30 Burst results for "Hoover Institution"

"hoover institution" Discussed on Uncommon Knowledge

Uncommon Knowledge

08:39 min | 2 weeks ago

"hoover institution" Discussed on Uncommon Knowledge

"Welcome to another special playtime. I'm at home edition of Uncommon Knowledge I'm Peter Robinson the daughter of a Presbyterian Minister and a schoolteacher Condoleeza Rice grew up in Birmingham Alabama. She received her undergraduate degree from the University of Denver Her masters degree from Notre Dame and her doctorate. Again from the University of Denver she has served in many positions in academia and government including as I mentioned just a moment ago as provost of Stanford and as Secretary of State and as of September first secretary. Rice has become the new director of the Hoover Institution, the Public Policy Center at Stanford Kanji Rice. Welcome. Thank you. Great to be with you. Condie the first question is more or less mandatory you and I have known each other for a number of years and if I may say so until September first, you had a wonderful life you taught at Stanford, you're participated in a consultant company and. Gave speeches and you still had time to practice piano and play golf. And now you have taken on a job that will involve endless fundraising countless administrative tasks attempting to lead some two hundred fellows of the Hoover Institute I I love our colleagues I really do love them, but they're not all people. So. The first question again is mandatory lie have you done this? Well, Peter Maybe I should have had my head examined you you left out that I also, of course, had a chance to be on the college. Football Playoff, committee and Chair Commission Basketball Yes. Life was very good. But in the final analysis. I had to ask myself do I like where we are right now as a country and as world and I had to say, no, I think we have challenges and problems that are piling up that are challenging our values challenging our freedoms, a challenging, our prosperity, and most importantly challenging the sense of Americans in particular that equal opportunity and equal access are there for them and challenges to the governance of a Free People's suggested that we need really good answers to a lot of the problems that we're facing. We need them to be based on solid and sound research new ideas that are fully explored explored where the data takes us. And I thought there's no better place to do that than the hoover institution a place that has a very solid foundation in the notion that free people's free markets prosperity and peace are to be sought going all the way back to the wishes of Herbert Hoover himself, and so if I can help lead and in fact, really bring our our colleagues together around that joint goal that set of responsibilities than it seemed a good time to do it. Would come to hoover in a moment. Let's just a moment to explain. Explain your thinking actually. On public policy centers on think tanks, there are over five thousand colleges and universities in the country far lower number of thanks for lower but not not insignificant. Hoover Brookings. Heritage the American Enterprise Institute, Cato, and so forth. What our think tanks for? Them from the usual from the rest of the academic world. Well think tanks. I believe have to have one thing that is, is there in the academic world and that is grounding in research that is driven by research questions which are then answered by data and where the data takes you wherever it will. In other words, you're really seeking in a sense, the truth from the questions that you ask a, but they also have to be a places that want to have an impact on policy. An impact on outcomes and impact on the thinking of leaders and those who are actually responsible for calling out and carrying out policy. And what distinguishes hoover is that it has to other really unique features. One is it sits. At a great university, one of the really leading universities and a leading university in the new technologies and the innovation and technological frontiers of the world. and. It is at the. Library and Archive, and so it's committed to its history, its committed to those historical documents and historical experiences that inform of the way that we think about policies. So to my mind hoover's kind of the complete package it is a think tank where we care about policy where we do A. Fundamental research but it is also a place that can draw on those documents and lessons of history, and it can do it in an environment of a great and broad university. You spoken of. Several areas of emphasis or or. Questions, and however you're still very new in the jobs. We haven't spoken about the much so. I I'd like to ask questions that have the virtue of being real questions. I. Really. Don't quite know how you're going to answer these questions so Slapped me around if I'm asking bad questions or you had Milton Friedman on this show and he treated me like a very slow graduate studies. Now, that's not the he. He rewrote the questions before answering them feel free. You've one of those areas of kind of organizing question. If that's the right way to put the way you're thinking about these, you have talked about the challenges or the failures. And this is the term you're using of late stage capitalism. So of course, I look that up and it wasn't used by Marx, but it is associated with the left and here's a definition that I found online. Late stage capitalism is a popular phrase that describes the hypocrisy and absurdities of capitalism as it digs its own grave. Now something tells me you don't really expect or want free markets to dig their own graves. So how are you using this phrase? I'm using this phrase as a challenge to us all to be provocative in our thinking to be wide ranging in our thinking. About how we get at the core? Of anything that's. What I considered to be the greatest economic system that humankind has ever created and that is the belief that if people are in it for their labor. If they mobilize resources smartly and capital smartly, everybody will be better off I believe in free markets I believe in free enterprise I believe in the private sector I believe in small government to make sure that the private sector is freed to the degree that it can be to do all of those things. But I recognize to that those who don't believe in that are making some very serious charges about where capitalism is failing and if we just say Oh no, no, you don't understand we're actually growing the economy than people will say well, what about all of those who've been left out and I'll tell you what happens Peter when you're not provocative enough in your own thinking about your assumptions about what is right? Is You get lazy And if you get lazy, you open the ground to those who would dig your grave and so my view is that unless we have answers to these questions and I'll I'll give you a couple of them we in fact are not doing our jobs as responsible stewards. Of the best economic system that humankind has ever created You know I of course, studied Soviet Union. So I am not unaware for late stage capitalism comes from. In fact, if you really look hard I, it is a phrase that Lennon liked to use a linen used. And so looked at mark's I was looking in the wrong. Is. Slow student and so..

Hoover Institution hoover Peter Robinson Herbert Hoover Free People Stanford University of Denver Public Policy Center Condoleeza Rice Hoover Brookings Stanford Kanji Rice Birmingham Alabama American Enterprise Institute golf Notre Dame Soviet Union secretary
Trump makes call for new White House doctor's virus advice

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | Last month

Trump makes call for new White House doctor's virus advice

"President trump has added a new doctor to his coronavirus task force and this time there's no daylight between them the new doctor in the White House is Scott atlas a fellow at Stanford university's conservative Hoover Institution and a frequent guest on fox news channel he's the former chief of neuro radiology at Stanford University Medical Center but has no expertise in public health or infectious disease mitigation Dr atlas has long been a critic of coronavirus lockdowns and like trump has been campaigning for students to return to the classroom and for the return of college sports the White House says atlases addition will not diminish the roles of doctors Anthony Fauci and Deborah Burke's however atlas was the sole doctor to share the stage at trump's pandemic briefings last week Ben Thomas Washington

Donald Trump White House Stanford University Stanford University Medical Ce Coronavirus Lockdowns Anthony Fauci Deborah Burke Ben Thomas Washington President Trump Scott Atlas Hoover Institution Fox News
"hoover institution" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

05:53 min | 2 months ago

"hoover institution" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"Atlas at the Hoover Institution is who are earlier guest, Dr. Scott Johnson was talking about And he is Doing some amazing things here. I've not seen him before. But I've been doing a little digging since then says there is a ludicrous level of hysteria. About school reopening. He's a former Stanford Medical Center neurology chief. Insisting anyone who prioritizes Children would open the schools. We course agree We're doing that. But It's interesting. That is interesting. All right. Back on. What's on your mind? 10 before the top of the hour last chance for a comment 701 I'll give you the 800 number 802 280550 Text me 367205 for Todd to 268503 texture, says Scott. I have a question. I've been watching these so called protesters, Lieut burned down things. My friend needs a new car. Can I buy a skateboard? Go to a car Lot. Break the showroom window, where the skateboard go in and select a new car. It must be okay these days and legal if you're carrying a skateboard, because looting a bigger study seems to be happening every day and they're getting by with it. Asking for a friend. A valid question. So if you want more of that, on your TV screens just vote for Joe Biden because he can't even bring himself to denounce that 53 days worth of it. 53 days. Not sure I trust Doc Burger at this point, says The texture. Bergen government of by and for the statistics. You might not have meant that a compliment, but I think that the governor would take that as a compliment because he is One of the best individuals I've ever seen of taking things, not from an emotional standpoint from a statistic standpoint. One of the numbers. What is the data? That, having been said if he was here and asking for my advice, I would agree with you in this sense. We have a lot of work to do because of the damage inflicted on us by Cove it by China. Okay? And I want as much as the governor's. A CZ. Much of the governors. Time energy and effort directed at Fixing what covert broke than I do in managing Kobe, because I think right now is managing itself. I mean, he he's done a good job. And Sanford the whole Team the Legislature's funding this stuff. You know, this is the head of the agencies. All right. Managing a plan that they came up with the numbers show you they've done a good job. So rather than just look at the numbers. And decide how great they look every day or what? Which way they're moving. I'd rather say Okay now business owners. Why your customers customers not coming back. What can we do about that? Whatever. Something along that line. Let's see. We're going to Enderlin. And Aaron. What's online Hiring? Go ahead. Yeah, I was just thinking I'd like your opinion on this with all this mail and voting. That's probably gonna happen this year, and the election is probably gonna be closed. I can only a vision that can of worms that might be opened with the recount it probably worse than Bush Dorrit drag on for months after the election. Don't mail in vote. Well, you could recount mail in votes just like you do the other votes. But I wonder, you know, if your stories of people getting two ballots to hear stories of, you know, I mean look. Att, the California most recently had had a race. There's huge numbers. They're so he raised a good question, and I don't know the answer to it. I think rather than trying to trying to devise A male and ballot system that had some integrity to it gives us comfort. I'd rather we just vote the way we vote. If you have to go to the doctor now, do you go to the doctor? Yes, you go to the doctor. If you have to get groceries, you go get groceries. Yes, you good groceries. You have to buy a car. You go buy a car. You have to get to work. You get your car and you go. You go to work. Why can't we vote? Just the way we've always voted. Ask yourself that question. And the answer you're going to come up with is probably not going to be real comforting. Just saying Why couldn't Biden And the debate be done similar to zoom meetings. President Trump and biting would have to be in the same place, but it could still be televised nationwide. I suppose that you could have monitors on them, but I suppose you know your binds could have all kinds of notes and people, you know, sitting up a teleprompter for him. I don't know. But they should debate they should debate. There's no doubt about my hearing. Pre. She ate the cold air in The border fraud in those seven counties will be incredible. Voter fraud. I don't know. Seven counties were talking about, But I do worry about it. Texas to say I saw an interview with Bill and Hillary this morning on CBS Morning show. I think the media is trying to set up Dillon Hill for positive press. For some reason, no You know, Let's not talk about that tomorrow. You don't think they're teeing up..

