35 Burst results for "Hopper"

Third Person Arrested for Firing BB Gun at Homeless People in Cincinnati

Dan Carroll

00:42 sec | Last week

Third Person Arrested for Firing BB Gun at Homeless People in Cincinnati

"Of using BB guns to attack homeless people in Cincinnati, where in court Wednesday the third suspect that was attacking homeless people and over the Rhine has now been identified as 30 Year old David White. Police are saying that white is the man seen in surveillance video, shooting innocent people with a BB gun. On June 3rd. He was riding in a car with Brittany and Kelsey Hopper, who were the two sisters who turned themselves in earlier in the day. On Tuesday, Kelsey Hopper was cited Britney Hopper and White had to answer to outstanding charges. In addition to the misdemeanor assault charges. White also faced a domestic violence charge against Brittney Hopper from May of 2020 adjudged that bond for wide at $6000 that bond for Brady hop. At $2000 I'm Sarah

Kelsey Hopper David White Cincinnati Britney Hopper Brittany White Brittney Hopper Brady Sarah
Dirty Outs

Just Hands Poker Podcast

02:44 min | 3 weeks ago

Dirty Outs

"Comes from a one three game. Five hundred effective time. Rake first of all i note. It's a pretty good deal. Hefei offend a lot of poker rooms. I've seen a lot of one two and three games most of them. You not five hundred effective in most of them don't have a time rate so i don't know where this hand took place but we don't let them make is either but hopefully at harvard. Imagine it's much worse than seven dollars. Yeah hopper although the one the one thing about time rick at one three. Is that the one. Three games are kind of slow because a lot of people don't play They can take forever so like time raking and more multi way. Pots take longer So here's five hundred dollars with the small blind two hundred fifty dollars effective with the off. The cutoff is a fun player. Who is extremely loose. Passive and the small blind is tighter older woman. Who's a regular in the row volts to the cutoff who limps and we're on the button with queen ten environments reason not to make it rather large. Yeah yeah. I think we want to be. I don't know it's a. It's a really strong hand. Cutoffs is really wide will probably still dominate a lot of continuing range Yeah i like race. He remains at twenty bucks. I think that's solid I need depending on your image. You can like it can be interesting to really choose the pot in these types of arts and raise like twenty five to thirty or something but i think twenty definitely accomplishes our goal here which is to put more money than you typically would in the pot based on the situation

Hefei Hopper Harvard Rick
New 'Stranger Things' Teaser Is Eleven-Out-of-Ten Creepy

Donna and Steve

02:13 min | Last month

New 'Stranger Things' Teaser Is Eleven-Out-of-Ten Creepy

"I believe we have A P, sir. A teaser for over this stranger things. I like it a lot to you because I like the kids. Are they going to be adults? By the time we see them? They're 40 years old. When was the last time that we had stranger thing two years ago. Then that there's so many questions I have with this. All right, you guys, I'm ready to go on here. Stranger things and then After what? Felt like an eternity of waiting, my lady? No. Here we go. Ladies. No. Here we go. They gave me two of them in the article. I think we have the correct one right here. Yeah. Hey, the clock is on three. It's crawling around on the floor. Playing Klink. Oh, and chest. I don't like that. Educate ball. Mm. Are some spikes really like it here, like in a mental hospital and subject. I'm sorry. His little kids crawling around in a cold room. The creepy guy walking. We just see his back. Good morning, Children. Good morning, Popeye. How are you today? Good. Glad to hear you because today I have something very special planned for you when the doors has a number 11 on it. Mm hmm. You're listening. Oh, that's where she came from. Cool. Yes, quick. I also remember last year we got to go last year. They did after this using a stranger things. From Russia with love, and it was this Russian hillside, snow covered. They're all working on a train track. And then you realize that what's his face? Hopper? Yep. Is there that's good? That's good. Be good. I don't think that I will. I will figure it out. This is his

Klink Popeye Russia Hopper
A McShake Up: The Battle Over McDonald's Ice Cream Machines

Kottke Ride Home

01:57 min | Last month

A McShake Up: The Battle Over McDonald's Ice Cream Machines

"It is a truth universally acknowledged that a mcdonald's in possession of an ice cream machine must claim that it's broken. I mean it's just laughable at this point rate the mcdonalds ice cream machines are never working last fall. Rashiq zahid even built a website called mic broken. That shows a map of mcdonald's franchises across the us and lets you know whether or not they're machine is currently working. The website has shown that at any given moment in the united states. Five to sixteen percent of mcdonald's have broken ice cream machines. Here's the thing. The machines being broken. It's a feature not a bug. And i don't mean that the feature is annoyed employees turning off to claim that it's broken so they don't have to make flurries ono. It goes way deeper than that. I the myth of line about the machine. Being broken is well. Probably the myth while the taylor. C six zero two digital ice cream machine used at most. Mcdonald's restaurants is pretty incredible in some ways. They have extra hoppers and barrels allowing employees. To pull milkshakes and soft serve simultaneously and they have a heating pasteurizing rephrasing cleaning process that eliminates the need to take the machine apart to be cleaned every night like other as cream machines. But they're also super temperamental. One anonymous employee describes them to wired as being like in italian sports car. If one thing goes wrong the whole machine collapses and despite the efficient nightly cleaning process they still have to be taken apart and sanitized. Every two weeks quoting wired some pieces have to be carefully lubricated. The machines parts include no fewer than two dozen rubber and plastic rings of different sizes. Leave a single one out. And the pumpkin fail or liquid. Ingredients can leak onto the machine. One mcdonald's franchisees tech manager told me he's reassembled taylor's ice cream machines more than a hundred times and had them work on the first try at most ten of those times and quotes

Mcdonald Rashiq Zahid ONO United States Taylor
'Vaxications,' Catch-up Trips and Pent-up Demand Fuel Travel Surge

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:09 min | 2 months ago

'Vaxications,' Catch-up Trips and Pent-up Demand Fuel Travel Surge

"Centers for disease control says that as of two days ago almost one hundred and twenty five million people have gotten at least one vaccine shot in this country and you know that is other than really good news. That's a business. Opportunity is what that is especially if you are in the travel business searches for domestic flights for this coming summer have gone up nearly sixty percent in the past month. That's according to the travel site hopper. Google searches for hotels hit at ten year high this month and searches for plan. A trip to disney world increased. I kid you not twenty six hundred percent from march to april and forget about getting a rental car whenever you get wherever you are going marketplace's smithfield's reports on what travel pent up. Demand looks like joylin. Anthony and her husband are ridiculously excited to finally go on vacation. The pent up demand here in our own home to just leave the house and go do something. Is this huge ankara's accountant in oregon and recently at the height of tax season. I told my husband. I needed plane ticket somewhere. They decided on tennessee. Flights were pretty cheap. She says but rental cars. That's going to be one of the most expensive parts of our trip. They're also finding most places. They're thinking of visiting require reservations now and seemed to be booking up. That is true for all sorts of things from disneyland. Tickets to campsites a lot of people like anthony our booking trips within the us and in many cases staying relatively close to home. That's according to christopher not at airbnb more than seventy percent of the searches that we're seeing for destinations. That are fifty to three hundred miles away from home for folks. So you know this sort of i can get there on a tank of gas. Destination and many of these are sort of in remote locations. Any of the flights people are looking for in booking are also to more remote outdoorsy spots says Motorin and economist at the travel booking site hopper now parks have done really well and beaches have done really well. That seems to be where a lot of the interest currently has end. Motorin says airlines have been adding flights to those kinds of destinations.

Joylin Centers For Disease Control Hopper Smithfield Ankara Disney Anthony Google Oregon Tennessee Airbnb Motorin Christopher United States
"hopper" Discussed on Happy Mum Happy Baby

Happy Mum Happy Baby

03:08 min | 2 months ago

"hopper" Discussed on Happy Mum Happy Baby

"Let leader won't means not bring losing your brain and being okay with it just very tired tired citizens up since having children i since having children i am not set a judgy cow. Nine hundred children. I appreciate sleep more than ever. I could and i'm happy when i'm happy when the four of us together in my web dot is in the world you know whenever we're together bus plus on on i'm happy for us and also christmas goes thank you so much. He's been amazing. I can't believe down and had a pro version with no interruption. So you get home. You can also log. He's been amazing. Thank you so much. do you go home. have so much love for you. Guys have got so much. Love your kids and you know we're all in this together straight back cat let things slide this episode of happy mom. Happy baby is brought to you by silent knight. The nation's number one sleep brand experts in all things beds mattress and bedding. They know that one size doesn't fit all when it comes to you and your family sleep from safe nights to healthy growth. Sinai kids and babies mattresses have been designed to ensure your loved ones. Have a safe and comfortable night's sleep at every age and every stage because sometimes the bedtime routine can be anything but a silent knight cast powers. Some of the world's best podcasts. Here's a show. We recommend. I'm lisa. And i'm kate and this is pants. We've met almost twenty years ago playing best friends on tv now. Not only are. We still best friends on tv but we're also best friends in the row. Look our shows a little different as you never know what you're gonna get right. We may hang out with our friends like fortune. Teamster teagan and sara jennifer beals and. We'll also sometimes discussed deeper topics like like in our profession. We love to have qna's with our listeners. Or sometimes we teach each other something new to make sure you tune in every wednesday pants with kate. Unleash please listen and subscribe now wherever you get. Your podcast can't speak aspect events..

christmas lisa Nine hundred children kate sara jennifer Sinai four teagan twenty years ago one wednesday one size
"hopper" Discussed on Happy Mum Happy Baby

Happy Mum Happy Baby

08:03 min | 2 months ago

"hopper" Discussed on Happy Mum Happy Baby

"Queuing thank you. And he's just not as cautious own his amazing. I think how people around us can really impact how we handle situations as well. Sometimes when was say one of ours buddy is having one of his moments. I think early on. I could feel the heat failed that feeling of failing in this moment. Everyone is looking bad. Judging me as a mother and the nasty seeing the opposite of that when someone has come and said you're doing good just something that's motivational this with you. And i think it's fascinating to see how our behavior towards other parents can impact them on doing the best job that they can kind of support them and empowering them rather them belittling them and making them feel crap and add to this situation ashley. I'm gonna win the best that you're talking about when everyone came afer freddie kind of started the trend of like. We're going to take our clothes off now so every hit with no. That's home by remember. Budi accidentally popping a balloon and he got really upset about and i was like can i do anything and you. No it's fine. He'll slowdown in a minute. And it just made me love buddy malm or just want to keep you up like his just in that moment he's having a moment occasionally occasionally won't shoot it as all kids do it because life is allowing live is becoming. And they're figuring out how to handle those situations like buddy when he is not situation he called put together so having us going. Tell me well you need doesn't help. It doesn't help otto we've kind of got to sit with him and let him get whatever is in him out and accept him for who he is robbed and try and go no. You've got to be this because this is normal. What is no one day last night because this is an ongoing conversation with david. Bowie wasn't a normal kid. A i didn't think i didn't any of us normal kids. Will we go to the question. Boy fits into assume box again. Let you into a ball long. And i think one of the things we definitely went through that whole like there were times. High pleaded with freddie. Don't do this please. And looking back now online. I understand why because size scared of like what that men him being different. And how about would change everything forests and actually. Freddie's the best never complaints because he can't talk so he never moons earth's he is happy with literally looking at a tree and so it was more. I think acceptance to me. Tom was not yeah. I think he's autistic. Esco and you you like onto the next thing really. I suppose was and i think this is again. It's an interesting thing that you were saying about the way that tom was looking at the buddy situation number. Because i do think that as much as i don't want to Put people at a candy box by do. The men and women can sometimes look how to deal with situations differently. Right the taking the mums and dads. I think i mean. I'm generalizing here but the way i'm from all perspective i certainly felt like there was something different about freddie and i started on the kind of person that goes right. I'm gonna look into this research. Now about the white behaving and then leasing sky coming up and i i saw found the autism thing quite quickly and tries told the lower about it and it was lower wasn't they. She was dealing with in a very different way. And i tried to. I don't know i'm telling you this is. This is something we need to look into because it saying. Hey the early early prevention is really important blah blah blah. So when i go for you too as well. It's also added layer. Do not being around. Because you're off working kind of giving her this information. The kind of goes so. I'm gonna go pretend to be a pirate for a while Element lead balloon challenge. You wanna give advice. Go and what you need to do. Is you need to do this and you need to. Look at this obscenity. This video here explains all about this. And i'm done an entire autism got certificate four. Not isn't like he he's fine. Stop sending me all this stuff an all. I got to the point where we'd be based on always cracking up by an attorney in auburn gone airplane mode because i was so fed up people telling me like well i think this and i think it's that and you should be doing this and you should be doing that. And freddie wasn't at that point yeah it took me five speech language therapists to find the right one because they always pushed him and the confused him because he wasn't ready the kids didn't have a two year is so he has with the with the relationship in the way we were dealing with. I think that in itself is much of a journey about how we are going to cope with it as a pad in the way. We both deal with it. So we're on the same path as as accepting freddie who. He is finding that unison Whole triangle of freddie. And then me and laura how. We're gonna do this together. So i would say this year has been the time that we'd finally come to a point where we've both realized what are the most important factors for friday for future. I've had to few things go indoors. Salafi things go on but we met in the middle we've compromised and nothing compromises the biggest thing you can do in a marriage and especially with a child with autism that you both have confounding factors are going to be problem in the marriage otherwise unless you find that middle ground but listen the appreciation for the past said i remember the ever knowing phil hopper thomas guest standing round and saying to if you're watching someone put their everything into the people who's put in them. I and i remember it being like a lightbulb. On and so. I'm looking at me. Like she is only evidenced to fill the kids offer for me and he was like a no one's put in half us. Not that's my job and the minute hit that he's not to do that. We just it. It was like a jigsaw puzzle. Fit together a really was a light bulb isn't it is tricky sins. I remember last year. When i came back from shootin. One-time an always so desperate to help the four of us together. You know when. I go on so side of the four of us as a family in what we're gonna do money back for like two or three days and i go back and laura was like right. I'm gonna go out. I'm going to do what just go back. And just i've been with the kids on my own for the last six weeks. North like the four of us in this kind of like a mental block of her going. No no. I need this slightly by to get out the house. Amigo i need is to be together. So y- constant thing you play with but then you have to look into. You have to look in the mirror and go okay. What's really important here is the she's happy right. I come home and she's happy so she needs to do is used to go away half day away this out. I have a little talk..

two Bowie Tom last year two year Freddie Esco three days david this year friday thomas laura last night freddie phil hopper One both tom last six weeks
Getting chippy: ‘I’m a Mac’ guy is now just a guy who likes PCs better in ad campaign from Intel

