34 Burst results for "Hosa"

"hosa" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"hosa" Discussed on Latino USA

"Latino and latina representation in film and television is an age old conversation topic and despite some recent milestones. The numbers are still pretty disappointing. According to a recent study by the la times latinos and latinas are underrepresented across all aspects of television and film productions despite making up nearly twenty percent of the us population that dino's and latina's constitute only six percent of main cast members less than nine percent of writers seven percent of directors and six percent of senior executives. The presence of african and indigenous latinos in the industry is even smaller but statistics can only tell us so much how latino individuals and communities are portrayed. Onscreen is another part of the conversation. That's why today we're taking you behind the scenes with two award winning latino creators were breaking stereotypes about how our communities are depicted on television. Stephen canals and linda evatt charges. My name is steven canals. I am co-creator executive producer writer and director of the f. Extra series pose. The category is hosed centers. The black and latin queer and trans individuals who are part of the new york city. Underground ballroom community as they are navigating the difficulties of the hiv as and crack epidemic of the eighties and early nineties. Stephen was born and raised in the bronx to an afro. Puerto rican mother and an african american dad. He made history when posed premiered in twenty eighteen featuring the largest cast of transgender actors in tv history

marvin medina hosa usa la times
"hosa" Discussed on The Journal.

The Journal.

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"hosa" Discussed on The Journal.

"In some places that reopening has become contentious lake in texas. Their local jurisdictions are clashing with governor. Greg abbott over his ban on mask vaccine mandates last week we called up the superintendent of the dallas independent school district. Dr michelina hosa to ask about the challenges. he's facing. we have order by the governor. This we're not allowed to use mass as strategy and we're also not allowed to have virtual instruction and we're also not allowed to ask people if they been vaccinated. That's the perfect storm of. How do you solve a problem. Michael is solving that problem by taking matters into his own hands. He's defying the governor by requiring students and teachers to wear masks in classrooms. And he's also trying to figure out how to get as many of his staff vaccinated and how to offer virtual instruction without state funding. What i say is that people wanna problem solving. Not a why and so. That's what we've had to do is solve one problem after another and some of them out of our control and some just gotta deal with welcome to the journal our show about money business and power. I'm caitlyn bob. it's wednesday august. Eighteenth coming up on the show. How a texas superintendent is opening schools while navigating the delta variant and a politicized pandemic.

Dr michelina hosa Greg abbott dallas independent school dist texas Michael caitlyn bob
"hosa" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

All In with Chris Hayes

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"hosa" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

"A remarkable public health showdown is taking place right now in dallas county texas where covert cases are spiking. The state supreme court just upheld the gop government is bound on mosque mandates. Well today was the first day of school in dallas. County and the superintendent is defying. Both the governor and the court by making kids wear masks. Dr michael hosa joins me to talk about his decision. Next it's the first day of school in dallas texas today where cova cases are surging and schools are taking safety matters into their own hands today in dallas. County one of the largest school districts in the state over one hundred thousand kids were told to come to class with their mosques on. that's despite rolling from the texas supreme court which sided with republican governor. Greg abbott's bound on. Musk mandates decision by the court which is made up of all republican. Justices is temporary but until a final decision is made kids in dallas county. Schools will be mosque regardless of the court's order. That's because the dallas independent school district superintendent. Michelina hosa is defying that ruling. And he joins me. Now thank you so much for coming on the show this evening. You had a moss. Monday in effect today. How did that go. was it difficult in false. No actually it was quite a positive and in fact it all started happening. Twenty four hours ago we try to plan as to. How are we going to execute our first day. 'cause we got the last minute bali and then when i went to the schools today it was amazing. It was nothing short of phenomenal. A have we have over. One hundred forty thousand students go to school today and i have reports that there. Three students who were not compliant One to at one high school another student. So what this tells me that we're on the site of justice but on the side the people believe in what we're doing as you can see by the pictures here that they know that win very dangerous zone. Despite what the you know elected officials are saying in austin and our own reality. You can't control people this way. If they're not going to be willing to participate then they will shun us. But i was very clear is that people are scared and they aren't going to take precautions to make sure that we're safe for the for now hand for the future so i was very proud of Dallas today

government association northern alliance the northern kabul afghan government taliban dallas county dallas Dr michael hosa us Michelina hosa texas Engel Greg abbott cova dallas independent school dist texas supreme court supreme court Rachel asia
Dallas County Maintains School Mask Mandate Despite Texas Supreme Court Ruling

All In with Chris Hayes

02:16 min | 1 year ago

Dallas County Maintains School Mask Mandate Despite Texas Supreme Court Ruling

"A remarkable public health showdown is taking place right now in dallas county texas where covert cases are spiking. The state supreme court just upheld the gop government is bound on mosque mandates. Well today was the first day of school in dallas. County and the superintendent is defying. Both the governor and the court by making kids wear masks. Dr michael hosa joins me to talk about his decision. Next it's the first day of school in dallas texas today where cova cases are surging and schools are taking safety matters into their own hands today in dallas. County one of the largest school districts in the state over one hundred thousand kids were told to come to class with their mosques on. that's despite rolling from the texas supreme court which sided with republican governor. Greg abbott's bound on. Musk mandates decision by the court which is made up of all republican. Justices is temporary but until a final decision is made kids in dallas county. Schools will be mosque regardless of the court's order. That's because the dallas independent school district superintendent. Michelina hosa is defying that ruling. And he joins me. Now thank you so much for coming on the show this evening. You had a moss. Monday in effect today. How did that go. was it difficult in false. No actually it was quite a positive and in fact it all started happening. Twenty four hours ago we try to plan as to. How are we going to execute our first day. 'cause we got the last minute bali and then when i went to the schools today it was amazing. It was nothing short of phenomenal. A have we have over. One hundred forty thousand students go to school today and i have reports that there. Three students who were not compliant One to at one high school another student. So what this tells me that we're on the site of justice but on the side the people believe in what we're doing as you can see by the pictures here that they know that win very dangerous zone. Despite what the you know elected officials are saying in austin and our own reality. You can't control people this way. If they're not going to be willing to participate then they will shun us. But i was very clear is that people are scared and they aren't going to take precautions to make sure that we're safe for the for now hand for the future so i was very proud of Dallas today

Dallas Dallas County Dr Michael Hosa Texas Michelina Hosa Cova Greg Abbott Texas Supreme Court Dallas Independent School Dist GOP Supreme Court Musk Austin
A History of Hate

In The Thick

01:41 min | 1 year ago

A History of Hate

"Hey what's up. Welcome to in the thick. This is a podcast about politics rates and culture from poc perspective. I'm hosa and i'm and join us. Yes from chicago illinois. A week to be back in chicago is sung. Yung trae moro. She is the executive director of the national asian pacific. American women's forum sung yung. Welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having me and joining us from philly. Philadelphia pennsylvania christine. She's a journalist and project editor at resolve phillies equally informed initiative. Welcome christine hi. Thanks for having me and before we get to our conversation. Remember if you hear strange things in the background it's quarantine life everybody's recording from home sirens door slamming dog barking. Yes so it's been a week because you know we've been following the rise of hate crimes phobia throughout the pandemic right. We've been talking about this. We've been talking about hate. Crimes impacting the asian american community. We've been talking about the consequence of word choice right so last week. We saw the consequent write the most violent manifestation of this hate after a white man goes into three. I don't even want to call them massage. Spa i want to call them like self help spas because people go there for whatever reason to feel self help self love okay. Massage spas in the atlanta area. And this man shoots and kills eighth. Six of whom were asian women now. Federal and local law enforcement officials have yet to declare this a hate crime. So it's again like gas lighting one

Yung Trae Moro National Asian Pacific Sung Yung Christine Hi Chicago Phillies Illinois Christine Philadelphia Pennsylvania Phobia Atlanta
A Prayer for When You Are Battle Weary

Your Daily Prayer

02:38 min | 1 year ago

A Prayer for When You Are Battle Weary

"A prayer throw when you are battle. Weary by bobby shea do not be afraid. Do not be discouraged. Go out to face them tomorrow. And the lord will be with you second. Chronicles twenty seventeen. Do you feel the tension that seems to permeate the air of this world lately. Things just feel heavy. Hearts are hurting. People are discouraged and dissatisfied. It seems as if this whole world is worn down from struggles and it would be so very easy to just to give in to the poll of weariness and discontent in the middle of the strife and struggles. We can start to feel overwhelmed warn and just plain weary when these feelings come and they linger far past their welcome. What can we do to keep our heads up. How do we remain faithful and hopeful when things seem so difficult. Maybe a good place to start is to look at someone else who was weary in the battle and see how they overcame it in second chronicles twenty. Two hosa fat is facing a multitude. That has come against him. He's going to have to fight his enemies however when he seeks god's battle plan he sees that it's a little different than the one he might have been considering maybe like joseph that god's plan to overcome our battles looks a little different than ours. Battle-weary friend you do not need to be overcome by the strife and the difficulties that surround you. Let's give up our battle plan with all of the fear. Worry discouragment wobbling and struggling that it brings and follow god's plan instead we can embrace the peace hope and assurance he offers after his record for victory is pretty solid. Let's pray lord. I admit. I am weary. Life is going a million miles an hour. And i'm just trying to hang on. I am tired. And i am afraid when i look to the future and think about all that is coming lord. I know you want me to trust you through this. I know you want me to surrender. This weariness to you i surrender. Now fill me with your strength. Fill me with your presence helped me find moments today of rest and rejuvenation. Thank you that you never abandoned us in the middle of the battle thank you for your everlasting faithfulness. In jesus name.

Bobby Shea Joseph
Coronavirus Economic Downturn Has Hit Latinos Especially Hard

The Indicator from Planet Money

06:15 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus Economic Downturn Has Hit Latinos Especially Hard

"Economists hosted. Mondays is the president of the american society of hispanic economists which just released its annual report on the economic outlook for hispanics and by the way for this episode. We are using the term his annex as interchangeable with latinos because data how it is used in the report and by our guests and unsurprisingly report focused mainly on the effects of covid for example looking. At how the initial spread of the pandemic those first few months last year fell disproportionately on hispanics. You're talking about a group that already explained something like thirty three percent of all cova cases. Which is the highest among all the groups and they only constitute about eighteen percent of the population and part of the reason for this disproportionate effect. Is that hispanic. Households simply contain more people on average the non hispanic households. So it's easier for the virus spread. Yeah and more. Shockingly hispanics are also more than four times as likely to be hospitalized from covid as white non hispanics. And that's partly because hispanics are also more likely to have co morbidity like diabetes which may catching the virus more severe ms economic effects. The unemployment. rate for hispanics shut up higher than for any other racial or ethnic group in the early months of the pandemic survey from pew research. Find the nearly six out of ten hispanics lived in a household where someone either lost their job or took a pay cut. And this is partly because of the specific kind of work that disproportionately done by hispanics in the us. They were in a lot of ford facing jobs. A lot of central worker jobs that were either being laid off. You know forced to to go to work and eventually exposing their families to to cove it. So you're either you either have to go to your job or you're in a low pay job that was hit because of closures made by different governors right so you think of the restaurant industry. There's lots of cooks that are out there if you think about personal services so how many people have some over to their house to clean their house About forty percent of that industry is hispanics. Were doing that so when you are no longer allowing household employment to commit when. You're no longer allowing people to to do that work that that's a loss of income that's going on for hispanic workers. There's also an important distinction between the experiences of hispanic women latinos and hispanic men morning. You've got to see. It is the former president of the american society of hispanic economists and also contributed a study about latinas to the new hispanic economic outlook. Latina's tend to be areas that are very specific to service so leisure and of retaliatory or other services on retail sectors were had contact with clients and also tend to be sectors. That are are flexible. In terms of time or use of time but also sectors have very few benefits and overall latinos are more likely than non letting women to have multiple children and especially to be carrying for younger children and the burden of raising the kids often falls to them more than two hispanic men and latinos who are roughly in their prime working years aged twenty five to sixty five participate in the labor force at lower rates than women of other races ethnicities but in the years right before covid their participation rate had actually been going up not anymore. Latina's were starting to see. Alight economy was growing and and the social norms for changing too cold lead. The crisis has rain for some of those social norms and this dan impact latinas even further and covert manned up having another effects on the kind of service jobs that latinos disproportionately working but size that. It's how a latinos are in sectors in were the job kobe's subsitute by technology and during covid we are finding new ways to do things and even finding new ways to do services in the future what i would like to see what i would like to do and i would like to see. It's what is happening to this. Job are latinas laughed and how many of them are coming back. For example if more people in working from home after covid because of teleworking technology then there will be fewer customers for the restaurants and hotels that cater to them. And were many hispanics worked. Finally there is another way. In which the kobe pandemic made a big lingering effect on the economic future for hispanics the disruption to schools all the closures and reopenings and the different methods schools are using as they tried to teach kids sometimes online and sometimes in the classroom hispanic students already have big educational gaps between them and everyone else. For example hispanics are the least likely ethnic and racial minority group to have a college degree. Hosa says those gaps were likely shrinking over time as each successive generation of hispanics integrates more the us but the gaps are still big and the media in hispanic household has less than one fifth. The wealth of the median white household and so hispanic families are just less able to afford the kinds of workarounds. They can keep their kids learning at the right pace. You're not just talking about these. Twelfth graders you're talking about these fifth graders fourth graders. He's third graders. How do you teach things like reading. How do you see things as a fine ex through this type of interface. That gap is going to be there. It's gonna be persistent i. I know i'm gonna feel it on the shores of college when we see that their students arriving who are not ready and we're going to have to make adjustments to deal with with those things to deal with having them catch up. And so for hispanics. There remains a lot of uncertainty about what their economic outcomes will be throughout the rest of the pandemic and after both straightforward things like getting back their jobs and incomes and their kids learning in schools again but also for closing the disparities that still exist between how they experienced the economy and how

American Society Of Hispanic E Pew Research Diabetes Ford Latina United States DAN Hosa
"hosa" Discussed on Our Body Politic

