inflammation and cancer. Their discovery led to a vaccine for Hep C.

Nobel Prize Harvey Altar Michael Houghton Charles Rice Scientist
3 win Nobel medicine award for discovering hepatitis C virus

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | 5 months ago

3 win Nobel medicine award for discovering hepatitis C virus

"In physiology and mentor medicine was Jointly awarded this morning to Harvey J. Alter Michael Houghton and Charles M. Rice. Professor Gunilla Carlsson had this dam He is a member of the Nobel Committee. This year's Nobel Prize in physiology or Medicine awards. The discovery of the hepatitis C virus. Your prestigious award comes with a gold medal and prize money of more than $1.1 million, courtesy of Ah quest left by Swedish inventor Alfred Noble.

Nobel Prize Professor Gunilla Carlsson Harvey J. Alter Michael Hought Nobel Committee Alfred Noble Gold Medal Charles M. Rice
Mother Charged After Baby Found Left Alone In Truck In Milton, Boston

WBZ Morning News

00:39 sec | 8 months ago

Mother Charged After Baby Found Left Alone In Truck In Milton, Boston

"Of one year old baby is found left alone in a vehicle in Milton the child's mother now facing charges yesterday morning Massachusetts state police say they saw a truck illegally parked in a fire lane at Houghton's pond the engine of the vehicle running when the trooper got closer though he saw the baby sitting in a car seat the trooper says the heat was set on high the child was alert and started crying the child was allegedly left alone for about twenty five minutes while the twenty four year old mother from Boston was setting up for the child's birthday party the baby was taken to Boston children's hospital to be checked out the mother now facing reckless endangerment

Houghton Boston Endangerment Massachusetts
"houghton" Discussed on Mindfulness Mode

Mindfulness Mode

02:15 min | 8 months ago

"houghton" Discussed on Mindfulness Mode

"What would that be? I. That comes to mind is the power of now. Eckhart. Totally right, that's. Incredible Book and well. You're all about APPS. Are there any APPS that you would recommend? That are related to mindfulness there are. There's a number of different APPS, actually the one that i-it's personally is called Moose. Have you heard of that one? With the Headband Ashley Senses Your brainwaves and helps you to be able to get into a more relaxing. Yeah, that's a fascinating tool to be able to use especially if you haven't done very much meditating. It's really interesting. Yeah, and for me it sort of crosses both worlds get to wearable gadgets, and at the same time be more conscious about my an state of mind so I actually bought the Muse device because I'm interested in head to head. We integrate that into the software that we have and I wanted to play around with night, but It also really helpful. Right right well, we can learn more about you by going to your website, which is Olympia View Dot Com? I, L you am I v AU DOT com. That's IT Yeah! Is that the best way for us to learn more about what you do? That's one way also might. Lincoln profile has a lot of. Up there another links to things I do. The tedtalk is linked up there, too, so on Lincoln. Is it under a Luma viewers at under your name? It's my name Cat Houghton. and. That's H. O. U.. G. H. T. O. N. exactly cat? How how do you pronounce that? Well, it depends on where you live. Finances. Which is how I? Pronounce it. North of Egland. But it seems like everywhere else on the planet ago. It has a different pronunciation so I just I just go with whatever wherever we are Roy was being from Canada. I went for cat often networks. Long as it works well, it's been really great talking with your cat, and and thank you for doing the wonderful work. You do in the world to help people with their challenges absolutely. Yeah, thank you for bringing mindfulness into people's days..

Lincoln Cat Houghton. Eckhart Luma Canada Roy Egland G. H. T. O. N.
"houghton" Discussed on Mindfulness Mode

Mindfulness Mode

06:41 min | 8 months ago

"houghton" Discussed on Mindfulness Mode

"Often with US today, cat! Are you in mindfulness mode today? I'm right here with Bruce. That's awesome. That's wonderful well. I'm going to share a bit about your project. Cat Hoffman has always been fascinated by the intersection of technology and psychology, and so like I said in two thousand nine. She Co founded a Luma. View. And she co founded that company to provide software systems to researchers and clinicians working in a wide range of populations, including all those areas talked about suicide, anxiety, depression, but also substance abuse. and. Cat is committed to finding innovative and effective ways to use everyday technology to improve the daily life experience of the millions of people who suffer with mental health issues. So let's get into what we're talking about here. But first what does mindfulness mean to you cat? yeah, mindfulness has been a daily practice of mine for many many years. And it actually means like it's I think about those two words like mind I have a psychologist, I have so many associations, the word mind and definitions for what that means and the sense of fullness. Typically mindfulness for me means filling my mind what it usually isn't filled with rights, and usually it's filled with thoughts and chatter when I find myself in a moment of mindfulness, it's filled with everything else. That is outside of my mind, so the natural world, the sounds of the birds sands of the. The wind the sensations in my body, the sound of the water in the creek like ever think outside of my little tiny human mind that is such a delight to tune into and to remember that is there that I'm a part of I think that's the other piece of mindfulness demeans is connection that sense of? Being connected to the rest of the world well I think you're very connected because in hearing your Ted Talk Your Ashville, Ted Talk. It's called the rights of nature. Wow, I was so wowed by that talk because you talk on their about how you know, doesn't nature have a right to exist just like humans do? A certain river have a right or a certain mountain range, or a desert or something like that it's it's fascinating because I think it's something that most of us don't really think of right. Yes, we're so in our own heads. Most of the time as humans that we start believing that that's the world is like the stuff that goes on inside our heads that we share with each other. When in fact, we're tired of much much bigger ecosystem, and so there is a global now a global movement to really recognize that the rest of the natural world, the more than human worlds. Is Not only living entity, but has the right to exist and to flourish just in the way that we give rights to humans that when now starting to think about what, but wait a minute. We're just a little part of this whole ecosystem, right? There's all these others that the trees in the rivers and the whales, and the little tiny creepy crawlies, and all these beings a part of the world, and what sustains US and keeps US alive and rights. Laws have been passed and even Ecuador in India, Nepal and Columbia and Sweden now how about the US I know you mentioned on your Ted? Talk About Lake. Eerie, and how that's kind of pending with the Toledo Ohio thing from other areas in the US where rights of nature laws have been passed. There are few yeah. There's a couple of tribal nations that have passed rights of nature or as the Agip. Agip way actually passed a law that protects wild rice specifically so just one species while rice, which is very precious in sacred to them, now has rights, so you can certain things you can, and cannot do, but that species and there are other nations that have passed more blanket rights of nature ordinances in their own jurisdiction. The Lake Erie ones the biggest one that I'm aware of in the United States that. Ending we still don't know what's going to be the outcome of that case, but it's really a test case for looking at how this is GonNa. Float in the United States as as you said it's been all over the world. These laws have been passed. So it's the beginning of like hopefully there being some movement in this country to all I find it fascinating, because it doesn't seem to me that we even acknowledged the rights of animals the way we should be. Let alone wait rights of nature. What do you think about that? Absolutely I mean. We don't recognize the rights of humans the way that we should be. A long way. Long Way to go but I think the rights of nature were is so fascinating for me. In a number of levels, one is like what we're talking about. And Mindfulness is expanding. Our awareness is humans to outside of our own heads outside of our own human bill worlds right that we've created to take in the rest of the world that's actually wailed has been here way longer is doing all this work to keep the atmosphere alive, and keep the ecosystems in the fair going ending human beings included, so it's really by expanding our wellness to take that all in and be grateful for that every. Every day that we have access to this world right right and you are committed to helping people with some of these topics I mention earlier, suicide, anxiety and depression, and and I fear that there's going to be more of an issue with that because of the pandemic. We're going through right now. Tell us what you're doing to help us Yes, so we've been since two thousand nine providing software systems to psychologists, behavioral health researchers to help them be able to collect data from their patients in study participants as they go about their daily life right so typically in reese, these kinds of research projects. You get to talk to your study participant when they show up at the clinic maybe once a week once a month depends on the type of study, and then he gets to do a questionnaire with them. Can I ask them how they're feeling? which gives you a very limited view of what's actually really going on with these people, so we provide software that than the this is a an APP for the participants point of your system APP. They download on their phone, and then it'll alert them multiple times throughout the day. Just super quick check in. Are you doing what he feeling? What are you doing what you need right now? What would help you feel better? Better depends on research. Program is to what they ask, but we're able to.

US Ted Talk Agip Cat Hoffman Bruce Lake Erie Luma Toledo Ohio depression Ecuador reese Sweden Nepal Columbia India
The Future Of Health Care