The Vergecast

03:25 min | 3 months ago

Getting chippy: ‘I’m a Mac’ guy is now just a guy who likes PCs better in ad campaign from Intel

"If you haven't seen them until put out a series of commercials with justin. I'm a mac guy. And he's he's as i'm a. I'm just adjusting. Just i'm a human being. He goes and he goes into the living room and he talks to a person on it looks and he's like. Oh wow. this has two screens. Oh well this guy's playing video games this stuff you could never do unimak the end There's one that the key word on the front computer with the second screen. They they screwed up the after effects audit and the second screen is hovering over his hands in like a split second anyway. So these are the commercials. I think these ads are mostly just integrate itself dunked on select just objectively. The ads didn't work the way they wanted to. Yeah let me make the case for the ads. Intel is about to enter a new ceo. Yep they're about to enter this extremely weird middle period where either going to figure it out or not. Yep inside of that middle period every time apple puts out an m one or m series computer. Yup the story about until being dead is everywhere yep into also has hundreds of oem customers with their chips inside their computers. These are ads about real problems with max so like it is true that you cannot touch the screen unimak yes. Many people have noticed this. It is true that you can't follow it over and a tablet is true that you can't use the silence on it. It is true that apple really wants you to have we. Did we talked about fitness. Plus with ashley like apple wants you have an ipad iphone and mac like yep that is true that there are no games on a mac like none of intel's points for wrong. It is true that the design of a mac has been static for years In even with the new chips they still look the same yup and maybe that will change now but on itself is true so the things that intel is saying are just true. Criticisms of the mac get hundred percent. That's it that's all i got. I obviously did not work out. Yeah the thing like every time apple releases a new Embraced mac it's going to be intel's dead. Stories is really every single time. I talked to a company about it. He left hopper. Like you chromebooks. Whatever it's like yeah but M one like here's your battery. Life is like actually half of what the competition is. And it's gonna be a long time before there's an answer and like to do with itself in that that period yet again new. Ceo he just started. I think in a couple of weeks. He's going to do his first. Big thing is the first big thing that the screw it. We're we're giving up on trying to have this stuff ourselves we're just gonna have to use mc make our stuff. Yeah we'll see. That was a big striking for those wishing. He's got to do something that's really. They're about to enter this weird fallow period and the whole point of the new to change the strategy and he just started. So what's the first thing to do is like just remind everybody that from a design and capability perspective. That mac is like actually quite static. Yeah okay well. Maybe like microsoft tries this every couple of years to like maybe had very predictable results. But like i get it i understand i. Just don't i think maybe they should have seen the predictable result on the other hand hiring justin long that made everybody talk about until that's sure got it themselves a whole if you believe all is good press which do not as a method. They bought themselves a cycle. We'll see

Intel Apple Justin Ashley MAX Hopper MAC Microsoft
While Some Spring Breakers Swarm Beaches, Many Stay Home, Dreaming Of Summer Travel

All Things Considered

03:30 min | 3 months ago

While Some Spring Breakers Swarm Beaches, Many Stay Home, Dreaming Of Summer Travel

"Of year that many of us pack our suitcases for a spring break trip, But things this year are still far from normal. There are crowds on beaches in Fort Lauderdale on a few other places, but overall travel numbers are still down. As NPR's David Schaper reports, Many are getting the summer travel bug. For many college students Spring break used to mean earning a couple of extra bees as it beaches and beer. But this year, many colleges and universities are canceling the annual week off and one that isn't the University of California. Davis is paying students 75 bucks to stay home or on campus. Many family trips to resorts and theme parks are also being put on hold as a new survey on behalf of the reeling travel industry shows disappointingly only 12% of respondents said they're planning travel for spring break. Roger Dow heads the U. S Travel Association, which commissioned the poll. What is a little more concerning to May is just last week. That was 16%. So it's down from last week. When we were thinking everything was starting to go in the right direction, Tao says. Recent bad news about new Corona virus variants appears to be cooling. A mini industry warm up is more people have been traveling. The T S A says the number of people passing through airport security checkpoints tops one million more often than not these days, but that's still less than half of pre pandemic levels. Hotel occupancy rates are also creeping back up. But the travel industry continues to take a beating now, says nearly 40% of all U. S jobs lost due to the pandemic are in leisure and hospitality. U. S economy just can't recover unless the travel industry is healthy and recovery and travel won't fully recover until the pandemic is under control. What many Americans appear to feel that day is coming. And their online travel searches show they're itching to hit the road. What we're beginning to see in the beginning of 2021 is a recovery from the deepest part of that depression and demand. Haley Berg is an economist with the airfare and hotel price tracking APP Hopper and she says searches for flights are up substantially across the board. Demand for domestic travel since January is up, 58%. International travel is up about 20% and those numbers are growing faster and faster each week, Berg says. TRAVEL SEARCH activity surges in sync with new cycles, For example, when President Biden last week promised enough vaccines for every American adult by the end of May Travel searches skyrocketed. We're fully anticipating a big surge in demand late spring and through summer, there is clear pencil demand for travel. Audrey Hendley heads American Express Travel, which released a report this week on global consumer travel sentiment. And she says many people are not just searching. They're ready to book even if they knew they have to cancel their trip in the future, And we're calling that shift. That book now figure it out later mentality. That's the result of airlines and hotels, offering more flexible changin cancelation policies as it's still unclear when some countries may reopen their borders and lift travel restrictions. And even though more people are getting vaccinated every day, the CDC still urges Americans not to take any nonessential trips. But even with so much uncertainty about the future of travel, Hendley says, many people find being bitten by the travel bog and planning. A vacation is good for the pandemic weary soul. David

David Schaper Roger Dow U. S Travel Association Fort Lauderdale Haley Berg NPR University Of California TAO President Biden Davis Audrey Hendley U. Hopper Berg American Express Travel
Goodbye to Alcohol - Series 3 - Episode 10 - Mary Anne Shearer - the Natural Way - burst 01

Goodbye to Alcohol

27:17 min | 5 months ago

Goodbye to Alcohol - Series 3 - Episode 10 - Mary Anne Shearer - the Natural Way - burst 01