Our Body Politic

08:00 min | 1 year ago

"hosa" Discussed on Our Body Politic

"I'm farai today. And this is our body politic. We've been marching to the drumbeat of political news for the last two months but here at our body politic we've also been talking to authors and journalists about our present past and future. These are women who are writing the first draft of history and looking ahead to the evolution of america to arts and publishing race relations and climate. This week we're bringing you the insights of people including maria hosa so many sen gupta lisa lucas and sarah marsh keeping us food for thought in a world hungry for answers. My guest has spent decades as a journalist. Working at pbs. Npr and cnn is three years. Mother gave her an ultimatum. Either get married to a woman and live a heterosexual life or get out and moved to the united states. That's a clip from us today. Revisited partout of a documentary. Maria in hosa and her team produced. It stuck with me that. This is a specific story about the universal striving for freedom. And i ask maria why she chose to focus on today. She is the first person that we know of taken by in this case undercover immigration agents from a courtroom. This story comes to light. Not because she was taken but because the immigration agents lied about being in that courtroom and that becomes the story but is three is mexican undocumented formerly deported with criminal record of fraud so nothing violent and they thought a throwaway. Who's going to care about this trans mexican criminal. That's exactly who i care about. You know hosts. Latest book is once. I was you a memoir of love and hate in torn america. We've been friends and sisters in journalism for years. Here's a window into how both seeking to process what the art and business of truth telling means to us and to the world there has been this idea that journalism is a place where you have no body and no self hood and all of your personal experiences have to before you can write about anything and now the cracks. That facade are manifest and that whole construct is breaking down. How did it affect your life as a journalist in the early days of npr. And how did that lead to you. Creating your own company fu tutto. You're exactly right for i. It was like how do i become walter cronkite. How white men in this country have taken ownership of the notion of objectively right so we have to not just leave the body. We have to become like them. We have to see the world through their eyes. And it's like yo- week so i ki- like when did you all become the arbiters of objectivity. I mean it's been adorable farai. I've been interviewed by many latino journalists. Who are now seasoned journalists. They're just like we were really the first you were like the first. Npr like the first latina cnn. Like what and i understood. Like i was the first So there was no way to kind of blend in. I mean honestly. Npr was incredibly white and very privileged and very male. And you sort of talk about a moment where someone's like. Oh you must be afraid to go out there in them streets like i'm actually more afraid being right here in this office. Exacly the beautiful thing of what happened in that moment for i was i understood. Privilege and the privilege is what forced me to you know. Raise my hand up literally. I would push my elbow up and just be like okay. Keep it up because they understood like you can't be here having had all this privilege and not doing your job representing being up these stories you know. Lay people know that the whole world doesn't look like them or think like them and throughout my career. You'd come up with a story idea they'd be like oh that's weird why i've never heard about that so it must not be important so let's not report about it you know and going home and just like whoa okay. I can't believe that was said today or that that happened. You know whether it was the sexism or the undertow racism or outright racism so it could have completely kneecap me like my editor from npr. When i was a reporter already said to me camera. Everybody knows about your latino agenda. And i was like what. What are you taught us. Come on everybody knows. You have a latino agenda. And i was like really and thankfully i was on my toes that day and i said well it must mean that you have a white male agenda then and he said it's not the same thing and i said it's exactly the same thing so that moment could have ended it for me. I could have just been like. That's it and i fought back because of that privilege and i'm really glad i never went away. Not only did you not go away. You created tutto. Media will only grown and strengthened power with latino. Usa in the thick radio documentaries. How has your vision for a few tutto challenged overtime while for i. I mean you've been with me on this path of I mean you're the person who labeled meet my favorite label for me. Is the one that you gave me. Do you remember it. The queen of never giving up while when you said that to me i was like yeah man. That's it you know. The creation of doodo media was born out of frustration. Actually and fear my dream job. As i write in the book i mean i watch sixty minutes as a little girl. That was where i wanted to work. It was like where do you go to next after you've done documentary work and won an emmy for you know long form investigate like you go there and they said. Can you wait until one of these white men get sicker dies i was like. Is this a joke and people had said you know. Maybe you should do your own thing. Maybe you should create your own thing and it's just like what. I'm so glad that out of that. Fear i created for tutor and the vision it i. Somebody asked me what division i was like. Well i had a vision. I knew i wanted to be create the newsroom. That i had always dreamed that i have as a young journalist. We're actually moving with ethics and love is possible. I was like the vision was to get to three years. If you made it two three years then maybe you could make it to five and if you made it to five then you know so now. That vision is real. We have a newsroom that is diverse which includes white men because yes the two we are. We include and we're always working on doing even better but we are newsroom. That is creating this content where our numbers are. Exploding variety know we just left. Npr we are now being distributed by pr x. I just got an email like a week ago. That said now grown by another twenty five stations while amazing. It's because we have done this work with so much love and authenticity and with understanding that we don't do what npr does. Which is you know looking at latinos like with benach yours. Like oh my god. Wow those hispanics. What's the matter with them. They don't vote. That's not how we approach these stories. We are all part of this continuum of holding.

farai Npr maria hosa sen gupta lisa lucas sarah marsh america cnn pbs walter cronkite Maria maria npr emmy
Who Will Win The Latino Vote

In The Thick

05:33 min | 1 year ago

Who Will Win The Latino Vote

"The thick. This is a podcast about politics race and culture in the elections and all that kind of stuff from. Perspective I might Hosa. Joining us from Park City Utah. Nice does a first time. We've ever had somebody from Park City. UTAH. Is Mi Mike Madrid. He's CO founder of a little organization called. Thank. The Lincoln Project and he's a part, the public relations firm grassroots lab. Hey, Mike. Welcome to the show. So glad to finally be with you guys have been fan for a long time to be with you. Awesome. great-great-great joining us from New York City Lee healed by the she ceo and Co founder of the big data analytics firm seen plus and culture. Intel. Welcome. Really thank you so much. Super excited to be here with your friend Yes okay. So believe it or not It's only one week. Oh. My God one week to the election according to analysis by the more than fifty eight million people have already cast their ballots surpassing all male in early votes cast in the twenty sixteen election. A number of states Georgia and Texas have seen historic early voting turnout. I mean Georgia and Texas, and the both of you Mike in Lilly you've been following the data and the trends when it comes to support for either candidate so we're going to dig into yes the Latino and Latina vote and we've talked about how well they're thirty two million projected eligible Latino voters in this cycle. So that is the second largest voting. Indian tire United States it's likely that this election is going to come down to a handful of key states including Florida surprise and we know right I mean what happens with Florida is going to be determined by Latino and Latina voters correct three point one million eligible voters according to Pew. Research Center there are a number of motivators this time around from the coronavirus pandemic which has really taken a toll on dinos and Latina's to yes the Supreme Court nomination of Amy Coney Barrett and as a disclaimer. So we are recording on Monday afternoon and the final confirmation vote of Barrett is expected to take place on Monday night just saying democracy question Mark Mike, what are you seeing about this Latino vote? And give us your sense like we're all on pins and needles. What's your top line? Is it going to be able to swing these key swing voter states towards Biden Or, will it be towards trump So let's talk about three states specifically and I'll give you kind of what we're looking out where we're trying to move numbers, and maybe some of the irony of the whole situation. There are, of course, a lot of voters now in states like Pennsylvania North Carolina but just mathematically where the communities really going to be determinative, it's going to be flooded out like you mentioned taxes in Arizona. Let me start with Florida because it is such Florida. Florida right Kinda got a look. We all know what that means and what it doesn't mean. Yeah. So trump's spat very early on Miami Dade was one of the counties that he spent most heavily in through the summer. He was up really big columbine the socialist trying to consolidate the Cuban vote multi generational, right? We all know that are older Cuban brothers and sisters have this real anticommunist sentiment anti-castro but the younger you get your that tends to Wayne and future generations and. Most of that was splitting off most Cubans under forty are actually Democrats as a plurality. So the Republican source kind of weight off, but the socialism stuff was working right can't wasn't working overwhelmingly, but it was working enough. Yes. Mike is that because maybe it was been his winnings, there are some of that's what I'm saying. Yeah absolutely. There's this kind of socialist is like the Big Buzzword big it's a big thing with these voter segments but. We gotTA KEEP IT in perspective. It's not like he was overwhelming. It was over performing with where you know trump wasn't twenty-six. They were moving votes early we all know Latinos. Late deciders we're hearing some of this stuff going y'all kit account makes sense. Yeah but look, this is largely corrected already we went in his Lincoln Project I'm not saying we went in alone we went in with a number of Latino organizations we went with North repack Chuck Rochelle Rip Bernie's group. We did you know me me Neither do I ask when it is a coalition and said, Hey, look you guys take the portrait. Daniels. You guys take the Central Americans the few Donald's out of there in Florida we're going to go in after the Cuba to the Venezuelan. We'll go hardcore after after the right you're going after the mother lode, you're like we're taking the colonial. Exactly, right you're doing Lincoln project style. We went with some really hard hitting ads gonNA peel off this vote. So you have seen the numbers come back to Earth a little bit I'm not going to suggest that there isn't a little bit more trump genus than we would like we get to kind of wise that's happening but one of the really Florida things about Florida this year is that trump the republican is over performing with Latinos. Enough to put this in title contention that we would like right and ironically, Biden is picking up more of a Republican sixty five and. Older senior citizen vote, which is a Republican base vote than his historical. So they're each eating into each other's constituencies and the question I think yeah. For flooded is going to be who holds onto each other's constituency the longest to push him over the line.

Florida Mark Mike Donald Trump Park City Utah Biden Mi Mike Madrid Utah Intel United States Amy Coney Barrett Ceo And Co Founder Co Founder Mother Lode Lincoln Georgia Miami Dade Texas Latina New York
"hosa" Discussed on The Podcast Domination Show | Grow your audience, make money and have fun doing it

The Podcast Domination Show | Grow your audience, make money and have fun doing it

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"hosa" Discussed on The Podcast Domination Show | Grow your audience, make money and have fun doing it

"What I wanted to ask Christine was What are some of the things that hosts said to you that that have been like a Ha's like, oh, like I just do more of that like what is something they say that they like and maybe hinted as to why they brought you on. The show. So they love that my pitch was about them and that it was clear that I understood their show and it wasn't a blanket pitch like. They get from publicists all the time. So. They loved that they loved the energy that I portrayed in the in just in my excitement my enthusiasm for what they were doing in the pitch. and then like. I mean, I do simple things like I'm going to get the information they need on me right away. I'm going to follow through if they asked me to do something on this show up on time like I'm a great guest before during and after the interview and I do my best again to make it about them and like us their name and ask questions I will tell you. One question that I ask this is like a Golden Nugget of truth for free. You heard it here. One question that I ask that nobody else ever asks always takes the Hosa back. Are you ready for this? Yeah. What I asked us in the pre chat what are you promoting right now? Or when world or will be when this episode comes out because I want to mention it if I can find a way during the interview. God that's smart. It totally puts you in put you in a position of service. Yeah. Unless the no like, Hey, like I'm I care about like what you're doing and I'm you know I wanted to actually help you grow and get better in succeed Always I. Get. WHOA. No one's ever asked me. And they're like, they have to think about it. Right. Thank you. Thank you right. I mean. That's that's amazing..

Hosa Christine
Interview with Maria Hinojosa

Latino Rebels Radio

06:11 min | 2 years ago

Interview with Maria Hinojosa

"So as you know, Latino rebels is part of Food Doodo Media, which is the nonprofit independent media company founded by Marina Hosa, and if you've been following what Matia has been sharing the last couple of weeks, she has a new book. It's called once I was you it to memoir and I've seen Muddy A- work on the book talk about the book worry about the book. Love, the book hate the book. To seeing her the whole creative process. and. Now, the book is out and everyone loves the book and she's been on every other podcast. Since we worked together I I said, you need to be back on Latino rebels radio. Not. Only because. You know we work at full Doodo media. OR WE CO host an in the thick podcast. But. Because we're friends and we're family so. Here's money a wholesale on Latino rebels radio talking about. Book. Once I. was you. Maria. This is the fifth fourth or fifth time I've had you on some form of Latino rebels whether it's radio or streaming. So. You're quickly becoming quickly becoming enough Latino rebel. He knew I knew I. Knew About Latino rebels before I knew about you know crazy. No but listen I, know it's been. It's been such a historic week for you. With the book launch, and then you're on Lulu Garcia now audio and we're doing it in the thick, and then the Lou Garcia now laterals interview shows up on Latino USA and you're doing all this promotion. AT OPRAH DOT COM YEAH OPRAH DOT com, and then you got these amazing reviews and and it's I'm an you know you're like. It's crazy what's happening but I wanted to just have a conversation you and I with no like the book will come out of this conversation but I'm not going to be like Maria tell me about your book you know what I mean. Like I, want I want us to be like just you and me. TO GIVE PEOPLE SORT OF A. I don't know like a feel of what we do behind the scenes a little bit I mean there's a little bit of crazy that has to happen when you're like I'm in a launch, my own company or I'm GonNa Launch, you know something like letting rebels and I'm just going to do it and I'm Elliot died. So there's a of you know. For one way or another for one reason or another jumping off a cliff and just being like but we got this in one and so I feel like food thorough and Latino rebels and everything that you know in the fake and everything that has come as a result is really because we have nothing to lose Indian this you know that we had. People are like what am I ain't got none your so it's like I. Mean I have a lot but I'm just saying like A. doodle I didn't have. My own company and I was like. How scary was that house like we've talked about this but how scary was that moment for you because you talk about it in the book but you. Know I talk about it in the book because there's it's a very important moment because what you gotta get the book to really get all the juicy details but they. Don't reveal too much. Basically I'm told by a very important network show. That that I should like, take a hike and comeback. When some of the white guys had died and I was an I get into the subway and I'm crying Hulu I'm crying in the subway I'm alone I think that there's a real understanding of you know. We are psychic psychically and in many ways tied to our family but we're also very deeply existential. Alone I'm sorry. I go there. You know it's just like we stomas Finale Quintas sister solo or in says, I got home I called my sister and I said Britain. I said, I cannot go on unemployment. I've never gone on unemployment and I don't have a job. And very immigrant t very Mexican. The I was like I can't. I cannot tell my father that I went on unemployment and so people. Who See your brightness your star, your shot they see it from afar. You have a hard time seeing it yourself. You know this often happens to us and people had said why don't you do your own thing deepa Sunday that you're of our board was like do your own thing I was like this look what are you talking about? What my own thing and at that point you know somebody else had said I'll help you and so then I just said. All right. Well, let's do this and we had no assurance. We had no funding. We had nothing we drew up some paperwork. and. You start it in your in your in your apartment in my apartment. In Harley, actually I ended up I. my first office was exactly in the area of the apartment where I ended up finishing writing the book because we had to rearrange the apartment. You know we live in New York we don't. We don't have like a huge apartment so. GotTa move some things are actually the altar had to be moved the friend had. And the kids were still I mean, your kids were still kids I. Mean I know they're older now but you're talking we're talking ten years ago. Yeah yeah, Yeah Yeah they earn motherhood you were in the well, you know we'll. Yes. Although I think that's an ongoing conversation honestly, and the book is in inspiring these conversations in my own family, right? which is so where was mom? Where was she was she here where she present? Did she feel present? Did she give us what we need? So those are ongoing conversations especially because right now while I'm getting a lot of attention for the book this time also when I have to be giving attention to my family, there's always that balance and I think that's part of what the message of the book is. Is a psycho Saddiqi. Oh, you have it all you can have many things, but you're going to have to work at them and it's going to mean sacrifice and risk anyway to answer your question will you he was a very scary time I was so scared, I had no idea what to expect.