Mentally Yours

08:38 min | 9 months ago

The Future Of Health Care

"Odd Bjorn and welcome Swinton Yours Metro. Could he ks mental health podcast? I'm Yvette and we're doing things but at the moment because of the epidemic today. I'm chatting soup Professor Mike Combs. He's the vice chairman of the Royal College of General Practitioners. We're going be fine the out about how. Gp's coping at the moment and how the health service might be affected after the epidemic We do know is I think. Definitely different general practice Evolved changed rapidly last Pepsi's accesses in a different way using technology and much more over way. But you know I think I'm despite the fact that has been changes work so it's GonNa. I'm still quite certainly where I would. Let's get to hear What's Today worked? Like how change because of the prime of it. So I think The Access to general practitioners. So we're asking patients to use the phone who use the Internet to contact us and then we're cooling back in assessing than needs and often weekly video consultations which we have helped in. We're trying to do with as as many agent requests hitting outweighs possible We're using more than one more. My Corona virus type symptoms. But we're also got the ability to save people both in the way I'd also Problems you are. A few people have been put off new ways. Contacting be found. People have adopted very quickly. Immi indicated you. I think people were the public with that. Had An amazing response and using services really appropriately and trying to keep away. She hasn't we have noticed that there was a reduction agent edgy cat activity. You know at one point. I think we're probably seeing a twenty five percent reduction of cool cozy against Over time has become slide worrying. And we're seeing fewer people they admitted to hospital for Co Coburg Related Issues Where seeing numbers referrals to Secondary Cancer Hospital Services has Jesus for example the two week. Wait referrals potential. Cancer diagnoses seems to have gone down by fifty percent. So we all worried that people have changed their behavior and it's and it's resulting Perhaps not presenting to general practice. We've probably be able to today. What about these mental health issues? Do you think people are still stiff? Hesitates to him thinking that they should getting touch that. Gps The moment useful thing. There is an element is I was talking to some colleagues From I AP and from so. That's the local psychological therapies service and also from the Somme and tell them to have reduced And I think we also you see few patients presenting with mental health issues which is again a bit of a worry. 'cause you know what we suspected that those programs have increasing due to the low kind due to the current situation so we all trying to get message out. General Practices Oakland to business. I mean we really would like to contact his a took him. Yeah definitely because I'm sure it's it's a very difficult time for lots of people for twenty two issues on that people with longtime mental health issues finding things harder at the moment but also Perhaps people who might not sit had mentally south issues before dealing with a great deal of sedans. Artie and other issues How you finding yourself that things like that. The video calls and of telephone calls with patients. I mean do you think it must be very difficult to support people especially with mental issues that way? Different I think. And we're having to adapt to that have to make the best of it and to be honest. We all able to communicate. We only see patients affected. Say is being in the same room with human connection and the definitely different I think it's okay. We're managing to have conversations and you know we do have the ability to see people and if absolutely necessary and of course We meet we have capacity to do that. We already sort of done how some people might be sort of hesitation about event the GP even if they had quite a serious issue are you. There might be some sort of Possible sort of Russians under people going to the doctor after tendon because over. That's one of the things that we have been talking about. You won't come next and I think general practice. He's starting to pass that and we want to avoid being overwhelmed and and we're starting to reach out to patients who we think might might be higher. School is situation where they might need our input so many long term condition and of course mental health is one of them. So we're thinking about well which civilian into to me to reach out to you Pets on dementia patients The pictures that practice of being at high risk for the reasons whether a history of safeguarding or perhaps domestic abuse history in the past you know building teams in the practice to then reach out and try and connect them productivity wrongly and just waiting to contact to What about GP's themselves? What kind of challenges? They face into the right mental health because it must be quite stressful time as a stressful time for all of us but it must be particularly Houghton Sosa from frontlines. Much me something where we we all. Well I think the changes in themselves and the ducks into new rated working has been one thing Obviously the risk of contracting to rotavirus yourself to play to think the meal Piccolo know patients. He's had an not a challenge. Either thing that we've come across the cruces A workload in terms of our shielding patients and contacting patients cat home near the vulnerable sincere and having difficult conversations about What they want for their future K. You know whether they want to be casual. Do they want to go into? And those conversations are really difficult to the best of times when you're in the face to face situation but during the do them have those conversations when you're not Is a is is quite stressful. So I think we all worried about. Gp We're trying to Offer resources And support for them to take it out their own well-being James Difficult time. Well supported the out there for GP's in particular. So I think we're so the the role Kanji the being a brokerage house. Educating the major stake goes energy I think in a strong to encourage don't healthcare professionals just to think about themselves focus on their law style to take because die The sleep access always make sure they could social connection and try to avoid an unhealthy way the de de-stressing. That's really important will also Kim giving advice they can do. We're is in that practices to support each other and again. I think that there's a lot of evidence that that sort of support from your team has a huge benefit but we're also the people to resources the NHL has has a website people and don't UK whether fifty fleet apps not help tweak and managing stress. Mindfulness we'd worry anxiety to leak. Think they've been really. Well used an on on top of that the helpline album on mountains. That's seven days a week. I'd also bereavement support line Which I think is getting at both getting really take

GP Royal College Of General Pract Vice Chairman Professor Mike Combs Pepsi Yvette Bjorn Immi Swinton Secondary Cancer Hospital Serv Cancer NHL Co Coburg Artie Houghton Sosa KIM Oakland UK
Former Congresswoman Katie Hill Does a Postmortem on a Lost Congressional Seat

Hysteria

09:05 min | 10 months ago

Former Congresswoman Katie Hill Does a Postmortem on a Lost Congressional Seat

"When the news is bad? I know that it is tempting for me to tune out but I also know that sometimes examining bad news and figuring out how to learn from it is a good thing so with that semester. Monaco and I are starting this week. Show with the conversation with former California Representative Katie Hill. Katie resigned from her seat last October and in a special election last week a Republican one bomber. So where do we go from here? Let's ask Katie are welcome Katie Hill. Welcome back to hysteria. We're so happy to have you back. Glad to be back. Thank you first of all. How are you doing man That's like a loaded question. I feel like I'm you know I'm I'm okay. The results the election were pretty horrible. You know in a way it was of what we were expecting. But you obviously didn't ever want and at you know it's just like one thing on top another in life in in figuring a way to get up in Russia yourself off in new forward was I was again when I was a kid. Reverses a still own a horse and the biggest thing that you were taught was being you fall off you get back up and get right back on and that's just kind of against what length is so drilling down into that trauma? A little bit last week was was the special election in California's twenty fifth for everyone listening. What happens and were you surprised when you say what happened do you mean why did we lose or yeah yeah why Jillette. Why did why did why did she was. Yeah well I think the biggest chapter honestly is just people in a special election. Democrats don't show up and you've got the rented. Republican base. That was particularly riled up because of my scandal and excited the opportunity to take a seat back. I mean that was that was literally what they were plotting. They were trying to you. Know to find something they. They found something. They exploited it. They got me to resign and this officers their opportunity to take back. The seat they felt was stolen from them in the first place remember. It hadn't been held by a Republican ever in its current form and they really did not think that it's possible for someone like me. Let alone any Democrats there So I think that they really rallied around this opportunity and from what we know they actually did some very despite the fact that you hear them complain all the time about ballot harvesting. They had some very organized efforts around ballot sting and Them for figuring it out. Because like you know that's to me it's about helping people be a but the churches were really mobilized in getting people to providing drop off centers. And saying that they're gonNA mail to use of swing by the church in you know do it in your car or whatever and we just didn't have something like baton. I think you can also partly attributed to the fact that Democrats were pretty disenchanted by things right. Like you're GONNA be really really frustrated works so barred and felt like you were. Finally I heard over a felt like you were finally represented and have all go away. So quickly is is really disenchanting. Should okay so there was a special election in California's twenty fifth special action in Wisconsin. Seventh both know that these are anecdotal elections in every district is different but you can still kind of extrapolate things on a maybe on a larger scale from this like. Do you think that Democrats should see what happened in your former seat special election as a wakeup call I do. I think that it shows that you remember mine was one of the Houghton quote safest swing seats right. Hillary Clinton when by seven. I want by nine. This isn't one of the seats that should have at risk. So what it means is that you know. Depending on what things are looking like November especially depending on the energy that's coming from rate than district's length. The ones that we flicked that were that were ones that that trump won by sixteen points are really really wants. We need to watch out for so we should give up or stop paying attention to the house just because the Senate is looking like it's within reach or obviously presidency so that to me. The biggest of all first and foremost the second is that as we are adapting to this Nalen strategy. How we doing that right? Field is what has been our strongest most important. Get out the vote effort right and that's modified I don't take. You should give up on it all together. I think they're Balkans Altogether they have they have a different base of people who they can go soo and again reliably that will reliably answer their phones that they can you get to things like drop off ballots churches. But we're GONNA have to modify field programs to to frankly make sure people know how vote by mail. When they have many many of them have never done it before especially in these lower turnout areas of to begin with which are usually the most. Democrats held Katie. Beyond even just in. How do we re engage the Democrats that helped you win by nine points when now they're also facing the pandemic childcare challenges on employment and things that are just like so catastrophic question? I think I am hopeful that the loss actually was a wakeup call for a lot of people might have thought like while the seat will be fine. Now they're like okay. I have really have to bow part of I mean honestly. I think that the the district itself is democratic leaning enough now that if we get to turn out that you know is usually expected in November election. I think she will win. And we saw we saw it happened with the ossoff special in Lucy. Macbeth one in general. I think we're GONNA see that in this case but it still. You know it's something that can't be taken for granted in terms of the support that I had the volunteers mobilized rabbit. I think that's that's going to be the same thing right is how do you figure out ways of ways of getting involved? That may not mean. Move leaving your house And how do we get people excited about it? Especially when the Senate is in play in California and the The obviously dilatory votes are going to be there for Joe Biden. No matter what so. I think I think it has to be like maybe you know maybe the Gee let's get so excited about meeting the seat back because like that. That as it's more like Oh you fuckers. Hello and stand up and what's ours okay. You said the word motherfuckers. Let's expand on that a little bit because we we chatted briefly about this About this race and how it personal it was to you and how personal it was considering the person who ended up winning the seat. Can you talk a little bit about the people who helped promote Christy Smith opponent short so the first person the first slew of images that came out was through the publicly came out was through red? Sti His enemies are images of You. That were released without your consent without taking taken without your consent. Got It and the only person that could have done. That was my accent. Spin obvious denied it. And so it's a it. So that started at Red State. The person who published those who who was the investigative reporter has been a longtime Republican operatives in the region who writes I guess on side. Honestly don't really know what I know that writing as is not a full-time thing for her and she had worked for one of my previous owners. She worked for Steve Night in the past and the day after the day. After I resigned she endorsement ARSIA There were a number of other people who were involved and again. This is information as circling through like facebook groups and drew a the random people that are on the ground in. It's not it's not like a niffer court case starting to like that bitch so many of the people who were supporting my sem from the beginning. We're the ones that need new. Had the photos and some of that is actually on logs. There's still posted out there. A Joe Messina. And things like that so I think For me that that was the biggest thing right like it was misleading. That my favorite before all of this came

Katie Hill California Senate Monaco Facebook Joe Messina Hillary Clinton Russia Representative Houghton Christy Smith Wisconsin Steve Night Joe Biden Macbeth Investigative Reporter
"houghton" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

02:58 min | 10 months ago

"houghton" Discussed on The Science Show

"Was both real and required an urgent response like his conservative predecessor. Tony Blair too was eager to present the case and achieve progress on the international response for him. It was only heads of state with their responsibility for Environment Transport Energy and Economic Policy. That could take the truly consequential national and international decisions required to reduce emissions at scale. Although John had been retired he and I spoke and I drew his advice frequently. More than one of the world's most highly regarded climate scientists. John Truly understood the hidden wiring of Whitehall and him no longer being any prescribed job he could speak candidly and direct in these informal role. John worked tirelessly to assist the UK diplomatic case with the United States with President. George W Bush close to leading. Us evangelicals John Houghton gave evidence in the Senate and made the ethical case that stewardship of the environment and taking decisions in the interests of future generations was the moral responsibility of all Christians and he was more than the scientist in government originally published in one thousand nine hundred four. His global warming remains the best introduction for anyone wanting to understand climate science with his leadership. Sa- John Helton did more than inspire generation of scientists no one has more successfully and effectively traverse the world of cutting edge science domestic and international climate politics and the institutions and policies required to reduce climate risk his combination of scientific rigour humanism and political. Now made him truly formidable years. After I returned to Australia John I continued to correspond after hearing of his passing last month following complications resulting from covert nineteen. I looked back through his emails to me and came to the last one. The final words stand is an EPA tov to a man who was truly a scientific and policy giant. Nick I agree with you completely about hope. They're all the denies who are beyond hope. They're all the doomsters. He's seen. No hope in between there is lots to hope for and there is much we can do. If only we got on with it regards. Johm that could butte. To Sa- John Houten who died in April was from Nick Rowley former adviser to Prime Minister? Tony Blair and former premier of South Wales Bob Carr..