"It was his guys talking roland hydra one year and end the sky was the and he came up to me after he said like. I'm here to help me recover from alcoholism. I don't want to rehab. I've just come to detox. My buddy what. Can i do to stop caving. Alcohol acid right. This is what you gotta do. Every morning you get up and you have as much fruit and a nice handful of narrow nuts or seeds with just eat as much food as you can stuff. Your face doesn't have to be early in the morning but it must be a first meal of the day and eat as much as it. If it's a box of mangoes and eat the box of mangoes op done that. Eaten a box magazine taya watermelon. And you might do that for three months and eventually what happens. Is you end up eating one mango in. It's really sweet sausage. I into stuff your face. Full of lucas. In every natural glucose fresh fruits nuts every time. You crave alcohol. Just reach out for some dates or some raisins or even like a hundred percent pure grape juice or you know have sparkling grape juice. It satisfies your cells needs for glucose that craving will stop welcome to goodbye to alcohol about calls from wealth without wine with you. Want to say goodbye to alcohol. Revie said goodbye. Twelve called over the on just so this is the podcast few. We've got recovery stories to in spy experts to inform you plenty of advice on how to drink and change your life. Hello hello and welcome to the good. By twelve coal podcast. My name is john goran. I'm the founder of wealth without wine. And i'm your host for this podcast. My hero wealth without wine we help people to change their relationship with alcohol over the past five years. We've helped hundreds of people to do just that and we created world without wind because we believe it's really really halt to change your drinking alone so wealthed without wine wit all about community each week we're going to feature a community voice just to give you a flavor of the also. Try his somebody from one of Subgroups hello everyone. So i have a little friday when which happened last night Myself my family celebrated thanksgiving with our american bamiyan states Remotely and it was the first time in twenty-six days at i would becoming face to face with an actual bottle of wine so i was a bit concerned and i knew that i had to have some safety precautions. Set in place for myself. So i had my phone Close by me. So i could contact group if i needed to My also got some alcohol free wine that was recommended by this group and And the support of my family so my mom and i enjoyed some lovely alcohol free wine. Which actually wasn't as bad as i thought it would be. We served at super chilled and it was actually super delicious and refreshing. We skype with a family overseas headed delicious meal and i didn't have a drop of alcohol And then at the end of the evening we weren't bid. I finished off my class of savvy. Rich in the candlelight listening to some chile music Went to bid and the biggest one of all was waking up this remembering exactly what happened last night and without a headache I'm super proud of myself. Never ever in a million years thought that this was possible. But it did it and today is day. Twenty-seven machine all a fabulous wonderful weekend wherever you are in the world if huge cut to join our woman welcoming community and get a bit of support. Just go to weld without wind dot com and click on the membership top. So let's get my guest today into being a lady who's pretty well known here in south africa. Her name is maryanne sheera now. Maryanne is a woman before had time. She wrote a book called the natural way more than twenty years ago. An only now is the way of life. She advocates going mainstream on apart from being an author. Marianne is a motivational speaker. And she runs a very successful pekan restaurant as well as running natural health programs. I'll begin by asking maryanne satele to bit about herself. I had serious health problems which included being bipolar had kids at had ear infections tonsillitis runny noses that was high blood pressure so we had these kind of. I call him normal health problems because it wasn't like the big three cancer heart disease diabetes. It was just all like niggly stuff that was affecting our relationships and was affecting the way we functioned from day to day. And i have always been interested in the human body i prob- i might have become a doctor. But i'm i'm glad i didn't because it made me look for answers and other places so i was fascinated with the human body studied physiology anatomy and chemistry in the sciences and i was fascinated with the how the human body worked. So we're not. We started having these problems and we were being treated traditional medical way with anti anti-inflammatories and antihistamines for a head allergic dermatitis. On my hands and the kids with antibiotics just didn't make any sense because nobody actually got well. all it doesn't seem to do is suppress symptoms. And then they'd come back two weeks later. I saw the athol up. Gotta find answers. This was long. Before the era of google that really dates meet And just go and do a search on google. And the closest i've got to google was on several occasions sneaking into the fits medical library in johannesburg and he are trying to find says there and looking at books in the archives and just like nobody really had answers to my questions had to find the myself now. I really believed because i could see the. You'll buddy actually repays itself if you cut your finger to paint it stop. You don't need to go and you know cost a spillover it or go to the doctor. My fingers cut itself. Please can drug. I mean unless you chopped to finger off you'd want to beg on but just a cut finger. Paper cut irritate you. It hurts but you it just eventually repays itself and and if you study the human body like a did you find out that the liver you can actually cut off your liver out. Remove it entirely donated to somebody else. Give the small lobe to somebody else in the big global grow and then you've donated your smaller that logo groesbeck like this is the most amazing thing and yet when it comes to lever cancer you told is no cure for it. You're going to die while you would because you're going to be given all these drugs and you live a second will just get sick and pick up than you will die so i was looking for ways to correct the looking for the causes and then ask trying to fix the causes. I did find that. Nutrition made a huge difference. When i changed my diet. Took after find sugar and my by pella symptoms when my crazy periods of manic unbelievable highs. We are could take on the world. And i was going to change the world and i'm actually by nature very idealistic person and my mission in life is i want to change the world. One person at a time. I want to get them healthy enough. Got the goal to reach. A million people wrote a book called the natural way it came out in nineteen. Ninety-one was a runaway bestseller according to the publishers and it sold as i say of three hundred thousand copies it's been published in the united states. The funny thing is it seems to be taking of now first published in the states in two thousand five fifteen years not getting traction. So it's like if it does take off and i happened to reach the new york times. Basically nobody can ever say was an overnight success at this pathetic years. So you're a woman before your time. Someone emission to really help people if i can get rid of my bipolar symptoms and be completely sane And and thinks straight and have a brain in and and bow bowels and bladder that works properly all the time and be living in that sweet spot of health than anybody can do it. Because i had terrible problems. Janet listening to all calls from weld without wine. Marianne take me about you just mentioned alcoholic parents. It that intrigued me wondering if that was one of the reasons why you want it to research to health unle- to healthier lifestyle was that of a trigger. I think it. I think it was. I think you know even mentioned to some one time that i want to try to get drunk when us fourteen and jank moms cara pheno one and didn't like the way i felt i felt out of control and i think that sense of not being in control of my immediate environment and i wouldn't say i'm a control freak but i needed to be common working properly and audley at the sense of order i think that comes from growing up in the chaos of alcoholic appearance at home and my mom was a party animal. She was functional alcoholics. She could party all night and go to work the next day in absolutely fine my father however party will not and he wouldn't work for six months and that was you know he'd worked for six months and then not work for six months to a year or two years so we grew up with that sort of chaotic and then my parents got divorced because my mother said she had four kids anita fifth one. My father married. Somebody was crazy as he was. You know do things like pour petrol over my stepmother and threatened sitter a lot this crazy stuff that chaos does makes you want to live an ordinary that the thing. That really got to me when i was a kid. My mom had this medical encyclopedia. And i would pour over at the age of four hundred. All these gory. Pictures of people as innocent large thyroid landed was like the size of pumpkin and the knicks and these open ruins and at sit there and cringes kind of not. Wanna look at them. But it's fasten. The human body fascinated me from a very early age. My mom was kind of forward thinking as much as she was a party animal. She told us we couldn't chew gum or drink. Physical because our brains would fry and and we went lottery comic books either. So i had the sense of trying to do the right thing I think it also grows up with you know you grow up with a parent. That's a bit narcissistic. i think. Alcoholism in a sense is a narcissistic habit. Because you just carrying about a million myself. And i'm trying to numb my pain. You know not thinking about the responsibilities of life you know growing up with it. I had the saints. That i wanted to please my mom and do the right thing so i was considered the goody. Two shoes in the family just always trying to do the right thing in an nfl had to take it back to pregnancy was a need to just have off in my life Feel like yeah. Things went as chaotic. As they've seen. We moved a lot as kids. You know doing a geographic alcoholic. Parents do that things. Don't work you just move somewhere else. Yeah i've i've come across two different reactions when people have Parents they are do what she did. And react against the kale. Some won't control an order in their life all they they tend to say well. You know sin family. I'm bound to be that as well and then kinda give up unsolved drinking as well so Is that been your experience as well. Do you think people tend to go. A different one of two was party. Animal ended in two brothers. That partied hard. I mean they crashed a few calls when they were aided. And that god they've grown up and grown out of it and They've so but very working my two brothers especially very sober and very hard working And and i just think. I think what you you learn the learned behavior sydney. I look at myself is it. I may not have been addicted to alcohol. But as very addicted to sugar so ahead addictive side to me that anita to the sugar made me feel good in that space. So i suppose in a sense. I was doing much what people do with alcohol when us feeling unhappy or was feeling sad or on feeling like a done something. Well i would reward myself or console myself with suga whether it was fragile candy or cake. So is scream. It didn't really matter how much as i said. Even propane sugar staying out of the sugar bowl. As i got older. I became health conscious. South for made fudgy using brown sugar. That was really good. But you're that that that needs that sense of of you don't you you know parents at properly as if you growing up in an alcoholic home so you learn. The navy is that that it's a k. To satisfy yourself for full let need with a something in a with some people it could be gambling. All pornography will with made was shook end and food as a compulsive overeater. And the only reason we're glad clinically obese of always been physically active and and if i was not eating properly and exercising. I wouldn't ever sleep. I would. And i think that looking at having dealt with so many people in our family and with people have met of the years that alcohol sometimes puts people to sleep just eventually knocks you out so eventually do sleep when you're very active brain not taught how to look off draw brain. How what does alcohol do to bring. What is caffeine due to the brain so one minute drinking coffee over here and then that's like over stimulating central noticing. Make all your nerve cells five. Ab rapidly and then you'd having alcohol too. Because that's a natural depressant than you take the to calm you down and put you to sleep and then you wake up the next morning and you hung oversee start with the coffee again in the brain goes into overdrive. Then you would lots of sugar into the coffee. So you just getting on this treadmill and i think i think if we were taught the staff about how everybody body reacted to sit and things from when we were kids. Part of the reason assorted school is that we would understand how our body worked and figure stuff out pretty soon and make good choices. But that's me probably being idealistic as well if you were talking to someone. That was drinking super too much. They weren't really aware of what it was doing to that office. That brains. what what would you tell them. How would you summarize the home that it does to us. Gee i'm the first thing we know. Is it really damages the central nervous system in the brain. And we've now these quite a lot of research showing that parkinson's disease which michael j. fox got a really young age and he has a. He was a big drinker. Huge drinker everything. I've read on him. The alcohol played a big role in. He's laughing was younger. That can damage your central nervous system. and it doesn't do it alone. Units alcohol and sugar and bed diets and bed living but alcohol plays a huge role in that. It really affects a whole lot of things affect your central nervous system in your brain so you don't handle stress well and lacewell you handle stress. The more you're going to drink because it numbs you. Eugenic feel you can just numb yourself. you stop feeling in dozen courage assistant behavior because it becomes all about my feelings and my stress and my money to numb in. I mean we all know this. We would go without food in a hassle appearance drink and i've seen it in other families. The mother a single mumble drink because she's lonely or because she feels a failure whatever. Her reasons are and there'll be no food in the fridge. Another normal alcoholic friggin. Look on his nets moke in there in a piece of cheese. And that's about it if you lackey Most just don't have food in them. And i know as kids if they was cheese enough ridge. We would flatness in like half an hour because he's a no win. The food was going come which didn't help but encourage things like a compulsive over eating so a central nervous system and that's the one side the other side that in a fix and impacts really badly as the indicating system and that's a system that controls every single part of the buddy janice it controls your liver your lungs your kidneys digestive tract your muscle tone. You sleep your menstrual cycles. Your facility these nothing. It's not in your breathing. Your lung function your hair. Growth your nails. You'll skin it it. It affects every single part. The endocrine system produces hormones in different parts of the body in those hormones may chemical reactions take place which makes the body function properly. Have alcohol's interfering with it function because what it does is it actually pushes your blood sugar up really really high so you feel like good on alcohol woo and then your blood sugar over produces your body produces over produces insulin. 'cause you're about to go into a diabetic coma and in your body's designed to repeat itself over produces the insulin brings it all the way back down and as it starts to slide mcdonagh feeling really tired immaculate and sleep and pass out if it gets really bad And then you you. You might have something like coffee or tea or another drink to try and raise your blood sugar again so when you blood. Sugar fluctuates fitting brain and central nervous. System your endocrine system and your immune system and you can understand the not explaining this very well with the whole covid. Nineteen they send. People are drinking and having caught accidents but alcohol suppresses immune function. That's what it does. So the government instead of educating everybody in showing us adverts over and over which i think would help better than just locking everybody down and telling you you know these content touch alcohol reagan so ridiculous. You can't buy alcohol during the on the weekend so everybody's just by way more so every restaurant selling wine under the counter to the clients you know because they can't make money selling food during lockdown. It was bizarre to see the activities that going on at the end of the day understood. Exactly what it does. And how it suppresses immune function we must take these things a little bit more seriously than being wrecked on the knuckles suck educate people that teach them the stuff so i think other thing that it does and this is fascinating. Refined sugar does exactly the same thing is alcohol does just desert loose something called reactive hopper blah seamier. Which when the blood sugar shoots up to high we over produce insulin and brings it right down so down so far down your blood sugar that the part of the brain your frontal lobe that controls moral behavior planning and forethought will just shuts down completely. Okay and the part of the brain that takes over as part of the brain that controls aggression appetite and sexual function. And i think this is probably really important to help people understand these blackouts that they have so you can have a blackout but you not passed out you just living life. I mean. I know a girl that poured wax all over yourself. Hot wax in that state couldn't remember how she got burned from this x. She took all our clothes often. Did this is absurdity. Because the people that were they told her what she does. She could not believe she did something like that. I had a woman that came and spoke to me. Because i was when i speak often speak about the stuff because it played such a role in my life and how important it is to make. Sure you're getting the right kind of glucose about in a while. And she came up to me after she said. I'm embarrassed to raise my hand and tell you what i do but cannot speak to you privately. Acid short can understand when she told me the story. She said i'm going to tell you. I'm very very committed. Christian person go to church regularly. my husband's actually involved in the leadership of the church. We go to bible study on wednesday nights. We go to between one and three services and the sunday we we're involved in the charitable work and stuff but she says periodically. I wake up in another town or another suburb in strange man's bid. And i have no recollection of how i got the and i say to you consume and she said. Nah don't i said are you a sugar addict. And she said yes osama title sugar addict and it does the brain. What alcohol does we. You just black out completely. Obviously you've got to be extreme amounts of sugar to do this but alcohol does the same thing you drink. Extreme amounts you'd binge drink and the knicks thing you wake up and you in somebody else's bid and like how the hell did you get in the shame of all of this is worse than you start drinking again and this whole thing goes on so what happens is when the primitive brain takes over. You either going to get aggressive. You're going to just eat and eat and eat canoe appetites. Just nothing's gonna be enough or you. Could your sexual function could take over. And you become extremely promiscuous and that's clearly very dangerous because besides possibility of fathering all mothering a child you could end up with terrible sexual diseases. So it's it's a huge problem and people don't know this until somebody like me comes and tells him and nobody studies this. Because you take the average psychologist or psychiatrist. Dr they studying medicine and how to cheat you when you sick with medicine and surgery than looking. And what is the cause of all these problems and vivian often. It's a physiological or physical course an and utrition is something that's kind of just ignored and net. That study was done with reactive. Hoppy glycemic was done by women. Called baba read stood. She lived in the united states and operated in stable municipal area and she was in charge of the juvenile delinquent and criminal juvenile delinquent and the prisoners. The adult prisoners in the end the juvenile delinquents and she found that of them something like ninety three percent of the people that she'd work with suffered from this reactive hypoglycemia and in that state of blacked out. Where you can't remember what went on people will kill the family. They'll the children we ask you. Yeah then they will beat somebody into coma they'll be do the most. They'll they'll commit a crime. And they have no recollection of course when you committing crimes being something people like as easy to say you lost your mind and you can't remember but it's an actual condition where you had no recollection of went on. It's completely blacked out. You listening to reply to alcohol. The podcast from world without one if eat lights join our tribe. Please check out website. That wine don't cold so yeah. Apparently those many people in child but have done that have a blackout killed somebody. You cannot in jail recollection too. Many people in jail i mean. Can you imagine Horrendous but blackouts very common in all community. We talk about the loss of people have blackouts. I used to have the have them as well Boston is like all it was a walking talking blackout because I was with some friends for afternoon. And apparently i seem quite normal. You know i was walking around talking. We'd walk quite a long way together. I have no recollection. I mean we'd been drinking since frightful Drink but i. It just hit me over the edge. I lost an entire. And you know i used to have blackouts where the end of the evening was a bit fuzzy Quite remember how it may be. But this one was really serious Hated the idea thought woking talking blackout the fat my brain was so alcoholic couldn't even make memories nazi Absolutely terrifying and here's the thing that people don't understand is that you'll cells and your buddy a designed to consume glucose. Nothing works in your in your at salable. You got thirty seven trillion cells in your body. They desperately need glucose they needed to make. Atp a denison triphosphate which is what creates energy your monaco andrea desperately. Need that your every little organ nelio in the plasma critical in these tiny little things inside the cell that you can't even see with your naked eye it needs glucose your brain and central system can't work without glucose and if you're not getting enough you going to crave alcohol or sugar and barbara read stood say we knew feed children refined sugar growing up on any level. She said you're actually preparing them for alcoholism because they get into the cycle. The blood sugar going up and it's coming down and they feel that the sugar satisfies and then you you graduate from a kid to adolescence or young young person in your twenties wait sitting stuffing faced with ice cream and chocolate says locked kind of interdict so will have a drink and it does. What sugar to to you. And now you recognize that. Except that the alcohol gives you even a bit of feeling takes you higher disrupts you lower so if we understood that we need need proper glucose for body's natural glucose and and so often when i've done a talk i actually say to the audience and i remember reading this one year at a secrets convention at sun city outside johannesburg. The were probably five hundred people Woman and i said to them. Okay if you do any of you crave sugar and they've just everybody put the hand and i said when you craving sugar. What is it that you put into your mouth. What is it you put. And what is it that you actually craving an attempt to get the point across. Imagine yourself in the garden of eden and you craving something sweet. What would you eat. And there was a stately silence and this woman blonde voluptuous woman sitting in the front rows in this deep voice. Adam evan rumor osc that christian. I'm thinking this woman. It was really funny at the time. But it's just interesting because i've often christian in los angeles of austin in the republic of hot bay of austin zimbabwe of austin the uk. Austin all over the

Roland Hydra Revie John Goran Maryanne Sheera Maryanne Satele Cancer Heart Disease Diabetes Allergic Dermatitis Marianne Cara Pheno Google Anita Maryanne Tonsillitis Parkinson's Disease Knicks Lucas Johannesburg Skype Headache
Millions traveling during holidays despite warnings amid worsening pandemic

Gaydos and Chad

00:34 sec | 6 months ago

Millions traveling during holidays despite warnings amid worsening pandemic

"By health officials not to travel for the holidays, Million's or hitting the roads and sky beginning today, Triple A, predicts 84. A half million Americans will travel through January 3rd. That's a decrease of 29% from the same time last year, but more people are flying right now than it any other point in the pandemic and many of them like this woman in Los Angeles. Are taking a different approach. We have hand sanitizer gloves. I don't know, just mask trying not to drink water travel up. Hopper predicts Atlanta, Chicago O'Hare and Dallas Fort Worth will be the busiest airports of the season. ABC is Brian

Los Angeles Dallas Fort Worth Hopper Atlanta Chicago ABC Brian
More than 84 million Americans expected to travel over winter holidays as cases surge

WBZ Morning News

00:38 sec | 6 months ago

More than 84 million Americans expected to travel over winter holidays as cases surge

"To travel for the holidays, a different story on the nation's roads and airports. ABC is Brian Clark has the latest numbers beginning today, Triple A, predicts 84. A half million Americans will travel through January 3rd. That's a decrease of 29% from the same time last year, but more people are flying. Right now that it any other point in the pandemic, and many of them like this woman in Los Angeles are taking a different approach. We have hands advertiser gloves. I don't know, just mask trying not to drink water travel up. Hopper predicts Atlanta, Chicago O'Hare and Dallas Fort Worth will be the busiest airports of the season. Ryan Clark

Brian Clark ABC Los Angeles Dallas Fort Worth Hopper Atlanta Chicago Ryan Clark
Burger King Urges People to Buy Takeout -- at Other Restaurants

Business Wars Daily

03:23 min | 6 months ago

Burger King Urges People to Buy Takeout -- at Other Restaurants

"What a year. This has been so this last friday before the holidays. Here's a little sweetness. From an unexpected source burger king the multibillion dollar fast food chain is urging hungry people to buy takeout meals right now. Hardly a shocker. But here's what is in. The uk and france burger king is urging diners to eat somewhere. Else there's more to life than a whopper burger king. Uk said early this week in an instagram post. Is there really well anyway. The previous day. The government announced that london other parts of southern england would move into tier three restrictions because of rising cova rates under tier. Three restaurants pubs must close with the exception of offering takeout and delivery meals as in the us. Corona virus restrictions put thousands of small businesses and their employees at risk in response to the crisis. Burger king's instagram post extolled the virtues of variety of independent eateries. It said quote. There are many great dishes from thousands of restaurants that deserve to be as famous as the hopper for consumers. The call to action was clear. Hold off on the burgers. Independent restaurants need all our support the chain stated but the gesture went even further burger. King is pausing its own drool. Worthy burger picks and until those smaller restaurants can reopen. The chain is offering its valuable instagram. Real estate to independent restaurants for free burger king invited them to share photos of their own signature dishes on the b k account along with the hashtag walker and friends. Perhaps it's the dearth of good news. Or maybe it's because advertising someone else's product is well hardly ever done but the post went. Viral reaction was swift and almost entirely positive newspaper called money control called the campaign a noble initiative. All of a sudden. I have renewed faith in humanity. One man named bob. Hayes tweeted on twitter. Another observer commented that burger king quote has won many hearts across the globe others call the initiative bold classy an even astounding. Naturally someone couldn't resist. They called it a whopper of a campaign from a strategic perspective. The campaign is indeed a hopper that helps burger king further. It's already solid identity as a marketing mastermind. This is what an industry leader looks like. Acts like an advertises like commented copywriter. Dave delicado on linked in indeed one observer wondered what would happen if other fortune five hundred companies followed a similar playbook also on linked in ian k a manager at an israeli air traffic business. Mused imagine this happening the travel industry with a giant. like american. saying we can't get you home to israel right now but united can here's their link and safe. Travels burger king's instagram initiative follows. It's equally shocking when a month earlier with hospitality industry under siege burger king. Uk suggested followers. Patronize its actual competitors. Mcdonald's taco bell. Kfc among them. Now we have only one question for the fast food chain and it's not about pickles or fries. It's when are you going to do this in the us be k. But despite that niggling negative we have to end. Positively burger king's generosity hits. Just the right note for a world been through far too much in twenty twenty. Hopefully it shining a little good karma on the holidays just when we need it