Dr. Scott Johnson Joe Biden Kobe Hoover Institution Aaron China Bergen Att fraud Doc Burger President Trump Dillon Hill Todd CBS Enderlin Sanford Bush Legislature
Exporting Authoritarianism

Why It Matters

05:19 min | 4 months ago

Exporting Authoritarianism

"I will relate that interesting story. The president of Kazakhstan actually visited a company called hike. Vision is another one that provides surveillance technology visit their office in China and he saw how with one. Click on a person's face. You could get that person's school history work history financial situation. Wow and wait for it. How did this person spend his or her leisure time? So where did this person go to have fun? Did you go to the movies? Did you stop by the bank to go to the post office where you hang out with friends? Did you participate in a protest and his reaction after seeing all of this was we need this technology. That's not where I thought the story was going. This is probably not the first time you're hearing about China's surveillance technology and that's because it gets a lot of coverage it's like a Black Mirror episode. It gives us visions of a dystopia in future but this technology and the eagerness of some countries to begin implementing. It is only a small part of a much bigger story about China through its belt and road initiative China's in the process of building and funding infrastructure projects across the globe and loaning vast sums of money in the developing world. Some observers argued that as it does this. China is also exporting its authoritarian model of government and eroding democratic norms. That many of us take for granted others say that China is simply taking business opportunities where it sees them and providing countries with an alternative to a global order that has gone unchallenged for decades. The debate comes down to one question. How will we choose to view China as they pour money into hospitals ports and roads around the World I'm Gabrielle? Sierra and this is why it matters today is China exporting authoritarianism. I think the most important thing to understand about China's foreign policy over the past ten years or so is that it really has been transformed. This is Elizabeth Economy. She's a senior fellow and director for Asia. Studies here at the council. She's also a distinguished visiting fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution beginning in about two thousand and eight with global financial crisis China's hosting the Olympics. These are really moments that defined in the minds of many Chinese leaders that China was rising. Chinese have many goals for these Olympics. One of them was to announce to the world. The China is back after two hundred years. China's economy has grown faster than that of any other major country. The Asian giant has now grown into one of the most important export markets for manufacturers from all over. The world is a period of historic change in China. There haven't been many periods in history as fascinating as this so there was a real sense within China for the first time that they had always expected that at some point China was going to surpass the United States but maybe that time was coming sooner than they anticipated. But what really has changed the game on the ground has been Xi Jinping everything for Xi Jinping is under the mantra of the great rejuvenation of the Chinese nation and it is a call for reclaiming a much greater degree of centrality for China on the global stage. Xi Jinping became China's president in two thousand thirteen some observers have called him the most powerful Chinese leader since Mao Zedong. Look I think there are any number of objectives and we can find them all and Xi Jinping's writings and speeches but fundamentally what I think. Xi Jinping attempting to do is simply to make the world safer authoritarianism. Teaching is a dictator but dictators. Still have to answer to domestic constituents. This is Jessica. Chance Weiss associate professor of government at Cornell and a leading expert on Chinese politics. She has a different take on China's expansion. One that sees it as being less offensive and more defensive. China's concerned about a whole lot of different risks. Some of them domestic others ones. That emanate from abroad sparks. That might start the prairie fire and bring down the Chinese government and might take units overriding purpose is to continue to make the world safe for the Chinese Communist Party to strive at home. So this is a world that safe for autocracy to coexist alongside democracy in the international space. So it's not been as ideological I think and it's foreign policy is some admitted. It out to be so. China is trying to find a way to sort of fit in with a world. That might not be comfortable with its model of government tried to make space for its form of government to be regarded as one that can continue to exist that is legitimate than democracy isn't the only form of government so to speak and so this has made it easier for other authoritarian states to survive

China Chinese Government Xi Jinping Visiting Fellow Chinese Communist Party President Trump Kazakhstan Elizabeth Economy Olympics Mao Zedong Asia United States Jessica Stanford University Hoover Institution Weiss Associate Professor Cornell
In Unprecedented Times, Governors Have Unprecedented Power

Lutheran Hour

03:16 min | 5 months ago

In Unprecedented Times, Governors Have Unprecedented Power

"Now let's move on to the power governors in the states have explained their responsibilities during a public health crisis so we're gonna do this what is your view of the constitution of the limited document the tenth amendment to the constitution stresses that they're in the powers not delegated to the federal government to research this thanks so I understand our constitutional law we understand that the states have what's called quote unquote the police power and it's not the power just to have a police force that power to regulate everything within the borders of the state all people and conduct except when it's taken away specifically given to the federal government so that's why it the governors of the states who are exercising that power under their own constitutions or because the state legislatures given that power they're the ones who decide whether businesses can stay open out whether we're allowed to travel outdoors what can be bought and sold because the states have the general reservoir power over everything within their territory finally local governments mayors county commissions do they have any unique powers or they beholden to what state government decides on last a governor specifically gives them the leeway to make their own decisions like an acting curfews or ordering residents to wear face masks in public question and that's really up to each state so some something could give if they wanted to their cities and counties that power that's the case in California for example but again that's just they launched a constitution each they could be different I'm joined by former Deputy Assistant Attorney General and visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution John you let's talk about re opening the economy and your piece explaining how the president can't force states to do it explain who as what authority there it's interesting so based on the police power states hi I have the primary thirty over in the opening closing of businesses for example restaurant in your hometown A. L. a public health standards that's under state law that under the police power the greatest use of the state police power in the system record is one where is their power to protect the public health and safety of the residents of that state hi imposing these lockdown orders that's all under state law now the federal government has a lot of tools at its disposal to try to get the economy reopened and going again what they're saying you can't do is actually reverse those lockdowns so the federal government can boost spending ranking give out more checks to more people her unemployment benefits it can actually directly assessed since it can reopen travel can encourage people to travel want to control whether businesses and establishments the open or not whether people go outside or not thanks still to this day in

Federal Government California Deputy Assistant Attorney Gene President Trump Visiting Fellow Hoover Institution
"hoover institution" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

06:18 min | 7 months ago

"hoover institution" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Hanson the Hoover Institution a senior fellow running in National Review online about the tragedy in China the tragedy that is yet unknown we know it's covered nineteen we know that there are quarantines but we don't know much else because the reporting is spotty your note the news that the Chinese average ejected three Wall Street journal reporters who have been doing an extremely careful job of reporting on the crisis we also know that there have been no officials from the CDC permitted into China for the ordinary testing of the epidemic however Victor's writing about what we are guessing about the failure of huge in paying the president for life head of the Chinese Communist Party victory right that China or shoot in paying of the communist party's an existential threat how so Victor well I mean we as we've seen with trade they have the the ability to destroy other countries and they really harmed a lot of their neighbors and they are about and then as we're seeing with a corona virus what state trying to the stage they have the ability to export this virus and what does that mean it means that when you have a first generation scientific revolution or new post industrial revolution and you don't have the regulations or the culture of all of it or transparency or freedom really allowing these the values of western trained scientists to come back to their mother country and then to do the types of research or not research without any without any freedom are on it and without transparency there the part of the government org so to speak and that's dangerous it's like handing a hand grenade to a seven year old so we don't know what how this virus originated we don't know it's kind of coincidental that was near weapons lab at people mention an open air market there's all of these weird explanations but the one thing that's constant new there's a lot of very sophisticated first generation scientific researchers in China and they're doing things whether it's cloning or biological research weapons research in a fashion that other scientists can't do because it's considered too dangerous in Europe or too dangerous the United States are too dangerous and you're proud and that's why I think it's an existential threat and then trump started this confrontation the showdown with China events sort of took over the narrative and now three years later it's not just China technological appropriation patent copyright that occurred don't be in our currency manipulation it's China or well in surveillance great trying to re education camp with the million waders and that China the Hong Kong protests China China and the more you Paul Walker trying this gap that will no longer need to trick and what do you like it or not trump's view on China now the orthodox we used to be heterodox an eccentric China sort of proved him right the more that we looked at it under a microscope picture our capitalist country made a deal with the devil twenty five years ago China have we learned a lesson or is it too early to tell I think we learned a lesson early on in the west and the idea of George H. W. bush and Bill Clinton and George W. bush and Barack Obama was the more concessions that you give to China on trade and commerce in politics on military affairs the more they're gonna see that magnum energy to be reciprocated when fact they see if his weakness to be exploited and they're never going to turn out like you know the upper west sider Cambridge mass he's not going to happen with the Communist Party in control and that idea that they would liberal arts and I don't know any Communist Party liberal arts bring a lot to me loaded and blew up but I don't know any of that gradually and willingly became more liberal we don't have good information about what's going on inside China where we can we guessing a lot of this but we have sense of history of the Chinese people themselves are using the euphemism Chernobyl for the virus and Chernobyl is a way of of noting that after Chernobyl the Soviet Union fell apart in five years do you sense that China's failing here or they gonna pull themselves together and and close the doors and go back to becoming the manufacturing hub which where they're gonna go Victor we have about a marketing yeah I think it's a force multiplier effect before the corona virus there were already a process of be engaged in the coupling contrivance so a lot of suppliers were going to Southeast Asia Mexico crafter under already started and we turned out to be a lot stronger than China expected and we found trying a lot weaker than we anticipated and that's coronavirus were confirmed out I don't see them coming back and that the chart Chernobyl it's sort of a false comparison because more people are probably died one day China right Darden Chernobyl them Chernobyl but there is some similarities that the Russians were way over there have the nuclear power research and didn't have a protective shell should have never been allowed to do that and yet they in danger other countries Zachary the fact they didn't Victor Davis Hanson of the Hoover Institution China some trouble I'm John Nash numbers mean much to me because of prostate cancer Johnny brags the number two for my step father who died of prostate cancer and my uncle who suffered so much of the prostate cancer surgery the number fifteen.