John Tony Blair Nick Rowley Sa- John Houten John Houghton John Helton scientist Environment Transport Energy a John I George W Bush Bob Carr Senate South Wales Prime Minister United States EPA President Australia UK
"houghton" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

05:25 min | 10 months ago

"houghton" Discussed on The Science Show

"We begin with Nick Rowley. Who's also saddened by the death of a great public servant and friend who died in April so John Houten who pioneered the understanding of climate science and led the IPCC. Nick rarely was former advisor to the British prime minister. Tony Blair. He may not be as well known as David Attenborough. Greta Tourne or Tim Flannery but his contribution both our understanding of the climate system and helping establish the institutions and decisions required to reduce the risk of human induced. Climate change is beyond compare and unassuming deeply religious and humble man. Jones was a trudy glittering Korea winning a scholarship to Oxford at the tender age of Sixteen Joan went on to become professor of atmospheric physics there through the nineteen sixties and Seventies. He built up a powerful research group at the university. Developing new techniques for remote sensing the atmosphere's temperature structure and composition. This groundbreaking work gained the attention of NASA with his team. Developing the instruments to establish space-based weather monitoring flown on the Nimbus satellites in the nineteen seventies. This work enabled detailed studies of the structure and dynamics of the ozone layer and ability to measure and model the radiative transfer of the earth and understanding of the dynamics of the stratosphere eighty-three that John Really came into his element as head of the UK metrological office. He developed his strong interest in climate science. During this time Joan was part of a small group including the diplomats crispin to kill and the scientists and environmental writer. James Lovelock who held a series of briefings within Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher on the risk posed. By what was then called the greenhouse effect in September nineteen thousand nine hundred fetch gave the first speech by any head of state on climate change informed by meetings involving John Her Royal Society speech at Fishmongers Hall in London I set out the importance of basic science informing policy and then turn to the threat posed by climate change and what she called and unwittingly massive experiment with the system of this planet itself in April nineteen thousand nine. The Prime Minister then held a daylong seminar on the subject with a full cabinet. A Downing Street. Unlike so many of today's political class having studied Chemistry University Margaret Thatcher was a leader at ease with signs who thrived on understanding arguments and the facts on December eighth nineteen thousand nine came as seminal speech to the United Nations General Assembly in New York years before vicious climate events such as the European heat wave of two thousand and three or Hurricane Katrina hitting New Orleans in two thousand and five. This was a fantastic speech. There is no better example of the political foresight and leadership required to respond to what scientific expertise revealed and her placing the issue squarely on. The international agenda was Abeille supported by John. Thatcher was convinced that the global warming hypothesis was clear and Britain had a responsibility to lead open by Thatcher in May nineteen ninety. John became the first director of the Headley Center for climate prediction and research. Soon as the world center of scientific excellence in the collation and interpretation of global atmospheric data by this time he was also a key member of the newly established intergovernmental panel on Climate Change. Joan was chair or co chair of the IPC scientific assessment working group until two thousand and two and the lead editor of the first three IPC reports. There is always another major report to read on climate change but I would encourage anyone with an interest to go back and read the executive summary of that first assessment report released in Nineteen Ninety. Thirty years have now passed. Sadly measurements revealed that over those thirty years. The atmosphere has been warming at a rate between the higher and middle predictions. And if the world doesn't redouble efforts to reduce emissions at scale we measure take tree to around four degrees of warming by the end of the century a truly dystopia prospect in two thousand seven on behalf of the panel except to the Nobel Peace Prize that was shared by the IPC and former US Vice President Al Gore just prior to this for two years. I was fortunate to work at Downing Street. Advising tiny Bleh on sustainability and climate change. This was before Hurricane Katrina before Al Gore's documentary an inconvenient truth with the UK having the presidency in two thousand and five Blair was also convinced that climate change was both real and required an urgent response like his conservative predecessor. Tony Blair too was eager to present the case.

Prime Minister Margaret Thatch John Tony Blair Joan Nineteen Ninety Hurricane Katrina Nick Rowley John Houten Vice President Al Gore UK IPCC Prime Minister prime minister James Lovelock David Attenborough NASA Jones IPC US
"houghton" Discussed on Ladies Like Us with Nazanin and Nadia

Ladies Like Us with Nazanin and Nadia

10:29 min | 1 year ago

"houghton" Discussed on Ladies Like Us with Nazanin and Nadia

"All right. We're back and since we were on the subject of family. Do you have any tips on balancing work marriage family? Because you're busy all the time. I bet a lot of work. I love to work right but I would like to save. My first job is currently being like a daughter. A wife and sister like family for me always comes first and I actually feel like my work is better when I'm happy and fulfilled in like my personal life. I I think people don't realize that I feel like I'm more creative. I end up doing things the best of my ability. Like if I'm unhappy it shines is so she gets a lot of the things I do are like being real. Yeah yeah no pun intended know. I mean like the phone and if I'm miserable where I feel disconnected from the people. I loved the most which is my family That gets weird so ex you. Yeah I work my ass off certain days of the week and then we literally carve out days that I don't do anything for work so whether it's just keeping a real whether you have to Pre shoot things for story and it's not in real time. Yeah and I will be like so. Lana go up at this time. Or there's even apps now that you can use them like you can play the Klimova and schedule it. Throw these stories up at a certain time and networks and literally. There are days when I will put my phone on charger and not take it off. I do not answer my phone because I need. I need that time. I need that time to Unplug to I I you see people. All the time. Say marriages such hard work and I was like. That is a lie because if you married the right person and it won't be work and because I didn't understand that the work is in loving them right. The work is maintenance correct. Yeah I love my husband but there are times when I come home and I'm so exhausted I get up three thirty in the morning and there are days when I have to. I literally without telling him I will put my alarm for two fifteen and be like we gotta get it in the You know I do that. I know I I need to look because that is that is essential in my marriage but I thought it was the oh man it's Corny seem wagner. And you'll be tired halfway through you like. Oh thank God i. Will you like that worked out but you have to schedule the sometimes you have so romantic refuse to lose that part of the the main his entity. It's exhausting and I got to work day and I turn to Tamino's I I was. I felt like I was being pulled in many directions and that part of it is hard work so but but I feel that because I married the right person. Loving him isn't Haro. Yeah all the things that I need to do that. Show that I love him. Yeah you know whether that's like You know sometimes I get home from work and I'm tired but he's watching jeopardy on the and instead of just going straight to sleep. I'm going to stay up for the next three hours and laugh and Camille or just do something together but quality time. Jim says so necessary now. The downfall of a lot of relationships is that they put their work. And all these things for because it's so easy to do and you guys I mean your. He has kids of their older. So imagine emily grandkids. Yeah little kids in the mix and they have their schedules. It's just like I sympathize with people that you have to prioritize really do have to so i. I know that it's not always perfect. There are days that I was like. I can't do this this day. And then I get an opportunity and it's like I now have to sacrifice that day that I promise was a non work day to work and I'm also grateful for marrying somebody that's super supportive and gets it and I also get that for him. There's Times where you know. We'll be smack in the middle of our family vacation for Christmas and he had an opportunity to do something in San Francisco. The man got on a plane the morning of got their did his GIG got on a plane back for a red eye back and it's sacrifice a lot of it is sacrificed. It's so worth it all. I'm like we need to have you back because I still have all these like first of all you lost all this weight we need to back Israel and your little love story laid back about it now or we have time how much time we go all right. Okay so fast. Version you the question. Okay well okay speaking of Israel. He's so nice I went to. We went to your launch though. Yeah you said it right. Outside my jewelry long we went to that. I was supposed to go NAS not being able to go and I said you know what screw it. I'm just GONNA go like. She seems like a nice girl. Find that again because I know there are so many young women out there that have moments like that where they're like well. This is the person that technically connected me. I have to go with them right and like you don't have to take a moment and if I'm on I now recognize you separate from her and I love that jazz so go for that matter that then. That's what up anyway exactly and and I was like. I'm going to go to that so I was gonna say hello to you. But I saw Israel worse and I like tapped him on the show or whatever and he turned around and I think he thought I was somebody he knew. That's my husband. He's so so we we se. He's never met a stranger. He's never met a stranger. That's amazing it's amazing wildly annoying so we'll talk to anyone on airplanes like he literally will be. Aweso begin to exchange numbers. He's like very friendly. And I think as a New Yorker growing up is like stranger danger. Walk Forward Right. Make eye contact you know. You're not like that though at your I've gotten if I'm honest. He has been a huge influence in that sense. It's okay to be like hi and family and yet possessing thirsty raised with so many like thoughts in your head or like you're putting these things like okay. If you're walking up to people like you I didn't know you originally but I'm like no 'cause see on instagram. I do I come off. Thirsty has got nursing with my just being friendly. It's the industry. Were into just here. I feel that way. I feel that way a lot too. Because especially like your more recognizable because you're with Miguel right so people already. Oh well we know who she is. They don't know me and they're like who's this girl like. I feel that's real. It can be uncomfortable. I don't want to come off like you said I want to come off like I'm just trying to be a friend because you're a celebrity. Yeah I'm just trying to meet people and talk and have a good smell right exactly. Yeah just a friendly person gas yourself real quick but going back. So how did you quick story? I do meet Israel. How did you know he was? The one and was age to minority holder is. Was THAT AN ISSUE. Or never okay. I've always liked germen. Just Random House save Even my ex was nine years older than me X. before that was ten years older than me yet the majority of guys update of always been older. My parents are also twelve years. Apart which Israel fame age difference Jason Beyond also twelve years apart and nobody mentioned that God forget that too. I know they looked closer. Yeah they do. Yeah but Okay look I'm holding onto it. I will take that I received so I did film a faith based film called. I'm in love with Church girl. I saw. I'm sorry to hear that it was on Visi. Yes joke that we have. He ended up coming filmed. It never heard about it again and I was like Damn. Yeah we didn't even make to DVD like nothing happened with the film Ended ended probably three years later after I shot it right. Yeah three years later after I shot in twenty ten It ended up going to as an independent film in two thousand thirteen because Israel came on as a producer and pleadings along. Exactly Okay as a Gospel Singer. He was able to be like attach his name to it and that helped get to Sony pictures and they ended up putting independent film. Guys like destiny and fate own but this is real messed up. If you ever get to this we actually talked about it on the real but when he originally did an interview talking about the film He was like man. You know John Rules characters so incredible he was going on. Josh did a great job and they're like well. What do you think about The and what would you think about the chemistry between Vanessa Miles? Which was our characters any goes on. You know. I actually think What's her name? So he had edited the film. Watch me on screen for hours and hours. You know when you're editing a film you're watching it all the hours that it was put together. He didn't even know my name till this day. I'll show my kids that and be like your father didn't even know my name so anyway we ended up meeting. Because we're about to do the promo foreign the Promo run from and I was like. Oh Hi nice to meet you. Whatever we end up becoming friends Giada other guys that were in the film the other producers. We became kind of like a squad at that time. I had just gotten the real like like. I don't even think we were greenlee. Late Greenlee yet I had just gotten the call that we were going to go. But we shot the pilot right so I ended up moving to La. Because it's GONNA film here in L. A. and Israel had just moved as well to Santa Monica area. Oh and at that point the whole squad was now living in La and John was in and out of La nonstop so we would always hang out and do like these group activities. You know I love to throw a party. I'd feel like that's all I do is send you on text messages. The other day I went through our texted and I was like Damn I just be sending her flying like you. WanNa come party all GONNA come. I'll will show up so so I looked party paints at my house and just Taco Tuesday and I would invite them all to these things and Israel started showing up without the other guys. Just live here. And what's up being friendly so we became friends at the time he was still married and I at the time was just recently engaged. Oh my ex we.