England Burger King Corona France Dave Delicado Ian K London Government Hayes King United States BOB Twitter Israel Taco Bell KFC Mcdonald United
New York Fire That Destroyed East Village Church Also Displaced 22 Women From Shelter Next Door

Freakonomics Radio

00:49 sec | 6 months ago

New York Fire That Destroyed East Village Church Also Displaced 22 Women From Shelter Next Door

"That destroyed the historic Middle Collegiate Church in the East Village yesterday also displaced nearly two dozen women living in a shelter next door called the Hopper Home. Diane McHugh's acumen communications director. For the Women's Prison Association, which runs the shelter for those at risk of being caught up in the criminal justice system. She says their church neighbors stepped up to help them. The middle church congregants. The truly in the midst of their own crisis, responded by showing up to our family shelter where the women from Second Avenue had been re evacuated and took them to buy clothes and personal care items. Most of the women were relocated to city shelters. Others were able to stay with family and does remain unclear whether they'll be able to return to the hopper home Transit Services

Middle Collegiate Church Diane Mchugh Women's Prison Association
Cicada: A Chinese State-Sponsored Advanced Persistent Threat Group

Security Now

07:06 min | 7 months ago

Cicada: A Chinese State-Sponsored Advanced Persistent Threat Group

"Cicada It was the group's use of the zero log on vulnerability that first brought them to my attention. But the more. I dug into the background of their existence. The more interesting they became they are Chinese state sponsored and sanctioned and a highly capable advanced persistent threat. We know that's a pt group Known by several names cicada a pt ten stone panda and cloud hopper. They've been involved in cyber espionage operations since at least two thousand nine there. Cyber intrusions are generally aimed at large international japanese companies with attack Presence having been spotted in seventeen geographical regions and across multiple business sectors. The anna's not just japanese companies because affiliates or subcontractors which may well not be japanese but are connected to japanese. Parents are also targets There are an advanced persistent threat because they burrow into a large companies network and remain in place performing long-term intelligence gathering the business sectors they focus upon seemed to primarily be automotive pharmaceutical and engineering sectors. As well as managed service providers the group uses what has become known as living off the land tools meaning using what's available on a network and they do have custom malware which has been observed in the their attack campaigns including a custom malware that semantic as named back door dot heart. Ip it h. a. R. t. i p. They have not seen it being used By the group previously but now they're seeing it everywhere so it's a recent addition to their arsenal Among the machines compromise during the attack campaign were domain controllers and file servers and there was evidence of files being exfiltrated from some of the compromised machines. The attackers extensively use a newer technique known as deal l. side loading in the campaigns that at semantic has an as observed And they were also seen leveraging. The zero log on vulnerability that was patched in august of two thousand twenty so as we know a few months ago. It's been patched control. Lots of corporations haven't updated their internal machines. Zero log on Is beautifully suited for moving laterally within an organization. And we know we. We recently did a deep dive into one of the ransomware attacks which exactly you know and specifically user a log on for that purpose This deal l. Side loading takes advantage of the windows so called side by side or win s x s system To trick windows into loading a malicious dll for an application when that application is run l. side loading is becoming an increasingly popular means for sneaking militias code inside of windows operating processes. You know getting it into ram And it's very effective in avoiding antiviral systems so it should be no surprise that the present campaign was first discovered when symantec observed suspicious de l. l. side loading activity on one of their customers networks that triggered an alert in semantics cloud analytics technology would just part of their Endpoint security that the symantec endpoint security offering the activity was brought to the tension of their analysts to verify that it wasn't a false positive then it was passed up to their investigations team for further analysis since semantics instrumentation is widely spread throughout. You know they're a large customer base. Wants the so called. The indication of compromise was identified. They were then able to apply that across their entire coverage space to identify other previously unknown victim networks and enterprises and begin through through the visibility that they had to get some sense for just how pernicious and widespread. This thing was also wants something like this is discovered. It's possible scroll back. Through prior activity logs to reexamine previous behavior. That wasn't appreciated for what it was at the time and to carefully examine the timestamps on files that they now know to look for which were not previously suspect. This allows them to german. How far back. An intrusion took place although the keta group is known to have existed since two thousand nine in this case this campaign has been ongoing since at least mid october of twenty nineteen And up through the beginning of last month. October of two thousand twenty. The attacking group has been active on the networks of some of its victims for a full year. The campaign is very wide ranging with victims in a large number of regions worldwide They have found compromised corporate networks in the us uk france belgium germany the uae. India china hong kong singapore vietnam the philippines taiwan south korea and japan so this one group is widespread

Keta Group Belgium UAE France Germany UK Hong Kong India Singapore China Vietnam The Philippines United States Taiwan South Korea Japan
"hopper" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:27 min | 7 months ago

"hopper" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Weren't her goal is to make computers accessible as many folks as possible as more programmers and more computers entered the tech landscape the need for standardized computer. Programming language became increasingly urgent. So nineteen fifty-nine cobol short for common business oriented language. Well many people contributed to call ball which became the first standardized business computer language grace's arguably its biggest champion pushing for its adoption among both military and private sector users. She developed compilers for cobol by the nineteen seventies. It was the most widely used programming language in the world. The grace had left active duty. Back in nineteen forty-six she remained a navy. Reservist in nineteen sixty six age restrictions forced her to retire as commander she later called it the saddest day of her life but just seven months later grace was called back up this time to standardize the navy's multiple programming language while the increase operations in southeast asia. Amazing grace as her herself. Ordinance colder remains an active duty for the next nineteen years when she finally retired as a rear admiral. At the age of seventy-nine grace was the oldest serving officer in the us armed forces towards the end of her life grace received a number of accolades including more than forty honorary degrees. In two thousand sixteen president obama posthumously awarded her the presidential medal of freedom. She died on january. First nineteen ninety two. She was eighty five years old and accepting the national medal of technology. She wants said if you ask me. The accomplishment of the answer would be all the young people have trained over the years. That's more important than writing the first compiler all month encyclopedia will monica. We're talking about stimulus for more on why we're doing what we're doing. Check out the newsletter. Monica weekly can also follow the show on facebook and instagram. At encyclopedia will and you can find me at kaylynn torres on twitter..

obama Monica southeast asia kaylynn torres Reservist facebook twitter officer us president commander
Judge rejects attempt to block nearly 127,000 drive-thru votes in Houston area

Todd Schnitt

03:30 min | 8 months ago

Judge rejects attempt to block nearly 127,000 drive-thru votes in Houston area

"127,000 drive through votes. Hast by Harris County voters are now In the hopper to be counted. The Republicans, the GOP They let a court challenge to try tohave the drive thru balance tossed And that challenge has been rejected by U. S District Judge Andrew Hanen. Just came down this afternoon. And this was a last minute effort. Yeah, it's a Suze affirming. I just wanted to make sure Harris County is Houston. I've been to Harris County. I've been to Houston. I just just double check and make because I'm out of Texas resident. I've never lived in Texas. Just making sure Accuracy is very important to me, but there was a last ditch effort. To stop the drive thru voting And a lawsuit was filed almost a week ago. Last Tuesday, October 27th by Republicans and Republicans in Texas and Harris County wanted an invalidation. Of 127,000 balance that were cast. At thes drive thru voting places in the Houston area in Harris County. The petition, according to the Houston Chronicle, argued that drive thru voting was not allowed under the Texas election code. The GOP challenge was spearheaded by Republican activist Stephen Hosea. Wendell champion. The Honorable Stephen tough and Sharon Hempel. Drive. Thru voting is not recognized in the Texas election code. This is, according to the Republican led petition. Collinses Drive. Thru voting scheme allows any and all Harris County registered voters regardless of whether they are permitted to do so under the Texas election code to engage in early and Election Day drive thru voting The Texas Supreme Court denied the petition Sunday while a similar case. It was before. Ah Hannon in federal court. The Texas Supreme Court did not issue an opinion on the ruling on Sunday, and the move marks the second attempt to shut down drive thru voting in Harris County in recent weeks to dismantle drive thru voting in Harris County. So you know what this means? The Republicans in Harris County in the Houston area, the Republicans clearly think that this is advantage. Biden If this is advantage, Democrat That Democrats that liberals Are more prone, inclined. To go to the drive through balloting locations when they were in operation. And now we have this ruling. From a federal judge just out this afternoon. That the over 127,000 of these votes that have already been cast Will be counted. So the Republicans, the GOP led court challenge has failed.

Harris County Texas Andrew Hanen Houston GOP Stephen Hosea Stephen Tough Sharon Hempel Hast Texas Supreme Court Republicans Houston Chronicle Wendell Hannon Biden
Playing to Win With Shawn Harper

The Authority Project

06:40 min | 8 months ago

Playing to Win With Shawn Harper

"We are back on the virtual state of the Authority projects. You are the project and we WANNA slept with thirty two your name so you can sell what you're great at in. We have a treat for you today and his name is Sean Hopper. He is a former. Nfl Player. I loved the failed love football all day every day. Like I said we can probably talk about that for an hour. But we're not here for that. We're here to to make sure that you finish off strong in twenty twenty but before we dive in. Please tell US Shawn first of all who you are personally and professionally personally. Shaun Harper personally a warrior. I'm a child of God. I don't hide that. I think that often is huge. And so what? I'll just you know go there you know speaking with. Your Voice of WHO? You are mentally spiritually socially is is is extremely important if you WANNA win in two thousand twenty and end in two thousand twenty one Born raised in the south side of Columbus Ohio Had had had a very interesting childhood. But I've learned how to rebrand my adversity By looking for opportunities in looking at it from a perspective of gratitude professionally like you mentioned plate seven years professional football with the rams with the colts retired. And now I Not only run. I have my own firm for almost twenty years. I teach people how to win. That's me I love it awesome. I am so excited So tell us right now before we go further in. Tell us what project. You're currently working on right now. We know what right yes short. I just finished my first Coaching course it's it's it's actually finished. It's so new that I'm not even gonNA advertise today. A Shaun Harper wins. Probably some time next week. It'll be up but I am so excited about that in house actually challenged because you know I cut my teeth on speaking so I travel in speak all over the world and people have been challenging me like you know what this great. You're able to speak great. You have a platform but you know what when you leave. You're gone you know where the books so I hadn't heard him get books like where's your courses and so I had my first course finishing s what. I'm working on right now. Okay great okay. So let's let's get into it. Let's get into it. Tell us where do you begin? Tell us your journey like what took it to this place where you're in the space of being on stage. You're doing courses now. You're you're writing books to inspire others the that all Derived FROM OKAY. So in order for you to For me to really explain that I have to give a little back story of my personal life of my upbringing. In a kind of forced a shift in my perspective ideology and my thinking born born and raised in the south side of Columbus Ohio. And most people think you know if you play professional football your business owner you must have had great opportunities growing up silver spoon in the mouth and you know nothing. Nothing I promise you. Nothing could be further than the truth. I struggle started early a as a a product of a single home environment. Mom was mom and Dad End in Butler made whatever you have as what she wasn't. She raised six of us all by herself. Amazing six kids. One house bathroom Mom did that. She's she's a remarkable woman Educationally I really suffered a had to repeat the first grade document with four to five learning disabilities by ten miles in the fifth grade. I was kicked out of two schools for disciplinary issues Left Highschool with the one point. Six two accumulative Jeff. Nine Alesi T. A. in fact I didn't even start in a well. I barely started in high school football. I wasn't honorable. Mention all conference all city allstate or intergalactic. None of that in fact I would. I would sit at the banquets now. The other way in the back eating at nasty court on blue and guys are getting into audience. Awards and I was just so upset. I wouldn't I wouldn't tell no one but I was extremely depressed. Angry in in fact. I was voted most likely to fail in. Know right here From graduating last in my class in academics I get a phone call from junior college two year school in Iowa. And you're like Sean. We want you to come to Mason City Iowa. Junior college to play football coach. Believes you have this thing called potential. You know what a that and a I go to the Cornfield. The cornfields of Mason City Iowa in the first year at the junior college. I sat the bench the entire season. Not One play and I remember calling my mom like mom I quit. You know I give up. I'm done know know I'm I'm expecting Montlake. Baby you try come on home the opposite boy state you. You Ain't coming home like what are you coming home to get violent. Just just things in home. No don't get stale way and sometimes that shift is good for kids and so going into the second year. I had a conversation with myself and the conversation was more on the lines of you're right or they're right. You don't have the education. You don't have the accusation. You horwood football you suck right now. Okay There's no way you can be successful right but you can win. You can win and the moment I made that paradigm that shift in my mind you can win. I begin to look at life differently. A beginning look at life as a challenge to begin to look at opportunities that I've never seen like I begin to macgyver. Life right and I went from sitting on a bench with the winning mindset that I was able to adapt if you want to expand on that to being you know junior college hall of Fame All Region Full Scholarship Indiana University draft any. Nfl Pick in fourth run to taking the same concept of winning and bringing bringing it to corporate America.