Maria Lulu Garcia Food Doodo Media Marina Hosa Matia Elliot Afar A. Britain New York
Reflecting on RBG and Redefining Success

Tamarindo

06:51 min | 2 years ago

Reflecting on RBG and Redefining Success

"Hey everyone we're back from. From the last time, you heard us well I. We want to acknowledge that we are recording this episode hours after receiving the News Supreme Court Justice Ruth. Bader GINSBURG has passed. So this is a couple of hours now. So we're we're past the shock and sadness, but we have to acknowledge it and he all her episode. We talked about how important the Supreme Court is in. This is another reason why we're we're excited to over by didn't Harris because how important the courts are and we have to watch out for say hypocrisy because my Ceuta Republican senators supple failed McConnell is already hours after she's best already promising to just bulldoze a Republican nominated. person. To the Supreme Court. Yeah, literally to add salt to the wound Brendan I. been feeling all the things we poured some rose. Am honor of her that we both shut some tears. It's it's it's a hard hard evening. Yes. We've shared some tears for doing a toast Rosa for BG. So I think many of us have have dreaded this day for a long time we knew it was coming. Not only because it obviously mark the passing of champion of women's rights but also because of what it can mean for the future of our country but it's you know we're we're trying to use this as fuel to keep doubling down on the things that we're doing. So wanted to share a quick thing that we're working on. We're co hosting a phone banking session October third at Twelve PM PS virtual, of course, check out the Lincoln the notes how you can sign up it is a bilingual phone banks. We're especially looking for Spanish speakers and it. It's really easy if you haven't had any experience phone banking, the point is that it's really an easy way to get involved in. You'll get all the instruction during the during the actual phone banking. So Cool I love that the. NFL is leading this. I love. It does really taking true to what she said in the last episode like every week you commit to doing something more for this election and that's great. So thanks for leading that and Y'all sign up. So despite that sad news by that by the time you're hearing this it's been a few days and we've all hopefully had some time collectively grieving and continue her legacy but we do want to celebrate a lot of things as well. This is our first episode happening during lat next heritage months. So let's give them a racket to all of us from carshield. Cares to. Makes Heritage Month. So why don't we give that at? Yes actually one thing I was really thinking about recently I was thinking I wanted to give them a threat to being by cultural. To, Brennan as. To most of our our listeners. Reflecting on this and how much broader our perspective is because we're bicultural and I and I know I I remember growing up I used to think that being like eating was like something that was bad and I always wanted to be more Mexican and then I wanted to be more American I just never feeling like I fit in but now I really started to think about how that's really a strength because we can. Really look at kind of what values from our that upper upbringing do we want to carry with us and some of them are problematic and toxic shit. But then some of them are I think are great and same thing from some of the values American valley some of them are very toxic and some of them I think are great. It's a week to kind of see from the outside what we like in what we. Create our own values in redefines new identity I love that. Part of the secret to the success of this podcast is that can we talk about the beauty of our identity as imperfect as some view it like you're not Mexican enough and American now guess what we're both in Los Angeles. Awesome. Just keep. Being yourselves and then don't look at it as a negative to celebrate exactly who you are. And someone else who celebrates exactly who she is and who I think is a very perfect example of being bicultural is mighty. Ena Hosa. She is a dream guest for combating or were so excited to have her on this show. You. All probably know who she is but just as a reminder, she is the anchor and executive producer of the peabody award winning show Latina say as well as co host of in the thick media's political podcast. You know Hosa has in for millions about changing cultural and political landscape in America and abroad she's here to talk all about her new book once I was you which this week was listed as five hot books by the National Book Review Let's give them my. Talk About Latina power. So share that you got to hear this interview, what did you think Oh my God I am so jealous that you got to interview her I. Absolutely fucking Love This interview Madina Hosa I feel like she's doing exactly what she's supposed to be doing because as she's she's meant to be a journalist actually sounds so soothing and powerful in also relatable at all at the same time, she honestly is goals on goals and You know one part of the interview that's I mean so many parts stood out but one part of this sit out because it referenced something that has coming has been coming up with a lot of our listeners and are followers. There's a part where she talks about her she. She leaves I think a very high paying job, and then her dad expresses some concern. You know she says, well, how Gomez, how are you going to make money and then she says bobby like I don't know. But she you know she felt like she wasn't making her happy and I think there was a you remember the quote or would dress she says I was a success but I didn't feel proud which was so powerful because. Yeah like you want to be proud of your work, and maybe that's the way she learned to define success versus traditional notions of success, which is the Nice House a nice car and the you know the Nice 401k package all those things, right? Right. Right. So really think rethinking about like what actually makes you happy and what actually success mean to you there is a one thing that. She said that kind of goes along with with that we're the drivers of what society is going to look like in the future we can determine what matters how we go goes the market, and for me that was thinking about how like as Latinos especially, during something we can think about like how much more powerful we are than we even were like you know I don't know five ten. Powerful. that. We can actually redefine not only would this what looks like for us but what are what values are important for this country? So we we have power and I think growing up I didn't most of us I definitely didn't feel very powerful I felt like I was living in a system that was created by white people and led by white people when I was just trying to fit in. So just really thinking about how. People were really finding our voice more than ever before and. I know hoses book is a great example about the power of voice and how we really right now as demographics change I really stepping into that power and we can define our own our own business success in our own values in this country.

Supreme Court News Supreme Court Bader Ginsburg Ena Hosa Madina Hosa Hosa Harris Justice Ruth Mcconnell Nice House Peabody Award Brendan I. Los Angeles American Valley NFL Carshield Brennan Executive Producer Gomez
LIVE From Home: Here We Go!

In The Thick

06:14 min | 2 years ago

LIVE From Home: Here We Go!

"Ought. To think this is a podcast about politics race and culture from a POC. Perspective I may know Hosa and I'm who you're a low and welcome to in the thick live from home I mean I had to commute from one bedroom to another to get here but I'm here on time. I'm here on time and I'm all present for you. Actually. We're so happy that you're joining us. So thrilled we actually thought we had this big plan for twenty twenty like all you. We were GONNA take the show on the row. We were going to be meeting you in person hugging dance. We're going to dance onstage maybe drink a beer or two afterward. But you know the pandemic happened, a lot of sadness happened a lot of rage happened, and so we're going to be virtual. We're talking about the twenty twenty election along with the letter other things including the POC vote. And you know it's really super important. So just because we're not out there in person doesn't mean we don't have to have these conversations and you know gymnasts we got to all stars tonight to all-stars please give workers. Welcome to Jamila King She's a reporter and host of the Mother Jones podcast she's joining us from her family's In Oakland California joke. Greeting. From apocalypse I doing house the dog. Oh man out there. It's rough. I'm looking outside of my window right now and the sky is. Orange you know. It's kind of tricky but I think it's real. Yeah. It's it's really are out here I you guys. All right. Let's give a poop roof to. Elite. Contributing opinion writer with the times and he's He's not live from the suburbs from Alexandria where we crazy. Live from home life from home or my kids are in the room and I'm praying to God they don't come in and start yelling. We crazy and Drinking Chai in. Coffee hoping that Jamila is. Safe. My home state burning I'm trying to come back to you guys new. York. One piece. Hey. Guess Co host to of in the thick, not only all stars but they've they've guest cohost. So awesome that you guys just say I was thinking about this this podcast years ago and we called so much of what's happening in America right nine we actually have the records to prove it just like the audio records of trump. We have the records to prove that we called a lot of this four years ago two, thousand, sixteen I feel like it's five because I've aged horrible fifty. In our minds in two thousand fifteen but it came to fruition in two, thousand, sixteen but. But. Yeah we did we and one of the things that we talked about which we all have talked about is the role of the media and how you guys are getting it wrong in. So many ways we talk about that but let's start off with our first topic so. It was twenty twenty. I think. You know every single one of us is battling some level of low grade or high-grade. Depression? You know he's just kind seeping in for me. The end of the summer is really hard moving into yet another season and still being in lockdown You know also just the weight of these decades, centuries of racism and injustice in this country. and that is kind of the backdrop for our twenty twenty-nine election update. We are now less than sixty days away from the November election I know, right so both the trump and binding campaigns are really upping their games. We think, right. We'd Hoke we know the Republicans are the Democrats. This election season but hey, the pandering has started as well. I don't know if guys have seen this actually was one of the first people notified about this campaign video by by Joe Biden people that are associated with the Joe. Biden campaign it's a campaign salsa song called. Biden. Muscles. Things. Just just. Coming off. Applaud keeps going. By. By then? Okay. Okay. Okay. So Oh God that's going to be playing all over Kissimmee Florida. I'm telling you they're going all in I know the people that created it. Very committed they just basically put Biden on the hook for that stuff right there. Yeah ecological in. Los Angeles. Off The detention facility. So his own campaign song is saying he's about to do that. Yeah. So and then the other thing I just wanted to add. Yaas who Maria interviewed. And frontline, we talk about this I think all the time you know the Obama deportation policy she was named to the transition team of Biden's campaign and all the immigrants, rights, activists, immigrant lawyers that I know I know you guys have been following. This are just there's a story in the hill people need to read it. They are up in arms about destroy. So there's a lot of questions about the Democrats right. Right it's it's yours to lose and I have nothing personally against Cecilia when yours But I did interview her and it was a moment that was very challenging Was You know? Talk me down 'cause right now I'm feeling like the. Vote. We are combined this immense electorate and it's like. Are you kidding me twenty twenty? I've been talking about this since the first time I covered politics in what in the early nineteen nineties. POC voters taken for granted.

Joe Biden Twenty Twenty Jamila King Maria Hosa Mother Jones York Alexandria Los Angeles America Oakland Depression Florida Cecilia California Hoke Writer CO Barack Obama
Unforgetting With Roberto Lovato

In The Thick

04:37 min | 2 years ago

Unforgetting With Roberto Lovato

"What's up welcome to in the thick? This is a podcast about politics race and culture from a POC perspective I Medina. And I'm who? We have a very special guests joining us from San Francisco. California. Is Loretto Novato. He's a journalist author of a new book it's called. Forgetting a memoir of family migration gangs and revolution in the Americas. Budo Salva through salary in your Roberto welcome to in the thick. Happy to be you go status. hinted. I love it. So the truth is, is that most of the time like I don't know but journalists, we call each other barrel last names it's weird. So I, really know Roberto as. WHAT'S UP LAURA? I thought you know. So it's kind of like. If I ended up calling you that just Outta love okay know Hosa. Your book is Super Raw. It's super honest. It's very unfiltered because I mean, how other can you write a memoir that deals with the history of Salvador Yeah Your own family's history and the complicated. Longstanding difficult relationship between the United States and in Salvador. You write a lot about your struggles, the Traumas, the violence things that you've witnessed firsthand or that you realize we're passed down to you from previous generations handing down trauma. So you talk about the rise of gangs in both Asadabad Order obviously the gang started on the streets of Los, Angeles? Child refugees, mass migration, the role of the United States in all of this and this really intimate look into Central America that. Well, we're going to talk about the fact that you know I know this place deeply. But most most journalists, they don't understand Central America and inside the from this perspective Gatiss about through go, which is a lovely way of saying he Salvadoran. And really the title. Forgetting. So talk about the title unforgiving and and what you mean and why this notion of unforgiving is so central to the Salvadoran story both here and That's part of the motivation for writing the book I am a personal level. Corrupt in a family of secret surprise surprise I don't know if anybody else had that experience. But I grew up in a household full of my mom's family's pictures. But none of my father's family's pictures for some reason, and it was just something that was not questioned. And my dad had you know I love my dad but he had a lot of secrets. So there's a personal where. My experience as. As a young kid here in San Francisco. You know it wasn't exactly a hardcore click but. Robbing we were stealing cars, we were dealing drugs, we were taking drugs, we were violent. and. We were doing things it. Had A lesson rebels do I also come out as things I did to my young adulthood after I became a born again Christian, which is unbeknownst to many I was. Going to be a preacher that was definitely. I. Was like, ooh Yeah. Yeah. I was going to be a preacher but I had to get out of how to get out of certain dangerous lifestyle. I was leading and became a born again Christian like many youth are targeted by these. Know, they're called youth ministries and they're really right wing ideological brainwashing. fucking. Thank you for pointing it out. We'll because you know what's happening in our in our communities and we're seeing this reflected in the vote is that we don't realize. How the Komo, San Mateo under the guise of preaching love and acceptance and getting into the you know getting into your heart gay and then they end up taking people to their first protests, which is an antiabortion protests and it's like you're kidding, yeah, I got on my knees. You'll see in the book I got on my knees and I prayed for the election of Ronald Wilson Reagan. Oh. My God and no, it was really funny and ironic people known nonni got Doug Guy cuts crazy but the truth is that's what I did from the corner of Twenty First Valente at a storefront church card, the open door alliance and eventually I woke up I was reading all the time and I. Started, going to Berkeley and argue with my German philosophy teachers and eventually said, you know, fuck this right wing church I'm going to bother to find myself and I went and found the Salvadoran revolution and again unbeknownst to most people I came back and was going back and forth between the side of other new. That's when I decided to go to stay for a while and I, joined the Fmln guerrillas as an urban commando.

San Francisco Roberto Central America United States Traumas Gatiss Salva Loretto Novato Medina Ronald Wilson Reagan California Salvador Twenty First Valente Komo Americas San Mateo Doug Guy Fmln Berkeley
Dallas ISD decides on virtual classes only for the first month of school

The Dallas Morning News

01:39 min | 2 years ago

Dallas ISD decides on virtual classes only for the first month of school

"Thousands of Dallas ISD. Students won't be returning to classes in person on September eighth as Superintendent Michael Hosa, his decision to only offer virtual instruction for at least the first month of school. Hinojosa. Made. The announcement yesterday a little more than two weeks before the first day of classes were to begin in DISD. The delay was based on guidance from the Dallas County Health, authority which convened a group of pediatric specialists and educators in late. June to provide rigorous look at how to best start this upcoming school year. Hinojosa said that while things were improving significantly in the county, the medical professionals were unanimous in their recommendation that there should be no impersonal. Learning on September eighth not everybody is going to be happy with that decision Hinojosa said, but it is what it is given. The context that were in in a related story Dallas ISD schools will have to wait at least two to three more weeks to resume athletic activities putting them even further behind schools statewide. Especially, those in the states lower classifications has reported disd will open with one hundred percent distance learning when school starts September eighth and will. Continue that through at least October sixth the resumption of strength and conditioning workouts was slated for August twenty fourth. But that will be pushed back to an unknown date said Hinojosa. It was just very hard to rationalize it and justify that it's not okay to come to school, but it's okay to participate in extracurricular activities. Hinojosa said that superintendents from school districts in Dallas County had a call yesterday morning and others in the county besides disd made delay.