Israel La John Lana Tamino Greenlee Times Camille emily Jim Santa Monica Corny Sony Miguel Visi
"houghton" Discussed on Ladies Like Us with Nazanin and Nadia

Ladies Like Us with Nazanin and Nadia

06:06 min | 1 year ago

"houghton" Discussed on Ladies Like Us with Nazanin and Nadia

"I'm like this is so beautiful. And the fact that she's so attached to her culture and she loves it she's like my children are going to speak. Arabic. She's like this is how I wanNA raise them. One it's really smart. She saving a bunch of money and she's washy still wildly successful on. She saw there so family oriented There's so many things. The food is amazing. The fact that I've been calling Hamas and she's like right Houma so our she says it and she's like you know what actually was a breakfast food. I didn't know that was actually intended to be like a breakfast food. So there's so many things and they're just tiny things like that being able to shine a light on someone else's culture so dope and beautiful to me. Yeah because yeah. Because it's like it's like you said when we grew up from your same age group says there was such little representation even down to Barbie like all of it from the dolls to the it was like it was all blond hair blue eyes and for the longest time. I thought that was what beauty was. And how did we all did? Yeah that's what gets the body type exactly all of that and it brainwash as a child and so you grow up thinking. I don't look like this. I'm not as attractive as those players. So you know it's really a mind fuck and so that's why having people like you. Having people like Nas having you know we need the diversity of people needs to be elected. They sealed see themselves. It's so much deeper than it really. Is it really is it? Is I love that well props yet thank. You may try we try. I mean again I would love to see more Middle Eastern people on television it her and I are mixed to which is really cool. What makes with we're the same Mexica so our moms our sisters? Yeah what yeah. Yeah put together moms so. We're half let the Middle Eastern. Our dads are Persian and their best friends. Yes so don. Yeah so it's also interesting because then I also to people who are mixed there's also a lack of identification juice and because you're just like where do I belong one hundred. You're like you feel like you have to have don't I'm pure Latina? But I'm half Puerto Rican half Ecuadorian and I even get that if I post something with the Puerto Rican flag the Ecuadorians. I like what's up with all right? I'm going to Puerto Rican Day parade. I'm posting it for that reason. But you didn't go to the Ecuadorian. Exactly the comments. I guess and you never would've Ecuadorean flag the Puerto Rican side but I thought she was Puerto. Rico you do feel torn and what I love most is now married to a man that's also mixed as well see is and I'm married to a man. That's my husband's Jamaican French. So I say what is that next generation of Children. They are going to be race. Lewis which h-honestly as much as I. I love being proud of who? We are I think it's going to be really special. There's going to be this whole other generation of children that are just mix ally so many what are you. I'm human I'm Puerto Rican Ecuadorian A new like they're just going to be up. I wonder what that's going to do to racism. That's under yeah. We had these conversations on the real about you know Caucasian families feeling like While my grandchildren are going to be by Brown they're going to have brown babies. That was a real conversation. Sadly a real fear for some people. In how do you? How do you make that fear? Go Away educate them enough and introduce them to other cultures where they get excited about it instead of being afraid of it right right right. Who's going to take a lot of work? Yeah it is was it says. Orange for sure. It's keeping the blood line row absolutely set that gives the race pure and exact just being honest. That's almost in every race. Yeah so you can sit and be there. Oh they're prejudice against me. But I've heard the say I've heard Black People's effort I've served Asians be like no. You gotTA marry the. It's the reality of it and it's it's not right and I think at some point. We have to raise our kids and raise this next generation. We like we are the world. Changes are the ones that will make it different for me too. I'm so intrigued to see how this is all GonNa unfold. I low key used to feel like damn but my kids not going to identify as anything and I find so much pride in being a lot. I was sad about it right and then I was like not. That's dope like they like. I will world citizens so you you you know what I mean. That's the one thing that I will say about our parents that I wish they would have kept up the heritage a little bit more. Yeah a both our moms kind of like set aside the Latino culture a little bit more for our dads like I think that they accommodated them more and so it was more of a Middle Eastern type household but even still we were born and raised in America. So everything was very Americanized. Yeah we spoke English in the house so we kind of lost a little bit of that tradition because of our poor first generation. Here my our dads were born in Iran. Our moms were born here so that makes a difference too. Yeah totally totally but but it boils down to. What do you want your children to know and carry out you have to really instill that in them? Fight you on ultimately as much as I love the idea of raising my daughter to identify and and you know identify with Latin culture and be to obviously be mixed and recognize that but No the language and all of that when you really boil down to it. I want a child. That's kind I wanNA child that recognizes. Everybody like that to me is way more important than her being on some pride. S. You know what I'm saying so when you think about it in the grand scheme of things I'm like I want a child. That represents the change. I want to see in first and foremost you go real quick. Stop this Mike but I wish I could okay so much great conversations happening. Let's take a quick break and we'll come back and.

Puerto Rican Middle Eastern Hamas Puerto Houma Brown Lewis Mike TA Iran America
"houghton" Discussed on Ladies Like Us with Nazanin and Nadia

Ladies Like Us with Nazanin and Nadia

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"houghton" Discussed on Ladies Like Us with Nazanin and Nadia

"I'd be better off going into the medical field and doing something. That's more realistic than I can. Make money and music will just be a hobby for me. I'll be a local celebrity and just keep singing in church normal life. Yeah so I ended up going to that school my second year there. I had to do an internship it's required and it was Beth. Israel was across the street. Doing my internship. I was filing paperwork and some guy walks in name. Reggie till this day I would love to find Reggie because Reggie low key low key. Heike changed my life Reggie walked in. I'll never forget what it looked like black guy with a hat and he walked. He's like your mind you saying and I remember hearing this quote that said There's no such thing as luck. It's preparation meeting. Opportunity will girls. I was prepared. I was turned around from the filing cabinet. You WanNa hear. I can sing church song little pop soon for you. I could say something for you in Spanish. What do you WanNa hear? And he was like no that. So he's like if you saying. I'm I'm scouting for a girl group scouting for a girl group and I know this manager this trying to put together a girl group and I know a lot of you guys from the high school intern here. Can you get some girls together for me so I was like I got you boom so I went back to my gym class random and I met two or three other girls and I was like you guys saying one girl using the wire in Brooklyn Tabernacle another Dominican girl was just like I just like to sing? Let's go audition ended appearing back from and he's like whatever you put together. We thought we had to be the girl group originally got it so we put together to little songs to sing for him. This is like I don't even think this was a song that was intended for three par harmony. But we did. Love.

Reggie Brooklyn Tabernacle Israel Heike Beth intern
"houghton" Discussed on Ladies Like Us with Nazanin and Nadia