Football Junior College Shaun Harper NFL Sean Hopper Mason City Iowa Columbus Ohio Authority Shawn Fame All Region Full Scholarsh Alesi T. A. Butler Montlake Business Owner Jeff America Iowa Rams Colts
Faking a Factory: Creating and Operating a Realistic Honeypot

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

06:06 min | 8 months ago

Faking a Factory: Creating and Operating a Realistic Honeypot

"I want to touch on the set up of the honeypot first. So as you were alluding to at your presentation, one of the reasons for behind pod is to understand the kind of attackers that would be interested in manufacturing facility to compromise it. So can you tell us how you set up the ICS components industrial control systems components like the hitch? The robotics workstation and try to make it as realistic as possible. So we went through we we already had four different PLC's we've used for other projects, and so we took those sees initially we were going to try and create the logic. I. But we found out is that it was actually a lot easier for us to go through and create the h. m. i.. So he went through a couple of of what our factory should be. and. We decided that we would go with a prototyping factory and the reason for that is that we could make changes on the fly would be a little bit easier instead of only making one type of part, they're pretty much always going to have the same setup. So we wanted something that was a little bit flexible so that if we went through and made changes, it wouldn't. Be, unusual. So we took our pile sees a connected them into an HMO for the. We just started dropping in some different components of what we thought would be at a prototyping facility, and that included a like a hopper or a container for our product. Basically, it was plastics, and then that would feed into a process heater that would heat up the material that would then go through an extruder and that would essentially similar to like a three D. printer or a an injection moulding print out the product, and then it would go off to a conveyor belt essentially and then get shipped out. So we had the appeal see we had different peels for different components. One of the components that one of the PC's was for the agitator in the tank as well as one of. The pumps. So the product would flow out of the tank using the agitator and then get pumped into the process that was essentially one of our PC's we had another one map for the process heater. Then another one map for the stronger and conveyor belts, and then a final one for the politics and the traffic I challenge I was just GonNa say listen I'm not too familiar with industrial countries. Can you explain what Piazzi is and what Tim is So An H. M. I is basically just a graphical interface. So when a switch on appeal see is turned on or off, usually control that through the Hmo I, just really interface, it can do other things but the primary function of the. Our human machine interface is a graphical user interface. Essentially, the L. sees a parable logic controller it can be set up in a number of ways, but typically you have logic on the device you have inputs and. Output S-. So one of the inputs might be a temperature sensor another, which could be the RPM from a motor. The outputs can be as simple as an honor offs function to turn on and off the process heater or the conveyor belt could also be something that you would use to increase or decrease the temperature of the process heater the PAC controls through. I O ports it has logic in there so that you can automatically perform functions. So if the temperature goes above five hundred degrees Fahrenheit than the PLC would automatically turn that down to four hundred fifty degrees Fahrenheit. For instance, you can set preconditions within the appeal see, and then you can also perform other demands that are remotely done through something like the. HMO. So you have fall components in your sat out, you have the agitator, the burner, the conveyor about and polite tyler, and you have a POC inter phasing with each of these components to allow the operator to adjust to operate at the components. So mostly for monitoring some some of it was for turning the process on and off, and so they it they. Had A bunch of different or a few different functions primarily turning it off and on and monitoring while the actual PLC's and we use some kind of pseudo logic in there to make it look realistic although they weren't actually connected to a real conveyor belt they weren't connected to a real prosecutor. So we simulated some of that data. So how long did it take for your team to come out with this design including the logic in the PRC's? Once. We had kind of settled on what our business was. We took about two weeks to get all of the the. All of the logic setup up that included setting up all the monitoring and all the other pieces as well, and you also have robotics on his well. Yes. So that was a simulated by one of the PLC's we didn't have a real robotic arm we did have a robotics work station. Bats some software on there, but it didn't control anything. So the way that you exposed visit a net is by the time I and also the PIC's as well. Correct. So initially, we had exposed the the robotics work station and all of the Piel sees and we did that using VNC on view only after a while we weren't really seeing anything so. We exposed with on VNC using read and write, and that's when we started getting more attacks and how is this setup different from your previous research where you were looking where research water system and the gas monitoring system I think initially on those that they had just kind of exposed certain ports in certain services online that were common I, think with the. Confident it was common to a gas station setup. This one was a lot more interactive. It required a bit more monitoring a day to day basis the other projects we were just able to collect logs whereas this one, we were actually monitoring what people were doing on our system by doing video recordings and stuff like

HMO PLC PRC Piel Prosecutor PAC Piazzi Tyler TIM
The Matter Of Castro Tum

Latino USA

03:20 min | 8 months ago

The Matter Of Castro Tum

"Roland Sylvain was born in Haiti, though by the time of his birth in Nineteen, seventy, eight, most of his family had one foot. My grandfather actually was the one that started it. He had issues in Haiti for political reasons things like that. His grandfather's problems started during the brutal dictatorship of President Francois Duvalier who's usually known as Papa doc hopper allowed no political dissent while he ruled the mortality rate of political prisoners reportedly was the worst in the world he and his son known as baby talk ruled over Haiti from the late. Nineteen fifties till the made one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty s for the first time in nearly thirty years of Duvalier, dictatorships Haitians are talking openly about overthrowing their leader ruling doesn't know exactly what went wrong. But by the time he was born, his grandfather was building a new life for himself in New York City. He was one of tens of thousands of Haitians who came to the US around that time. have been fleeing their island claiming to be refugees from political repression within a few years rowlands grandfather got settled and was able to bring the rest of his family to New York legally. and. So in December of one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, five, little seven year old role in boarded a plane in shorts and a tee shirt and flew to John F. Kennedy airport in New York City. And given the time of the year New York. City was a little bit of shock. Possible world where was that freezing? But then a bunch of his relatives pulled up in a really big van and had a run at one of the stores inside the airport and get us coats may bundle them up and welcomed rolling to America. From the moment he arrived in the US. Roland was a legal permanent resident and his life became very American very quickly after a couple of years living in Brooklyn, his parents moved him and his siblings to the New Jersey suburbs Roland finished high school and got a job at a chemical plant became the manager there everybody loved me because I was the youngest guy a job. He started making good money. Then after nine eleven he got laid off for a while which someone else might have seen as a glass half empty kind of situation. But Roland he saw freedom. Just had fun I had my four one k. that was loaded sides. I took the 401k he took off on the road kept going back to Montreal Miami Atlanta well. Texas. I. Did Texas a few Tom I was teenager. Enjoying myself and it was on one of these trips that Roland got pulled over for speeding. This traffic stop and the events that followed would lead role in story to collide a few years. Later with another man's a teenager whose unusual journey through the United States immigration system has derailed tens of thousands of people's lives. We're going to tell you both of their stories because the trouble rolling got into is still haunting him now. It's threatening almost everything he assumed to be true about his life and he isn't the only one.

Roland Sylvain New York City Haiti President Francois Duvalier United States Papa Doc Hopper Political Repression Texas John F. Kennedy Roland New Jersey America Brooklyn Montreal Tom I Miami Atlanta
Some of Edward Hopper’s Earliest Paintings Are Actually Copies He Made From a How-To Art Magazine

Kottke Ride Home

05:29 min | 9 months ago

Some of Edward Hopper’s Earliest Paintings Are Actually Copies He Made From a How-To Art Magazine

"Zoom in art history doctoral student of the court hauled institute in London has just caused quite a stir in the art world. was. Shadwick has discovered that at least three of Edward Hopper's early oil paintings are copies of other artists work. Two. Of them come from a magazine for amateur artists that was published before hopper's paintings of the same scenes and a third appears to be copied from Victorian painted porcelain plaque. Painting by Bruce Crane that appeared in the magazine, the art interchange in eighteen ninety called a winter sunset is nearly identical to. Eighteen Ninety, seven old ice pond at Nyack. A painting that also appeared in the art interchange in eighteen eighty, six called ships by Edward Moran is a near identical match to Edward Hopper's ships from eighteen, ninety eight. And the Victorian Porcelain Plaque based on an unidentified painting I think needs a little bit more verification but it does look just like hoppers 1897 church landscape. You can see all of these side by side in the New York Times article linked in the show notes. But a couple of notes on this Carter, foster hopper expert and director at the Blanton Museum of art in Texas notes that it's not at all unusual for artists of the time to have gotten their start by copying other works it was part of the learning process. But the problem is that much of the myth of hopper that he leaned into a bit while he was alive was that he had a preternatural talents especially evident in his early oil paintings that he created all on his own quoting the New York Times for Kim Canetti curator of drawings and prints at the Whitney. Museum. In New York where she is. At. Work on a big hopper, show the copying that Mr Shannon with revealed has more important repercussions. It cuts straight through the widely-held perception of hopper as an American. Original. She said as an artist whose innate genius allowed him to emerge on the scene without a debt to others. The only real influence I've ever had was myself. He wants claimed and quotes. And importantly, hoppers version of old ice pond nyack is currently being sold by an art gallery for between three hundred and four hundred thousand dollars. Will these revelations change anything about that price points and other sales of his early works? Showed wakes discovery is still in the process of being compiled and peer reviewed but perhaps, the market and hoppers legacy will shift somewhat in the near future. You know hopper's art has become a symbol of everyday life in mid century America his paintings brought to life the predominant thoughts and feelings of the time quoting again from the New York Times critics and scholars have always been intrigued by awkwardness that hopper allowed himself in many of his classic paintings sees that looked more painted than liquid in his famous groundswell, the Awkward Anatomy of his female nude in morning in the city or the stony faces of the diners in nighthawks. Now that we know that hopper was never a painting prodigy we can think of his later paintings as deliberately revisiting the limitations of his adolescence and finding virtue and power there. There's a classic move in American. Culture to see the unschooled in Homespun as more authentic and especially as more authentically American than the sophist stories of those decadent old Europeans end quote. And yet this is something I think about sometimes you know oddly for a nation. So deeply entrenched in its origins in the idea of the Protestant work ethic does seem to be this pervasive narrative throughout the centuries in. United. States that someone who is just miraculously gifted born perfect in a certain field or talent without help or instruction from anyone else is so much better. So much more deserving of being glorified than someone who Had to work hard at it who trained in grew over time maybe made some mistakes along the way not only does that do a disservice to the true fact that many people do have to work hard to perfect skills and talents and lead many to give up if they think they're not perfect at their first shot, but it erases the many people who help someone hone their craft and make it to where they are. Leads us to only praising leaders, celebrities, Star athletes, people in the spotlight and forgetting all about the people, the coaches, the teachers, the drivers, the medics, the operations, managers, the custodial workers, the domestic workers, the caregivers. Who Make someone's life like that possible I don't think there is anything at all wrong with Edward Hopper copying other artists as he learned his craft. But I do think it speaks volumes that he chose to or felt he had to particularly as he became this emblem of Americana Incarnate, hide that he had had any type of early instruction or influence, and thereby taking credit over these other artists instead of bringing them into the fold with him the New York Times mentions that part of it was so revolutionary and captivating about hoppers work was his depiction of average everyday life in America and they conclude I. Agree quotes. If. Hopper claimed to be an absolute original uninfluenced by others, his greatest paintings work hard to convey a different image of their maker. Their studied awkwardness asks us to imagine him as someone who might indeed have started his career copying someone else as just your average American working hard to make good end quote.

Edward Hopper New York Times Edward Moran New York Blanton Museum Of Art Shadwick Bruce Crane Nyack London Whitney Mr Shannon America Kim Canetti Carter Director Texas
"hopper" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"hopper" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

"Promo could Adam or twenty five percent off so right yes I wanNA to get back to the death of facts. Are we saying that people have lost track of facts? Because they're so focused on feelings. Is that the hypothesis here? There's there's two basis for an argument debate heated discussion. Whatever you WANNA call it there to hoppers. You could pull from you could pull from a fax hopper or you could pull from a feelings hopper when you want to have a debate. An argument or a disagreement. Okay guys like you actually more so guys like me. Probably pull from purely facts hopper now You always take a little bit from feelings hopper is well you take you take three scoops from the facts copper and a teaspoon from the feelings hopper and you spread it over. You don't have feelings and not that I don't have you. You do it that way. When we argue with our wives they take three big scoops from the feelings hopper illegal. Pixie dust from the facts hopper. Okay that's how they are argue. It's I don't I'm not telling you that one ways even more effective than the other. But that's how people argue one hopper or the other hopper and there's always going to be a little co mingling now the more you pull from the feelings hopper and the less from the facts hopper the less actual information you have but you still may win the argument because you're crying or you're talking louder or you're you're making the proclamation that not one child should be left behind and people have realized that the facts hopper. That's a hard hopper to keep up. You have to read a lot if eat researching to keep checking your own information the feelings operas always there. It's always available is very easy to get and then facts. Dr Go to die well now that we have more ban thinking and acting like women. Then there's going to be more arguments from the feelings hopper. I said that for quite some time. Thank you all right and wrong. Bring it home drift been stellar. Show for you staring at your phone. The whole time trying to fix Chris hardwick finger aright. Mostly all right You can go to my youtube page. Youtube dot com slash. Amc Ron see a bunch of stand up their free. Stand up and you can Preorder my ebook. I'm your emotional support. Animal and Check that out is coming out. I think June sixteenth grew Dr Dot Com. Got All the pods there TELMEX. I'm Dr drew saying Mahallah..

hopper Dr Dot Com youtube Dr Go Adam Chris hardwick Ron
"hopper" Discussed on Dots, Lines & Destinations