Hinojosa Dallas County Dallas Dallas County Health Superintendent Michael Hosa Disd
"hosa" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"hosa" Discussed on Latino USA

"Eddie? Lurk ? Tech's says is a small city just north of the US Mexico border. . This CD seats on the outskirts of mcallen, , the Rio Grande Valley, , and the land of here is wide and flat. . Except over and sugarcane season and the fields full of workers. . Among the farm fields in new housing developments, , seats Edinburgh High School. . It's a sprawling campus of two thousand, , five, , hundred students. . A. . An inside the. . In a conference room with no Windows Group of eight young people gather around folding tables. . Everyone here has one thing in common while other kids to spend their summer vacations going to come or at the community pool these students migrated north to working every cultural fields. . <hes> who wants to go for a few and they are all members or former members of the migrant student club at Edinburgh. . High. . They gathered today to share their stories. . My Name is David and I'm seventeen right now on voter turn eighteen on Sunday. . Thank you. . David, , is a smile young men with shaved hair in the sites and he tells the room his honor working in. . Michigan's Blueberry and Strawberry Fields, , WACO four, , five, , six in the morning and okay let's go make yourself a tackle because that's all the time that we have for, , and so we would go out and it's long and it's hard I mean to stick your hand inside the bushes you'd have to wear long sleeve. . long-sleeve because you rip your shirt, , rip your skin. . You know he says, , he thought he was pretty quick worker until he met other migrant workers I thought I was really fast I was like you know what like I'm a young guy I'm going to be able to be like really really fast this you know like these guys got nothing on me. . I'd finish one bucket and the next me finish all six. . Right. . Next to David is Leslie and she's a former student. . My parents have been migrant workers on my life. . I was two months old when they first started migrating. . Iowa she actually graduated in two thousand and seeks and went on to become a nurse. . But she talks about how going to classes a migrant farm worker was a struggle. . Especially switching between her school in Texas and her school in Iowa I felt. . So out of place because I these weren't my friends, , it wasn't the people I was used to. . Me and everybody looked at me like what are you doing here? ? You don't belong with us. . It's hard. . It's very difficult to go back and forth you can't take the same classes you're never with the same people. . That was hard. . But I'm on a young men in red t shirt is on the other side of the table he chimes the in. . One of. . The younger ones there. . This is my mother. . Many of the students or former students came here today with her mothers. . They wanted to give us a full picture of what being in a migrant worker family is like and we've been going to work for a good while like a family tradition. . Once you turn thirteen, , my grandfather would take you and warm weather will join us and they would take us up and we'd go. . Work in Minnesota North Dakota but since I was a little bit on the short side, , I had to wait until I was thirteen, , and then when I was thirteen, , then I was able to join them. . He still remembers his bare you first year starting out in Fargo North. . Dakota, , when he realized the farmer dealing use pesticides and I thought that was cool until I realized that that meant like all the weeds and all the. . Everything that didn't belong there. . We had to take out by ourselves. . So. . That was a tough year to have as the first year because that year alone. . The farmers like all of the weeds must go and since I was really new either didn't know what was weed or what was

Texas US NBA USA. Hosa Ryan Michigan
"hosa" Discussed on The Sportscaster and Her Son

The Sportscaster and Her Son

06:04 min | 2 years ago

"hosa" Discussed on The Sportscaster and Her Son

"Jason joining us we've been talking about the two thousand ten, the greatest season in Chicago Blackhawks history. So we Kinda dial up a couple of our hockey friends and actually a couple of players from the two thousand and ten team former Defenseman Brian. Campbell is joining US along with Colin Frazier, former Blackhawks Center. Guys welcome to the sports caster and her son, and we are just reminiscing about the greatest season and Blackhawk history two, thousand, ten, both of you guys part of it and Let's start with Brian like. You're obviously the Stanley Cup is the greatest memory but when you think of the team what comes to mind about that squad. Probably like the year before and that year obviously it's Kinda like that group was kind of together for a couple of years I think it was just. Everybody had you know we a lot of young guys? I was older older for that team and I think it was just like we love to go on the road we love. Hanging out at home. It was kind of it was always just a team that would that always wanted to be around each other and you don't see that whole lot especially. Even in today's game with younger players. Young teams they still didn't do much team bonding and you know going out just whether it's going up for dinner or drinks or plant you know bowling whatever it is. It was always something that the guys wanted to do and be around each other. You know it's funny. You actually say that because I remember after the Third Cup win with the Blackhawks I said Oh. My Gosh guys are married. They have kids this is so different from two thousand ten because it was such a young team I don't know if anybody was married except maybe Marion Hosa I would it was such a young team Colin Woody remember about the guys on that team. Bryant. Hit the nail on the head for the Camaraderie was really through the roof and soupy. We signed him as a free agent but if you go back prior to if you go to the Three and four drafts specifically the Oh four one when you have. been. Fickle I can't even remember everyone got through that was like the core of your team. So go back to the minor leagues nor folk and rock was myself and brower. Bercy and Buffalo and and Boland, Corey Crawford and all these guys. So we were friends even you know three or four years prior to winning it in two thousand ten. So we kind of had this good Camaraderie Golan for a number of years. and. I mean Bryant you grow. Beers or meals or really anything we kinda for whatever reason a bunch of good personalities and everyone seemed to get along well, and we we fight like brothers to. But at the same time, we all respected each other everyone played hard and played for each other and I don't know we were able to kind of throw it all together and and win the win win a cop I go. I was only part of the twenty ten cup but I like I said it's the best one 'cause that makes me feel extra special better than the other. Blackhawks. Absolutely one of my favorite things about sports is hearing about like the championship moment of teams whether it be like the regular season or the playoffs when you Kinda know that you're going to win it all that year. So tell me about like. Did. You guys have that moment and if so when was it playoffs? Regular Season Stanley Cup final you know I think for me and and probably two times when I felt that. The one was a regular season. We're probably forty five games into the season team. We had a great team actually we had a really good team or plan not bad hockey, but we picked up. Hosa that summer shoulder surgery so he missed. The first forty semi games in the season, and then we played in San Jose and I know everybody remembers in see scores on a breakaway. We're all sitting on the bench like Oh, my gosh. Wow like. You. Know how good he was. You know how great he was. So. That was that was hit two goals that game I never remember anything about regular season really and I remember this time when he had two goals and. we were just like you know this is we're having misguided this lineup now pretty special and then. Another one is obviously won't be eight, four, I think they were. Kinda. Looks like the Goliath was like this seems like. They're better than us kind of thing and. We matched up well some, but to beat them four straight was pretty crazy in my mind from they were playing regular season in the playoffs and was that Kinda ruled into the Stanley Cup final series. I don't think we played our best hockey against billy but were we played good enough. To get the job done Colin went about you. I think yeah for me. So I, I got a couple of one I remember that was Hosa marrying hosted moment that he's talking about and. Haas he's like the guy that. Talks like underrated he really is I didn't know we just maybe not because he just went to the of fame, but he doesn't really get talked about enough for what he brought to to every team he played on. If you think about before the Hawks, he spent two years straight in the Stanley Cup finals and this is a guy that I feel very fortunate and lucky to. Played hockey with only teammate but but as a player in to spin off that the the moment for me was the first round, we've all seen the school played over and over through Colbert here Haas or the whole story really hot takes a five minute major were down at goal to Nashville and he comes back and scores the the game winning goal in overtime..

Blackhawks hockey Hosa Bryant Brian Blackhawks Center Colin Frazier Camaraderie Golan US Colin Woody Haas Chicago Jason Colin Campbell brower Bercy Corey Crawford Hawks
Journalists of Color