Ladies Like Us with Nazanin and Nadia

14:22 min | 1 year ago

"houghton" Discussed on Ladies Like Us with Nazanin and Nadia

"We are back and we have a special guest with us. You may remember her from groups such as thrill w and the Cheetah girls. I were my cheetahs. She is a singer actress and Co host of the Emmy Award winning talk. Show the Real Adrian. Houghton is here with us today. Come through on their own. You know I was going through your IMDB. And I was like no. This is amazing. This is like this is what you aspire to gain and at such a young age like you're killing it had just called me young and you said my IMDB was as good girl teams on like. I'm so grateful for it but I think everybody looking back like what that first of all I M and your little the little picture of the icon change. That doesn't change. I'm sending everybody now over to see dammit but it's awful. No I know all my Disney films like grand things that I did like buffalo dream brand totally played a native American and then years later on the real when they did our DNA tests where we're from turns out. I actually was casted properly. Seven present native Americans. Yeah well you gotta remember trail so you have to prove that you're more than twenty five percent and then I can move in a casino. I could kill a Bald Eagle and I could buy land on a reservation. Were killing a Bald Eagle. I don't know it's on fan so I guess it's because like technically it's illegal okay to do okay but because technically this is people's native land is okay because I'm saying okay. I'm looking at your picture. And she's the long yes. Why why and Mad Pale older you here. I must have been twenty one or twenty two in that picture. Okay okay early days all that so saying utilize but yeah. I was looking at everything. I'm like wow you know you've like from three L. W. which we listen to force promises found was Oh yes to cheetah girls and the hosting like. Do you ever have a hard time picking one thing. I don't because first of all. I'm like low key workaholics. I WANNA do it. All right Super ambitious but at the same time. Kind of whatever it's all come in different increments. It's never been like do it all at wire. It's like music was how I got my first one. And it's honestly still my. I love love doing music Not Professionally but I love it on like a passion level arrive passionate about but I think it's the most competitive field and it's like the music industry recognizes not so much about your love for music but like what's your marketing and what's your single at work and who are you as an artist. I'm like I'm just me? I enjoy seeing the shower. I loved doing mass singer. Oh was it was an awesome way to like be able to do what I love without being like harshly criticized for. How hard was it to keep quiet about this as art? Anybody did you tell anybody I told my husband. My best friend knew my parents knew and my sister new. And that was it on the ladies only so I saw the episode where they revealed that it was years and they were all genuinely surprise so tam and Jeannie the whole time. We're like we know it's you corner me and literally was like check on our friendship on our. French and I was like Yo. You can't do that. That's not fair. Nda I will not be telling you if I am or that made fun then. It was like film than it was like the. Cheetah girls doing film even though that incorporated music and then which is the best part. Because it's to act in singer fulfilling every triple threat. The honest truth is it's never going to be perfect though. Yeah like even when I got to do dancing singing and acting together it was like but as this corny. And that's how I felt. Hi doing it because I was older than what I was playing. A lot of people didn't realize like I cheated guided. He realized that I was nineteen. Playing fourteen or fifteen. Oh Shit yeah so then it just kept going on and on that. I was like sixteen playing sixteen and being like twenty three. I use that honey because those are gene and then in the middle of it. It was like okay. Now I'm done with my Disney era. And what do I do now? And I started getting so many opportunities for hosting and I wasn't sure to take that as an insult and that's how I felt because I was like what. What talent does it take to like host? You know what I mean like. Oh you're a personality. Like what does that even mean right? She's a TV personality now. Let's have her host on MTV. And that's kind of where the hosting being started. And I used to be like damn you'll like I used to be the one getting interviewed. Now I'm interviewing you go through those weird for lack of a better word. Mindful like you can like really messed yourself in the head doubting yourself you know this is awkward and had I let those insecurities get in my way. I wouldn't be where I am today because I would have been like. I want to be the one being interviewed. Your ego gets in the way you're like I I want be the one you know answering the questions and you had to check that one hundred percent and a one of our executive producer is one sent to be said to me after she casted the real and she was like. You don't get it. We saw every woman of Color in Hollywood. And then some and he's was like it takes real talent to be able to be yourself when the cameras come on like they're like people have red light syndrome. Have you heard of that? Yes like the red light comes on and they know they're being reported in there like Hello. It's pleasure to meet. Ya and they suddenly. I kinda was like that in the beginning because I have a big personality but then when the cameras in front of me and then you get used to it. Yeah yeah they're like Yo that's A. That's a gift a gift to be able to connect with people. It's a gift to be able to be vulnerable to be transparent conversation so now I'm like oh I get it like and I'm so grateful for the platform that I have now but it wasn't something that like I sought after phrase came to you. Yeah like you need to be doing this. Thank you Lord. It's now it's all a part of the journey. All of nine had not taken those opportunities who knows what I mean. Yeah because you you were kind of like on the sidelines for like a little bit for sure but what was happening with you during that time so I after Cheetah girls literally while I was still touring with them I ended up going to New York and taking a meeting with L. A. Read and he signed me to island def jam so literally coming off of the tour. I had a record deal at island def jam which was Super Dope and I now is going to be hosting the hours that were where. Trl used to be right so they had just Tiara had just gone away and they hired me on an awesome guy named God lost Santos host afternoon hours on MTV and it was just afternoons on. We literally would toss to room raiders and all those shows like finger so we just would host the afternoon. And that's kind of what I was doing and then my la read ended up leaving Def Jam and my project got shelved and I had to ask to be released. It was like. Can You please let me go? Because I was just stuck there. He had moved from there to go to epic. And when your main cheerleader? The person that signed you at the label anymore. It's a wrap. No one's paying attention to you. The music is just sitting there and they want who they brought to the to exactly eggs and if you didn't sign the act you're not excited about it because you don't get to claim of course so there was really no one there for me and I was just like okay. Well I'm going to go now And that's when I was kind of in limbo so I no longer was on. Mtv that run had ended And now it was just. Oh that's a lie. I then this is so random I then got a development deal with NBC universal. And they were priming me again to do like a talk show Now I was other fun thing to Google. I was now like being like a guest on Maury Povich. Yes and I would come. Yes we miss this. Yes I would do all of the episodes that were like feel good like kids. Being bullied and like more CH- younger audience oriented. Like I need a makeover. I WANNA be a sexy girl like and the parents being close on so I wouldn't be there for that and the other one was bullying and I'd be like to have a feel like your daughter. Just isn't gonNA come home today. It was very dramatic and very deep. That's where you're out came in. And so then I did tubing that when I got home. It was so random and awkward so in that me and my one of my best these. Ju- Lisa ended up doing a reality show. Yes higher girls and then straight out from empire girls. I got the real. Wow so that was like my limbaugh area was like I'm coming out with an album. Album was never coming out and then it was like just doing random things like people. Were seeing me randomly on Maury or and not really understanding what the idea was behind the scenes and it was to hopefully land a talk show right and then they're like hey we're casting a talk show for you know minority women or women of color and I was like amazing right here. We'll you're my personal goals because that's on my dream board. I added. That is shy because this show has sparked something in me that I didn't know that I could do or have and it's like and same thing with like your whole all things Adrian. It's so inspiring. Because you do everything and everything you do. I'm like Yes yes like. I love everything you do in your personal taste. It's like yeah you from the day I met you. I was like has so much personality and you could do it. And even when we were coming up with the concept for my youtube channel was like well. What kind of youtube is it going to be? Are you going to be cooking? No Am I gonNA specifically just be doing house. No is it just make all right and I was like all then. I'm sure you get this all the time. That like women are not one dimensional exact like we have so many layers to us. It's not like oh now. I'm just doing podcasts. Or I just do music right just to make up right you know. We have so many layers to us. And when you're an entrepreneur now in this day and age. Multiple streams of income are just three sixty. Yes absolutely not how it used to be ten years ago. We had to pick one thing and you had to stick with that one thing and people would even tell you you have to stick with it because that's how you want your audience. They need to either take you. You need to be like an expert of something. It has to be that this is what you do. Oh hone in on that now. It doesn't have to be that way anymore. Put you in. That bothered everything more like we're out of the bar and I love to know I do too so when you were in your limbo period. Yeah did you ever feel discouraged? I'll hell yeah. Maybe industry isn't me like did you ever feel that way absolutely and more than just feeling discouraging? I had like a very real mom. Who's very lengthy? I wasn't alone like mummy. Listen so me and your sister both work at Cornell I can get you a job here and she really did offer that to me and I was like yes but nobody. I hadn't given up on the dream yet and at that point that was all I knew I only knew the entertainment business because I got into it at fourteen years old. Like I get my worker's permit to be in the studio singing right. How did that come about how the all wheel? W THE STRANGEST. I relocated here L. Yes so when I was in junior high school I went to a performing arts school. Random fag the Wayne's brothers went there and so two Jerry O'CONNELL Clinton School for Writers and artists in Chelsea and It pretty much a junior high school that prepared you to put your portfolio together to go after one of the big talent schools like juilliard or the other one that is completely escaping. My mind was that other one Juilliard and I'm bad at whatever those schools. That are huge dipping. Nicki Menaj went to those schools. Anyway but I was. I was like a a poor kid like we didn't I lived in the projects. We didn't have money to put like headshots together and really do the portfolio. So I went to the school and ultimately did not audition for those schools because I had not put my portfolio together. I didn't get the headshots. I never got the demo cut on me for studio time so I ultimately was like you know what my sister is in high school. When I was coming in as a freshman she would be a senior. She's three years older than me and that just seemed like a very ideal situation. You know what I mean like. I'm GONNA come through and I'm going to be hanging out with the seniors. I'll be looked after and it was a medical high school that she went to it. Was the medical school for Stuyvesant stuyvesant building in New York City. It was health professions and human services was high. School was the name of the school and literally I was like. Maybe I'll just sing babies out of the womb. I'll be an obstetrician like because you have to understand when you come from that sort of world guys grew up in La right that's La and even though New York is like you make. You can make it anywhere. I had no connection to the entertainment business. I didn't even know like how this works. We gotTa have a famous celebrity parent like I just had no connect so I was like this isn't real. It's not realistic for me at all..

New York IMDB Emmy Award MTV Disney La Houghton Maury Povich Stuyvesant stuyvesant Google executive producer Hollywood Maury Ju- Lisa tam NBC Jerry O'CONNELL Clinton School
"houghton" Discussed on Small Doses

Small Doses

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"houghton" Discussed on Small Doses

"Audible book. Why because our engineer Brandon Produce Day? Ed Yes and I made that happen because I knew you always want that to happen so it went down like four flat tires soap shoutouts everyone who's was audible and the book because you are a special kind of fan. Let's get into the show. Nah SPA so funky. I wasn't that episode of small doses everyday use today. I've got a special guest on the show. Some my cholera flamingo. Semi-colon Shkin. I know her before. She changed her name as editing by land. You know it but now it is. Asian isn't holding a hot. It's Houghton I. I went from one terrible last name to another terrible last name. I went from one last name. No one can pronounce to another one. No one paper. I'm like so wack Houghton. Yeah I like Asian so I like to break my last name down like this when it was by loan. It was like you buy it. You loan it Like you buy alone by so I was mispronouncing your name by John for loan and then now I mean this is I guess. And it's just like you know I got this last name via Jesus and like you know and the way I explained it is very not Jesus like I'm like it's a ton of Ho Ho Tun US. I thought in order to be a Ho. You've had tons of whole ton whatever but you get it home and at least the preliminary again so mia agent on our UNA show. Yeah quarter real that bar. We be on TV People like to say things. It's funny when I read like like you`ll. Ag and Amanda are beefing. I'm like wild this thing because we're actually mad tight. I'm like I wouldn't even know what even what you looks like. Yeah I wouldn't beef with you. I like you more than that. I respect who you are respond. Mind you've been this agreed on a thought. I genuinely respect. You appreciate you did. Oh because I have known Adrian and this is the subject of this show since we were in New York. Yes we were in. New York. Agent is a constant New Yorker facts. Then you meet a mother and you're like it's even more New York than I thought my God someone why mom worked at Cornell for like fifteen twenty years. She was answering the phone allergy. Immunology and pulmonologist mill speaking. May I help you? I will call and be like who the hell are you like? What is this voice? I think that's like you're not harvard voice. That was my mom's like clue wish more now boys and I was totally. I got it but at the same time as I can is into my mom literally me a fake stop. Why are you talking like this? Stop talking like this. Yo that's my mom but my mom real had moved out at every time. I have my mom cameron. It's like I'm not sure what we do in the only time. She's ever not been like this when she did our podcast and she was flicking dragging me through the mud. So crazy and the podcast. I never air it. We record an episode. She now we will demand for though episode like Brennan and fucking backwards so uncomfortable. They were like no. We need the anxiety EMOJI. Face the whole time everyone please go on like a super like what's that call when you fighting for something fission a petition like something to hear this episode. Please do you like me be like what are we doing? My mom in real life is hysterical. She's Super Spicy. And I think sadly which is the things that we talk about on the real. There's so many stereotypes of what we are and I think it's a different generation where like our generation is taught. Be who you are and be proud of that. They're from generation where it's like. Don't let them think where whack or like everything they think. We already are so she. Yes yeah I'm like you ain't no classy classy so I wanted to talk about being transplanted gas.

New York Ed Yes engineer Houghton Brandon Adrian John harvard Brennan Ag Cornell Amanda
Ousted ambassador to Ukraine has a book deal

KNX Weekend News and Traffic

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Ousted ambassador to Ukraine has a book deal

"Former ambassador ambassador to Ukraine Marie of on average will tell her story in a memoir it's a familiar path serving government leave government or be told to leave write a book the publisher Houghton Mifflin Harcourt has confirmed it has a book deal with the former ambassador to Ukraine Marie Ivanov itch the publisher says the book will cover her diplomatic career from Mogadishu to Kievan back to Washington where she found in the publisher's words a political system beset by many of the same challenges she has spent her career combating overseas literary agency that represents your Bonaventure also represents former FBI director James Comey and former national security adviser John

Publisher Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Marie Ivanov Mogadishu Kievan Washington James Comey John Ukraine FBI Director
Ousted ambassador to Ukraine has a book deal

KNX Weekend News and Traffic

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Ousted ambassador to Ukraine has a book deal

"Three years and then you'll probably remember former ambassador to Ukraine Marie on which she's going to tell her story in a memoir it's a familiar path serving government leave government or be told to leave write a book the publisher Houghton Mifflin Harcourt has confirmed it has a book deal with the former ambassador to Ukraine Marie Ivanov itch the publisher says the book will cover her diplomatic career from Mogadishu to Kievan back to Washington where she found in the publisher's words a political system beset by many of the same challenges she has spent her career combating overseas literary agency that represents your Bonaventure also represents former FBI director James Comey and former national security adviser

Ukraine Marie Publisher Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Marie Ivanov Mogadishu Kievan Washington James Comey Ukraine FBI Director
Former Ukraine diplomat Marie Yovanovitch has book deal

WBZ Morning News

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Former Ukraine diplomat Marie Yovanovitch has book deal