Hoover Institution senior fellow China Hanson National Review
Most feel good about the economy but not the state of the country

Joe Walsh

09:35 min | 8 months ago

Most feel good about the economy but not the state of the country

"The president must be brought to heel the nation must be safe I guess the nation must be safe from the lowest unemployment from nineteen sixty nine and the addition of thirteen trillion dollars to the economy I guess we have to save America from that somebody who can help explain what is the logic of the political elites today is perhaps one of the greatest writers we have today a classicist in his own right senior fellow at the Hoover Institution you've seen him almost every night on television he is professor Victor Davis Hanson professor welcome to America first thank you grab the bastion I'm you've written a piece of the fabulous website American greatness called top get trump forever having read it it raised in me a very simple question I see the president's defense team doing sterling work this week we have fabulous America's scholars such as Alan Dershowitz we have former especial councils like Kenneth Starr who have given very solid lectures lectures I would've enjoyed in graduate school very professorial very fact based the history of impeachment and I thought to myself why is there anything that the president's defense team could say that would change the minds of those who wish to remove the duty elected president from the White House are only for the fact that there's four five senators are there is maybe thirty or forty house members who are you know they have been aware of political reality and are in need of states are congressional district don't wanna can put a cold from the congressional district I put my fault publican lost in a Democrat one Republican is one name is way ahead poll hello I I think that's the only thing it's not about actual crimes it's for a variety of one complex reasoning across town wait until November because I take very agreed upon probably blooms Alexian inn for about eight years of the progressive project pretty much junk for generations and they're just not just one tap on powerful so we go to all these **** drummer do not moment calls twenty nine month Michael Kohn Michael I'm not a tax returns impeachment you were just never yonder worn out because the outlook the alternative Sebastian I guess it's Bernie Sanders on the stone for the new green beer or revelations are apologize for young speech by a little more we don't have much our angle control of the catastrophic miscalculation the ball could be able to stay home and I love should clue without thank you hello they may get and then when I got to lose they're not they called while com there do what we did and how it's gonna be bipartisan and you go do whatever we want the United and they will come and get you look knowledge just giving a call out the kitchen sink speeches always been practical moves on on and I'll talk to quit cold cold creams and broadly our public schools the abuse of power right in Congress but that didn't go anywhere and then made a really crowd because your mistake and betting everything on Adam shell because the more you hear in the less you like it he appeared on the number you can't tell the truth and he's been caught so many cons non and I don't think they want I really don't think they want because I think they want to end on Friday and then say it's really a good we did get a chance to call witnesses but the downside I don't think Adam Schiff wants to go up there on the old and then have the whistle blower band on all give Mary versions of how this functionality because are not compatible with talking to press a Victor Davis Hanson of the Hoover Institution all for all of of the case for trump you need to read this book you you built your career as a historian historian of military history of of of the ancient civilizations of of the Greeks this is the bedrock of western civilization then let me ask you a very simple question that is my concern there is this theory of of social contract that there there are written and unwritten ways of doing business and and and western civilization is built upon them if one of the two parties in the system not a fringe party not the Libertarian Party not not Ross Perot but one of the two party says that we will impeach the president because we count we in the at the ballot box isn't that the shredding of the social contract or even the original call product on which the Republic was founded what what does this do on the long term for the United States professor Hanson well I think if you read our federal sixty five and sixty circle how we can serve them and other essays at the time about impeachment I thought it would be very where very hard to do that's one name that tune because you have to have it how old six separate crafter and they didn't think it looks to be the opposite they didn't envision that some of the opposition party trickle of the house would be a European Parliament terrible but not that's what it's become and there's a lot of Republicans we believe the appropriate approach doesn't want the Democrats so I imagine that the next time we have a democratic president and there are any legal gonna consider doing that because it's now going to be the most off the laundry vintage one as we know it doesn't exist anymore it's been transmog apart in the dictionary yeah but hi this is the way it is and remember we have no special counsel report no bipartisan support you have no public support need this approach currently W. peaks of the nineteenth century of course come president and will premiere Alexian it was just awesome we have in the basement we are not in the house Judiciary buttonholes intelligence committee to selectively things by Alan ship so we just it's just patently dishonest asymmetrical one and I think they're gonna pay a price for me home is on his way to a seventy nineteen seventy two or nineteen eighty four reelection well that's exactly the mangled that's exactly the next question I wanted to see professor if if nothing else exogenous happens if there's no massive external crisis if the economy state keeps going the way it's going and the president is reelected in two hundred and seventy seven days what do you expect the effect to be the knock on effect on these people will will live suddenly be Damascene moment where they say okay we got it wrong way sorry the media the left and will behave ourselves could it get worse and and really how could it get worse well here is the story we just have to ask what did they do after seventy two when they got the winner should not my government a surgeon on both the Compaq we never we haven't won since JFK and us you have a democratic guy with a southern accent DJ can you call the right and unions kind of a central St eighty four the left four my gosh school's out and they did it again with the caucus and then they they didn't do it again I got a guy with a southern accent so I think they'll be a lot of people who say the A. L. C. when school's out and you want to let you wrecked the blue dogs but I don't I'm not sure the demography and the changing twenty first century landscape allow that to happen the Democratic Party is so the Jacobin party control no quality and I don't know if they they kind of extinguisher liquidate all of the people want in all single barrelled omegle dinosaur the nominee list anymore and the people in there a light might exist like Bloomberg S. inviting has been scouring the exits images from renouncing or the prior cell because I don't know if there's anybody left the use of the for a different one with her late and have to come and say you guys destroyed the Democratic Party it's kind of a lot of one whether the Republicans take the house of course Brian's got fifty fifty chance of doing ten cameras on them as well can a pragmatist with a southern accent save the Democrats about trounced this November we shall see first we have to win the election those who believe in the make America great again agenda with talk to professor Victor Davis Hanson senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and the author of the case for trump will be back with a good professor in a

President Trump America
What Is America Still Doing in the Middle East?

Ethan Bearman

04:02 min | 9 months ago

What Is America Still Doing in the Middle East?

"Iran said it launched a missile attack on US led forces in Iraq in the early hours of Wednesday right now in retaliation for the U. S. drone strike on an Iranian commander who's killing has raised fears of a wider war in the Middle East Tehran fired more than a dozen ballistic missiles from Iranian territory against at least two Iraqi military bases hosting US led coalition personnel at about one thirty AM local time that according to the US military fog of war the source for most all of this news is Iraq the source for the photograph produced by Reuters being used and picked up around the world right now is Iran press handout via Reuters we're looking at propaganda release from the follow fog of war I welcome Victor Davis Hanson of the Hoover Institution is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution writing most recently at American greatness about a much larger canvas then the propaganda of the disgraced rogue Tehran regime this has to do with the American people asking questions over these last years what is the Middle East for what we doing there Victor a very good evening to you it's an excellent question it comes up often I'm sidestepping the partisan matter will come to that but you asked this question in light of the revelations of these last years at the U. S. is not dependent on middle eastern oil is not depended on in fact the success of any of these all ago or Logar case or of the bully boys Iran and its help mates Russia and China we're not depended upon them at all we are locked into a long term conversation that is left over from the twentieth century in the Cold War so do you measure that the American people that the trump administration are trying to find an exit or to change our posture towards the Middle East good evening to Victor good evening John I think they're trying to collapse all of the reverse to be in the middle east of the last seventy years down to just one or two reasons to have a much smaller footprint and by that I mean we don't need it oriel anymore and the people who are most dependent on the waterways are trying now in the European Union the European Union apparently won't track horizontally grow on their own territory and they won't protect their own tankers in China we don't really want to subsidize their security needs I don't think we don't have a as you said the geo political rival like the Soviet Union proven as on a qualifier in self in Syria there are so many mount Terry questions but no more so than in Africa or South America or Asia so I guess what we're saying is why why do we have troops in Iraq and what are we worried about I think the only answer well I think one the administration is focused on is we don't want the oil wells and its considerable about thirty percent of the world's oil we don't want that but while format to accumulate in my hands about unstable regime that would use it to get a ball that's all I can Franco and that's why we are trying to contain a ram the other secondary reason is we don't want to become an enclave of sanctuary or platform what used to be black September of the PLO the national liberation front propels flying or then later became all cried and isis so did most two reasons it's hard to see why were there and I think the ministrations same old grunts stand off with around so that we were in the sport of stopping them from becoming a nuclear power and then we went and history of a bomb isis for most of the only two legitimate reasons I can