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

37:15 min | 2 years ago

Journalists of Color

"Before the interviews I wanNA share my theory. For why all of this exploded for journalists of Color Right now? It goes back a few years. So many of us went from covering the first black president to covering Donald Trump. And ever, since trump came down that escalator, announcing his campaign back in Twenty fifteen, when he denounced Mexicans as drug traffickers rapist. When he was that he would build a wall at the border and that Mexico will pay for it. Those journalists were told to avoid using words like racist or lie to describe some of trump's worse behavior. That kind of self censorship, especially on race for a lot of us, it became untenable after we had to cover the death of George Floyd and report on that video of a black man, being choked to death for eight minutes. On top of that we are now dealing with the coronavirus pandemic, which is laying bare racial inequities across this country. And Corinthian has given a lot of us time to sit and think. Notice what's going on in the world and in our lives and in our newsrooms? You have black journalists and other journalists of color who think of themselves as truth seekers in the same way that their white colleagues, too, but very often when they tell the truth about racism when they tell the truth about. Bright, white supremacy. They're labeled as activist. Highs! They dared to bring their blackness across the newsroom threshold. PSORIATIC McDonald's has been thinking a lot about race and the news. So I asked her as a black journalist in this moment. What does she want to see change so I would say what I want is actual structural change within newsroom leadership? I do not want the equivalent of painting black lives matter on a street in yellow letters, but in a newsroom. It's visible. By that doesn't really solve anything when it comes to pay discrepancies between. White male journalists and black female journalist who do the same job have the same level of experience and one is making thirty thousand dollars a year more than the other. The other thing is that. You cannot have. Newsroom leadership that is completely made up of six Cheddar straight white men. Even. Under straight white women. Zicklin or gender straight Whiteman that power needs to be distributed more equitably. You know the other thing died. I want to see I wanNA see US cover. Race honestly. right? Race isn't just something that black people, experience or something that non white experience, attempting that everyone experience and says and so. There needs to be a baseline of literacy rate when it comes to how we talk about race with an America how it operates within American history, and how that informs. President and what world. News media has played in that way. We have to consider that. The last time that we had a pandemic, the nineteen eighteen flu pandemic. We need to recognize that. The paper of record in Chicago the Chicago Tribune. Is Basically scapegoating black people who are fleeing the American south, basically saying Oh half a million darkies are basically invading Chicago. If that's objectivity as not the kind of objectivity that I want to participate in them. Yeah, yeah, I WANNA get personal a little bit You ended up being quoted in New York Times. Article about this reckoning talking about how you didn't have a great time at the Washington Post. You've tweeted about your experience as a black woman in newsrooms. What does this reckoning meant for you? And what have you been trying to get off your chest and this moment about your experience? In some of the newsroom's that we've been talking about my hope for this reckoning. is that. There is not one more class of you know young. Ernest! Twenty two year old coming out of journalism school I'm who basically have to go through this really damaging gauntlet. We're constantly sort of questioning yourself and your own worth and I think there are a lot of really talented journalists who have been driven from the field. Because at some point, they feel like they have to make a choice between their own mental health. Or being journalist. And they just self-preservation and I cannot blame them. and that is really a shame, because think about the people that those journalists now think about the stories that they could have told. The access they could have had picked the access to walk into certain spaces at their white colleagues cannot exactly and you know one of the ways, and this is not the only way that this is important, but one of the ways that this is important is. We need them to trust us. Our job is to tell their stories and to tell them accurately and to tell them fairly. And if people are are always getting pushed out the folks who might actually be able to empathize with them who know where they're coming from right I? There's a quote from their lake when I fall where she basically expresses the you know, she's probably the only person who covered public housing who's actually lived in public housing? That, yeah, that is. Expertise right that is. Valuable knowledge so I just I want us to be able to practice our profession with humanity. Yeah, and also it's like in this moment where it seems like more than ever before. At least in my lifetime, there is such a deficit of trust. Americans don't trust institutions. They don't trust journalism. They don't trust facts. Worst argument about whether or not mask can prevent the spread of Corona virus like in this environment if newsrooms don't act in fix some of this stuff. is going to create more mistrust in the media and these news outlets will become less relevant in a moment in which I would argue. They are needed more than ever before. Yes, and you know the thing is is and I've said this repeatedly at that American journalism does have a credibility crisis. The the credibility crisis that we have I think. Actually bears a lot of similarities to. Our current sort of Voter disenfranchisement problem. Being. In Journalism, we have not spent enough time. with the very same folks who are often disenfranchised when it comes to media coverage as well right. And when we think about the press and freedom of the press is an instrument of democracy we have to think about. enfranchising everyone, we have to think about making sure that they do find us credible. The folks. If they look at the newspaper, even look at a website or they listen to the radio and their conclusion is. That these entities are not telling the truth about them in their lives and held their lives are. For them yeah for them. That's a credibility issue for us. Yeah we can fix. It failed them. That means that. We have to develop far better relationships with folks who have historically been shunned or shut out of district of media coverage are only allowed to participate in very limited ways. You know I still very much believe in that adage, the journalism exist to comfort the afflicted and afflict comfortable. Thanks again to riot, not at McDonald's the culture writer for the undefeated and also this year. She was nominated a pilot sir. My mind. I wanted to hear from other journalists of color about their newsroom experiences. And they wrote in. Here if you, my name is Lavi Cima Guy side. I'm a naturalized citizen who came to this country as a young child. I worked at a bare he a newspaper for a long time and have fond memories of my time there. I had mostly white editors, and in fact, I've only had one non white supervisor in my over two decades in journalism. My name is John. Sepulvado, I mixed. I have Mexican Irish indigenous and Black Ancestry I worked in public media for fifteen years. There are tons of horror stories. There was the white woman editor who asked me if I like dog-fighting because she quote hurt. Might People like dogfighting? There was another white woman editor told me to smile more around the office because I quote have dark features and those dark features, scared herself and other white women around the office. One time a headline I, wrote for one of my own stories, led to a newsroom wide, meeting an emotional one, where a bunch of US had to persuade top editors to let us call the president's racism what it is! The most frustrating part was that I and others had to explain to our colleagues. Why our voices were important. And partly because they reflected the communities we covered. argued. Repeat, a thousand more stories like that. But at. A point I realized. That no matter what I did no matter how good I was no matter how hard I worked. I would always be seen. As something that is not. White. And my mobile was the leave the industry. All right time for a break. When we come back, we will hear from Latina, trailblazer who refused to leave the news business. Instead. She started her own media company to tell the stories that she wanted to tell. Hey another reminder asking you all to fill out that survey for us. Okay, it is anonymous. It is short and the link for it is NPR DOT org slash I B. A. M. Survey. All one word I BAM SURVEY NPR DOT Org. Slash IBM. Filled out I'll be really happy if he do thanks. This message comes from NPR sponsor discover. Sometimes, food is more than just food. It's an integral part of the community so this year discoveries, giving five million dollars to support black owned restaurants to places like Rodney Scott Barbecue in Charleston post office spies Birmingham back in the day bakery, and Savannah and hundreds more places in your local community all across the country. Learn how you can show your support at discover dot com. Whenever you face a choice. It helps to think like an economist and this week on Planet Lenny Summer. School will start off our course in economics within workout for your brain how to decide what something newly costs for? Planet money from, NPR. People still find it really interesting salmon like I'm like no. No I. I was the first Latina in the newsroom at NPR ever to step foot. WHO WASN'T CLEANING IT? That was me right that that was that. Was this Latina? That is Maria. She's had a long career in media, not just here NPR but also at CNN NPS in two thousand ten. She founded her own company for total media. And she has a memoir. It's called once. I was you that comes out in September, but most of you probably know Maria. As the host of a very long running public radio show turned podcast from NPR and through media. It's like new USA mighty. Hossack Latino USA has been around since the early nineties. It is attributed by NPR. which is why you hear NPR in the credits, but that will be changing USA is moving. As distributor. It means nothing's GonNa Change for you. Our listener that our audience is going to get way way way bigger. We're very excited. Announcement might have been confusing for listeners, but don't worry like. She said you'll still be able to hear the show. But the Journal of Color, especially in public radio that move meant that NPR was losing a hugely influential show dedicated to covering Latino stories in the US. And from its founding NPR has been well bad on race. More than seventy percent of NPR's newsroom is white and of the sources you here on NPR's air, those voices they are more than eighty percent white. People of Color who work in public media? We have been saying for years. Fix this including Maria Hosa. We're asking the question. Are you listening? Are you hearing? And that his own ready a power dynamic that is wrong. This notion is the assumption that they the they will always have the power I. Ask Maria what Latino USA leaving NPR means for this network, but I I asked her about blazing trails. One could see your path to be one of color who found her own company as a shining success, but one could also see your path as proving that the conventional spaces in media can accommodate of voice like you the way they should you know like. I'm so proud of what you're doing, but also the fact that you have to make your own production company shows at the NPR's and the PBS's and the CNN in many ways. Don't get it and can't help people like you tell the stories that you need to tell. I was thinking about that as I was thinking about our interview Sam because. My husband calls me Aguirre, a warrior, and then as I was thinking about our conversation, Sam. I was like well. That's great i. like that, but you know what I don't want. Journalists of color to have to be warriors at into order to be able to work as To work as journalists of Contians, who can bring their entire cells into the news room? Who are going to be seen who are going to not only be seen and heard but actually. Put into positions of power to be the ones who are listening and making the decisions about. Yeah, we want that story on the front page and the headline is going to say that exactly. I want you you know everyone has been using it. Everyone's been going to twitter sharing their reckoning story, the slight the knocked in that promotion. The being told you can't do this do that. Give me one of your reckoning stories from your career when I when I come to this country, I'm born in Mexico. My whole family's born in Mexico. We're raised on south side of Chicago. You know sixties and seventies, but as Mexican immigrants we also understood the essential nature of journalism and American independent journalism and so. My father was watching. Meet the press every Sunday and we were watching the today show and we watched sixty minutes, and because of the fact that it was so American in holding people accountable and I was like that's what journalism is so long. Story Short is many years later actually a decade ago go to sixty minutes when I'm out of work and needed a job actually and. They basically like look, can you Can you come back and talk to us? When one of the old white guys get secret is really and I, said and I just remember like. Like am I supposed to laugh? It's funny. Is that a joke as being? and. As we do in the media's people of Color, 'cause we're really good at laughing things off. Like. Yeah. Banter you know the the the the the we're so smart. On. Exactly Racism! Exactly. And I got into the subway at fifty ninth street onto my apartment in Harlem and I cried on the train. and. I was just like, but I am not. You know I'm knocking to let this take me down. And that was the moment that I decided to create food. Media Winds Rams history. Takes over Latino, USA. And Expands Latino USA grows the show and let the USA's audience twenty seven years in. Is in a continual upward trajectory. You love to see it. As I. Want to ask more about what needs to happen. We are in this moment now. Where so many journalists coming forward with their stories? But it's still unclear what newsroom leaders will actually do to fix this stuff you have been on all sides of media for profit nonprofit. Give me like a checklist of the big three or four things that mass media should do right now to effectively respond to the issues raised in this reckoning. Feel like this is a moment to be having that difficult conversation, which is pushing this reckoning that we're talking about to another level. I'm going. Give you an example, Sam it brings me joy, it brings me no joy to have to ask white men in senior editorial positions how they consider my role as a Mexican immigrant woman journalist. In relation to a president who insults every single one of those things that I do? And and And basis a lot of that on his white supremacy. Which is very challenging word to even use in our newsrooms right, but yeah. I don't feel comfortable saying it. I want you to feel uncomfortable having to answer that question. Because his white supremacy does not impact you in the way, it impacts me, and I am a journalist just like you. I am an equal journalist just like you so now. You helped me to figure out. Harmon handle that because that that impacts our might quote unquote objectively, you have to be able to recognize that you do not have an ownership of activity or an ownership of the media or an ownership of public media, or it's not yours to share yeah. Did any of the issues we've discussed about. In diversity and Unfair situations that journals of have to deal within this industry. Did those factor into your business decision. To leave NPR ex. Look I've had you know NPR's my family? IF NPR calls I'm going to say when you I was absolutely and Bureau Sam he's my family. You know we hung out once, but he's. He's my brother. Because we're digesting PR so NPR's my family Mi. Familia was my first job. But You know I started a company. And I have a team of very savvy business and media executives journalists. And when they said look, we have an opportunity here in in a competitive marketplace A. Somebody PR X.. Who wants to really go big? Yeah, I will say you know they are all of these. Underground email channels and slack channels and discussion boards were journalists of color are coming together to talk about all these issues and there's been a lot of chatter about your show. What says about NPR yeah? Why am I so disconnected? Oh my God. I thought I. Thought I was like connected because I'm on twitter and I got a fat. And what folks have been saying? People who love your show Oh my goodness. They're saying well. This speaks to the larger problems. NPR has always had with content may for people of Color. They don't market it enough. They don't support it enough. You have these program. Directors at various stations put a show like yours on at not great hours. This is the stuff that people are saying. Do you I mean like to the extent that you can elaborate on it, you know. Did you feel like NPR? Neglected or didn't promote enough your type of show. So of these issues at play with the race and diversity in space like NPR. Again. Let New USA right now is growing an audience at kind of extraordinary numbers I think we're one of the few public radio programs or previously distributed by NPR. That is growing an audience at these numbers. And so the fact that. We made this decision. Says everything about. WHAT NPR. Kind of thinks. About letting USA. Now having said that I don't know you know I. Don't know the internal finances at NPR. Maybe NPR's is is really facing a a real financial challenges that I'm not privy to. And so you know, but but when you're thinking about AH, show, that has this kind of. Audience Commitment There was a point not long ago. When one of your colleagues called me up, actually she works in. She's a Latina colleague at NPR in the newsroom, and she called me up and she said. Do you think that Latino USA has been this incredibly successful because of NPR or despite NPR. And no one had asked me that and I kind of like. ooh And I said well actually despite. Despite NPR, do you think you know 'cause? There are a lot of shows not produced by NPR. Distributed by NPR. Do, you think other shows like that in your same boat that were hosted by white people or felt to maybe India leadership more mainstream. Do you think they got more support than your show did pound for pound? Yeah How does that make you feel? Like I said, that's why. I didn't. See I've been feeling this for a long time, my love. News, so Gimme a word for the emotion. Well right now I'm glad that I'm with a partnership with Pr X.. That's not gonNA units not on the table so I'm like I'm looking to the future. That's why I'm like yeah I'm all about like? It's all about the dodge this morning, boxing teacher. was making us do the we've the. We've the constant, which by the way is really really hard, and that's just how I feel is a journalist of color in a survivor Mexican immigrant woman in this like it's always like whoo. Okay well and so. That stuff that you're saying like. How does it make me? That's rolled off me a long time ago, and it is a central part of what has moved me as a journalist as a woman of color in this country is that. Is like. Oh, you're going to try to silence me or tell me that I'm not objective or tell me that I have an agenda or tell me that is not going to be successful or tell me. Okay I might go home and cry. But I'm not GONNA give up. Thanks, again to Maria Hinojosa. She's the host of the Tino USA. We asked NPR for a response to what Maria told us and they gave us this statement. We have the highest respect and admiration for the Latino USA team and from Maria Hinojosa. We are proud. That Latino USA originated at NPR member station, K. U. T., and that since nineteen, ninety-four NPR has been the program's national distribution partner today, hundreds of NPR member stations bring the show to their listening communities. We are grateful. Maria entertain who are produced a consistently wonderful show and nurtured journalist who have gone on to work all over the public radio system. We are glad public radio listeners will continue to hear Latino. USA on their public radio stations across the nation. All right now. We're going to have a chat with someone who just began working with NPR Kelly. McBride NPR's newest public editor. I WanNa talk with her. About one particular part of this entire debate, the way in which we've been taught as journalists to do our jobs that most fundamental level leads to systemically racist outcomes. I am talking specifically about the idea of journalistic objectivity. This idea that reporters only report the facts. They keep themselves out of the story, and they eliminate all biased in their coverage. A lot of folks say well. That only works if you're man and straight. And White. I wanted to find out. Why are journalism so entrenched in objectivity and whether or not this standard is fair, so I went to one of the top journalism at experts in the country I am the senior vice president at the POYNTER institute. I am the chair of the Craig Newmark Center Ethics in leadership at the Poynter Institute and I am also the public editor for NPR that Kelly McBride. Kelly has advised newsrooms about difficult journalism ethics problems for years, so it made. Made, sense to begin by asking Kelly for her definition of objectivity in journalism, it really means that you will objectively pursue the facts in order to determine the truth, and there's all sorts of things that go into that right like there's how you frame the story how you identify who you're going to interview, and then really important is who else is involved in the story. So who edits it because that the the safety nets that are created in newsrooms are meant. To help an individual program against her own bias now the problem is if all the safety nets have the same biases that that doesn't happen right and that's. That's exactly what's been happier. Also objectivity has come to mean certain different things for different journalists. There are some. Who say well objectivity means that you have to. Pretend! That kind of you don't exist, and you have to just simply say what these powerful people are saying doing. You don't provide context you don't provide analysis. It's a kind of. Totally taking yourself all the way out of it to the point where you won't even tell people if you vote or not. And I think. This is the thing for me like there's so many different interpretations of what objectivity means, yet you know that's actually kind of a confederation of two different principals in journalism, so one is the principle of objectivity in this idea that that we are pursuing the truth in spite of our own biases, and that that we actually promised, swear to God that we're going to get it right because we have all these safeguards in place, even though they've failed numerous times in the past. But the other thing is is that in American journalism in particular? It was built on this business principle of aggregating A. Politically diverse audience, and then selling that audience to advertisers, so in in Europe you see much more you see much more of the journalism coming through a political lens because that's just how the business model grew up over there, but over here especially as in different markets, you went from multiple newspapers to a single newspaper. There was this motive that was really a business motive that you would bring in the entire political spectrum and if you were going to do that, you needed to convince that audience that you in the newsroom didn't have. Any particular biases it is refreshing to hear you as a leader in the industry acknowledged that some of this is about the principles and bedrocks of our journalism, and some of it's about business, and at the end of the day for whatever reason we have ended up with a definition of objectivity. That is as much about business as it is about telling the truth and I think what frustrates so many journalists, somebody younger journalists, journalists of color or women require journalists as at newsroom leaders are resistant to acknowledge that I read NPR's social media policy, and it's couched in terms of ethics and morality and idealism. But I also know that part of it is the bottom line is. Not Do anything of the public facing person at NPR. That would possibly damage NPR's revenue streams. And I mad. They don't just say that. Yeah? They don't mean to say that they. Don't I mean that's the thing is they? Don't. They really do believe, and I actually believe also that there is. That there is a line somewhere that we shouldn't cross, and maybe it is way up the continuum on just. If you're a political reporter. You can't help people who you're voting for. Maybe the line is all the way over there. Right, because of imagine that like if you were a political reporter in you were covering. Trump's campaign and you again. I'm voting for Biden though I was that guy. Did you tell people out loud. I didn't tell folks voting for in two thousand sixteen, and I wouldn't but I think gets. Those are the ones where I think everyone can agree, but there's there's there's other things like how much of me do I. Bring to a story when I'm covering police violence against black men. Am I allowed to say that's racist. Because I know what racism is experienced, it trust me and don't make me say racially tinged. Like those, and that's where it gets murkier well. You know you know where I. I experienced this. Yeah, so when gay marriage was was a hot hot issue, right? They were different cities or states that were making gay marriage legal. The Supreme Court hadn't yet decided in San Francisco the mayor of San Francisco. made it legal and a reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle on a Saturday after weeks of covering it, the City Hall reporter went down and got a marriage license, and she was taken off the beat. Wow, and as in as an ethicist, right is a journalism ethicist. I was like wait a second. That can't be right. because. She was exercising in San Francisco. What was a legal right? You don't mean you didn't tell people who'd been divorced. They couldn't cover this issue because they'd you know somehow. Defiled the sanctity of marriage by? Getting divorced. So that was, that was where realized that you cannot penalize people for who they are. That's not fair. Yeah, because you end up with the only people that are untainted enough to do all the work are people who are only straight are people who are only men are people who have only gone to college and has a certain pedigree people who are an the deaths a problem, so bias is to right. It's just that we don't well. That's the thing, but these leaders aren't seeing those. Yeah, because they look just like them. I think now what is required to speak to the Syria. Systemic issues being raised in this reckoning. Going to have to be an acknowledgement that the movement toward writing these wrongs. It's going to be in some ways painful and you should do it anyway. From your conversations with newsroom leaders across the country. Do you think they're ready to accept that idea that this might hurt that? It might not just be. A statement and everyone shakes hands, and says sure good now now I mean nobody wants to voluntarily sign up for something painful. You do it because you know that what comes on the other side is worth head. There's individuals in every single newsroom who are part of the problem. Then somebody has to tell those people that if they want to keep their jobs, they have to stop being part of the problem, and that means that they're either going to have to be quiet. Or they're going to have to change or leave. Just leave well. That's I mean if they want to keep their job right like. Yeah and I've seen people. Who are these problem, people? I don't think I've ever seen any of them. Actually chain, but I've seen some of them. Learn to be quiet and let other people lead. And then they actually become the beneficiary. Of what comes after yeah. And then I. Think also so many lessons of me too I. Think are applicable to this meteoroid. Me To kind of work. Because a lot of folks were just literally canceled and they had to go, they were shamed. They were fired. And you said you can't be here anymore. And it was painful for them, and probably all the folks that liked them in love them but like. Sometimes, it's just that yeah. So my last question for you back to these two ideals that butt heads this idea of objectivity. But also this business idea of needing to be somewhat neutral to appeal to a large audience. And reworking probably reassessing, what objectively means a newsroom? What advice would you give to newsroom leaders? Writing up that next ethics guideline for their journalist about quote, Unquote Objectivity Post reckoning. Yeah, so this is where I'm supposed to come through with something really profound and I mean I. I am I. Am humble enough to say. That I don't have the answer yet. But I'm also arrogant enough to say that I believe after working through lots of really really hard ethics problems with newsrooms that I think we are going to find the answer and I think it's going to start by. Recognizing that there is a difference between. Revealing political bias. and. Revealing lived experience. And we need to start there and say your lived. Experience should not count as political bias. Thanks again to Kelly McBride joining us and thanks to everyone who, over the last week or so shared very very personal stories about life as a person of color in the newsroom. I heard from colleagues as well. And one thing one of those colleagues told me about all of this. She said so much of this work is convincing journalist. who think they've been doing it right for so long that maybe in some ways they've been doing it wrong. And then she said to me. This phrase really stuck with me, she said. How do you argue with the fish about the water there's. I. Don't know just yet how to do that. It's pretty difficult. It seems frustrating,