"Former ambassador to Ukraine Marie you're out of it she will tell her story in a memoir it's a familiar path serving government leave government or be told to leave write a book the publisher Houghton Mifflin Harcourt has confirmed it has a book deal with the former ambassador to Ukraine Marie Evanovich publisher says the book will cover her diplomatic career from Mogadishu to Kievan back to Washington where she found in the publisher's words a political system beset by many of the same challenges she has spent her career combating overseas literary agency that represents your Bonaventure also represents former FBI director James Comey and former national security adviser John

Publisher Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Marie Evanovich Mogadishu Kievan Washington James Comey John Ukraine FBI Director
"houghton" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"houghton" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"The crash at V. Houghton's pond exit ninety three southbound crawling on the expressway to twenty four north one twenty eight north crawling past winter street delays to Lexington and from route three open to Wakefield ninety three north crawling off as it can bridge up to Medford and slow going from Montvale laugh right up into Wilmington miking WBZ's traffic on the three is how we are dealing with the rain and drizzle some low clouds and fog that'll be the story through this evening still a few spots in the north in Worcester county that are hanging on to temperatures right around freezing so some slickness of there but everybody should be getting into the mid thirties to upper thirties for the low temperature overnight tonight cloudy and breezy overnight and then partly sunny gusty winds tomorrow highs forty four downtown a little cooler in the suburbs and the real fuels available thirty story today Wednesday night clear temperatures in the low twenties in Boston teens in the suburbs and for both Thursday and Friday some sun some clouds upper twenties for many of the suburbs and lower thirties downtown this is WBZ news radio ten thirty with the news watch never stop good evening on Ben Parker here the five things you need to know at five forty five president drop granting it pardons and commutations just Ahmad profile convicts a lot more coming up on time all state rep David Nagel is free with conditions after he made a court appearance on corruption charges today homeowners in Roxbury they can't afford to stay in their homes because of predatory lending my boss the non profit but the ones mayors not happy about it just about power outage they're deceiving a national group of federal.

Houghton Lexington Wakefield Medford Worcester county Ben Parker David Nagel Roxbury Montvale Boston president Ahmad state rep
Focus on your STRENGTHS & Delegate your WEAKNESSES to those whose strength it is!

Plan B Success

05:27 min | 1 year ago

Focus on your STRENGTHS & Delegate your WEAKNESSES to those whose strength it is!

"Every a person that you know including yourself has strengths and weaknesses. We all do strengths or things that really good at and without really exerting a whole lot of ourselves we can get spectacular. Results and weaknesses are things that are good at and no matter how hard we try and stretch. We probably get mediocre results but one of the ingrained aspects of self development strategies that I have noticed who have thrived over a vast Several years now several hundreds of years I should say is that there's a lot of emphasis laid on the fact that one needs to recognize. Is there weaknesses and spent an inmate amount of time and effort working on nimbly improve your always told Mitchell you work on your weaknesses. Make sure you spend time on them. Make sure that you work hard so that you get better at them. Well no matter how hard you try getting better is one thing but can a weakness beat turned into a strength. That's the question and if at all it can be how much effort Food Desert Jaguar. How much time does it required. And what kind of disciplined approach DESERTEC ladder for person to turn their weakness to strength and is it really worth the effort in. Although I do agree that a very important aspect of self improvement is the need to recognize your strengths and weaknesses. I for one. Do not believe that. A telescopic review of your weaknesses. An inordinate amount of time and effort spent focusing on them mm-hmm results in any market shifts. Who strengths so basically no matter. How hard you work on your weaknesses? The Nago Done Indu. Your strengths is Houghton natural ability in every person where they have certain strengths and sudden weakness. Yes you can focus on a weakness meekness and get it to a certain level. Maybe a little bit about being mediocre. But you won't get it to be at a point lead at stellar. It's key that that you need to truly recognize and understand and comfortable with your strengths as well as limitations. It's also important to have a plan. In place to stabilize your limitations or weaknesses you have to provide stability to your weaknesses. You GotTa get to a point where you can live with them. You don't have to spend inordinate. That amounts of payment effort could do strengths. Because you already have certain trends and if you spend the same amount of time on your strengths you will beater remarkable in those particular strengths even to reach remarkable effectiveness in those strengths. All you need is a little bit of exertion. Little bit rid of more focused work on them but to be at your practice. Best and to benefit from what you do. You need to focus on your strengths. Daniel the weaknesses. The foot spend on trying to come. Weakness is better spent on honing Trent's and realizing their potential because their potential is many fold. It has a multiple effect of benefits for you. You bound become better stronger. Anger and deservedly rewarded if you apply the strategy of focusing on your strengths. I'm not saying don't focus on your weaknesses. Do focus on them to get get them to be stable so that they do not hinder your focus on your strengths. Not everyone in. This world needs to be good at everything everything. That's perfectly all right members limitations while you exude your strengths. There's no need to feel guilty or feel feel belittled for things that you do not share an interest in our that. Do not reflect your best self but each each one of us has some aspect that we enjoy are good at and can create a distinguished place for ourselves. Concentrate on Exerting yourself in these areas areas that you enjoy working and that you can contribute your best. Enter your strength. Trent's will distinguish you walk on foot or excelling at them and exercising them. Your very best. Not only will you enjoy what you you did and be at your productive best but you will also cherish and pride yourself rewards. It will reap for you. This done motivates. It's your further to go beyond your best in what you're already excellent in in what you already excelling imagine the in fight night exponential you have available to unravel with the Australians. When you focus on them what your strengths. Discover your in finite potential. Y You recognize your limitations and stabilize them enough to not influence your pathway of progress now heels to your success. Gobert condo strength and make things happen for you for who you are for who you can be for who you aspire to be. It's all

Trent Mitchell Houghton Daniel
Practical Differential Privacy at LinkedIn with Ryan Rogers

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

09:17 min | 1 year ago

Practical Differential Privacy at LinkedIn with Ryan Rogers

"Am with Ryan. Rogers Ryan is a senior software engineer in data science at Lincoln Ryan. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thanks so much Ravioli. Huge Fan in the show also also. I am glad glad to glad to hear that and glad to have you here. You're pretty active in federated learning Differential privacy. That's in fact. What what we're going to be talking about? Tell us about your background and how you got interested in those topics in my Grad school during my PhD. I was very interested in Sort of those fields of game theory with Computer Science and I was working with Michael Kerns. Aaron Roth there and I started burning more and more about differential privacy from Aaron Roth. He wrote the textbook on it and so he was a great teacher and we started working a lot on on the topic and then toward the end of my PhD. Like the last year Apple announced that they were doing differential privacy and Iowa's ten so that was really exciting to see that like wow The research that I'm doing can be actually useful to To companies that are interested in privacy. So so I seemed like a logical next step just after my PhD to go immediately to apple and kind of continue some of the research that I've done during my phd even now at apple and so they're kind of worked on What's called the local model of differential privacy where Any records that are submitted are privatized on device prior to being sent to apple in that case so use cases like you know finding popular emojis. People are typing in popular new words. That people are typing keyboard Things like that And then toward the end of my time at apple started exploring more Private Federated Learning Local differential privacy in that case machine learning tasks and then I started learning about more and more about some of the work that's happening at Lincoln with differential privacy and it was really exciting to me those like kind of a different model of differential privacy. That was going on there Something it's called the central model of differential privacy where data is collected and Things that we want to do with the data set is privatized So rather than in the local motto which can be restrictive in some settings the global model can kind of open up a whole new class of problems that you can do so that was really exciting to me. So after about two years at apple then Moved To link thin and that's where I am now on differential privacy. They're awesome awesome yeah. We first started covering differential privacy on the podcast. Maybe a couple of years ago with a series of shows which included Aaron And and so much has happened since then. I think you know it's like. The census is now writing differential privacy so many more organizations are talking about how they're incorporating it into kind of the way they do business whereas before differential privacy in particular differentially private machine learning being was. Oh and also that it's there's a tensor flow library now open source project open source stuff exciting time to be in the field. Yeah Yeah Yeah So. My two thousand sixteen apple announced they were doing differential privacy that like spiked interest in the in the area and now light census bureau announcing that they're doing differential privacy received like even more recognition into the area. So it's really important to get like practical things to To be differentially private in for more people to get engaged with the topic. Yeah Yeah so you have a spotlight talk here at the Conference on paper that you contributed to practical differentially private top case election with pay what you get composition interview like just isolating dissecting when all those words mean in this context right yeah. What's the best way to go through that So yeah this is a really really fun project with my colleague linked and David Durfee So when we first started working on a project Lincoln we wanted to use them off the shelf techniques from differential privacy. It's been active research Field for fifteen years so we were kind of handling a very basic tasks like what are the top ten articles that members members are engaging with across link then And so for that type of clearly we were we were just like okay well. We can take existing algorithms and use that it'll be differentially private. Unfortunately these existing techniques require you to have extra information about what you're searching for for instance if i WanNa know top Houghton articles that are being engaged. With among all data scientists in the bay area I would need to also provide all possible articles that are actually out there. and which is kind of contradictory to how data scientists would actually want to run that query. you would want to ask the data said Hey. What are the top ten articles? Because I don't know the articles are as opposed to which of these. Yeah exactly so. My Algorithm would have to know all the possible articles that are out there which could be millions. Maybe I don't even know about it. Got All the possible. You'd presume that those articles are in a in. The data set is the requirement to know all of those in the data said. Is that the issue that it breaks the privacy aspect of it itself exactly so like even Articles that nobody clicked on one in differential privacy. Would have to think of this hypothetical world. This hypothetical data set were one new member might be added to the data set which which might actually click on these these other articles that didn't exist in the real data. Set that you're running things and so only in the analysis to prove that it's actually differently private. Do you have to consider all possible articles that can show up okay so that seem contradictory to like how did you. The tightest wanted to work with it so we were like okay. There's gotta be a better way of doing this more of a black box approach. Top Ten articles top ten in skill sets among these users. Something like that. You wouldn't have to feed it also like here are all the articles that you should sit out here. All the skill sets to look for so so we're talking about an approach that essence of this is that the differential privacy at its core is providing a theoretical guarantee twenty of privacy but all the theory these theoretical guarantees was based on the knowledge of everything exactly and in practice That's impractical exactly. Yeah so whenever you would like to run these things like you just want the data set to tell you these things sort of exploratory data analytics so before you would have to give exactly those things beforehand but then with these new algorithms you can just ask a top ten articles. Top ten countries topped in Skill sets and not have to provide oh herald articles here all countries here. All the skill sets that you I need and and furthermore still have differential privacy guarantees. It's not that you couldn't ask your database. Select top ten from whatever. It's you can still get your difference French subject to differential privacy as always the constraint with these issues yeah so the practical aspect of these algorithms Adams are that You don't have to feed it. The the what we call the domain of the data set into these algorithms and they could work. Ah on top of existing infrastructure. Say That you already have built at your company some Very efficient Top Cape Solver. We weren't considering differential privacy to begin with right. So you're taking this highly distributed data set that's located in lots of different areas and you built this system. I'm that can run queries incredibly fast so now when you want to introduce different privacy. You don't WanNa just totally bypass existing infrastructure. You Wanna be able to leverage average that still with all of your queries. So that's where we wanted to apply differential privacy algorithm sort of as a layer on top of this existing infrastructures. Wouldn't and slow things down. You can still get the efficiency that you ask for while still getting Privacy guarantees so that's why what was so appealing about these algorithms like the mathematics with Matt Behind. It is incredibly difficult But the algorithms themselves are fairly straightforward so essence. Like you would ask a top K A a problem and rather than asking top K from the original existing system you would ask like maybe top two K maybe a little bit more. Fetch a little bit more data. Get those results and then add noise to those results in only released k.. K. Results from that and so that's essentially the algorithms algorithms that we propose but proving that it's differentially private is a lot more difficult.