Iran United States Iraq
"hoover institution" Discussed on Uncommon Knowledge

Uncommon Knowledge

14:31 min | 10 months ago

"hoover institution" Discussed on Uncommon Knowledge

"Days that replaced the barbed wire with cinderblocks and in the following weeks and months the cinderblocks with concrete slabs some thirteen eighteen feet tall in effect sentencing the people of East Germany to imprisonment those concrete slabs. The Berlin Wall would remain standing for more than twenty twenty eight years. The Berlin Wall was a symbol of the complete breakdown of the alliance between the Soviet Union and the United States after World War Two ended and all hope then that perhaps eastern Europe would would be a place that people could be free that they could travel to the West That they could see family. Particularly if you were German Family Scott separated raided by this wall and so it was to me the end of hope. The Wall was about the fear that these systems had of their own people. They were afraid that their own people would run away. They were afraid that their own people would prefer the west they. I would prefer that their own people weren't going to be duped by their own propaganda that became a symbol right at the heart of Berlin of the failure of the experiment in East Germany to create a viable state. That would enjoyed the support of the people there. I of course lived behind the Berlin Wall in East Germany and therefore forgot to know at first hand what it felt like for people to be imprisoned for nearly three decades. Many of these people were friends friends of mine and I remember to this day. You know the tears the frustration and how difficult it was for them to live behind that wall all and quite simply not be free. I remember it hits me that time had stood still this. Germany looked essentially the Germany of the late nineteen nineteen forties. Berlin became the epicenter of the East West Geopolitical Tussle between gene communism and democracy and capitalism walls usually keep people out and this was a unique doc. Wallet kept people in and this came after World War Two with the spread of Communism in Southeast Asia and Africa and the Middle East and everybody thought this was the dogma of the future and suddenly they have to build a wall to keep people in so it marked a turning point I think in the early sixties where people felt that the dynamism animism and there was never a dynamos. With the profess dynamism of communism is is a sham. Any any system in the ideology has to build a wall to keep people in inherently bankrupt. So when the walking down it was absolutely breath. Think it's just flabbergasted. UH hopes up stopping the West berliners destroying the wool were soon dashed as dozens of young men pulled on a rope and chains. That chant went up more vague back done with the wall. The symbolism seeing at crumbling to me was not just about Germany but it was about maybe this will the entire Soviet Empire will collapse and sure enough two years later. It didn't. How did it happen peacefully the fact that he throws peaceful? That was my main reaction office. Surprising I suppose some people expected the world to fall. And let's remember that Ronald Reagan made a speech. Imploring Gorbachev tear down the wall but for me it was shocking. Doing the time it happened and of course we were surprised. Because we didn't understand that the communist elites would capitulate pitcher by nineteen eighty nine the Soviet Union had had become a shell of itself. It was a country that really had no technological future economy was in shambles and that ahead brought to power a man. Mikhail Gorbachev who understood that the Soviet Union was a shallow itself was in the context of the day Tong which the second term of the Reagan administration had introduced at seize the opportunity to of course hoover distinguished fellow. George shows that Gorbachev felt comfortable letting this APP. Reagan was extremely confrontational by comparison with his predecessor. Jimmy Carter Sir Bart's when it came to the crunch Reagan did Daytona to with batch off and ultimately did more radical disarmament armament than had been done by any previous president. We're not through Gombrich off played a very big part in changing Soga policy. I'm making it more possible for East Europeans to to choose their own destiny. One of the reasons he did this was that he had an idea. The communism could tiny itself into something freer than it had ever been in history so tonight extent a was misguided thank thank thankfully. He was doing what he did but He was misguided in thinking that communism could reform itself by the way if they had intervened. I'm not sure they could preserve those resumes at that time. The system didn't work. And the people who perpetuate the system know that it doesn't work. It's going to be very hard to implement it abroad. It's sort of like an octopus before they were cutting off tentacles. But when you cut the head off then it's not going into Be Able to have any command or control. Over its periphery. There's a fashionable argument nowadays. That of course the fall of the Soviet Empire and nothing to do with what Ronald Reagan Margaret Thatcher did or for that matter. Pope John Paul. The second that these things were entirely Tali indulgence. Consequences of bundled reform the last loss of legitimacy of the party and so forth. This is a great era. The United States and its allies won the Cold War the fulfillment of cannons vision was really a long project. It was a project of forty five years. I sometimes we get very impatient today. And we say all we've been doing that for eighteen years or twenty years for forty five years they stuck with it and then of course Reagan who who basically said This is a weak system. Not a strong one and We can indeed as Kenan would have put it make it have to deal with its tone internal contradictions. And that's why fell when Ronald Reagan came to office in the nineteen eighties. This this pressure on Moscow was increased and this was one of the reasons why Gaba trough persuaded and was able to persuade the Soga. Okay policy to change and was allowed by the poet bureau to go ahead and seek an accommodation with the Reagan. White House without. This pressure is unlikely to this would ever happen to pay off in in a way that makes us long for these days of cooperation. Collaboration diplomacy we had the muscle but we use diplomacy. And that's I think one of the greatest message of the time standing up on behalf of freedom doesn't mean starting wars in places that are not necessarily strategic from an American point of view but it does mean standing up to adversaries or threats to freedom we in the West as a whole United States written West Germany. All of us did was to keep up own societies strom prosperous dynamic open at attractive you know the host the poll solidarity used it was entitled High Nine Nude Fourth of June nine hundred ninety nine. And it was a picture of Gary Cooper in High Newton wearing the solidarity badge and Zapped Batson amazing tribute to the south of the United States. And the idea. This would all happened in one thousand nine hundred and nine hundred ninety one. If we'd he'd done nothing if Ronald Reagan had given a speech which said Mr Gorbachev you can just leave the wall right there. It's fine with us. That's not plausible. The external pressure was crucial and it gave encouragement to those enduring persecution behind the iron curtain. The Cold War. You know I think brought out in some ways the better angels as I said of the American people going in defending the right of people to choose their own governments if we look at the values of the United States and of the West European democracies proved to be much more attractive than the values and the practices services of of communist rule. We were preaching to the rest of the world but we had something to show inside where the functioning institutions ocean's democratic institutions. And we had something to be proud of. People revolted in the name of dignity and morality. They had good enough. They were looking to the United States and not necessarily to mimic it and copy. It's a system but is a guide. Is it power that stood by them. mm-hmm so let's remember. This was a multigenerational task. This was both sides of the political spectrum there was a consensus in the United Adage states. That the Cold War was necessary. That consensus was correct. The Cold War was not a mistake. The Cold War was an achievement deaprtment. Why the United States? It was a necessary challenge. That didn't mean we would rise to the occasion. What we did? I would say that the United States and its democratic allies. Pass the test that was put before them when the Soviet Union was astride half of Europe To make sure that one one day Europe would return to Europe that was democratic and peaceful and prosperous the challenges remain. And they're different today but we could learn learn a lot from those people Who created the circumstances that led to that extraordinary day when the Berlin Wall fell peacefully? Well I think in the nineteen eighties Ronald Reagan showed all the qualities. It's necessary for bringing a bath de-communitisation in the Soviet the Union and Eastern Europe. He did this by showing firmness he never gave up on his basic Objectives but at at the same time he had the diplomatic skills and the self confidence and the ability to impress upon Gaba of he could be trusted. If they could do a deal he would stick to the deal that enabled the world all to come out of the cold wool without a hot war on. This wasn't a a stupendous achievement. And and it wasn't. I'm just Reagan. It was also George Shultz. It was a whole OSCE of American politicians and diploma cysts. who were supplying the necessary support to bottled Reagan? Who have the necessary vision now? Now the Soviets themselves may in a limited way becoming to understand the importance of freedom. We hear much from Moscow about a new policy of reform and openness. Some political prisoners have been released certain foreign news broadcaster. Yes sir no longer being jammed. Some economic enterprises have been permitted to operate with greater freedom from state. Control are these the beginnings winnings of profound changes in the Soviet state or are they token gestures intended to raise false hopes in the west in order to strengthen the Soviet system without changing it we welcome change and openness for we believe that freedom and security security go together that the advance of human liberty. The advance of human liberty can only strengthen the cause the world peace. There is one sign the Soviets can make that would be unmistakable but would advance drowning nickel dramatically. Weekly the cause of freedom and peace general-secretary Gorbachev if you seek peace if you seek prosperity insperity for the Soviet Union Eastern Europe if.

Ronald Reagan United States Soviet Union Mikhail Gorbachev Berlin Wall East Germany Berlin Ronald Reagan Margaret Thatche Europe George Shultz Soviet Union Eastern Europe Moscow Reagan administration Gaba Germany Scott Middle East Pope John Paul
Brexit Is The Latest Blow To The British Pound, Once A Symbol Of Economic Might

Morning Edition

05:02 min | 1 year ago

Brexit Is The Latest Blow To The British Pound, Once A Symbol Of Economic Might

"It's been some time since Britain's empire extended around the world but the British pound long a symbol of Britain's global power is still a source of great pride in the country over the years though the pound has lost a lot of its luster and the turmoil surrounding brexit has hurt its stature even more you Jim zarroli in the late nineteen nineties Europe embarked on a radical experiment it got rid of Italy's lira Germany's Deutsche mark and the French Frank among others and replace them with a single monetary unit the euro only one major country refused to get on board Britain here is then chancellor of the exchequer Gordon brown we will not seek membership of the single currency on first January nineteen ninety nine the decision was driven by much more than economics the pound also known as the quit or sterling is a rich cultural symbol a powerful reminder of the past glory of the British Empire I'll notes have been adorned with some of the most illustrious figures in British history Shakespeare Dickens and Darwin today people such as Jacquelyn Cup for a pharmacist's assistant in London say giving up the pound is almost unthinkable I think it's because it is so you know you've got an old school friend to turn everything now talk about the talent and it's part of our kind of culture really I think anything that you try to replace it with it wouldn't did the talking I think the pound is encrusted with centuries of British tradition one pound was long week will take two hundred and forty pence it bewildered tourists in nineteen seventy one the government decided to simplify things one pound would now be worth one hundred pence it took some getting used to even students had to take classes in the new money how many new pen if you guys have in one house for new my mom doesn't like the fifty pence I today's twelve to make sure they're not the singer Max Bygraves even put out a song of through all the changes the pound has long symbolized Britain's economic might at one time the pound was used to buy and spend all over the world it paid for roads in Africa and railroads in India it financed cotton fields in the American south Neil Ferguson is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and the author of the history of money if you go back to the nineteenth century the British pounds occupied the place in the global economy that the US dollar does today but as Britain's power wind so did the pound the government tried to stem the decline after the second World War travelers were barred from taking pounds out of the country you can take a holiday business alarms and travelers checks but not more than five pounds in studying those efforts like these not withstanding written over the years would have trouble controlling the pounds volatility the Ferguson remembers living through it my childhood was in some ways scarred by periodic sterling crises I think they were my introduction to economics as a boy growing up in Britain in nineteen ninety two came what was perhaps the worst crisis of all it was known as black Wednesday deep pocketed investors led by George Soros made enormous bets against the pound and the whole world watched as the pound collapsed the most dramatic turn in government if not extract you for twenty five years was forced on the prime minister and chancellor by the overwhelming pressure upon billions of being sold in the far next change mark Soros was said to have made a billion dollars in just one day since then the pound has only lost more ground today it's worth just a dollar twenty a fourth of what it was worth almost a century ago one big culprit lately has been brexit Britain's decision three years ago to leave the European Union sent the pound tumbling the government's chronic inability to come up with an exit plan has driven it even lower David Blanchflower is an economist at Dartmouth College the chaos that sits around a possible no deal brexit is scaring the markets and so the pound is folding steadily Blanchflower says the pound could soon be worth one dollar in the history of the pound that's never happened today the British pound with all its glorious tradition indoors but like the empire itself it's not quite what it used to be Jim zarroli NPR news New York

Britain One Pound Twenty Five Years Billion Dollars Five Pounds Three Years One Dollar One Day
Where all the 2020 Democratic candidates stand on health care