NPR United States President Trump Maria Chicago Donald Trump Mexico Mcbride Npr George Floyd Washington Post New York Times Kelly Mcbride FLU Bureau Sam Chicago Tribune Scapegoating Mcdonald
California - 1 dead, 5 people shot at celebration of life party in

Ray Appleton

00:37 sec | 2 years ago

California - 1 dead, 5 people shot at celebration of life party in

"One man is dead five others including a young girl wounded after a mass shooting last night into Larry police say it happened around ten thirty near Tulare Avenue and I street across from a city skate park earlier there was a party or some type of celebration of life going on there was a solo suspect shooter who walked up on the party and opened fire firing multiple rounds to merry police sergeant Eddie you know hosa adds that one of those wounded was a seven year old girl who is now in stable condition at valley children's hospital investigators say they have very little information on the suspect and are asking anyone who may have witnessed the shooting to contact the Tulare police

Eddie Larry Tulare
"hosa" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"hosa" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Welcome to Latino USA I'm Medina hosa I was on thanksgiving break and went to whether Hannah to go visit my family and while I was there I read American dirt this is medium goodbye she's a check on a writer who was asked by ms magazine to review the book American dirt bike ginning Cummins and found it to be an incredibly insulting endeavor to have to read asus novel well I was visiting my family and my he call the novel tells the story of Lee Dechy Connell she's a middle class bookstore owner in Acapulco Mexico EDS entire family is gunned down during a king St yet I'm after her husband a journalist publishes an article about the head of a local cartel a man that Edea was flirting with so needy and her son Luca escaped the massacre and in fear of the cartel they find themselves taking a dangerous trek north to the United States I wrote my review sent it to me as and then I received an email it says something to the effect that several editors spoke to one another and decided that though my review was and I recall specifically where the word spectacular that it was far too negative and after that it was stated that if I could think of something redeeming to say I would be paid and the review would be published and I responded that I don't have anything nice to say about that book so I'm not changing a word that I wrote today we're gonna dedicate our entire show to the outcry over American church the book that set the internet on fire we're going to go back to the end of twenty nineteen that's when news rooms across the country like ours received copies of American the cover is white with a pattern of.

Hannah writer ms magazine Lee Dechy Connell Edea Luca United States asus Acapulco Mexico EDS
"hosa" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"hosa" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Welcome to Latino USA on Medina hosa and we've been speaking with Gideon Vasquez deciding cheese correct of the documentary decade of fire and we're gonna pick up our conversation now this notion that new Yorkers not living in the Bronx we hear stories the Porter Ricans of the south Bronx are responsible for setting all these fires because they don't really know what they're doing in their apartments in fact that was absolutely not what was happening this was targeted arson it was strategic it was planned yeah I've heard that before in fact we went to a college to present an excerpt of the film and a professor from I'm not gonna mention the college from a pristine just college told me do you know why the south Bronx burn and he told me it was because all those Porter Ricans were cooking pork on a spit in their apartments here we were in sort of what I thought was this really L. again college setting and someone who was a professor there tells me that even if like we didn't set the buildings on fire purposely that we were still stupid enough to try to cook pork on a spit you know it it is it's really it's bad and you know not to say that young people did not torch but if they were offered like our person in the film Lorraine says that she's offered two hundred and fifty dollars to torture building that's a lot of money in today's dollars it's like two thousand dollars to be offered to torture in a lot of young people took that opportunity to make that money but like I said people learn the community members they were people who came in from the outside to torch our buildings and the idea that my grandparents and my parents will come from Porta Rico to destroy their home you know it's like it doesn't make any sense why would we come from wherever we came from to improve our lives so that we can burn our buildings but interestingly enough that was a narrative that was accepted you would think because this was not a hundred years ago this was the nineteen seventies you would have thought that you know mayor Lindsey at the time would have said well we've got a we've got a help here we're gonna send more fire trucks more fire engine companies up there we're gonna open up more fire houses and in fact in the decade a fire they started closing down fire houses how do you explain that level of of logic and I think it's because at that time the news sort of business approach to management was coming on the scene and so he brought on the rand corporation who came up with these computer models that would show how city government could be more efficient systems with run more smoothly you can save money and sort of take the personal out of making decisions on behalf of services rand corporation was assigned to the four to try to reduce the cost of fire protection in the city using ran computer models to predict future trends John o'hagan head of the fired above started eliminating fire companies they're closing fire companies most poor neighborhoods of very high fire numbers while neighborhoods that have lower fire numbers are on touch and in many cases are gaining companies I think that was a mistake you know it's sort of like you know that saying the map is not the territory he was looking at some kind of blueprint that would show efficiency but he never really spent time thinking about those people in the community who would be if impacted by that efficiency those strategies when I was a college student here at Barnard up at Columbia University during this time right after the decade of fire a movie was being made in the south Bronx called fort Apache and I remember hearing about the protests that were happening in fact pots and pans means struck to interrupt.

Gideon Vasquez Medina
"hosa" Discussed on The Steve Warne Project - Sports

The Steve Warne Project - Sports

13:34 min | 2 years ago

"hosa" Discussed on The Steve Warne Project - Sports

"Breaking Peyton Manning's all time passing touchdown record Monday night in a blowout over or Indie The thing about the past. How San Diego? If they could do it over again they probably would have resigned. Drew brees and not decided to let him walk and go go to Philip rivers for the next decade and some And my question on the RB competing web bowl is When you look back at your own team who would you most regard as the one that got away and The timeline Jimmy is because I think mostly senator fans who are the ones who follow me. They're all going to the sends card and most of them are trying to decide between Sabino Chara and Marian. Hosa I'm guessing is. Is it ninety nine. Potentially Dave Lumley aided that were no lum's loves Oh my God although although lumber got used to twenty goals like nothing when he played with Wayne Human everyone else. Yeah well when when. Don't forget when Wayne when Wayne left for you. Know he got sold he got. We ain't got salt. He's quick to point that out. It traded console. Because you could do that back in the day. Right you could you could you. Could there was something about. There was more allowances announces with money. yeah they they let that go and I think around two thousand mid nineties two thousand. They stopped allow. That for Shamir can defend it as a trade great because there were there were people involved in it. Crucial Nikki was in there as yellen a whole bunch of names in there but US Peter Pocklington. If if I happen to pull about ten or fifteen million dollars out of that deal if you'd still do it I don't think so right. But but the following year Steve They won the Evanston won the Stanley Cup. Yep that's right Mark Messier as captain you know so but but you you know for for personal reasons and many other people who knew Wayne and you know it was just terrible right. It was like how. How what do you mean? You're getting rid of. What do you mean you're going to let Wayne Gretzky go and and that seemed? That's what made that the the biggest blockbuster trade in all of sports you know Americans reckons might argue with it. But but certainly didn't my time and yet and yet Lebron James Okay. This is the best basketball player to come around. You know when when he he broke in how this guy's been where Cleveland Miami back to Cleveland. La Right they. This guy moves around more than anybody. And that's Tha- that's to the detriment of sports as well in that you don't really have the true rivalries because when guys are just you know changing in uniforms like we change underwear. I think that takes away from the game itself because there really isn't any aunt I mean there's some animosity but not the way it once was where guys would play. You know if you say on a rival team. Let's say a Toronto Montreal phenomenon back in the sixties guys guys would not move around that much. They're getting paid. But the rivalry like every guy was synonymous with the team that they were on. They didn't play for five teams. They always played for at least or they always played for the haves and when those two teams got together. This wasn't like the third time they'd met. This was about the eightieth time time they'd met and and wearing the same uniforms at the same time. So I think the amount of movement we see with the players that is a detriment to rivalry and the excitement that comes from that. You know an extensive question. Steve What's the biggest you know. What's the most the biggest one that got awake? What's the biggest fish here that that we had and we released and of course Wayne comes comes to mind but the opposite of that Steve Is? What's what's the biggest one we didn't do right? What's what's the one we could have done? It didn't and there was a shot. I think Winnipeg had a shot Wayne Gretzky right back in the day they were they. I don't know to what I don't like to the final minute. They could've hit a bid here and got Wayne. Probably if I know Peter Pocklington it would have been who's got what were the most money and so you know there must be some other teams in there who had had how to choice. I think Vancouver might have been there as well like Jim. Taylor did a really wonderful Wayne. Gretzky Coffee Table Book. Some of the best Gretzky photos you'll ever pursue their fantastic but obviously dialogue in there as well there's a lot of accounting of Gretzky's career and he mentions Vancouver in there as well. I don't know if that's true. But that's what he mentions. Yeah so if you're in Winnipeg right they. They lived that nightmare. They live nightmare for me. Steve for me. The biggest. The biggest ones that get away have got a result in a championship. You know when you look back right so you know here here out west. Most everyone's gone. This is the most lopsided deal ever the most significant thing in in James Neal coming from Calgary to Evanston Vinton for Milan Lucci each okay. who was a flip flop right? I don't know if there's other guys involved or not but effectively that's what it was and Neil is lightning lighting it up. Okay and Lucia's gone for Shit. I don't know if he's better now. But but it became the most apparent parent one sided trade ever. But but you just didn't know at the time but the deal is yeah but they have them until they went a coup- until they win a championship or or get us deep into the playoffs. I can't I can't make a decision that until you know we we. You see what happens so you can You can interpret the question any way you like. It could be you know. Maybe maybe the player was Your neighbors and yet barbecues your families. loved each other. And you know I don't care whatever the reason I don't necessarily have to parameters on it but I see what you're saying for sure you regret things more when the guy was on You know not only a great but to win a bunch of rings and certainly in this case the Chara and Hosa scenarios both fit that bill of course Russia are one with Boston and and Hosa one at least a couple Pittsburgh Chicago he was with Detroit and so he went significant. Yeah for sure and and and the reason I take Hosa is because you'll recall is funny with the sense how they've you know a couple of moves have really changed the NHL Gel landscape Alexander dig back in the day. Was the number one overall draft prospect. People thought okay. He's everybody's number one and in the season leading into that. The sends Bruce Firestone who was the original owner of the team was Reputed to have had a conversation with the media about maybe throwing a game against against the San Jose Sharks who were also down at the bottom of the standings who also this before the lottery. That also showed Dag and there was some there was some discussion Russian. About Oh shall we throw that game in San Jose and that led to that conversation led to a whole big investigation and the eventual adoption of the lottery because they didn't want teams tanking And the same is true with how the NHL No movement clause came into. or at least the no trade clause with the Marian Hosa case ace Hosa in good faith signed on with the sends John muckler signs in a six year contract. He's like cocaine. Good here we go. I'm set. I've got security. Muckler tackler immediately turns around and trades away to the Atlanta thrashers for Danny Heatley. And it wasn't long after that with players bargained in the concept of a no trade clause but if they had not traded away Marian Hosa Zunino Chara who was offended deeply by the way that thing was handled his friend and countryman who ends up getting traded after assigning in good faith the six year contract if Hosa had stayed then char would have state is well. He was very offended by the way the sins handled the Hosa case right right yeah. Those are significant though. You know who got away right and and and of course the other story there is they take instead of what's his face. The defenseman Chris pronger pronger who actually came to Edmonton for one year when they went to the final and and had some social issues. I think Yeah they're they're apparently there was something like that with his wife juicy stuff but Yeah so but they still didn't win right this Evans and went to the final. But but that would be significant if you get to the final DA. The trade will be significant. If we win the Stanley Cup. But percents fans Chris pronger would be another great answer to this You're right. That would be another great answer to this particular. One MARDI Saint Louis another one in there as well who was an Ottawa senator camp and they didn't even see fit to get him in one exhibition game. He's at Camp and he's he's an undrafted free agent. He's ascends camp and he didn't even get to play in one exhibition game to show what he could do. So Ottawa gets burned there because pronger has a fantastic career so to sell away. Yeah he pronger maven still be with Philadelphia. I don't know I don't think he's on the payroll anymore. But yeah he was there for a long time. Yes so that's a really significant deal you know when when they when they when they go to pick draft when they went through that You know that that's for sure that would go down in there. Drew brees would be the one when you bring up a bunch of names because he goes on to win the Super Bowl so the chargers let them go and any any any wins wins the championship. You know that's big. You know one of the greats of all time. There's no question about that but you don't. You said some interesting that brought up Lebron James Right who moves around all over the joint and I think when he did they won championships. Sure didn't they like He. He did Cleveland not win when he went back to Cleveland. They did anyone in Miami right correct. Yeah because what's his name went from the raptors in the two. They signed three big guys. Chris Bosh exactly so that's you know that becomes huge right. You move this guy around. The Guy Takes a fucking trophy with memory. Goes but when you said you know but it screws up the league screws up Perry parody to make loyalty you know. Love goes out the window right on all this stuff when when your team trying to win win a championship deanship goal. Okay we're GONNA send you to a long deal. Do what you want and then like you say Michael Turns around gets rid of the guy that deal. Soccer's what comes to mind for me. Steve and I don't know which team Rinaldo place for right right. He does. It means around not just teams but leagues leagues eggs and different leagues different. And it's all money you know I never it's like He went from he went from event. This Down to Brazil in some differently and it was a four hundred million dollar deal right. Well what what happens. All the time has all kinds of transfer fees. Yeah it's totally different deal. Soccer's its own animal animal with the way it is all these different tournaments and why was watching when the other didn't even know existed. The the club World Cup is on right now. Like I didn't know the the fee club World Cup where you have clubs instead of nations competing for a World Cup the Saudi different tournaments There's so many unbelievable leagues like it's the equivalent of having you know ten. NHL Because every league is amazing right. You know you've got the the British Premier League you've got Lalita you've got the Bundesliga you've got a whole bunch of Syria like they're all like all NHL level. This is so much much unbelievable soccer out there that you don't really have a number one league in the world like you have in the NHL Relegation Concept There's just so so many different facets to soccer that doesn't exist in other sports although interesting you know soccer Aside from that transfer feed deal. Whatever that is is they do have these tournaments within the league and we were talking about with how interesting that might be with hockey when you've got teams You know who even short halfway through the season out of it right. They're done they're not gonNA make the playoffs. You know less than forty games it or thirty for that matter and then you think well. There's this tournament within the within the regular schedule of play play that'll be designated for these these teams who aren't going to make the playoffs but they'll be a significant.