Apple Rogers Ryan Lincoln Aaron Roth Lincoln Ryan Aaron And Software Engineer Iowa Michael Kerns David Durfee Adams
Vaccines and the N-Corona Virus

Second Opinion

03:46 min | 1 year ago

Vaccines and the N-Corona Virus

"Medically the world is not the same as it was last week. A virus that started in China perhaps from an animal source has caused dozens of human deaths and infected hundreds. It is likely that more infections and deaths will follow in the weeks to come. It has already wreaked economic and social havoc in China coming during the festivities associated with the Lunar New Year families. leaser separated from each other. Entire cities are on lockdown and hospitals are simply overwhelmed. The culprit is a virus called N Corona for for Novelty Corona. We've known about this family of viruses for a long time as a common cause of colds and sore throats but things changed just in two thousand and two with these SARS corona epidemic that started again in China and caused illness in thousands and killed over. Eight hundred Dr. Peter Hotels the dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in infectious disease. Specialist and CO Director of Texas Texas Children's Center for Vaccine Development picks up the story in two thousand and twelve it arose out of Saudi Arabia. Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome. There's quota virus virus also very serious infection spread from Saudi Arabia elsewhere in the Arabian Peninsula to Korea. Viruses are often preventable with vaccines. Well unfortunately we do not have a licensed vaccine for any of the those three major corona viruses even though the technology to make it. Not that complicated. So the technical feasibility. Making these vaccines is not very difficult. It's a matter of contracting invest your support or finances to do the clinical trials. The problem is that these epidemics pass was what happened with our SARS vaccine that we were developing we developed and manufactured. We think a very promising vaccines for the SARS virus and then when SARS was gone there was no longer a lot of interest starting and continuing clinical trials which lead to licensure so the vaccine more or less sits in the freezer. The problem is that these epidemics pass and when they do. There's little appetite for investing vesting in developing vaccines with the feeling that the epidemic is now over. This isn't just unfortunate for Dr Houghton says his group. It's unfortunate for all of us because it may have helped out with this new epidemic. This new and corona virus looks like it's quite similar to the old SARS Corona Corona virus has about eighty percent similarity in terms of genetics and amino acid sequence. So we think there's a good likelihood that our SARS vaccine that we previously we developed in response to that first step attic could potentially cross protect against the current and Cronin of ours but their vaccine will require extensive sensitive testing for safety and effectiveness testing. And this could take years. Unfortunately we end up being very reactive and not so label to think ahead had Dr. Houghton and his group been able to finish their testing years ago. Things would be different today with a vaccine ready for rapid dissemination as hotels points out. These serious corona viruses. Now seem to be the new normal. We've seen one every decade in this this new century so he had SARS in the early two thousands. We have mayors in the two thousand ten in the early twenty twenty. We've got this new end corona virus. There's has every reason to believe that history will repeat itself and when it does. We need to be prepared. This is Dr Michael Wilks with a second opinion.

Sars Texas Texas Children China Dr. Houghton Saudi Arabia Center For Vaccine Development Dr Michael Wilks Colds Arabian Peninsula Dr. Peter Hotels Respiratory Syndrome Baylor College Of Medicine Korea National School Of Tropical Me Cronin Director
"houghton" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"houghton" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Circle looks to centered for Kopitar that was motivated by Shattenkirk winner saps John Kirk absorbs a check for my Apollo but feed circuit jet back for Shattenkirk in the right way Phil wanted down the ice the rally deflected in from center not Roy places for the kings of the near side hello Tyler Johnson right circle shot he flew wide left due to our score with three away left in the first Austin Wagner plays the puck for the kings around the near side in Houghton mill drill it out and this one will be nice it's all the way down the link to the ice to fifty seven left in the first two to the score is to search of that time he came all the way down to the hash marks to the right of the goalie on the boards and blocks that didn't make them and end up getting a nice I was a brilliant play by Sergio of of what I did play but a brilliant one culprit turning point to the left of Jonathan quick our winter Roy by design it spins around the fires that held in search of what point circle could drop connects with plot left corner softly plays a toward braided point right circle can point hold is in doubt you guys check via follow works a doctor Wagner center Austin Wagner delighting in corrals it right point eight posted by the light nickel circuit chat a little feat for Kevin Shattenkirk in the right wing under pressure gets help from Kucherov left wing at circuit de with two and a half to go with driving a check by an idea of the kind of person through that checking got it out to center ice for block crossed one braided point right circle we'll work it by that could drop is there jockey to live for plot left corner of corner could drop the hurry back at the right point turn back muscles to hold it in at the right point right server could drop.

Circle Kopitar John Kirk Shattenkirk Phil Austin Wagner Jonathan Kevin Shattenkirk Kucherov Roy Tyler Johnson Houghton mill
"houghton" Discussed on The Big 98

The Big 98

06:42 min | 1 year ago

"houghton" Discussed on The Big 98

"He Houghton for if we roll down streets of would you hold on to as the summer sun we rolled even close who this is Jason Aldean are for us Cody Allen on the big ninety eight never got the chance to and in this I was everyone never got the chance to C. M. T. C. M. hooks is my guest new song out kinfolk.

Rekindling Cultural Burning

Think: Sustainability

10:00 min | 1 year ago

Rekindling Cultural Burning

"Naturally actually occurring processed in a string through a lightning strikes on principally but also I can occur so other races. He's Oliver Costello is a bundling man and founding director of the five six aligns indigenous cooperation what he's describing is a cultural burn a traditional channel method of environmental management which has been carried out by aboriginal people across Australia thousands of years though people sort of learn so on manage for a really positive why the raw and how interact with different plants animals and landscapes in some ways cultural burning is similar to hazard reduction Burns wins it reduces fuel Lord and hopefully prevents more intense and damaging fire down the track but there are significant differences. OJ were used to turn to clean up country and you'd have a feud action outcome but it wasn't principally. Wa doing now doing it because I had a responsibility to look after the health that lane I wouldn't be out of because people in one context I really survival is traditional. Bush race authors nine Houghton gathered us of all over there have to UN's out of the Bush to survive outside of the United Morton and writings on those relationships of China China and so you know I guess nineteen is which is now back to the opium did but understanding valuation ships the ladies. Fis Ben Loa slower and often set more frequently means. They have a different effect on the landscapes in the hot intensfies used by local agencies. You can get applies to the fall out. You can get around the fire. You can move through the far more win at school and moving slightly it also means that plants and animals animals are more resilient you the plant particularly canopy while Principles Full Canopy Frost Kate the far out of the Kennedy because the canopy cited food for the animals you know the animals can insects and stuff can crawl up the trees in house can can climb up up into the canopy and get out of the intensity of this Mike and the idea. Is that a lot of teams aside painting on on five day regeneration. You know whether it's sort of like compete like pruning back in I think the grass and shrubs and stuff sometimes I just need a bit of a growing recognition of the benefits of cultural burning and government agencies as have shown support for the practice to varying degrees but they're a huge barriers to widespread cultural bunning that have been in place since colonisation. I'm Kaitlin McHugh. This is think sustainability. A common description of cultural burns is a fire trickling through the landscape like water gentle revitalizing certainly not dangerous. That's a world away from merced people's experiences of fire in Australia through the accurate hazy nuisance of Hazard Reduction Burns blowing in from the Bush all the seasonal Tara of Bush fires. It's been another relentless definers and the emergency is far from a with the number of increasing around the state dramatic afternoon here emergency headquarters eight thousand people in entire township had urgently being asked to leave to leave calmly to pick up their kids literally from school jump in the car. Ah Don't go home. Any residents still in those areas are being urged to an accident bushfire survival plan those who've left are wont it is too dangerous to return It's the way we have come to fear fire and I've just been down to the mountain. Ash Forest forest burned outside Melbourne. This is Jacqueline girth a professor at the University of Technology Sydney School of design. She's worked with fuss sticks to communicate Kate. The importance of cultural burning government institutions and other stakeholders and in the process discovered a deeply ingrained fear of fire in Australian culture. I went there last year and I saw what had happened. There and those the mountain ash those trees that were hundreds of years old have you just been destroyed by that fire and the response around that has been to close off the area like a crime sane. It's an and attitude that traces its roots to the first moments of colonization says Oliva on Salas Fan FA threatening they pay you know using for very commonly used I used to mine and then they will say used for warfare and for hunting and stuff like that and so there's been a fear four in first contact. That's in that flight three tonight because you say that she's impacts of waffles. phya according to official institutions is something to be tightly controlled restricted to the domain of highly qualified government endorsed experts. The wide agencies a little bit frameworks. You have to offer even beyond Afar so if you I wanNA become in the rural service throw it. If you want to become a member you've gone up. You're going to be accepted. Then you go and do training. I'd run the training couple Tom onto you and you get some experience and also full even let you on a fire seemingly your national parks and forestry and all and all the way management agencies. Aziz employees and then you go to be dual the training then you've also got to do fitness requirements to be out of a four in. Ucla files on through the agency frameworks has been quite honest what this bureaucratic approach ignores is a long and shameful history of Australian government's attempts to eradicate Aboriginal Cultural Practices Oliva points out that apart from being an effective tool in improving the health of the landscape rape burning is a cultural practice and its suppression is a continuing example of colonialism are you. I was GONNA paypal actually have wrought to do onto ninety total. you know total hall whether it's been recognized bottom the crown or not if I if I have culture connection saw in nineteen cultural practicing law actually brought to size being able to do that. I need to be out to get around. Cancel these processes that restrict them from doing it because otherwise practicing alone culture apart from depriving aboriginal people of the cultural practice the often unbending rules around when how and web burning can be carried out mean burns on always done as efficiently as they could be. You know we've we've gotta behind by five. We can't be at night banning when sometimes the best time to be banning his in the later afternoon and evening because it cools that five down on slows it down this is Peter Murray Stanley a researcher at James Cook University whose work focuses on cultural burning in north Queensland. It sometimes means that those windows where it's the perfect timing to putting a fire get missed because of you know the resources required the paperwork work required to actually sort of implement I hazard reduction Ben or conservation burn prescribed Burns carried out according to a strict timetable will this block of land at this time in this manner cultural burning on the other hand response to cues in the environment which tell practitioners when it's safe breath and desirable to burn this responsiveness means cultural burning can adapt to the changing conditions brought about by heating planet indigenous. These people have lived through a number of different major climate shifts and you know more and more oculus goal waxed on anthropological work you know strayer is learning about that continuity of connection being on country and being able to read those signs in those changes ages is probably more important now under the pressures that you know climate change is bringing but reading countries really critically okay the Kay and so you know as climate changes indicators shift and they may come more than once a year but when you look the landscape it's telling you that it's ready for burning the Kula gentle fi used cultural burning also means that overtime ecosystems become more diverse. Peter Murray saw this firsthand in her research over several years she documented burning carried out by Kutai Elba's duct Tommy George and Dr George George Moose grave so we had you know instead of one species of grass in the undisturbed. We had four different species of grass in the story. We didn't have background between all six tusks were interconnected and that was connectivity between them. Tulsa clumps of grass like you might see dotted around the ground on a Bush walk and then that allowed loud sort of the right environment for the Forbes and leg games and flowers and things like that to grow back through those systems the changes pay to Murray. We documented in homework want immediate. She says it took around five years for the ecosystem to reset itself and to an outside observer might not have been incredibly doubly dramatic but diversity has knock-on effects for the entire ecosystem it is major in terms of species diversity and then obviously what relies lies on die species as well that coming to that system that I'm perhaps once we just had moved on and found other places in the landscape