Michael Medved

03:39 min | 1 year ago

Where all the 2020 Democratic candidates stand on health care

"You talk about disingenuous promises when it comes to health care I don't think anyone has been more disingenuous more modeled more incoherent than Kamel Harris she has taken five or six positions most of which involve single payer health care but she tries to shaded and back away from it occasionally her new thing and she gave an interview on CNN I play the audio I broke it down on the air she said in the same interview that yes she supports a single payer healthcare for everyone and also will not raise taxes on anyone but the rich in order to pay for it in the math just doesn't even come close Joe Biden was asked about that while he was on the campaign trail in Michigan this week his response to those dual promises from Comilla quote come on I mean what is this is a fantasy world here Gander candor freeze all right yeah he's right look she's got a real problem here this is this is for all the talk about camel Harris is the next great democratic presidential candidate you she's got a real problem when it comes to healthcare and this is going to be a real weak spot for her she is the nominee I think president trump's going to be able to really take advantage of of this because she your call this debate started when she came out and said let's get rid of private health insurance for everybody much just have Medicare phone CNN on C. N. and that first town hall I think she did that's right and then she realized oh oh that's kind of a political problem I don't think a hundred eighty million Americans would like to have their health care taken away from them and so she came back and said that's not actually what I meant but then she said again well maybe that was what I meant and then you know she's been all over the map and this is one area where Americans are going to demand clarity they're gonna want to know are you serious about taking away the health insurance we've come to to use and to enjoy into value are you gonna make it harder for us to see the doctors that we want to see you and make it harder to get access to the hospitals we want to use that's a non starter for Americans but make no mistake that is exactly the planned that Bernie Sanders and camel Harris and Elizabeth Warren and Cory Booker of all endorse they've endorsed a plan that would take away your health insurance about a minute left line he and this is a lot to squeeze in a last minute but is there an appetite in your experience on the Republican side do you have any unified health care policy yeah going into the next election well I I think it's hard because there are we do have some disagreements among Republicans but but fundamentally I would say we agree on more than we disagree on and so we should we should settle on some things first of all we got to focus on cost let's figure out you know that the presence then something's on drug pricing he's gonna do some more surprise billing which is where you go to the hospital you end up with this huge bill because your doctor wasn't in network or facility within network hopefully the Senate will take care of that as well and legislation that they're considering and then what I say is for obamacare let's figure out a way to get the federal government out let's figure out a way to check engine to to repeal elements of all we don't like and replace it with more control for states more control for patience and that is something I think all Republicans can agree I know we we don't have to get into too much of the detail here I actually I actually want to but we don't have time in this particular broadcast but I'll be back here for a week and I will do it then let's have you back in let's really T. that what you mean by that yeah one he chan has been my guest here on the guidance and show he is a PhD is also the David and Diana Steffi fellow in American public policy studies here at the Hoover Institution turning a hundred years old the Hoover Institution that is not launch this year our congratulations to Hoover on a big achievement a big milestone in line he always a pleasure to have you want thanks guy

Kamel Harris Hundred Years
"hoover institution" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

12:07 min | 2 years ago

"hoover institution" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Hoover Institution. Why you and numerous if Chicago writing most recently on the fires, California, the tragic campfire north of Sacramento and the Wolsey fire in Ventura County and Los Angeles county's leading to an enormous loss of property and an enormous as yet untold loss of life. However, the detail here is why these fires and what is to be done in the future. Now governor Jerry Brown in the last days of office has Judd said these fires are product of global warming. That's that's governor Brown's opinion. And that is echoed proud media. Richard provides for in defining ideas. A nother version of these fires. You don't have to pick a party here to be curious about why these fires why they spread so quickly. What it is. That's changed in America and the twenty first century that we're plagued by these fires where that are very. But they cause loss of life. Whereas these fires have been natural occurrences for thousands of years. Richard a very good evening to you. Take us to two decisions by congress in the nineteen seventies. Are you the national environment Policy Act nineteen seventy and the Endangered Species Act of nineteen Seventy-three? How do these acts of congress? Well intentioned at the time lead to conditions that made those fires possible. Good evening to you. Well, I mean, the situation is even more complicated than that. Because these are only two of the many statutes that deal with the kinds of questions that we have to face there. Also, many local statutes many other permits out there. Oh, and other statutes that are interacting, but the basic story, I think it'd be told pretty much the spa. The question of how it is. That you run a forest is not easy. It's a management challenge. If you let these things get overgrown with underbrush and trees, what happens is you run the catastrophic risk of a major fire to see why that's the case. Think of the way in which people start fires in their own fireplaces. What they do is. They have a bit of paper, then they shoot it a few tweaks and a few small small branches that they put in a bunch of logs and each the earlier levels are easy to ignite. They create a next not tonight the next one until the whole thing goes up. That's what's happening in these forests if we don't keep them clean on the ground. Oh, what you do is you get a bunch of dead wood. Which is very flammable. You get a lot of plant life, which is very immature doesn't have buyer protection. Anything that starts those things off will create a low level fire. But that's large enough to burn the next level species up until you get a raging in for that goes from tree to tree. And these fires particularly when push by win can outrun any human being. Probably go faster than some cars. That's how quickly they start to move. And so once they're in place, it takes a roller captured to contain them. Nobody I think is ever said that things that have been done by the firefighters in response to going on have been in any way misguided or road east. I've not seen any challenges of that sort. And I don't believe that any of these would be sustainable so that all the question goes with respect to the earlier management. And what basically happens is the moment. You put these things into place these statues. What it does is it changes both the procedural way in which the world looks. And it changes the substance of what you can do the National Environmental Protection act was passed the height of the environmental concerns in the late sixties and early nineteen seventies. And what it did is it seemed to call for a system in which congress wanted all agencies to take maximum concerned with various kinds of environmental risk. It could be argued that the overrated these vis-a-vis others. But at least as part of the individual design that was not clear because it seems that what was contemplated under the statute was if you're running an agency, and there's an environmental issue you're supposed to take into account. And when you do that, you're supposed to get consultation from the people on all sides of the particular issue before you form your particular plan, and the theory was that consultation would give information to the agency which would then make its final and what Thomas decision within a year after its passage. There is a decision. The Calvert cliffs case involving the construction of a nuclear plant in which judge skelly Wright who was an ordinance by mental is in a massive interventionist looks at the statute. And he decides it anybody who's disgruntled with the administrative process could launch a direct challenge in court in order to show that the plan has not met these exacting standards. Now, these very very high standards when they're done administrative way. You can relax them a little bit when they're done judicially. Oh, they become very much more rigid. And so what happens under the national environmental Policy Act kneepads? It's commonly called is that you get Vance levels of scrutiny. But who brings the challenges people in the middle of the political spectrum generally willing to live, and let live it's the people who aren't opposed to various kinds of projects, including anything that's associated at that time with the development of nuclear power, all which came to a halt in the nineteen seventies because the environmental challenges became insupportable and the extreme groups get into the courts, and then there is a development of what is called the hard look doctrine in wish you look at every aspect of a particular proposal, and it's awfully easy to find something that's wrong with it. And then you have traditionally made of remedy, which is we stopped everything until everything is corrected that sent offset by a mile to remedy which is introduced somewhere, but you do get this procedural rigidity, which makes it very difficult to change. I want to ask a question about judge skelly Wright, he he made this rule. In Calvert, cliffs coordinating committee. I. The US United States Tomek energy commission about nuclear energy was he where at the time that this the generality of his opinion because I've read through it could be used could be used by the environmentalist to apply to to apply to federally owned forests not not nothing to do with nuclear energy. They're applying. He knew that he knew that. They absolutely he said this statute treated as a British will initiate, a flood of litigation. Laws is carte blanche to stop everything to just. You just essentially can use this as a huge veto power. Because of the way in which the particular thing was done. It doesn't mean that every one of these challenges are going to win. But in many cases, the nature of the game is not the win. The challenge is to delay the outcome. And if you delay the outcome than the financial support for the project can weather, so we'll die deaths in that, particular fashion. Environmentalist a keenly aware of that. And so in the pipeline cases, that's one of the strategies are always trying to let them start construction. Spend a fortune in strand the caused by bringing environmental claim underneath that you haven't met this Saturday the other safety conditions. So yes, he knew exactly what he was doing. And he was proud of it. I mean at the time one has to remember that the world was slightly different than the following wet. You take any field medicine, whatever it is. And you look at the sort of the ratio between good and constructive action on the one side and ineffective and destruction of actors on the other side. And what happens is there were many more mistakes back in nineteen sixty nine on environmental issues in the today. This statute was passed in the wake of the Santa Barbara oil spill, which took place very elementary situation. That was a well in the middle of Santa Barbara hopper. Leaked started this feeling nobody could figure out how to control it things like that just don't happen anymore today. So to some extent skelly Wright said look, I know what the high frequency is of these adverse effect. So I want to really be better safe than sorry. The likelihood that kind of an accident given modern technology in virtually anything that we do is probably doubt. But let's talk about ninety eight percent. Let's apply to forest so because forest we're don't have oil spills them for us. We don't have nuclear plants and forest forest require very careful management are the native American ancestors of North America manage their forest they and they managed forest is an invitation. For tragedy, especially when you permit people to build houses, right in the way of the unmanaged forests judge skelly Wright's opinion is out of date, Richard. We're living with something that no longer works in the twenty first century and been telling me, you're telling me that that's that's the root of what has happened in California. Judge skelly. No. The look the pipelines involved the clean water act, in many cases, the forest fires that you see in California often involve the Endangered Species Act. This act particularly says is that if you have a habitat, and it could be a very large habitat in which some endangered species will live, then what you have to do is to put every other consideration second to the preservation of that habitat. This is led to several powerful things. One is huge amounts of water are essentially not available for the use brag were coal to and other things because it's thought that they must be kept inside the scream in order to help some. Endangered species of salmon make it backtracks pointing at fourteen but way, just Nipah applies to the inability for the forest to be harvested correctly. You. Not one instance, they can't even log out the after a fire. They can't even log out the worthy would because environmentalists come forward. And stop anybody on federal lands doing anything because what you do is. Now, you have to keep the old growth forests. Well, old growth, forests dive. And that's when you get the accumulated buildup and so on public lands at two things that are worth. And the fires in California are public lands. Let's. The private the private plans. If you own land say by a company like Georgia specific Pacific. They don't have old growth forest. So they don't have this particular problems. And what they do is. They have a very orderly system in which they grow the trees that keeps them appropriately space. They make sure the ground underneath it doesn't become situation. So they managed the farm. It's a farm trees. They're good at it. And they're very good at it on the public lands. What happens is you do have the old gross stuff? But in order to make way for the cycles to go. You have to systematically, remove things you have to start backfires. They're all sorts of things that have to be done. But everything that changes, the ecology is now subject to a permit system and the permit systems that basically put and controlled by people who said we do not wish to have any small fire started by man, that becomes a bad thing. And what happens is you humilate this stuff and you'll get all of these terrible. Fires that come from. Well, who knows what the rumor? Many of these cases is that the fires were started. When some spark week from one of the power lines that went through the forest and hit some of the underbrush. Now, you know, the two ways in which you can deal with this one of them is you could try to have greater installation on the trees. And the other thing you could try to do is to have out on the on the on the on the wires. The other thing is you can have greater separation. And it's getting that separation becomes very difficult on federal lands because you have both the regulatory structure on the one hand, and many of the government officials who do this are the same frame of mind, anyhow, so it's not even like it would be with public. Regulation of private lands. Would it be some pushback, this is a case in which both sides of the same area, and it becomes slightly crazy John in many areas, and you want to put a four foot walkway over a small stream, and you know, the thing is four feet wide and ten feet long. You need to get a permit for that. Why is that? Because if you change the amount of sunlight that can reach the water underneath the under. The new bridge or walkway that could be regarded as a form of pollution. So you have to do all of these crazy kinds of studies..