Dots, Lines & Destinations

10:54 min | 1 year ago

"hopper" Discussed on Dots, Lines & Destinations

"Welcome to episode two hundred eight of DOTS lines and destinations. I'm Steven Seagraves. Joined by Seth Miller doing. I'm doing all right Tired today yet. It's groundhog day here. How you doing again like I said earlier. Yeah it's actually also a little weird for me. Because I think this is my second podcast and third audiovisual recording today. But all nice and there's some topics but I'm GonNa try to say unique an interesting things. This what's What other shows should we listen for your good question? I'm on Ashok this week. Okay which that Flaring or twenty four guys and Inmarsat which is one big flat inactivity and satellite operator companies is doing a online sort of Sort of an all day seminar next Wednesday the twenty ninth talking about all things passenger experience in flight connectivity. But also the news and other developments seating and I'll just all sorts of really interesting stuff sort of replacing Aircraft Interiors not replacing trying to get some similar content produced and we all miss starbucks show in Hamburg the beginning of the month so did a test run of what that video is. GonNa look like so. We can be ready to have something to go for next Wednesday. So it's A. It's been a sick day for me. Post the links in the show notes. Sure I should probably member do that idea. I'll send you a note to remind you assistant producer this week. I like to talk about. I think some of the one of the big ones the Kinda hit the news today on. We're recording this on on Tuesday. The twenty-first April Air Canada is temporarily suspending all transporter flights with the US They had previously cut back to just eleven route from twenty six or so or alone destinations from twenty six But I gotta be. I'm a little surprised they were running still running that many. This goes back to like. Why is North America's still flying planes when no one else is in a lot of ways but that's an interesting point right like why? Why are there so many flights United States? Something I've noticed is like there's a huge number of southwest flights compared to the rest of the carriers. Yes actually just chatting with someone about that literate before we started southwest today ran about thirty five percent of. It's normal schedule where everybody else's Attended twenty and up until now had been running close to fifty and on the one hand. You could say you know. Gosh that some gumption. They've got the spirit Bad Pun. Sorry they're gonNA keep moving no matter what serve customers that need to go Also I think it's stupid also like you know. Post nine eleven. They kept flying their full schedule because they wanted to be there. And yet for the quick bounce back but this is not going to be a quick bounce back and I just don't understand it. Yeah yes I mean your question about Air Canada similar I think they were flying these destinations y. Yeah I mean the borders closed to non-essential travel right. I mean it's not even like we really don't think you should. You gotta go to like a immigration officer and be like no no. This is actually important. Sorry you have to let me in record. We were told if we needed to go to Canada. We need paper on a good day fighting with the Canadian Border Patrol for other people. I've never had promised but I've heard great stories from you and others about the troubles. That can come. Yeah I just I don't get I don't get why anyone WANNA fight with border patrol officers at any level but like pushing your luck on that and so there can't have been that many people like where they are Canadians for the last three weeks. That have been like. Oh I'll just go back on the next flight now. I still got some work to do here. I it just doesn't make sense to me. Yeah Yeah and I don't. I don't think it was close to. Us citizens right so they it. It was like soft close and then became non essential travel closed. Okay so it's sufficiently closed and they just announced yesterday or the day before another day before. Xhosa Sunday but in recent days they just extending that Non Essential non essentials closure for another month. Which is why the flights are finding suspended. Gotcha okay so there's a reason for it but it's It's still weird so it leaves leaves American Delta United Really. The only one's flying to handed I. I'm not sure if WESTJET REPORTER ARE FLYING TRANSLATOR. They started them not. Yeah so and for what? It's worth Canada's now. Also requiring facemask masks of any sort just tired to shoot around your face if you forget one But anything across your face if you're getting on an airplane so interesting but yeah I mean along those. Those there was some there was a united call today right like a town hall or something that they have as their sort of like internal Staff briefing and I mean it's they're running what ten percent load factors right now on ten percent of the schedule. Really Amazing. Yeah so one tenth of what does that. Come out to like one tenth. Not Normal load. Yeah Yeah One. One percent one percent. Which is I mean. It's not I mean it's it's Kinda hard to believe. Yeah and it's and they're not alone. I mean if you look at the numbers that Tsa PUBLISHES EVERY DAY. Like traffic is down ninety. Four percent or whatever. Ninety six percent. They're suggesting that it's a huge. You know that it's there's just skeleton passengers if you look at the numbers it's worse than you think because the scans Con Bembibre concessions stand and other people working at the airport to actually I think those are automated counters of like bodies walking through machines. Not some guy checking things so you know. It's it's a lot of a lot of problems. It's no passenger so like they're really. I actually got a a message from a flight attendant friend. Working Three Twenty noted that forty five passengers on board Amazon in my seat. Because that's like double the load of normal. Yeah I saw a couple of flights. I kinda monitor united flights every now and then. I saw a few flights the other day Denver to Houston was relatively full. Ask hub to hub kind of makes sense but on a mid mid week so strange it there are some you know arguably. I'll say that's good news because the cuts are working. The capacity cuts are coming down. And so you know if you can see us. Thirty to fifty percent full flight today. That represents what would have been three weeks ago ten her five flights that we've all been five to ten percent full and so it's it's better and I don't think we want to some level you wanNA say Gosh. You need the central plains. There can't be anybody on board but that's also stupid and there are reasons. Some people need to travel by air at demean whether it's country to get around and unlike Europe for example like the border between states are vaguely still open in most cases. Yeah or or Florida or Texas I. There's some even actually stuff out though. Yeah that was. That was funny. That I think New Hampshire even has like a sort of please quarantine yourself if you get here policy got so but you know it's. I'm glad that the flights are being cut. I still think that more should be. And we'll see I mean you know but this goes back to why South West someone asks me. Do they have some sort of special deal where they are able to fly them cheaper than everybody else? I don't think that's the case. I just think you know I'll never get an answer session. Sense up into court common. Ask but like high. Why are you doing the stupid thing that no one else is doing? Rarely gets a response that I'm looking for my brother. Yesterday had to fly to Raleigh kind of like last minute from Houston and on a southwest. Flight there's a nonstop at of Hobby to Terrell was on that flight and he was him and another guy. Yeah so right I mean like you had to go so and to be fair in a lot of ways the. Us government is paying for these flights to operate by. That's the argument you can make. As they've they're covering payroll costs are seventy percent of payroll costs of which thirty percent is alone in ten percent comes back in. Warren's so fifty percent of payroll costs which maybe is in the end. Fuzzy math is fifteen to twenty percent of the full cost of Ryan the flight but the federal government is subsidized now pressures flights to make sure that people can get around because the US government recognizes that that has to happen and doesn't want to deal with another million people on employment and with no health. Insurance I think the I mean speaking speaking of like non-full planes. You actually posted a story about a new seating options and it's the in Anyang seating option. Yeah it's bizarre it's obvio- interiors is the name of the company and there. They are normal seating provider there Celsius two airlines like they're not sort of supermassive or bigger. They're not the biggest by any stretch. They're like Certainly top five and they're known for doing some creative things from time to time. And they've designed the product that is the middle seat for a single-aisle planes three three but the middle seat faces backwards. And they're sort of like a wavy divider between everybody so everybody has their own armrest got walled. Lean against instead of your neighbor. Obviously in the same space you'd have some issues of the cushion getting a little narrower which some people complain about There's concerns about like staring at your neighbor. Which is also an issue with everything else. Like that. Sort of from facing thing right. No one likes the vehicle for that same problem except in this case you can't lie down and put up divide or you're just staring at them you know. Some people are inclined and from what they wrote on the press release. It sounds like it's an articulated recline so like the Pan sides forward rather than the seat going back. He lose knee room during their Klein. Which people wouldn't like it? There's a lot of problems with it but it does sort of solve some solution Some provide some solutions. That was terrible senator There's a lot of problems with it but it also offers solutions. Yeah good editor. I would just fix that. And so you know it's interesting to me. I think it's a good conversation point but I don't think it'll overfly so I don't know also expensive to buy install new seats to the divider right. The partition between the seeds is like this molded plastic. Yeah which can't be easy to to you know are cheap to pay for I'm guessing because now you're having to install this extra thing and maintain it right because now batch it and and Kirti it gets back to you know coughs or whatever you gotta like. Do you wipe it down every trip. I don't know every time it's a cool concept I the idea of flying backwards in staring at somebody's definitely not compelling to me I was on a Jau flight where they have kind of forward backwards facing seats and you have to have the divider down during takeoff and landing and it was. It was awkward like because the way that they were setup is I mean he was literally I could not look at all to my right without staring right at him. So yeah it's weird. America America has a set similar to the other here which is concept that we might be. Yeah there was that they were installing them. They had to stop. Because like if you're seat-mate moved at shook your C- to too much or bolted together to Ross. Here's thing like all of those. What I really like is looking backwards out the window seat..

US Canada Inmarsat Houston Steven Seagraves starbucks Seth Miller Ashok Air Canada North America Aircraft Interiors WESTJET Canadian Border Patrol April Air Canada Hamburg Us America producer New Hampshire Europe
"hopper" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

Stuff Mom Never Told You

16:05 min | 1 year ago

"hopper" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

"Harvard Kentucky. Dan South yes. Yeah Amazing Grace. Indeed right and while. There's always aggravation that I feel when these awards come later and then many of them after the fact her kids right right. It's nice to know that many people at least finally come to the Hopper Party right. She has like the world's largest conference for women in computing aimed. At least like the legacy is there. At least people know who she is. And you know that actually wasn't a guarantee She was kind of in obscurity for a very long time until was sixty minutes did a special on hers and all of a sudden people are like wait. What yeah which is in some ways? Because if she is done she did so much and we still use so much of what she built without creditor crediting Mary disheartening. So I'm starting to get the recognition long-deserved whether she does not want to know who who are all the other stories and people of Color who contributed to these revolutions right to our knowledge base and you know get one month out of the year that we tell their history and we tell the same story over and over again and I just. I want there to be so many more of these. These incredible stories told because you know they were there. We just don't know their names exactly. Yeah that's right you know. We sort of already talked about. The premise of our podcast may think it's very clear why enroll hopper is our unofficial patron saint. But what what is so important about her too is that she probably if you asked her right. She was like Oh. I'm too busy working on this thing. I can't talk about whatever you want to ask. You know like she was just like head down in work and she was just you could tell so passionate about cracking open things that should never be closed like she was like yes. Why wouldn't writing and mass go together more? Why would end we in these different industries? Use the same language like she was just by showing up and living what she was passionate about. She was an innovator right. I I think you know on our show. We talk with different. Innovators Lee really liked to have conversations with guests who are really bridging different fields and saying no to silos. And it's not surprising to us that it's really easy for us to find female identifying guests for our show like. This doesn't seem coincidental at all. Yeah I mean it reminds me of Cindy Gallop who's a fabulous woman In the advertising industry and in Technology Who has a famous saying? She says women are often disruptors. Because they're the default like the world was not designed for women and so as a result they see where the friction is or where things could be designed better and that makes it Maybe not easier for them to innovate. But it certainly gives them a perspective. That is outside of this is how things have always been done or this just works because it works and so I think we see that. Very clearly with Admiral Hopper as well as so many guests on our show where they say. That didn't make any sense to me and so I tried to see if there was a different way to go about doing it. Yeah yeah absolutely. I think you know hopper is such a incredible example of this. Just steely resilience of shooting. Like I'm too small for the navy will let go somewhere around here right like I'm just going to be in spaces that weren't built for me but I will. I will shift the spaces in mortar to do the work that I want to do. The fact that she was able to do that so many times in the span of her life at a time. When you know I mean my gosh. It continues to be difficult right. But she was able to just bust through so many doors just iconic and bad ass and so inspiring right. I just love so much that she went and got a waiver. Like she's GonNa take. This is such an important thing. I think I say this to my meant. He's all the time where they're like. Well I'm not qualified for that thing or like I don't meet the whatever the minimum rules and I'm like did you ask if they'd make an exception and they're like why they make an exception for me and I'm like do you think don't exceptions. Ever like go ask right and more often than not. There are waivers to be found. You'd probably just hurt my light bulb. Which is I feel like getting a waiver is GONNA be my new comeback to any feel like well. I'M GONNA go get a waiver and we do this to the waiver. So we're GONNA come back with a little more from Keeton Christina but we have one more break March sponsor. Okay so a recent study found that a great hair day makes you happier more confident but the same study also revealed that ninety. Five percent of women don't feel great about their hair. I can definitely relate to the confidence part because my hair is doing something a little weird. I don't want it to do then. I can't stop thinking about it. The rest of the day Alma Guy. We've all been there. Panties rosewater collection feels and smells amazing and comes with a deep treatment. That leaves your hair pedal soft. It was inspired by Ramadan traditions. When many in the Middle East break the fast with rosewater because of its hydrating benefits and the collection is free of sulfates parabens dyes and mineral oil. You had to look really great. Thank you I actually worked in a place for a while. That was very sensitive environmentally. And we weren't allowed to use shampoos that had sulfate in them. So that's something that I look for these days and bonus. 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Hopper Party Admiral Hopper Harvard Kentucky Cindy Gallop Carolina Bermudez Dan South Middle East Keeton Christina Mary Lee Alma Guy navy
"hopper" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

Stuff Mom Never Told You

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"hopper" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

"I'm not GonNa lie the exhausts me 'cause. Go overboard to prove ourselves not only. Do what you're asking me to do, but I'm going to go beyond, so I can prove that all you want. In order to. Not, only do I have to go do what I'm supposed to do, but unlike a white man I have to go beyond that. Show you I'm more. Than that be us. That's. That's the thing if you can bring others like you along behind. The door open. One of the things that hopper was known for not just in believing that anyone could code, but she's specifically went out and recruited young woman, and and taught them. She's like if I can teach them how to do it, then everyone will see that everyone can learn how to do it, so she didn't just like. Allow herself to be the exception. Really designed a world and brought people along with her. That said I'm not the only one I'm just the first because I'm the first one to ask for the waiver arm I. One that had the stamina to put up with all of this crap, but there are lots more like me and I'm GonNa. Make sure that I bring them along with me to ensure that we stay. Yeah, which is right, and and she just created this undeniable force from doing that, which as we saw more than one time in history, a bunch of dudes. We're like Oh. Wait, Whoa, yeah, we need you. Like yeah. I'm I'm throwing this proverbial party over here with a lot of bad ass. Humans. Get on board or Another train move on Ofek. Also going back to what you said earlier about the context of how many I have we lost. so I'm glad. These stories are starting to come out and always important to have that context of there were people doing these things were not recognized and have not been yet right, but hopefully. Hopefully and then we can get because there are the stories that's been the theme today. Covering stories of this was done I. We just didn't know about it. We had to put all this research, and there are many more who we didn't know about that. Still it coming out and hopefully we can continue to find that I'm sure we will continue to find that and dig deeper, which is phenomenal straight because that means, we can keep learning. All like big old shiny gold stars to you to. Having an episode idea now I and inspiring to relieve deep dive a woman in history who we love, and in just I mean I I feel my gosh just every time. I look at her story. There's just Wardha more than mine. IMMORTALIZE RIGHT YES! Gold Stars to you as well. I mean when you said it was the first pitch you said, and I was like yes. I love her..

Ofek hopper
"hopper" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

Stuff Mom Never Told You

05:23 min | 1 year ago

"hopper" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

"Her back to active service at the age of sixty. Whichever doing this map. It's now twenty six years past when they told her she was too old, right? She's now called up to active duty. Because literally no one could do which she could do. And, then she remained on active duty for nineteen more years. And became the oldest serving officer in the US armed forces so. That age. I can't imagine getting that call. What what? Would you say you need? About. Isaac, Hetty. Era! When we're talking about comebacks clapback. She's like Oh. Tell me that again. How? Nicely. And I'd say great. My price has doubling. Say how much you. Sure. She couldn't do that and. I'm saying. It's probably nicer than what I would've. Acknowledged that you are the only person who can do this, yes. Absolutely and your team of people to keep you as hopefully. So so going back to right in the wake of Pearl, Harbor Right Nineteen, forty-three. She's gotten the waiver. She was able to join the navy. At this point she had been married for fifteen years to a fellow academic, and that marriage wasn't hopper got divorced, and so at that time she was really eager for a new path, which admitted academia, and she's like Jonesing for a new challenge. And in case you're wondering about her personally. She never had children, and she never remarried after her divorce, but she did date other people we've read. She still had a life. I love it. That's right. That's okay, so hopper joined the navy. She goes into basic training and she thinks that she's going to be assigned to the CRYPTOGRAPHY unit to help decode communications, but literally in the weeks that she's in basic training plans change and she gets sent up to Harvard to become the literally the third ever computer programmer of the world's first the mark one. So. That's what like you know. Things were changing fast and furiously in the moment, but she you know she could see how and why her skills were relevant and I think that that one little decision to send her up to Harvard really changed the course of all of human technology. yeah, it's. It's so true and I love this fact that. After the war cover was actually offered a full professorship at Vassar. So I feel like the department Vassar was like a-. We hide you teaching those terrible classes and I'm back in. End. She said no, she was like. I'M NOT GONNA. Come back because she wanted to stay at Harvard, she wanted to keep working on the mark wine. And during this time she became a research fellow in engineering sciences like physics, and she helped develop the mark to computer and then the mark three computer. and. Even though she did all of this eventually, it became clear that she wasn't going to be promoted or granted tenure at Harvard, which is just like who was running the place. Had over, here yeah. Why so she was like all right academia. I'm done with you and she went into the private sector. brought us the compiler and Kobe like. It wasn't a terrible outcome for humanity, but it's frustrating on her behalf. Right like it still wasn't good enough. But it's okay because she ended up being the recipient of more than forty honorary degrees, she got scholarships and professorships and awards in two thousand sixteen President Obama posthumously gave her the Presidential Medal of freedom, which is the nation's highest civilian honours so harbored..