Wayne Gretzky Hosa Marian Hosa Zunino Chara Chris pronger Steve NHL Drew brees Cleveland Steve They Peter Pocklington Lebron James Winnipeg senator Soccer Peyton Manning Dave Lumley Steve What
"hosa" Discussed on ScreamQueenz: Where Horror Gets GAY!

ScreamQueenz: Where Horror Gets GAY!

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"hosa" Discussed on ScreamQueenz: Where Horror Gets GAY!

"It's just looks like it hurts so fucking okay and much nothing you can do. Yeah and this is the the movie out of it just yeah practical effects at its best. That's what I'm talking about like like this. The the practical terrifying and just like the blob affects itself. I'm going to do this without a computer really early. CGI stuff. But I think so because every every now and then there's some really horrible process shot a stop motion kind of deal running clearly running on a treadmill. There's a movie The blob behind. Go God God it was going so well up until there but it's okay. It doesn't even matter. Just squint. Your eyes and it's a lot. It's a lot more at the end of the movie where it's worse. The early blob stuff is a lot more practical than towards the end. It's kind of the rampaging blob. There's a lot of weird like layer things that just pop up out of out of the bottom of the screen like Godzilla movie. Yeah Yeah Yeah but even then tentacle edges. It just works it just all works. It's just such great little monster move risked. I've never used ribbed. Are they any goods. They work they. Don't the pleasure so I don't know falls asleep regardless of what I definitely whatever. I'm over away before she is sorry. I you know they love makes parents to yes like normally parents had movies like this are right off characters but her dad's Hosa and her eh. Great Horror Movie. Mom She's the mom you want a movie like this the thing with her little brother and the friend and she was I was like Oh you. Boys can't go see that horror movie. Are you talking about.

Hosa
Can land expropriation help heal South Africa?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

07:20 min | 3 years ago

Can land expropriation help heal South Africa?

"In addressing inequality quality it seems a straightforward indeed elegant policy. Take stuff off people who have a lot of it and give it to people who don't have any of it however anybody certainly any government proposing such a measure would do well to heed the immortal wisdom of H L Mencken who wants observed that there is is always a well known solution to every human problem needs plausible and wrong nevertheless the idea of land expropriation has returned to the public discourse in South Africa a panel assembled by President Cyril Ramaphosa to look into the idea has returned a proposal recommending in limited circumstances the seizure of land without compensating the owners. We should no longer be afraid of this process of having to change the land ownership architecture in our country. It is here and it is here to stay. It is going to happen land. Land ownership has been a persistent issue in post-apartheid South Africa and not without reason a quarter of a century after the racist monstrosity of apartheid was formerly dismantled white South Africans who comprise roughly nine percent of the population still own seventy two percent of the farmland possessed possessed by individuals as an illustration of the lingering effects of systemic injustice. It's hard to beat this by lament is rare opportunity unity to redress on this past wrongs to allow the natives who have lost so much to reclaim the dignity. <MUSIC> BIC by kitching our land back no law shall. We be treated as life in our own land. Never Ramaphosa's panel has proposed seizing land which is held for speculative purposes land which is occupied and worked by tenants and land and and that has has been abandoned it has also suggested taking inner city buildings owned by absentee landlords for obvious understandable reasons these these measures will go over well with a significant proportion of South African voters especially those who have lately been tempted away from President Obama poses his African National Congress now very much the Party of South Africa's establishment and towards the radical firebreathers of the opposition Economic Freedom Fighters Party not who nearly doubled the parliamentary presence in last May's election the F. F. led by Julius Malima who might be charitably described as uncompromising uncompromising in his general approach favors wholesale nationalization of South Africa's land. You'll say I thought what colonialism we wanted decolonisation yet yourself party or Lord Boorda's in Africa what is being proposed by President Obama poses panel is significantly less than that but it is nevertheless significant as it stands under section twenty five of South Africa's Constitution and the government may expropriate land but is required to cough up just and equitable compensation there has long been chat about amending this his clothes and or concocting some legal argument that in certain circumstances just and equitable compensation might amount to nothing they is also a growing body of opinion in our country that the constitution as it stands does not impede. beat expropriation of land without compensation that expropriation will be popular in some electorally important demographics is beyond doubt and that is very usually the clinching argument in matters of politics. Although some polling in South Africa suggests widespread unease with the idea of no compensation factor less often subject to rigorous scrutiny is whether or not a given see see policy will actually work and where expropriation nation of land is concerned. The are some discouraging precedents and if you WANNA the inroad of what you want to do today most infamously in the early years of the twenty th century Zimbabwe's then President Robert Mugabe ordered the seizure of white-owned farms and they're transferred to black ownership good have looked at what happened in Zimbabwe. Remember signor Robert Mugabe went down the same road was he also did in so doing was effectively <unk> demolish. Zimbabwe's agricultural infrastructure femme production plummeted by two thirds in less than a decade and Zimbabwe's economy collapsed alongside to the point where the country had to abandon its hyper inflation stricken currency in two thousand nine. Zimbabwe issued a one hundred trillion dollar banknote note which wouldn't buy a phosphate. They're actually doing the opposite non Zimbabwe. 'cause they realize the folly of their ways. South Africa is not Zimbabwe's and Cyril Ramaphosa Hosa is not Robert Mugabe but the <hes> some similarities many years after the end of white minority rule things remain extremely tough for many among long South Africa's black majority the unemployment rate in South Africa is a staggering scandalous twenty seven point six percent even higher among youth who. Who are increasingly drawn to the E. F F and South Africa is as Zimbabwe was an apparently attornal one party Democracy Ramaphosa a post has big problems and the means always tempting of making big gestures in response. If this Kevin was serious about restitution and redistribution we would speed up the hundreds of thousands of land claims that tremaine unprocessed in South Africa that is what it serious party would do if it was kid about land performer land redistribution the trouble is that property rights matter they are along with free and fair elections a free press judicial independence and the rule of law one of the crucial differences between functional society and a shambles property rights are also in this specific instance crucial to the foreign investment which South Africa urgently requires. Nobody is going to buy something if they're not sure they will be allowed to keep it and in fact we have said to those who are investing in no country that they shouldn't have no fear that the land property is going to be expropriated while the proposals of the presidential panel panel commendably constrained they will prompt concerns about these slipperiness of this particular slope they are of the ways to redress economic imbalance and historical injustice. The President Ramaphosa will be wearily aware that they are often more complex and long term than understandably impatient poor people would prefer he could of course set a personal example his own farm. The in Taba Neo near state in Malaga Province is reckoned at five thousand one hundred Hector's plenty to go around for monocle twenty four. I'm Andrew Moolah

South Africa Zimbabwe President Cyril Ramaphosa Signor Robert Mugabe President Trump Party Of South Africa President Obama Africa H L Mencken Cyril Ramaphosa Hosa Freedom Fighters Party BIC Andrew Moolah African National Congress Taba Neo Lord Boorda E. F F
UN Chief: AIDS is far from over

UN News

09:57 min | 3 years ago

UN Chief: AIDS is far from over

"Sense that winning the battle against AIDS is a done deal has been slowing progress on reducing new H._I._V. Infections and in reality. It's far from over according to the chief of the U._N.. Agency dedicated located to tackling the virus and what's more Gunilla Carlsson the acting executive director of Human AIDS says if we forget about people at risk such as intravenous drug users men who have sex with men and sex workers we will not solve the problem with the rise of new H._I._V.. Infections affections in an interview with you a news. She said although world leaders had signed up for an AIDS free generation by twenty thirty. If we don't walk the talk we might not get that Miss Nelson spoke to this graffiti. I think that there is this notion as if AIDS eights is over and it's not we still see an increase in new infections and we are still having seven hundred seventy thousand AIDS related death in two thousand eighteen so it's far from over and I think the complacency seeing the feeling like this is done that has slowing down progress that we actually have done in the world it also illustrates a precarious picture with some countries making gains while in others new H._I._V.. Infections and AIDS related deaths are on the rise. Can you speak to that where we see progress. It's good but it's not fast enough and the investments and the interest needed should be accelerated. I think because we know what helps and what can make a difference and that's when we put communities at the center. Boy That is when we we really try to address those people at risk where we see an increase in infections it is where they are lack of protection where there are no rights where there are no access to treatment and care yeah we are there happened to be discrimination and perhaps sometimes criminalization whether it's a lot of stigma and in some parts of the world new infections are especially rising in key populations six workers men having sex with men people living in prisons people injecting drugs transgender amber partners and if they are excluded I mean they stand globally for fifty four percent of the new infections in the world so if we tend to forget about people at risk we will not solve the problem with the rise of new HIV epidemic these people at risk because of stigma and discrimination. They're still being marginalized also with regard to prevention services. How can that be addressed? I think to have a good discussion around around H._I._V.. That this is about sixty it is about a virus that can be treatable and preventable and I think also if we are trying to shy away from it and hide it we're also losing a big bulk of the young populations and still too many kids are dying of AIDS related deaths due to that they don't have access to treatment so it is a complex issue but it's getting even more complex and dangerous if we are hiding away from and that's why the stigma and the risk of people hiding eating because they feel ashamed is also something that we have to address. This is nothing to be ashamed about. I think at sometimes even more than just being ashamed some people are afraid to mention it because they can be stigmatized and even violently hurt. That's also why. I'm admiring a lot of these young people than I do me too and I'm traveling so I was outside Durban in a little village call him lassie and I met with a nineteen year old lady called Ziva and her mother Potiskum. Both of them are HIV positive and this nineteen year old. She was not hiding away from it. She said I'm H._I._V.. Positive she was talking about this with her friends and the likelihood in that region because now we're talking about South Africa in KwaZulu Natale all were up to one fourth of the young girls below twenty five years carry the virus it is a huge epicenter as there are brave people in the communities start to talk about it. It can also normalize it in one way and then make sure show that people have access to treatment that they know how to protect themselves not spreading the virus and that is also part of where we have to have a good global discussion around this but the risk for many many others to hide and not disclose. I think it is because the the communities the environment on not helpful enough we have to end that we have to end stigma and discrimination. I know in South Africa L._G._B._T.. Rights enshrines in the constitution but in many countries it's illegal so I would imagine that many people if they're H._I._V.. Positive and they're not supposed to be gay to start off with so how do they get to this point. That is a problem when you have laws that discriminate against certain sexual identity entity or where you're not allowed to have access to services. I must say that there are countries that still have it in their laws but from a humanitarian and from a health perspective or making it possible for example gay men and transgender. People to access services and healthcare but that's not everywhere we spoke about South Africa South Africa's very progressive they have seen a decline both in new infections and AIDS related deaths since twenty ten so they are addressing it fully fully but not at the speed enough and they are having a full-fledged approach but many other countries are exactly as you said they are discriminating and that means also that it's very hard for those individuals to access treatment in time according to the report Howard Children Faring I think we failing the children in two thousand eighteen. There were seven hundred seventy thousands AIDS related death. Still I think many people doesn't understand that it still a health threat but one hundred thousand of them where kids below fifteen years and about half of the kids of the world that are living with HIV are not having access to treatment they diagnosed or they don't even know some of them are diagnosed. Some of them don't even know there has been a huge success when transmission mission to mother-to-child an understanding preventable programs but still it's not enough and that's why we are talking and the leaders of today have signed up to an AIDS free generation by twenty thirty and I think if we are not working the talk we you might not get there. That's why AIDS at this period of time in this global update are actually sounding the alarm bell. The report also points out that available resources for H._i._V. is drastically falling. Why is that and what will be the impact? Many reasons for example that global donor community have many other challenges as well and money for development cooperation and foreign aid is kind of drying up what we also have seen that it's a D. investments in the HIV response to early so in two thousand eighteen the available resources declined by one billion U._S. dollars and that there is a huge financial gap now why seven billion newest honoring total and at the same time the domestic stick resource mobilisation that the capacities for countries themselves with high epidemics have not enough resources and systems to carry on the treatment programs. The donor community now really has to think about successes made and don't D- Invest Invest too early because this is something where we really can say that we made a difference there is a good economics also in doing more to ending AIDS Global Health Threat by twenty thirty but it will need resources on all levels you have recently stated the urgent need to increase political leadership in order to end aids. How can that help and how can it be done? We see politically have to be more understandable that AIDS is not over and perhaps also talk about sex to talk about relations to talk about not discriminate and also to stop violence against women and girls that is also part of what's driving the epidemic and that is what I call political leadership so talk about the reality and to put H._I._V. Into a context because it's not only about fighting a virus it is actually about changing society and that's why we are so happy to work with the communities and give voice to those that knows how to change that trends. In two thousand thirteen you served alongside Ellen Johnson Sirleaf and David Cameron and others on the Advisory Board for the Post Twenty fifteen developments agenda. What was the H._I._V.? AIDS situation like back then as compared to now we discussed is that not abandoned the Millennium Development Goals because they were unfinished business on the role of women in development and especially those that H._i._v. was not over and it should be inherited into the sustainable development goals so that's why we now have a big agenda where we have still the promised to end aids as a global health threat. It's still there and we know that we can do that. When we also spoke about these issues it was about the role of women in society society? I really feel sad to know that six thousand two hundred adolescent girls and young women are infected every week and they are phone available because it's also part of an equal power relations. It is about sex it's about violence. Sometimes it's about lack of resources it's about nonconsensual sex and we spoke at that commission a lot about addressing the needs and the roles of these young people in this society is is to give them voice to give them power and to be part of development but when we see the increase of new infections H._i._v. in these groups we have to say that we are not doing good enough on all levels and also to make sure that we can end this figures but we have to do better actually hosa deputy secretary general I mean Mohammed was part of this commission. We also spoke about violence against women and it is not only about mass violence. It's not only about rape. It's also about domestic violence so there are many reasons.