skelly Wright California congress Richard Hoover Institution Jerry Brown governor Brown Chicago America Sacramento Ventura County Calvert cliffs Judd
Meghan Markle and Prince Harry Attend Friend's Wedding on Her Birthday

Under The Hood

02:32 min | 2 years ago

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry Attend Friend's Wedding on Her Birthday

"Quickstart from relief factor maybe all you need to lower or even eliminate these pains whole, lot of people have already. Gone to relief factor dot com and here's something you need to know the majority of people. Who ordered the three week quickstart now only nineteen ninety-five go on to order more let's see if we can get you. Out of pain To go to relieffactor dot com Just. Weeks after tying the knot themselves the Duke and duchess. Of Sussex are at another wedding. Let's Karen Shamas reports this time they're the guests Prince Harry and Meghan Markle were attending the. Wedding of the prince's longtime fan. Charlie van Stubbins e today's jank's the ceremony also happens to. Be taking place on Megan's thirty seventh birthday fence job and see has nine the prince since childhood and was an Ashrat. Harry Megan's wedding at Windsor Castle in may the prince Wartelle Cates in sunglasses and Meghan is short sleeved dress and matching fascinates as a couple arrived at the medieval chat isn't Mary the virgin. Franson forty miles. Southwest of London Taryn Shammas London Francis first baby panda celebrates his one year anniversary today with, a, birthday, cake, comprised, of bamboo. Honey apples oranges strawberries and lemons the panda named Yongming weighs about sixty six pounds and has recently started eating bamboo while still suckling milk from its mother townhall dot com New concerns about the security of computer tablets offered to win mates prompted Colorado with. Authorities to take. Away all fifteen thousand of its tablets from their state prisoners confiscation comes a week after Idaho, officials, said, three, hundred, sixty four. Inmates exposed a glitch in their tablets that they use to apply a total of two hundred twenty five thousand and credits to their accounts Which they said to send emails free music play games. Read books or take classes officials in Colorado declined to discuss the security. Issue that led the Goths gate the tablets. Department of correction, spokesman Mark Fairbairn says the predators were not using the tablets to hack into computer systems or to take money Patrick fos reporting a statue of confederate general Robert E Lee. On Richmond's famed monument avenue has been vandalized with red paint splattered on the statue's base letters on apparent reference to the black lives matter movement also sprayed on the base Virginia capitol police say this is This is a. Lot of the Hoover Institution for townhall.

Harry Megan Meghan Markle Colorado Prince Harry Taryn Shammas London Francis Hoover Institution Karen Shamas Charlie Van Stubbins Mark Fairbairn Windsor Castle Yongming London Patrick Fos Robert E Lee Richmond Sussex Idaho Wartelle Cates Virginia
Study: Warming climate will likely boost suicide rates worldwide

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

03:09 min | 2 years ago

Study: Warming climate will likely boost suicide rates worldwide

"LAPD chief Michael Moore, releasing video, of the deadly shootout at the trader Joe's revealing that. It was police fire that. Killed the civil lake store manager chief said he sought to shooting looks like it was justified and those officers actions to stop him and then, split-second decisions they. Had to make I recognize how they will forever go through their mind debating whether that was what they had to do. But as chief of police I believe it's what they needed to, do in order to defend the people. Of Los Angeles and defend the people in that store and defend themselves more of our in depth team coverage. Of the aftermath of the shootout coming up. At the bottom of the hour the sexual offenders Assessment Board in Pennsylvania is recommending that Bill Cosby be classified as a sexually violent predator the, request follows, his conviction and the drugging and raping of a temple university employee in two thousand and four but a judge will make the final decision. If he agrees Cosby would receive, increased treatment in prison and increased automation of neighbors when he is released Cosby's due to. Be sentenced in September New research. From Stanford and UC Berkley says there could be a link between climate change and an increase in suicides Stanford professor Marshall Burke tells. Can actually. Found a strong correlation between warm weather and higher rates of suicide there's increase in the future our results. Would suggest that we will, likely see more than we would have otherwise are estimated by mid century we'll see an additional twenty thousand suicide in the US Mexico combined due to increases again that's the twenty thousand lives that will tragically be lost that would not have been lost otherwise mental health. Experts say other risk factors should be considered in the increase in, suicides such as medication and the economy. Secretary of state Mike Pompeo Defense Secretary James Mattis are meeting today with their Australian counterparts at the Hoover Institution. At Stanford University this is an annual event. State Department said this year songs would include cooperation on how to defeat ISIS as well as ongoing issues involving China and North Korea ecoconscious San Francisco is expected to join Malibu and Seattle in outlawing plastic straws the board of supervisors will vote today on legislation. That also prohibits carry out containers made with fluorinated chemicals people with disabilities have spoken out against the plastic. Draw band but businesses in. Politically progressive San Francisco appear to be largely in support the hunt for man and police say kill the nineteen. Year old woman in an unprovoked to San Francisco Bay area stabbing ended where it. Began, in a train station authorities arrested a man suspected in the attack on the train last. Night, at a bay, area, rapid transit station please say he killed the young woman with a knife and wounded or sister at an Oakland. Station Sunday night the. Office of Senator Orrin Hatch says reports of his death sir greatly exaggerated there had been. Some confusion after Google search. Results indicated the eighty four year old politician died last September but it turns out the search engine was repeating information from a mistaken. Wikipedia entry Twenty with a look at your money here's. Bring Motech brought to you by Bob Smith..

Bill Cosby Stanford University San Francisco San Francisco Bay Lapd Senator Orrin Hatch Michael Moore Pennsylvania Google Mike Pompeo JOE Los Angeles Marshall Burke James Mattis Bob Smith Hoover Institution Oakland State Department
New-home sales rebound in May on hearty demand

Hugh Hewitt

01:02 min | 2 years ago

New-home sales rebound in May on hearty demand

"In new home sales commerce department says new home sales jumped nearly seven percent last month with the southern united states accounting for all the monthly gains the south reports sales growth of just under eighteen percent in may rates were flat in the mid west and fell in the north east and west so far this year new home sales have risen nearly nine percents as a solid job market and a shortage of existing homes have boosted demand mike hemp in washington british parliament approved plans to make europe's biggest airport even bigger on monday and what the government described as most important transportation decision in a generation the house of commons voted overwhelmingly four fifteen to one nineteen building third runway at heathrow airport after hours of debate on the eighteen point six billion dollar project more of these stories at townhall dot com i'm patrick fos this is david davenport of the hoover institution for townhall dot com california lives on the edge of.

Mike Hemp British Parliament Europe Patrick Fos David Davenport Hoover Institution United States Washington Six Billion Dollar Eighteen Percent Seven Percent
San Jose, Chief Operating Officer and Ray Donovan discussed on KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

01:45 min | 2 years ago

San Jose, Chief Operating Officer and Ray Donovan discussed on KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

"The drive on the five enor walk your traffic report coming up in less than three minutes to twenty two on knx there is a clear favourite in the governor's race but will he win with such a big lead somebody run quite like who's been so overtly progressive in his agenda they'll waylon is a research fellow at stanford university's hoover institution governors historically had been the break to the engine that had california government if you think of the legislatures the gas cuddled and governors the break showed no signs of wanting to be the break that combined with the desire for single payer coverage which is controversial in california his embrace of just all things left but also his persona will statewide as we think given the huge advantage democrats have over republicans and voter registration and california whalen says it would be tough for the lieutenant governor to lose two gop businessman john cox but he contends this could be a closer race than expected cloudy fescue knx ten seventy newsradio scottish man who had planned to across the atlantic ocean alone in a row boats has been rescued five hundred miles off massachusetts nile mcdonald triggered his emergency radio beacon early on this morning after he started taking on water during rough seas dutch cargo ship found him brought him on board she's going to go with them to canada the plan journey would have covered thirty four hundred miles naya rivera's a single lady again her marriage to ryan dorsey he's over after nearly four years former gliac chris and her former husband will share custody of their two year old son dorsey is also an actor who has appeared in the tv shows glee and ray donovan some news from san jose the founder and former chief operating officer of theranos have been charged with defrauding investors doctors and patients is so blood testing company that was really taken down by stories has started off in the wall street journal the indictment here charges him with.

San Jose Chief Operating Officer Ray Donovan Ryan Dorsey Nile Mcdonald GOP Wall Street Journal Theranos Founder Research Fellow Chris Massachusetts Atlantic Ocean John Cox California Whalen California Stanford University Three Minutes
California primary election 2018: A look at the turnout

The John Batchelor Show

01:58 min | 2 years ago

California primary election 2018: A look at the turnout

"The john batchelor show elizabeth peak peak for fox news my colleague we turn to the results from the primaries of these last days especially the california primary this i report to you having talked to bill whelan of the hoover institution that the turnout in a race that had villa ragusa the popular mayor of los angeles on the ticket running for governor on a ticket that would could have frozen out all republicans at the gubernatorial level there were ordinary turnouts that's what bill reports to me that the hispanic vote and the least educated at least likely to vote vote in a midterm did not turn out in any extraordinary number despite the fact that villarreal gaza was on the ticket and that the republican entry a man from illinois john cox is on the ticket making a success for the republicans they have a straight republican ticket devote a surprise to everybody against gavin newsom in addition john fund of the national review online reports to me about the the primaries that of the seven congressional districts that nancy pelosi says she can flip suburban districts that voted for mrs clinton in the two thousand sixteen election over donald trump six of them six of the seven had a bigger republican vote than democratic vote which john tells me has heretofore been predictive of the final because it's a jungle primary out there on the final results so right now that blue wave that we watched disappear a couple of weeks ago that blue wave is is looking like just a ripple very small yeah i thought that california results were interesting everyone was really focused on that jungle primary and the possibility that so many democrats running in some of those districts that you might end up with two republicans at the top of the ticket they didn't have that they didn't suffer that indignity they do have a democrat on most of those platforms running but as you point out on almost all of them the republican.