research fellow Harvard Harbor Right Nineteen US Vassar Isaac Kobe officer Obama President Hetty
"hopper" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

Stuff Mom Never Told You

12:31 min | 1 year ago

"hopper" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

"And we're back things boxer. She found a way to live her vision of creating a common language. For technically savvy. People and people who didn't identify as Tech Savvy. Basically she was able to hang out with everybody uninformed she got everybody to hang out we also need to mention okay in nineteen sixty nine. She was awarded the Data Processing Management Association's Man of the Year award. No one saw the irony is also. This is a crucial fact about her. She invented the term. Bug is in computer blindly. Yeah and and she invented it after an actual bug. This is true was a moth was found in a computer that was having issues and she took that off and she taped it in her notebook along with her notes from the day. And we still use that to describe a problem that prevents a program running successfully. I love that she saw problem and just sort of embraced it as. Yeah that's what that is and here. It is completely in. Our vernacular weirds me out about. This is having a bad bug taped in the notebook. Christina Doug's right. Yeah I'm I'm a little screen. What they're enough. I must say oh. I use word every day. You don't really think about it. When you have an inkling of why do we call it? That and then there's this amazing story behind it happens. I would love to like every time I heard. Someone say that there was a bug in the system. Somehow just this like a Hologram of grace hopper take credit for the or some kind of like praise Hubbard trademark. Just shows up a little a little bell to ring right like everytime a bell rings an angel gets its way hotter gets her credit but he's actually a woman gets the credit she asking and we have to talk about her background because she obviously was a bad ass. But how did Admiral Hopper become such a bad as? Yeah well it all started you could say on December ninth nineteen sits in New York City when Admiral Hopper then Grace Brewster Murray was growth. Name was bored. Great Start. Let's fast forward just a little bit. Yeah I think that's a great idea. It was clear looking at her upbringing. That education was important family. Her Dad actually went to Yale where she would eventually go. She went to private schools. And in nineteen twenty eight. She graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Vassar College at two degrees both in math and physics and then in one thousand nine hundred thirty. She got her masters degree in mathematics from Yale and the next year began teaching mathematics at Vassar while finishing her doctorate in Yale in mathematics and mathematical physics. She finished that in nineteen thirty four. So No slouch working while finishing the doctorate right and you know. There's actually an interesting historical act here that a relatively high number of women receiving doctorates in the nineteen twenty s and the Nineteen Thirties and the number of women who were receiving doctrines at that time wouldn't be matched again until the late nineteen eighties. How just kind of crazy to think about right like there? Was THIS UPTICK in women getting doctorates and the valley and it up kicked again You know like fifty sixty years later so you know it. Sort of seems the postwar kind of leave it to beaver era American. Suddenly decided women should resign being mothers and housewives. And you know there was a war going on there. Were things that needed to happen during that more jobs that needed to be had. But it's also important to know this wasn't always the case I love going back to history and signing moments when women had a lot more power than they did in half a while to their right into the habit exactly and You know either case. Her success in a male dominated field and in male dominated organizations like the military it was truly exceptional right so after she got her PhD. She became a full fledged math. Professor Vassar and she became very famous at Vassar and which he was known for was bringing in content from other disciplines in her math courses so her classes became some of the most popular of the department. People would just show up to hear her lecture. I love this so much. Because basically they gave her a lot of the craft courses and she had a lot of them in one semester. She was teaching. I think like six courses. She was yeah she was given kind of the the runt workload and she said you know what fine. I'm GonNa make these classes fascinating. She's Toke. What came naturally to her this interdisciplinary interest and she applied it to her pedagogy so while she was professor she had the rights to audit classes at Vassar. She could sit in on anything she wanted and she attended classes in get this list. This is an insane list in astronomy. Physics Chemistry Geology Biology. Zoology economics architecture philosophy and the history of scientific thought so she she was curious and she. She found like newfound knowledge applications of mathematics in those fields and she brought those applications into her courses which helped make math relevant for students a wide variety of majors and that was so crucial that she wasn't teaching these concepts in a vacuum shoes showing them. How does this apply to your world? And why does it matter right right and just love thinking about that student? Who's like showing up for this? I don't know statistics class in this like this is just going to be a snooze fast. Hover is just off in the front and just completely breaking down whatever expectations all of those students came in with you know and that was just another one of her superpowers is. She was his connector and another thing that she did along these lines which is so fascinating. Profound is that she incorporated writing in her math courses. They were essay assignments. Her students sometimes complain if this was a math course not an English hopper replied that. There's no use trying to learn math unless you can communicate with other people. So if we haven't yet mentioned that she was known as Irreverent sharp-tongued and Brilliant. She was queen of the comeback is so crucial to her later. Success right her ability to connect ideas but also talk about her work. Really truly communicated English is what made her so successful okay. So she's teaching Vassar. She is a professor and then Pearl. Harbor happens and hopper like a lot of other people in her family in her community. They wanted to serve their country but she was thirty four years old which the military deemed too old. Someone who is has thirty four currently. I'm insulted by agreed also was considered fifteen pounds underweight for her. I do not suffer from that problem. That was too old to small small and so the military was like no thanks and then they reconsidered because her mathematical skills were pretty in demand and so after like petitioning for a waiver she In December nineteen forty-three. She was able to join the navy which was super exciting. Yes and not just going to jump ahead here because this was one of those moments and we'll jump right back one of more than one times that the navy was like we're done with you or we don't need you and they were like. Oh wait you're actually too valuable. Because when hopper was sixty she was forced to retire from the Navy due to her age but then a mere seven months later didn't even take a year. The navy called her back to active service at the age of sixty. Whichever doing this map. It's now twenty six years past when they told her she was too old right. She's now called up to active duty because literally no one could do which she could do and then she remained on active duty for nineteen more years and became the oldest serving officer in the US Armed Forces. So that age. I can't imagine getting that. Call What would you say you need about? Isaac Hetty era. When we're talking about comebacks clapback. She's like Oh. Tell me that again how nicely I'd say great. My price has doubled. Say How much you sure she couldn't do that and I'm saying it's probably nicer than what. I would've acknowledged that you are the only person who can do this. Yes absolutely and your team of people to keep you as hopefully so so going back to right in the wake of Pearl Harbor Right nineteen forty-three. She's gotten the waiver. She was able to join the navy. At this point she had been married for fifteen years to a fellow. Academic and that marriage wasn't hopper got divorced and so at that time she was really eager for a new path which admitted academia. And she's like Jonesing for a new challenge and in case you're wondering about her personally. She never had children and she never remarried after her divorce but she did date other people we've read. She's still had a life. I love it. That's right that's okay. So hopper joined the navy. She goes into basic training and she thinks that she's going to be assigned to the CRYPTOGRAPHY unit to help decode communications but literally in the weeks that she's in basic training plans change and she gets sent up to Harvard to become the literally. The third ever computer programmer of the world's first the mark one. So that's what like you know. Things were changing fast and furiously in the moment but she You know she could see how and why her skills were relevant and I think that that one little decision to send her up to Harvard really changed the course of all of human technology Yeah it's it's so true and I love the fact that after the war cover was actually offered a full professorship at Vassar so I feel like the department Vassar was like a- we hide you teaching those terrible classes and I'm back in end. She said no she was like. I'm not gonNA come back because she wanted to stay at Harvard. She wanted to keep working on the mark wine and during this time she became a research fellow in engineering sciences like physics and she helped develop the mark to computer and then the mark three computer and even though she did all of this eventually it became clear that she wasn't going to be promoted or granted tenure at Harvard which is just like who was running the place over here. Yeah why so? She was like all right academia. I'm done with you. And she went into the private sector brought us the compiler and cobol like it wasn't a terrible outcome for humanity but it's frustrating on her behalf right Like it still wasn't good enough but it's okay because she ended up being the recipient of more than forty honorary degrees. She got scholarships and professorships and awards in two thousand sixteen President Obama posthumously gave her the Presidential Medal of freedom which is the nation's highest civilian honours so Harvard.

Admiral Hopper Vassar College navy Harvard Yale Nineteen Thirties professor Professor Vassar Data Processing Management Ass New York City Christina Doug Phi Beta Kappa Physics Chemistry Geology Biol Hubbard underweight research fellow Obama US Armed Forces Isaac Hetty
"hopper" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

Stuff Mom Never Told You

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"hopper" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

"How does this apply to your world, and is it matter right? Right and just love. That student WHO's like showing up for this I don't know statistics class in this like this is just going to be a snooze fast. Hover is just off in the front and just completely breaking down whatever expectations all of those students came with you know, and that was just another one of her superpowers. Is this connector and another thing that she did along these lines, which is so fascinating profound is that she incorporated writing in her math courses. They were essay assignments. Her students sometimes complain if this was a math course, not an English. Hopper replied that there's no use trying to learn math unless you can communicate with other people. So if we haven't yet mentioned that, she was known as irreverence, sharp-tongued and brilliant. She was queen of the comeback. is so crucial to her later success, right her ability to connect ideas, but also talk about her work. Really truly communicated English is what made her so successful. Okay, so she's teaching Vassar. She is A. Professor and then Pearl Harbor happens and hopper like a lot of other people in her family in her community. They wanted to serve their country, but she was thirty four years old, which the military deemed too old. Someone who is? Has Thirty, four currently I'm insulted by agreed. Also was considered fifteen pounds underweight for her I. Do not suffer from that problem. That was too old to small. Small, and so the military was like no thanks, and then they reconsidered because her mathematical skills were pretty in demand and so after like petitioning for a waiver, she in December nineteen, forty-three. She was able to join the navy. which was super exciting? Yes and just going to jump ahead here because this was one of those moments, and we'll jump right back. One of more than one times that the navy was like we're done with you or we don't need you. And they were like Oh. Wait, you're actually too valuable. Because when hopper was sixty, she was forced to retire from the Navy due to her age, but then a mere seven months later didn't even take a year..

Hopper A. Professor underweight navy.
"hopper" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

Stuff Mom Never Told You

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"hopper" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

"And we're back things boxer. She found a way to live her vision of creating a common language for technically savvy people and people who didn't identify as tech savvy. Basically, she was able to hang out with everybody uninformed. She got everybody to hang out. We also need to mention okay. In nineteen, sixty nine. She was awarded the Data Processing Management Association's Man of the Year award. No one saw the irony is. Also. This is a crucial. About her, she invented the term. Bug is in computer blindly. Yeah, and and she invented after an actual bug. This is true was a moth was found in a computer that was having issues, and she took that off, and she taped it in her notebook along with her notes from the day, and we still use that to describe a problem that prevents a program running successfully I love that she saw problem and just sort of embraced it as yeah. That's what that is and here it is completely in our vernacular. Weirds me out about this. Is Having bedbug taped in the notebook? Christina. I'm I'm a little screen? What, they're enough. I must. Say. Oh I use word every day. You don't really think about it when you have an inkling of. Why do we call it that and then there's this amazing story behind. Love it when that happens. I would love to like every time I heard. Someone say that there was a bug in the system, somehow just this like a Hologram of grace hopper. Take credit for the or some kind of like praise. Hubbard trademark just shows up. A little a little bell to ring. Everytime a bell rings. An Angel gets its way. Hotter gets her credit actually. A woman gets the credit she asking and. We have to talk about her background because she obviously was a bad ass, but how did Admiral Hopper become such a bad as yeah? Well, it all started. You could say on December ninth nineteen sits in New, York, city. When Admiral Hopper then Grace Brewster Murray was growth name was bored. Great Start. Let's fast forward. Just a little bit I think that's a great idea. It was clear looking at her upbringing. That education was important family. Her Dad actually went to Yale where she would eventually go. She went to private schools and in Nineteen, twenty eight. She graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Vassar College at two degrees, both in math and physics, and then in one, thousand, nine, hundred thirty. She got her masters degree in mathematics from Yale, and the next year began teaching mathematics at Vassar while finishing her doctorate in Yale in mathematics and mathematical physics. She finished that in nineteen, thirty four, so no slouch working while finishing the doctorate..

Admiral Hopper Yale Phi Beta Kappa Vassar College Data Processing Management Ass Christina Hubbard York
"hopper" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