Aids Infections South Africa HIV Gunilla Carlsson Durban Executive Director Miss Nelson Rape Deputy Secretary Ellen Johnson Sirleaf Natale Ziva Mohammed Howard Advisory Board David Cameron
"hosa" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"hosa" Discussed on KQED Radio

"For the arts that org. Welcome back to letting USA mighty Hosa. So we've heard the story of a strike in New Mexico's grant county in the early nineteen fifties. And we've heard about the film that inspired called salt of the earth. Now, producer cubital takes us back to grant county to find out how the strike is remembered and what's been forgotten. So before we start this journey. I wanna give you a lay of the land. You're going to hear a lot of names silver city federal center, Rita, Hanover, Bayard. These are all towns in grant county all within about fifteen or twenty minutes of each other. And we're going to begin in the town of Bayer. Terry humble picks me up in front of the local library. He was a kid when the strike happened and remembers it pretty well later, he became a minor like his dad before him and a member of the union the local late ninety. Now, he writes about the minds, and it gives guided tours of the county usually it's in a bus. But today's since it's just me we take his trouble. Let's go down to the union hall. I. In downtown Baird population pretty close to three thousand and you'll never get any bigger because it's completely surrounded by mountains company land from here. I can see the low colored hills and slate rocks and hills of mining waste. They look like Brown beige and red aquarium sand trucks pass heading towards the mind. The men inside them where neon reflective vests things in pretty quiet. This morning. Yes. Quiet little town. This is our union hall here. This was the union hall..

union hall USA New Mexico Terry humble Baird cubital Hanover Bayer Bayard producer twenty minutes
"hosa" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"hosa" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm muddying the Hosa. We return now to our producer until yesterday. He who's in California for Haley lexuses big day. Perking tenure? Saint Dominic Savia church in bellflower, California. A lot of if not most have a religious ceremony that precedes the party. There's a special mass dedicated to they continue. Helius sitting right in front of the priest with abused behind her rosiest two rows back. The sermon ends, and it's off to the Hummer limo. Which will take us to to important places the party? But before that the photo we're at heritage park where I see one two three four. Us taking their pictures with their families. Heritage park is a public park with like almost medieval touches, small castles of bridge over remote. And everywhere you look there are clusters of shiny colors. I'm big hair that belong to people posing. Okay. Two girls lean into Haley, really close. We'll give flowers right here in your chest. Healy stands in the middle of her court, which as you might remember is like the continued version of bridesmaids and groomsmen. There are six and seven Chamberlain is one of which is really stands partner. The Damas are all in -til filing stresses and the wearing black suits with teal bow ties. Of the vacuum. I have to go on YouTube. Soviet are waiting for one guy in.

Hosa heritage park Haley lexuses Saint Dominic Savia church California bellflower YouTube producer Healy Helius Chamberlain partner
"hosa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"hosa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Hosa. We return now to our producer untorn yesterday. He the who's in California for Haley lexuses big day, perking tenure. At Saint Dominic Savia church in bellflower, California. A lot of if not most of us have a religious ceremony that precedes the party. There's a special mass dedicated to the Kingston yadda. Helius sitting right in front of the priest with appears behind her rosiest two rows back. The sermon ends, and it's off to the Hummer limo. Which will take us to to important places the party, but before that the photo ship, we're at heritage park where I see one two three four Kingston need us taking their pictures at their family's. Heritage park is a public park with like almost medieval touches, small castles abridge over remote. And everywhere you look there are clusters of shiny colors. I'm big hair the belong to people posing. Okay. Two girls lean into Haley, really close. We'll flowers right here in your chest. Healy stands in the middle of her court, which as you might remember is like the continued diversion of bridesmaids and groomsmen there are six and seven Chamberlain one of which is least dance partner. The Damas are all in -til filing addresses and the wearing black suits with teal bow ties. So when I counted three guys of the vacuum. I have to go on YouTube. Wait are waiting for one guy in.

heritage park California Haley lexuses Saint Dominic Savia church YouTube bellflower Kingston producer Helius Healy Chamberlain partner
"hosa" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"hosa" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Detour get it out. That's all right. I'm sure we'll be visiting that documentary later this week. It's fascinating. But listen to this little nugget of current twenty nine thousand nine hot gossip, Colleen and Bradley guess who this is about this foreign born A-minus Lewis actress who is still a newlywed and keeps getting married to remind us of that fact, menopause one of the men she wants had an affair with who is from her home country this happened while are actress was out of the country. Priyanka Chopra jealous. Thank you for including her full name PC J towel. Right. Priyanka Chopra Jonas who is still a newlywed and keeps getting married to remind us of that fact, met up with one of the men she once had an affair with who is from India. This all happened while Priyanka was out of the country is this guy. The wrath of. Yes. Yes. She's having sex with the now deceased said Hosa fantasy island. Ricardo Montalban who also played con. Colleen. Thank you. Let us fill in the joke for you know, I knew that part when you said the fantasy island I my brain immediately goes to. Tattoo. Hervey villa. Well, that would have been far more salacious? But anyway, my point being there's a guy a very rich guy named Khan. That I thought she was rumored to be having an affair with by could just be making that up you might be making it up. But I'm what this blind is. How is Nick feeling? Marriage. Oh, yeah. Don't worry. He's over there. Listen sweetheart, he's. You're gonna say something different. Holly. Can you fill in the blank? I did. Alright. Forget it. Then another.

Priyanka Chopra Jonas Hosa fantasy island Colleen Priyanka Chopra Priyanka Ricardo Montalban Khan Hervey villa India Lewis Nick Holly Bradley
"hosa" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"hosa" Discussed on Latino USA

"All of your comments. So keep them coming. I'm your host and executive producer might gain of Hosa. Join us again next time. And in the meantime, look for us on all of your social media. And I'll see you there s that Brooks Chow. Let's see no USA is made possible. In part by the Annie E. Casey foundation. Creates a brighter future for the nations children by strengthening families, building greater economic opportunity and transforming communities, California endowment, building a strong state by improving the health of all Californians and the Ford Foundation working with visionaries on the frontlines of social change worldwide. What was it? Like was it crazy? So you saw at all all right? Wholesome and next time on the USA. We're joined by genital the award-winning actress and star of the show, Jane, the virgin, she talks to us about how growing up in a Puerto Rican family in Chicago made her the performer she is today, and she talks about new projects like her upcoming film Misbah that's next time on that USA. Whether it's athlete protests, the Muslim travel ban gun violence school reform or just the music giving you life right now race is this subtext to so much of the American story on coats, which we make that subtext text. You can listen to us on NPR one or wherever you get your podcasts.

Annie E. Casey foundation Jane Brooks Chow USA Ford Foundation executive producer NPR California Chicago USA. Misbah
"hosa" Discussed on In The Thick

In The Thick

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"hosa" Discussed on In The Thick

"Contributed to the New York Times and an all star and doing new all-star after just he's very first visit venue Kirk staff writer at the Atlantic. We loved having you on the show. Thank you so much for joining who you and me on in the fick. Thanks. Thanks to my grandma. I'm marina Hosa. And I'm Julia Rica Lorella. Dear listener, I stood this maybe once or twice before. But we'd love you to do us a favor. Can you go to apple podcasts to rate and review as pretty please really really helps us also I know that voice. Ron sounds like a mom voice. Like, I'm about to ask you to do something for us. Mama, mama. I'm gonna totally rate review this show like immediately. Also, he you listen to in the thick now on Pandora on Spotify and wherever you get your podcast. So tell everyone that you know, and follow us on Twitter and on Instagram at in the thick show, and like us on Facebook in the thickest produced by Kwon public Artem and Nicole Rothwell. Our audio engineers are stuffing the boat into the Caruso. Our intern is lead the at an this year the music that you heard it's courtesy of kept Enzi gay records. We will see you on our next episode of into thick on this Friday. Thank you to your listeners for this thing. Chow chow. All right. Listen, you guys. Only rushing you guys because we've only got fifteen more minutes in that studio. And then they're gonna kick you out, and you guys become pumpkins. But listen, I'll record from McDonald's. So sweet we love that.

staff writer Chow chow marina Hosa Julia Rica Lorella New York Times apple Kirk Atlantic Pandora Twitter Caruso Facebook McDonald intern Ron Nicole Rothwell Enzi Spotify Kwon Artem
New poll shows Beto O'Rourke down 9 points in Texas

Todd and Don

01:07 min | 4 years ago

New poll shows Beto O'Rourke down 9 points in Texas

"A lot of people have been talking about this Blue Wave that's going to take Ted Cruz out led by Bentoel Rourke. But they say, well, there's a new poll outs and tad apparently has a nine point lead over challenger bento. According to the latest Quinnipiac university poll survey of likely Texas voters has cruise at fifty four percents and Rourke at forty five James Dickey. He heads up the Texas Republican party. We're trying to build a narratives that Senator is in trouble. And the Republican leadership is not respected else. Does have fortunately been put to lie down on the other side, Texas democrat party chair gabled Hosa doesn't think the polling numbers are accurate and a lot of people that are probably not being polled. New voters have not been involved in other elections prior to now, and that's what you seem a lot with the campaign. Now, the first of three debates between crews and a work has scheduled Friday and. SMU Rupp there in Dallas. So they got three debates gonna do one in Dallas Houston, another in San Antonio those. Those are pretty interesting debates that are going to be

Bentoel Rourke Texas Republican Party Texas James Dickey Smu Rupp Ted Cruz Quinnipiac University Dallas Houston Dallas Senator San Antonio
Lea Michele Reflects on Cory Monteith's Legacy 5 Years After His Death

Roe Conn

03:58 min | 4 years ago

Lea Michele Reflects on Cory Monteith's Legacy 5 Years After His Death

"In judy's news brought to you by kars for kids mostly cloudy eightyfive degrees at o'hare an outbreak of an intestinal illness and in some cases has been linked to mcdonalds salads has sickened ninety people in illinois the public health department says about a fourth of those who contracted cyclones pariah sis reported eating mcdonalds salads before getting sick cases of their illness reporting counties all over the state including cook governor round or married a same sex couple last month but that's not being toasted by some socially conservative groups the groom saved the runners are great friends of theirs in wonderful people the illinois family institute says it's a reminder that the governor has a social agenda but it's not conservative or republican now the chew brazilian boys detained by immigration agents in chicago have been reunited with their fathers there is concern about one of them heading to a facility in pennsylvania with his dad in a lot of litigation centered mostly on whether burqas properly licensed told children your license has been revoked and then administratively reinstated and then appealed so the entire stash of the berks disability is the subject of a large amount of litigation attorney tom yardley representing one of the families the department of justice has reopened its investigation into the nineteen fiftyfive killing of emmett till whose death sparked the civil rights movement he was abducted and brutally murdered in mississippi by two white men for whistling at a white woman but last year she admitted fabricating her testimony in a book written by duke university historian timothy tyson wrestling with the legacy of the atlantic slave trade we're wrestling with slavery kind of racial caste system and a river of unpunished blood till was from chicago amid threats of a trade war with china mayor emanuel had what he calls a productive meeting with the country's vice president emmanuel met with chinese vice president she sean and hopes affirming up a deal to have chinese firm build a factory in chicago to manufacturer c k railcars the mayor says the one hundred million dollar factory on the south east side would create three hundred fifty jobs america's increased tariffs on chinese goods threaten the deal but mayor emanuel says after meeting with government officials and executives the project is still moving forward does not pungo wgn news that viral video showing a man berating woman last month has now led to the resignation of cook county forest preserve officer and hate crime charges timothy tribals harassing the woman for wearing a t shirt with the puerto rico flag on it now facing to hate crime charges will appear in court for a bond hearing tomorrow meantime the officer accused of not helping her resigned wednesday i'm sincerely sorry that this happened i've seen the video and i'm outraged that this would happen anywhere let alone and especially sad that it happened in our force reserves that's the head of the forest preserve district arnold randolph says patrick connor did not leave in good standing in an investigation into his conduct continues wgn sports here's kevin powell thank you judy the blackhawks and arizona coyotes have struck a deal the centerpiece marian hosts his contract which runs through twenty twenty one there's a five million dollar salary cap hit each season that the hawks wanted to clear so they move hosa along with vinny headed stroz in jordan oester lead in return for four players including forward marcus krueger he spent seven seasons in chicago won a couple of stanley cups obviously really i mean couldn't be any anymore happy and ready to go and the overall really excited be back also got a third round pick in next year's draft in a classy move by marian halsey has a no trade clause in his contract but he understood the situation he waved it allowing the hawks to trade him in his contract off night for the cubs and white sox both back at it tomorrow night sokolow host the royals will have it here at seven ten cubs will be in san diego at wimbledon serena williams has advanced to our tenth final at the all england club and plenty of pro golf locally this week in highland park.

Judy One Hundred Million Dollar Five Million Dollar Eightyfive Degrees
Columbus, Illinois and Jane Addams discussed on Dean Richards Sunday Morning

Dean Richards Sunday Morning

02:12 min | 4 years ago

Columbus, Illinois and Jane Addams discussed on Dean Richards Sunday Morning

"Hits including a home run lucas cheerleaders six solid and he's gonna win white sox will look for the series victory this afternoon near guaranteed rate field pre game at twelve thirty five editors jay the first pitch at one ten reynaldo lopez looking for his first one of the year he'll go up against mike minor for texas split of a double header for the cubs yesterday who's game one five to four in eleven innings but wrapped in game two tend to nothing in that nightcap and half homered jason heyward tied a career high with four runs batted in jose tana pitching seven shutout innings in the victory yu darvish scheduled to go this afternoon in the series finale at cincinnati well it's news we kind of already knew but very unwholesome made it all but official at a slovak newspaper yesterday saying he's not playing hockey anymore hosa sat out all last year because of a progressive skin disorder and the side effects of the medication to treat it is you leave the game with eleven hundred thirty four points five hundred twentyfive career goals and he went three stanley cup while a member of the chicago blackhawks and justify takes the second leg of the triple crown winning the preakness stakes yesterday he'll go for the triple crown coming up on june ninth at the belmont stakes attempting to become the thirteenth horse in history to win the triple crown on the whole the blackhawks northwestern wildcats and chicago white sox baseball anti mazer wgn sports wgn traffic we're looking at traffic starting to build on the kennedy inbound a twenty five minute trip now from o'hare to downtown twenty minutes or so from the junction to downtown the accident we reported on earlier in elgin at the jane addams tollway inbound illinois thirty one is now cleared this note in the river north area in chicago wabash between hubbard and the chicago river is closed all lanes blocked there until eight o'clock tonight for a tower crane to be removed downtown also we have the chicago spring half marathon that's been underway since about seven this morning that is closing columbus between rosa veldt in randolph and all of the cross streets in grant park belbow jackson monroe all closed as well the streets will be reopening by the noon hour for personalized traffic on demand get the traffix chicago app it's approved by team hockberg at perl mortgage just search t r a f f i x chicago.

Columbus Illinois Jane Addams Kennedy Hockey Official Yu Darvish Texas Mike Minor Lucas Chicago Randolph Rosa Veldt SOX Chicago River Hubbard Elgin O'hare Wildcats Chicago Blackhawks