Elizabeth Peak Mrs Clinton National Review John Fund Illinois Villarreal Bill Whelan California FOX Los Angeles John Batchelor John Donald Trump Nancy Pelosi Gavin Newsom John Cox Gaza
"hoover institution" Discussed on Examining Politics

Examining Politics

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"hoover institution" Discussed on Examining Politics

"Welcome to moment conservatives i'm your host hugo gutten editorial director of the washington examiner i'm delighted to be joined today by professor thomas soul who's a senior fellow at the hoover institution at stanford university and one of the renowned conservative economists in the country professor soul thanks so much for joining me on modern conservatives and i want to congratulate you i on your book discrimination and disparities which is is a fascinating read which i completed over the weekend i want to go straight to that i want to go straight to that as if i understand it right lead the thesis of the book is contained in the title which is that there that discrimination and disparities are two distinct things and that there is what you call an invincible fallacy that seems to guide to bait in politics and policy discussions which suggests that any difference in outcome between different groups whether they be races or the sexes or nations must be to do with either discrimination or genetic deficiencies and the argument that you make is that all the evidence suggests this is absolutely wrong so first of all correct me if i'm wrong on the on the thesis of the book and then tell us about the book and the thesis that you that you have laid out here you're you're you're absolutely right it's amazing whenever you look for facts when you do research either about people or about nature you find skewed distributions everywhere but when you listen to people talk especially in the academic world the underlying assumption is that the people are all have the same capability and that therefore any differences in their outcomes must be to other people in some way doing them wrong it's amazing because if you think just of an individual i mean the same man does not have the same capability he's not even equals himself at different stages of life much less being equal to all the other people that all all the highly varying us stages of the allies one of the things that you point out just you mentioned age just now is that there are some sections of the population perhaps section divided sorted by race where the median age is radically.

editorial director thomas soul senior fellow hoover institution stanford university hugo gutten washington professor
"hoover institution" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"hoover institution" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"At the hoover institution reviewing new ball the dawn of eurasia on the trail of the new world order by a portuguese european minister previous former bruno messiahs and i named for capitals washington berlin representing the west always presumed these last two hundred years since the napoleonic order to be progressive filled with education a yearning for transparency scientifically based and aggressive then the east regarded as backward at at the very least and tyrannical and monstrous at the worst in the twentieth century represented by stalin and mao but here we are in the twenty first century professor i go to these not moscow and beijing alone but two capitals i've visited in this last year that make me stop on my presumptions one baku azerbaijan on the caspian sea basin which is said to the crossroads for a new rail part of the belt and chain that wants that they are looking to construct from the european markets to the asian markets to flow through boku and then another rail to go from moscow to the indian ocean north to south that's one capital that if you visit baku today it resembles nothing like the romantic pictures of the ottoman empire it's his completely up to date as any building you can find in in san francisco or new york and then if you go to other by a go to qatar to doha they're preparing for the twenty twenty two world cup and they're building stadiums instantly the city's rising all around they're putting in light rails and they're welcoming the world and they ship their liquefied natural gas they ship it east to india india can take all at once a sub continent of asia so i mentioned those two on two capitals because they're not primary and the thinking the united nations but both those capitals are building as quickly as anything in the west to be part of the twenty first century and they're counting on the business of beijing and moscow and the rest of their eurasian partners i'm not even sure they need american trade professor well this is a good exemplification of how the united states has to be concerned about potentially being shut out of of.

san francisco bruno united states united nations asia india qatar new york hoover institution baku moscow caspian sea basin azerbaijan beijing professor mao stalin eurasia
US-China trade talks center on rivalry over technology

02:02 min | 2 years ago

US-China trade talks center on rivalry over technology

"Special tomorrow five o'clock eastern carol i'll be thinking with robert kaplan from the dallas fed wanna talk to you about the international aspects of fed policy and also about the us economy good stuff as always kathleen hayes global economics and policy editor at bloomberg news there at on the west coast attending the hoover institution monetary policy conference at stanford and of course our thanks to philippi hernandez latin america economist bloomberg economics inner bloomberg eleven three studio let's get back to world and national news headlines and it's ever to nathan hager bloomberg newsroom in washington dc nathan carol president trump didn't know about the payment to stormy daniels when he said he didn't know about it that's what white house spokeswoman sarah sanders just said at the daily press briefing in the west wing after the president's lawyer rudy giuliani revealed last night that the president has in fact reimbursed his personal lawyer michael cohen for that hundred thirty grand stated and i'll refer you back to his comments this was information that the president didn't know at the time but eventually learn reports that federal authorities wiretapped cohen before the fbi raid on his home and office sanders is deferring questions on that to the president's lawyers and the justice department says the us cannot confirm reports that north korea's releasing three americans ahead of the president's plan to summit with kim jong un but she says if it's true the administration would see it as a sign of goodwill so far so little to say from president trump's economic team when it comes to trade talks with china the latest from bloomberg's irv chapman in washington china's economic policies plus geopolitical ambitions make the negotiations a tough slog elizabeth konami of the council on foreign relations said in a bloomberg interview superpower they want to reclaim the centrality of china on the global stage they want write the rules of the game they're made in china twenty twentyfive program to protect the chinese economy and chinese industry in ten cutting edge technologies is antithetical to getting the us companies in their opening market access and getting a fair deal economy says the administration would have a better shot against chinese cheating if it worked in concert with allies who have the.

Kim Jong Un Washington FBI Wiretapped Cohen Nathan Hager Hoover Institution Editor United States China Irv Chapman Bloomberg Robert Kaplan North Korea Justice Department Michael Cohen Rudy Giuliani President Trump Sarah Sanders Daniels
"hoover institution" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"hoover institution" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"I'm john batchelor samuel tatras writing for the hoover institution the descent of siri into the abyss is looking at a a scenario that is awful for the people who live there but certainly a quandary for the great powers and the two most involved right now or the united states and russia into the future the immediate future sam i agree with you that the map is itself a problem and certainly the assad regime or assad himself seen as somehow holding off the cutthroat militias when in fact it's just a tangle and anarchy almost as if we're on a science fiction planet in everybody's at war with everybody else but the us is committed to it not just the trump administration but obama administration and we could go back to bush but let's say with obama obama didn't wash his hands of syria but refused to get involved when the chemical weapons tragedy i came up mr trump has involved himself by firing cruise missiles into syria but now again we have plenty of evidence these last months the un is skirting council said we have even more evidence of chemical weapons being used routinely inside and the us again is being very cautious almost reluctant to talk about the fact that wmd is being used sam i'm going to press you on this this is a this is a challenge for everyone talking about syria how do you stand back and watch this how do you not get involved.

hoover institution united states russia obama syria mr trump john batchelor assad bush
"hoover institution" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"hoover institution" Discussed on WTMA

"I'm john batchelor this is the john batchelor show the arctic security initiative what is it what does it mean for the twenty first century looking forward i'm very pleased to welcome gary rough head former chief of naval operations now the hoover annenberg distinguished visiting fellow we're talking about the security initiative the arctic security initiative because there are number of nations the arctic nations that border the north pole of the arctic itself and also because of the global climate change we can see now over the last twenty or thirty years whatever the driver the fact is that the ice pack is smaller in in seasons and so more ocean is open or to paraphrase the admiral when he presented this to the hoover institution and in two recent world economic forum what we're looking at here is the first ocean opening in ten thousand years to navigation to opportunity into commerce and security gary admiral a very good evening to you thank you for this in ten thousand years that got my attention does this get everybody excited or is there is there more worrying oh what now good evening gary good evening john and it's great to be with you and i appreciate the opportunity to talk about something that i think is extraordinarily important and i think it's both quite frankly it is a tremendous opportunity for the arctic nations in particular but i think even beyond that because of the the opening of new transportation routes clearly the resources in the arctic region are vast but also there's challenge as as as you may have seen that even though the ice has diminished it's still a very inhospitable place last year had the.

john batchelor hoover annenberg hoover institution gary admiral chief of naval operations visiting fellow arctic ten thousand years thirty years
"hoover institution" Discussed on Waking Up with Sam Harris

Waking Up with Sam Harris

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"hoover institution" Discussed on Waking Up with Sam Harris

"Be helped and now for today's podcast today i am speaking with neil ferguson neil as a financial historian the author of many books he's also a journalist he's a professor he is now affiliated with the hoover institution at stanford university he is the lucky husband of on her sally one of my friends in heroes also a former podcast guest and he has most recently the author of the square and the tower networks and power from the freemasons to facebook in this conversation we talk about mostly that book we talk about trump and other matters and those of you who have hated me on the topic of trump may like that part of the conversation neil is really one of the first people to say anything that has given me pause on the topic of trump and what he says is fairly simple it makes trump look no better it doesn't take the onus off of the people who have supported him but i did find it worth thinking about it has to some degree changed my sense of how bad an outcome the election was all things considered so much appreciate that when it happens in the conversation neil as most of you know is a man of strong opinions and a wealth and information and i bring it to you please enjoy neil ferguson i am here with neil ferguson neil thanks for coming on the podcast it's a pleasure some this has been a long time coming i you are one of my most requested guests and you are also a man who's had the good sense to mary one of my favorite women on earth i on her cialis so um well done on both counts but that is the most interesting thing about me and and she is more interesting than me so you'll you'll list this will just have to make do with second best on this occasion yeah well it's it's a good problem to have it sure is so before we get into your new book which is fascinating give me a picture of how you view your career as a an academic at a journalist to be you are often described as an economic historian you seem from the outside at least not to be an entirely standard academic our journalist ugur you seem far more entrepreneurial than that and and have just walk.