Stuff Mom Never Told You

17:09 min | 1 year ago

"hopper" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

"Today. We are really excited to be joined by the host of the PODCAST. The limit does not exist. A show that digs into what the host describe as human oven diagrams. Thank you both so much for being here. Were so happy to be here. Can you introduce yourselves and describe your show a bit more in depth? I believe sure. Yes so I'm K. and I'm Christina and any Senate right. Our podcast is a show for human than diagrams. And that's really are a term for people who have multiple interest that off until like they might not go together and we're so fascinated by the intersections of those interests. We believe when it comes to presenting your passions. You shouldn't have to choose. We are a fan of the end over the order. Exactly both of us kind of have these zigzag paths with as Kate said UN unexpected intersections for me. It was math and theater for Kate. She's got filmmaking directing producing all of that world plus the fast and the and helping girls get super sect by math and we thought well if we love all these things. There's probably a lot of other people like that too. So that's what our show is about. That's right. It really began as the intersection of stem science technology engineering and math and the arts and since then over one hundred plus episodes later it's really evolved into the identity were can. How do you make sense of what you love? And how do you hopefully build a really sustainable custom-built career out that So that's us or so happened to be here. You I I'm really passionate about Girls and women in stem as well. I've told this story several times on the show that when I was in elementary school I used to ask for extra homework in math and science until heater. Hold me that. Nobody would ever want to date me. Yeah Yeah I. I didn't but I dropped out. I was in Calculus. This was in high school I was in Calculus and I dropped out and it's one of my biggest regret. Yeah Crime Against Education and I agree on your behalf. I know used to take so. I went to Georgia Tech. Which is a really big stems and physics classes. Like on the deal about it or something and now it makes me angry. Yes shadow accepts. So Real Tammy is I mean. I never liked me in school because it wasn't a consideration and I could just be the know it all of math class and I didn't care yes it was one of two women in my calculus class. Ap CALC class. It was there. Were a lot of guys. There wasn't long ago. Yeah Yeah Gosh so when we were discussing what we were going to talk about. I was bearing with them. Because this is a we're doing a female I and we're doing it on one of my heroes grace hopper. Yes absolutely I mean grace hopper. We like to call her Admiral Hopper. We want to the rank that she earned admiral yet. She actually had a lot of firsts yes she did a hundred percent she was the first woman to ever earn a PhD in Mathematics. Trim Yale University was also one of the first ever. Computer programmers have invented the first compiler which we will explain. She was integral to the invention of a computer programming language that no small fee is still used today. When you think about how far we've come technologically. It's really impressive. Yeah she was called amazing grace by subordinates. And I can see why right so We are to share her. We actually call her. The patron saint of our podcast. We have our first episode was about her and a fantastic book. We found On her history. And there's so much of her life. In her background that is consistent with this idea of interdisciplinary work and kind of pulling in unexpected interest that That we thought we had to share her with you right. Actually our first. Our first media handle was at Admiral Hopper quite certain about three and a half years. Yes that'd be tag us in comments about her and we appreciate the shoutout. But like we're not actually admiral hopper just to clarify to be mistaken for anybody be okay with that. Yeah that's so. Here's the deal. Greece hopper was like one of the pioneers of the computing history and her impact spanned like four decades and counting like she has pretty impressive. That's right she's she's still going and I like to think we'll go on forever Christina. I think let's start with a compiler. Which is the first computer jargon word that we just. Oh yeah okay. So hit highlight run. A compiler allows computer code to be written in a programming language written in actual words Rather than machine language Which can be kind of the Zeros and ones if you think about bits and bytes It can also be just like really complicated Kind of terms at the computer will understand but is super clunky and makes it. It's not just like you're writing in a foreign language. You're you're literally trying to speak machine so it makes it really hard to pick up programming. If the bar was you have to write in machine language? Exactly what? What's so cool about that. An impactful is that the ability to have computer code written in a programming language makes it more accessible to more people so if you can just learned that programming language you don't have to turn your brain into a machine. Can you can write the code. That's right and so grace hopper was super against this idea of the high priest genius. Ethos like only special people can write code. She's kind of like yeah. I mean I actually think that anyone can learn how to write code. It's a way of thinking and language and by insisting on kind of moving us toward writing code in English and using a compiler translated for the machine democratized access to computers like. This is a big deal. This is what we're not talking like ten years ago. We're talking back in the fifties. This was a foundational concept to the beginning of computer programming that she believed anyone could learn. Yeah so she really was this champion for inclusion. This idea that everyone could learn how to use a computer and could learn a language around it. And you know it's a significant to the about the story that you just told Anne because there's continues to be the sort of proliferation right in math in some fields where it's like there is one way to do it and understand that way too bad for you right now. So Admiral Hopper was really segment or no. It's a language that's learnable and you can learn it and I'm going to bet. This thing is going to make that really possible absolutely so I also think Christina that we should know that at the time that the compiler was invented by Mahathir. This was like the late. Nineteen forties early fifties. So computers took up entire rooms. Like we've all seen it in figures and the Harvard. Mark One computer of which hopper became one of the first programmers Just some data on that. It was fifty one feet long eight feet tall and two feet deep so feared during some quick quick mental math. That's eight hundred. Sixteen cubic feet daunting even look like he was already very sorta like. How do I touch that? Like how now they do that. It also weighed like ten thousand pounds. This is a pretty gigantic. You'RE NOT GONNA put it on your laptop bag so okay. Back to the compiler which to recap hover invented the compiler to allow computer code to be written in accessible programming language. So there were several other. It's important to note rudimentary programming languages being developed at the time. But here's the thing. Each one was specific to one brand of computer rates than you could learn one language that you could only use it on one. Kindest computer you'd have to go find like your ten thousand pounds computer. Use that language on an so programs weren't portable as we already have talked about neither where computers so a universal programming language was needed rain. And you know what Admiral Hopper do she helped create one not want. It must make associate needle fix it. That's right so the language that she really spearheaded the development of is known as Cobol Not to be mistaken with a cabal but cobalt common we use the word. Common Common Business Oriented language in a flexible accessible. For you know words that you could really some other parts of hopper's work with language then still in use today which isn't talked about as extrordinary. Amazing I mean so. This is what was so big about it. Cobol was a program that could be used. The whole design of it was that it could be used across all these different brands of computers. And there weren't like standard specs from one computer. Make it to the next way there is today so until this point you would have to translate a program from one computer to another and that would cost like hundreds of thousands of dollars so they needed something that could work on all hardware and and this was what was so powerful about the language that could be applicable and useful across banking insurance utilities manufacturing inventory control healthcare government the military right there all these different industries that needed the power of computing but they took in data in different structures. They needed to process that data very differently and to write one simple English programming language. That was flexible enough across all of these industries and open enough for kind of continuous development as these industries progressed and could be owned by kind of a broad pool of people like this was a really ambitious goal. Yeah you know at a time where all these industries even more today right so much more really silo like they were really independent of each other like we are feeling the industrial revolution. Like we're feeling the effects years later still very strong and this is a profound because let's find a way to bridge the divide lakeshore heaters for all literally here here on work. So okay exact. I think we can all remember the ease of y two K I. I remember the water bottles holding their breath. Like nineteen. Ninety nine is wrapping up in full force right right at that time. Nearly eighty percent of all computer code worldwide was written in cobol including ninety five percent of all finance and insurance programs. It's just absolutely in effect still and that point and then do we all remember the Y. Two K. fear around resetting numbers Millennia. Right it was like wait. What happens all setting to zero and everything crash? Automatic doors. Never Open that night. So we can. Also bankable for that committee created cobol and there are many things that I did right but one of the things that maybe it was a bit shortsighted was that it shortened years to just two digits ninety nine instead of nineteen ninety nine. They did this to save memory. And I guess it's probably pretty understandable that in the mid nineteen fifties. The thought that this language would still be in use a half a century later is not that unreasonable to be an issue. So you know. Luckily an entire generation of cobol programmers were able to come out of retirement in like nine hundred ninety nine great. He's like patches and work arounds to solve the problem and it ended up being kind of a bus but it's not because it wasn't a big problem. It's because we still had enough. Living people knew how to write cobol that they could like six at the last second. That's funny right. They were doing a whole life. Yeah mess around to gather everyone. I do remember that. Says WE'RE GONNA GO HERO? Yeah I love that though because I feel like that's like the sign of the successful operation of any kind that most people think. Oh it was just fine. We like black tweeting. The end of the millennium is it. Happening didn't have other things to look for too. But no you know what I love about. That too is that it was so great that all of these retirees came out with this whole you know not only did hopper inspire the democratization of computers but longevity in the workforce and we'll talk about that in a little bit about how she was like the poster child. You can work right as long as you want to going. Okay you could go away. Maybe we need right now. They're coming together like assemble this one. I'm retired. What's wrong with incredible about her leadership style because you can imagine designing of programming language by committee to work in. You know all of these different worlds. That could have been a total disaster But instead she really spearheaded this and you know a lot of the people Interviewed about what this experience was like afterwards said working with her. It was interesting because she served as a conductor invention rather than a dictator. She she really allowed information to flow between her company. Remington rand and all the other collaborators at other corporations and one of her like famous quotes was. You don't manage people you managed things you lead people and I thought this is a really notable difference between her and a lot of the men that led the early computer programming efforts. This was a very distinct leadership style that you know I think we can see the effects of how how well it worked. Yeah it was really intuitive right. And he was released of human driven. And I think that's something when we think about this sort of separation between us and you know technology always like well. How do we bring it to us? And Admiral Hopper was so great at saying. Yeah this is only valuable. If we know how to talk about it and use it and we share it together and that was just such an inclusive worldview and one that came from her own life of really bridging different fields and it being such a pioneer more grace hopper story. And we're going to get into that but first we're going to get into a quick break for word from our sponsor..

Admiral Hopper Christina Kate Georgia Tech Yale University Senate Greece Harvard Remington rand Anne Mark One
"hopper" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

Stuff Mom Never Told You

04:47 min | 1 year ago

"hopper" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

"Computer could use that language on an so programs weren't portable as we already have talked about, neither where computers, so a universal programming language was needed rain, and you know what Admiral Hopper do. She helped create one. Not One not one must make. Associate Needle, fix it. That's right so the language that she really spearheaded. The development of is known as COBOL not to be mistaken with a ball, but cobol. Common we use the word comment..

Admiral Hopper
"hopper" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

Stuff Mom Never Told You

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"hopper" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

"To share her, we actually call her the patron saint of our podcast. We have our first episode was about her and a fantastic book. We found on her history, and there's so much of her life in her background that is consistent with this idea of interdisciplinary work and kind pulling in unexpected interest that that we thought we had to share her with you. Right actually our first, our first media handle was at Admiral Hopper. Absurd! About three and a half years. Yes, that'd be. Tag Us in comments about her, and we appreciate the shoutout, but like we're not actually admiral hopper. Just to clarify. To be mistaken for anybody. Be Okay with. That okay. Yeah, that's run, so here's the deal. Greece hopper was like one of the pioneers of the computing history, and her impact spanned like four decades, and counting like has pretty impressive. That's right. She's. She's still going and I like to think we'll go on forever. Christina I think let's start with a compiler, which is the first computer jargon word that we just? Oh, yeah, okay so. Hit highlight, run. So a compiler allows computer code to be written in a programming language written in actual words, rather than machine language which can be kind of the Zeros and ones. If you think about bits and bytes it can also be just like really complicated kind of terms at the computer will understand, but is super clunky and makes it. It's not just like you're writing in a foreign language you're. You're literally trying to speak machine, so it makes it really hard to pick up programming if the bar was, you have to write in machine language. Exactly what what's so cool about that? An impactful is that the ability to have computer code written in a programming language makes it more accessible to more people, so if you can just learned that programming language, you don't have to turn your brain into a machine. Can you can write the code that's right and so grace hopper was super against this idea of the high priest genius. Ethos. Only special people can write code..

Admiral Hopper Greece Christina
"hopper" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

Stuff Mom Never Told You

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"hopper" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

"We are really excited to be joined by the host of the PODCAST. The limit does not exist a show that digs into what the host describe as human of then. Thank you both so much for being here. Were so happy to be here. Can you introduce yourselves and describe your show a bit more in depth worst? Please sure yes, so I'm K. and I'm Christina and any Senate right? Our podcast is a show for human than diagrams, and that's really are a term for. People who have multiple interest that off until like they might not go together and we're so fascinated by the intersections of those interests. We believe when it comes to presenting your passions. You shouldn't have to choose. We are a fan of the end over the or. Exactly, both of us kind of have these zigzag paths with. As Kate said UN unexpected intersections for me. It was math and theater for Kate. She's got filmmaking directing producing all of that world plus the fast and the and helping girls get super sect by math, and we thought well. If we love all these things, there's probably a lot of other people like that, too. So that's what our show is about. That's right. It really began as the intersection of stem, science, technology, engineering, and math and the arts, and since then over one hundred plus episodes later it's really evolved into the identity were can how do you? Make sense of what you love. And how do you hopefully build a really sustainable custom-built career out that So that's us or so happened to be here. You. I! I'm really passionate about girls and women in stem as well. I've told this story several times on the show that when I was in elementary school I used to ask for extra homework in math and science until heater. Me that nobody would ever want to date me. Yeah Yeah. I. I didn't but I dropped out I was in calculus in high school. I was in, Calculus and I dropped out, and it's one of my biggest regret. Yeah? Crime Against Education and I agree on your behalf I know used to take so I went to Georgia tech which is a really big stems. And Physics classes like on the do. About it or something, and now it makes me. Angry Yes Shadow. So, real. Is. I? Never liked me in school because it wasn't a consideration and I could just be the know it all. Of Math, class and I didn't care. Yes, it was one of two women in my Calculus Class AP CALC class it was. There were a lot of guys there this wasn't. Long ago. Yeah Yeah Gosh, so when we were discussing what we were going to talk about, I was bearing. With them because this is. A we're doing a female I and we're doing it on one of my Heroes Grace Hopper yes, absolutely I mean grace hopper. We like to call her admiral hopper we want to. The rank that she earned. Admiral, yet she actually had a lot of firsts. Yes, she did a hundred percent. She was the first woman to ever earn a PhD in mathematics. Trim Yale University was. One of the first ever computer programmers. Have invented the first compiler which we will explain. She was integral to the invention of a computer programming language that. No small feat is still used today. When you think about how far we've come technologically, it's really impressive. Called Amazing, grace by subordinates and I can see why right so we are..

Kate Grace Hopper Christina Yale University Senate Georgia
"hopper" Discussed on Forever35

Forever35

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"hopper" Discussed on Forever35

"Hey, so once again, before we get to our interview with just the hopper, which just want to remind everyone that leader in the segment, there is a discussion of sexual assault. It comes after the second adv break. So just a heads up. Our guest today is Jessica hopper, welcome. Jessica high Canedo. I'm just gonna read a quick, very impressive bio. Jessica hopper is a Chicago based author editor and critic. She started working as a music critic and writer when she was fifteen years old. And instead of college started a publicity company doing press for independent record labels and bands. In two thousand four. She started writing for the Chicago reader has also written for spin g. q. Rolling Stone, BuzzFeed. The village voice and many more. She has also worked at rookie as music editor pitchfork in MTV news. Her first look, the first collection of criticism by living female rock critic was published in two thousand fifteen and her latest book night moves came out in September. She is currently working on a book about women's music history. That's basically it. I have one. I've one more book before that, which is for teenage girls called the girls sky to rocking how hard cool it's okay. It it was. I mean, I came out a very long time ago and also if you if you weren't a tween you might not have known about it. Sure. Well, Caitlyn were both very moved by your book. Yeah, yes. I actually texted door this morning. I'm not sure if I used the word wrecked me, but it to me in a good. You know that the good wrecking, but it really tapped a little something inside her deeply. Can you just tell us a little bit about the Genesis of the book and kind of what it's drawn, what you drew from to write it. So the book is is a collection of. Somewhat diagnostic writing from two thousand four to two thousand eight kind of the the bones of it was coupled from blogs and sometimes have make little one off fanzines for when I went on tour with bands that I was in reading tours, sometimes different things that I made and I'd actually kind of I didn't say, didn't intend to do this book. But I when I was working with my friend, Alice Merrill who's helping me sort of index all of my work when I was putting together my last book which is like an intolerable of my writing. Alice said, you know, you have all this writing about Chicago, that kind of doesn't have anything to do with him. He's at criticism, but I think he should be visited. And by the way I have already started the entry I look at and put them in ever know for me. Categorize them what we work in indexing style, but said that was like here. And that was like about sixty percent of the book, which is like, I mean, don't we all want that women in front in our lives by the way? I think you have a book in you that you were not anticipated..

Jessica hopper Chicago Caitlyn editor Alice Merrill assault BuzzFeed MTV Canedo Stone writer fifteen years sixty percent
"hopper" Discussed on SOBRadio Show

SOBRadio Show

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"hopper" Discussed on SOBRadio Show

Nancy hopper CEO Gail Bryant four hundred pound two hundred pounds