Bush Australia Oliva WA Peter Murray Oliver Costello UN Ash Forest Forest China China Opium Founding Director United Morton Kaitlin Mchugh Bunning Tulsa Kate Melbourne Kennedy Ucla
"houghton" Discussed on Who? Weekly

Who? Weekly

03:33 min | 2 years ago

"houghton" Discussed on Who? Weekly

"So this Adrian by lawn on TV, she's on TV she's notable. I mean, she's she's famous she's famous still a who. But she's famous she also tacked on that last name because you got married, which honestly confuses me. I know she's allowed to do that. But it made me like, I know she's allowed to do that her last name Helton now Houten. Hollow hope Adrian violon Houghton anyways, she has YouTube channel called all things. Adrian and much like YouTubers. She does these different like challenges that are viral one of the challenges was my favorite weird food combinations. You know, peanut butter and banana, that's not weird. But like that could be something weird. Adrian had to make up some of these weird things because she didn't necessarily have. Them before she made the video. So what ends up happening you think that she made them up. Well, I think some of this may be she had. But there's I haven't watched this full video, but there's literally of her cooking Cheerios a pan butter. Right. So I'm not quite sure what's going on there. Sautes them with butter. Why do you know why she's all tastes butter? Why do anything? But this is not what the issue is. The issue is a part of this clip went recently viral because Adrian made a really interesting, I'll say interesting tuna fish sandwich. Bobby tell our audience why it was interesting. Okay. So she starts off on. You're like, okay. I see what she's doing. She gets out the tuna fish. She puts it in the ball. And you're like God it then she gets the mandate. She puts it in a bowl. And you're like God. That's great. Then I approve what comes out of blew out of out of nowhere salt and pepper then out of there's like a loaf of bread in front of her near like this all looks like what I am used to. Then. Suddenly a glass of fruit punch as in like technicolor, red fruit punch appears and she's like, then there's this. And you're like, oh my God Adrian, what are you going to do with that? And she pours a little bit into the tuna fish, and you're like. This is so weird. And then she's like, that's great. So she pours red fruit punch into the bowl of tuna fish. She slathers onto the Brett then she takes a by of the fruit punch enhanced Tunis out sandwich. And then it's like, you know, what not good enough and she takes her sandwich. And she dips it into an even more my bad opinion about this. What tuna fish made a little sweet with like a little sugar or like, something sweet is very good bread bread and butter pickle or something like a sweet tuna fish with like, a sweet moment is not bad. I've had sweet tuna fish before pretty like. Tunafish with raisins. No. If you add relish those like a sweetness to the pickles. And there's also like a lot of people add sugar to their Tunas not haired hate that. But I I've seen it. So her adding that like dip of fruit punch is like totally disgusting to watch. But I can't understand how it might taste good the dipping is wild. So you see that? Now, he NS Oun. Beautiful Santa some tuna fish. Now. The next thing that covers up the fishy. Taste good ole salt and pepper. This is turned into a cooking episode, then you're gonna make that altogether. And just when you thought I was done. Some fruit punch. So as you can see I have a problem..

Adrian violon Houghton Hollow Bobby Houten YouTube Helton NS Oun Brett
"houghton" Discussed on Cool Blind Tech

Cool Blind Tech

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"houghton" Discussed on Cool Blind Tech

"Your uncompromising only one place get started so let's see what's on screen here look at home heading conflict to the right i said only one place get started one by the conflict could rape houghton's than confirm count heading he was discounted goldline team on the double doublechampion slated goldline team the afflicted the right golden into gmailcom abuse and other account than three vehicles are invited inkling does have a better legal terms that there has linked and privacy policy linked be yet occasion were click on here and it will read this thoroughly it's getting we won't do them total double w okay mountains all right now we're gonna flicked google us experts had found getting okay so looks like it found the guy who many would like you at the point michael ethiopian coolant that it gmailcom thrown out the next but after will do bent double to have you not than look to the right connecting to go home any of this cutting edge liquid up okay it looks like we are now connected more more often than that he was on getting yes i did latino connector michael many okay affleck to the ranked minute friday thanks link but his vice dwight an yes but we'll go with happier it it it up the more often than what did they want we're this vice hitting fifty locations glow many this will help unionized advice has got an than bedroom but through them ciller didn't dining room.

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"houghton" Discussed on Canada Foundation for Innovation

Canada Foundation for Innovation

03:05 min | 3 years ago

"houghton" Discussed on Canada Foundation for Innovation

"Houghton canada excellence research chair in virology at the university of alberta dr hadden's research focuses on developing a vaccine for hepatitis. C. dr houghton. Thanks for joining us today. Thank you pleasure to be here before we get into your research. I'd like you to tell us a bit about hepatitis c. How common is this disease in. Canada and worldwide worldwide There's around a one hundred million. People infected with hepatitis. C in canada the estimates almost two hundred and fifty thousand people are infected with the virus today and what happens to a person when they become infected with hepatitis. C it starts off being a fairly harmless infection but what happens over time. Most people cannot eradicate the virus most people become persistently infected and over the course of years that can develop into severe liver disease is like lissa roses and liver cancer and in some cases fatality. So it's a slow virus. That slowly develops severe disease if left untreated so it sounds like something that people might not even be aware that they actually are infected. One of the problems is that many areas in canada and worldwide. I'm not aware that they're carrying the virus and that is dangerous because the longer time goes on the more chance there is of them developing serious liver disease and in the case of liver cancer even the most recent powerful drugs that we have available to treat the infection it will not reverse the liver cancer so this can be fatal disease then oh yes if left untreated around five percent or so of people will develop end stage liver disease which is fatal and often requires a liver transplant and of course they are limited in number and even if it's not fatal is there a lot of pain and suffering associated with the disease when it begins to manifest yes around twenty percent of people entering affected will develop liver cirrhosis and that often is clinically disabling fatigue pain nausea and become serious liver. Cirrhosis is generally a serious condition and From there many of the liver psoriatic patients develop liver cancer. Which of course is faithful. Unless get a liver transplant. So are there any particular groups of people who are most vulnerable to this infection. So back in the seventies eighties. There was a huge risk of getting hepatitis. C infection following a blood transfusion. It was estimated that almost one in ten canadians that got a transfusion in the seventies and eighties. Get hepatitis c. Fortunately now we have tests to protect the blood supply and now you cannot get habsi following a transfusion today..

hepatitis excellence research liver cancer dr hadden dr houghton liver disease canada university of alberta Houghton hepatitis c liver cirrhosis nausea fatigue
"houghton" Discussed on WCBS-FM 101.1

WCBS-FM 101.1

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"houghton" Discussed on WCBS-FM 101.1

"Really become not balboa let's go back to how much you're colouring your hair and a because if you really i said there's a low chance for a stray shower and ocean county if you were there but apparently did so there's a chance apparently they don't count showed the or they'll be i can jets is scott janika by show there is a chance it's going to be a heat wave have so here's the deal i think we hit 94 today so that day to then tomorrow we hit ninety one that's day three were done a we're in the books we think is gonna happen have yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah now the other concern is overnight tonight that would be like you say ten to eleven tonight and then into early tomorrow morning there's a few more thunderstorm some of those could be nasty like borderline severe heavy rain gusty winds that's tonight into tomorrow tomorrow still houghton's then saturday it's is actually during the day looking better but still some showers late in the afternoon and night '86 88 on sunday sunday right now it's about a 5050 chance you'll see a passing shower or thunderstorm 81 now ninety four were hoping later this is really scary story remember when a sony studios got hacked by russia s wait a minute elzor rusher career was it was who who was that i thought it was not was north korea i stand corrected but as my second the the big thing was the hacking it with all the information we early remember that destroyed careers the head memos while now too two hollywood studios ours actually editing out fictional portrayals of vladimir putin because they think the same thing that's going to happen the happened then that happened to sony pictures when they got hacked our kim jong wounded we got past disney hacked into sony's studio and you don't wanna pay them off no but i guess they don't want to upset blatter putin either in two different studios fox and you rolpa cooperation have got these movies in production and their editing out scenes that feature a vladimir putin character a p lace oh that's like a bunch of pushes championing on that just don't do you're saying it's not you don't believe that there there's a possibility of cybercrime well they just don't want all their inside information released yeah so is they don't.

scott janika the deal houghton korea vladimir putin disney sony russia hollywood kim jong
"houghton" Discussed on KROQ 106.7FM

KROQ 106.7FM

01:44 min | 4 years ago

"houghton" Discussed on KROQ 106.7FM

"Action was all around houghton still homes up binge well interesting obviously times for many people have got hauge and people are nervous schiffl and it's not just in politics shame boats is often impedes the harry potter films a finished his moments to the law let's look at the other side of the coin metallica new albums under a deeper level i'm optimistic wherever you seeing tragedy see brave reaching have you seen ordinary people juicy extraordinary ordinary people come to you owe it to yourself to listen to the rest of that speech though it's really a powerful thing and did you did you like the uh the the love actually the the regrouping alley did you enjoyed i did i loved it so much and i want a fulllength movie and maybe a series of maybe a web cadillac quite that all of those my my favorite part was worm rick admitted he was a dick all with the with the whole well yeah he was a bit of a stopover told this is great too and it's been awhile since we had a popular viral video of somebody on on pay medicine but this is a guy who had a fractured ankle is in hospital in scotland and they give him a pain so that he does it feel it as they're putting his ankle back into place they're doing that thing you know how people that can be yep as is often the case when you're under this kind of medication or anesthesia whatever is you have no control over what's coming out of your mouth in that was definitely the case with this dude success and kitties is pretty strong stuff so he may scream pain of any of us.

houghton harry potter cadillac rick scotland