professor hoover institution stanford university trump neil ferguson facebook
"hoover institution" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"hoover institution" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"He is a fellow senior fellow at the hoover institution he is the author of the new book uh published by hoover institution unstable majorities polarization party sorting and political stalemate a previous book culture war question mark on goes to the myth of a polarized america and as a great deal of polling and social research data in an to show that americans agree a lot more than people think if i can just a one quick word to follow up on you what you were saying morris before the break on this issue of abortion there is a professor at uh she's retire now at harvard mary ann glendon who who writes that we were in the process of working the abortion issue out when roe v wade hit and it was a disaster because what a did is it took the issue away from legislatures and state legislatures which are sort of built for compromise and took it to the courts which are built for absolutes words all the absolute right to choose or the absolute right to life whereas when things are decided in legislative bodies are much more likely to halfway split the difference compromise let's go to uh greg in cleveland greg you're on the michael medved show good afternoon michael i will get right to it um i do agree with your guest in certain ways i'm in the service industry and uh uh i'm constantly warning into people out in the field who are very supportive of donald trump uh they kind of said it on the snyder like wing wink nod nod so tell anybody but yes we are very supportive we're happy with what we're seeing that's going on in the in the country in his successes with the economy and the tax cuts but you never know it by the media he is enemy number one but and then my comment on the memo okay i think it it can be boiled down to the one sentence were mccabe testified before the committee in december two thousand seventeen that no surveillance warren to would have been sought from the sisc without this deal does see a information that is the key without that steel dossier which is a bogus a trumped up charges they would have never gotten the.

senior fellow hoover institution america morris professor ann glendon wade donald trump snyder warren harvard mary roe cleveland michael medved mccabe
"hoover institution" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

03:16 min | 2 years ago

"hoover institution" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"Of the media fellowship with the hoover institution and we look forward to a perspective on the coming state of the union from uh these great individuals will also be speaking to a former democratic senator noted for his strong support of american defence and strong opposition to soviet tyranny his aim as a sam nunn former senator from the state of georgia he's also a fellow at the hoover institution will be speaking to senator non a little bit later in the show as well first up the the left rallied in new york with these socalled people's state of the union now how it is that a bunch of hollywood stars led by the inimitable michael moore yeah he's back the hollywood stars led by michael moorer and mark ruffalo and amy schumer murder and rosie perez and cynthia next senen john leg was armo the mayor of new york otherwise known as big bird uh the honorable bill de blasio stop by caffeine and jamie stopped by they all spoke they why did they call this the people state of the union why do these people gathered in manhattan represent america large more than the people who are elected to represent america larger we're going to be together in washington dc applauding the president and waiting to hear what he has to say you don't have to wait to hear what they said at the socalled people's inaugural i mean this is unbelievable people state of the union is what this is called and michael moore had a rather sorry impression of the current state of the union here's what he had to say we want our mirrors goal hot meal three ignorance okay a population of semiliterate and unaware people we have to clothe our american soul of white privilege cleanse our american soul of white privilege and unassailable ignorance and and consuming greed really do you really think the american people the most charitable people in the world and by the way there are some studies that show that a religious people who happen to be struggling economically still are more generous more generous in terms of what they give then uh some people who were determinedly secular who may be making a lot more money this in salt this contempt for the american public is exactly what elected donald trump it should be very clear and yet michael moore is doubling down with his hatefilled and contemptuous rhetoric about his fellow citizens listen.

michael moore donald trump semiliterate washington manhattan jamie rosie perez amy schumer michael moorer hollywood sam nunn hoover institution president america caffeine cynthia murder mark ruffalo new york georgia senator
"hoover institution" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"hoover institution" Discussed on WGTK

"Asked what is the real history of the republican party carol swain has the surprising answer in the new video from prager university cnn prager u dot com where we teach what is wrong hello everybody well i could streak to all three hours early the twoday returns to we have story on senior fellow at the hoover institution we're talking about the foul i think lowly misses the little overstated but you get the idea of those of us in a conservative intellectual world but who are defenders of the president as opposed to the never trumpers i if i have felt victor that from the beginning it amounted to this if you if one appreciates the threat to western civilization that the left and i always distinguish between the left and liberals but that the left composers the constitutes then that's the difference that's the determinative difference brad stevens friend guys made prager you videos uh he he wrote in his last call own on on a recent column how much in fact the president has achieved and then throws in the sentence but i still wish hillary clinton had been elected.

carol swain senior fellow hoover institution president victor hillary clinton brad stevens three hours twoday
"hoover institution" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"hoover institution" Discussed on WGTK

"Todd at the hoover institution you may be alone the out and i think that almost everybody of most those types of you know wellknown conservative organizations that the people who feel that while they might not have supported trump in the primaries swansea he was nominated they saw that he was the only salvation given the alternative there there are minority clear in that the other people feel that either um they they had said that he wouldn't win the primary wouldn't win the general election he'd be a failure first year and now they feel that rather than recalibrate evening there are digging down because they they want that prophecy to be selffulfilling they have one last thing they they make the argument that even though there's a conservative virginia that's in some ways more reagan than reagan's it took trump's supposedly dirty footprint saw nullify the entire agenda and that because he's so unusually crude of that would uh they're very intelligent people so i asked myself do they know anything about the fdr white house do they know anything about the lbj white house so they know anything about the jfk white house and what would that would have been like have we have ninety percent of the contemporary media negative to those administrations and talking about jfk's bedroom antics rather than the cuban missile crisis so i i'm that's what really bothers me that these are intelligent people but they are so blinded by culture or prejudice or whatever it is but they're they're not being historically empirical.

swansea white house trump jfk virginia people hoover institution
"hoover institution" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

03:47 min | 3 years ago

"hoover institution" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Thomas soul i hope you know who thomas solis he is an american economist he is an american political philosopher he's a senior fellow at the hoover institution out at stanford university he is a long time black conservative thomas saw brilliant brilliant man who is all about as a black man in america he's all about freedom and limited government thomas soul check him out read some of his stuff he sort of retired uh from the public eye but you can still check him out on line and read from some of his greatest hits check out some of his best books thomas soul he said he tweeted out this morning something that i thought was wonderful and i re tweeted it and i want to give it to you right now thomas sold tweeted out the following quote i have never understood why these greed to want to keep the money you have earned but not greed to wanna take somebody else's money isn't that awesome i'll give it to you again thomas soul i have never understood why it is greed to want to keep the money you have earned but not greed to wanna take somebody else's money like ew and me and most people listening to this show generally you work hard every day you were card every week the money you make is yours you'd like to keep as much of it as you can it sure money you believe you wanna keep as much of it as you can and somehow we call that greedy widening the key the money that you will work for that you've slaved for again i don't want to speak for everybody most americans don't love their jobs most americans do their jobs most americans by the end of the week they're ready for the weekend most americans were pretty doggone hard and every dollar every every die you make generally earn you'd like to keep as much of it as you can for yourself for your family four whatever and yet in america today we call that person greedy we call you gril greedy you who don't believe that the government should tax you at a rate that is off the charts yoohoo yoohoo you.

senior fellow hoover institution stanford university thomas solis america
"hoover institution" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"hoover institution" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Of the hoover institution for town hall dot com if the last week alone terrorist attack for taipei to attack targets in european nations we call allies in france one of the main railway stations in brussels belgium was targeted so too were innocent civilians on the shots at least a in paris these attempts come on the heels of deadly attacks in london and manchester and recent attacks at stockholm berlin emmys the threat of radical jihadist terrorism israel and if we are naive enough to believe that the terrorists are only interested in attacking european nations shame on us they loved nothing more than a successfully attacked the american homeland that's why for all the threats we face around the world not is more significant than the one we face from radical lama terrorism the intelligence community and law enforcement have done a superb job of keeping america safe says on eleven lawmakers should make sure they have everything they need for success and the trump administration should continue to vote time effort and resources to neutralizing and eventually defeating this threat by law he chen his would nine said the answer morning glory america it's hugh hewitt i begin with a story out in nevada which is the most important story of the day thousands of residents will be left uninsured in fourteen of nevada seventeen counties after two insurance companies exit the government run but privately administered health insurance exchange next year in what state officials call a health crisis wednesday at the blue cross blue shield cetina wednesday statement it will no longer offer plans for the exchange enrollment data citing market volatility the uncertainty of federal operations as republicans in congress continue debate an overall all of the system providence health plan says it will pull out of the state entirely nevada thus joins missouri ohio in washington state which several largely rural counties where no insurance company will participate in the marketplace and twenty eight t iowa may be the first day with no ensure is willing to enter the exchange in any county next year silver state health insurance exchange executive director heather bullets at eight eight thousand fifteen.

congress executive director washington missouri health insurance law enforcement berlin london paris heather bullets iowa insurance company ohio hoover institution insurance companies nevada hugh hewitt america israel stockholm manchester belgium brussels france taipei
"hoover institution" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"hoover institution" Discussed on WCHS

"Where we have less reason to put as many human beings in line of fire but there are still those moments we just look such as benghazi but the point is the generation back then our values our our our customers of the fabric of our society was such that drafting thousands and thousands of average ordinary americans and you can see them buried in cemeteries of europe you to see them buried in arlington mr random selection of people moldova country created the absolute best most skilled fighting force never could we do it today if we hit there are people at legitimately ask the question it's not meant to insult anybody it's not meant to cast aspersions on any other generation it's a legitimate question because at the time it was needed if we had not succeeded united states might have ended as we know it the japanese and the germans were on the march once we entered we were as much the enemy is that a european nation what if what if we had surrendered that was talking after thomas soul the great economists and now retired columnist who was the hoover institution in palo alto at stamford i remember interviewing him the last time i did for the limbaugh letter it was during the obama administration the iran nuclear deal came up and he was scared to death he was literally scared doctors soul is part of the generation i'm talking about greatest generation were to generation he was scared to death of the iran nuclear deal he was scared to death of iran getting nuclear weapons that the most unimaginable thing to him was a worldwide state sponsor of terrorism acquiring nuclear weapons with the aid of the united states he was beside himself so much so that i ask him what are you fear his arm afraid that iran's nuclear weapon and they're going to take out chicago and obama or somebody like him going to surrender.

benghazi europe united states thomas hoover institution palo alto stamford obama administration nuclear weapons chicago arlington moldova limbaugh iran obama