40 Burst results for "Hong"

 Ship sinks in storm off Hong Kong, dozens of crew in danger

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 13 hrs ago

Ship sinks in storm off Hong Kong, dozens of crew in danger

"An industrial support ship operating in the South China Sea has sunk in a storm with over two dozen crew members feared dead Rescue planes and helicopters were dispatched to the area with at least three crew members being brought to safety emergency services footage showed one crew member being airlifted onto a rescue helicopter as wild ways slashed below them The accident occurred about a 186 miles south of Hong Kong Hong Kong's flying service said that crew members were negotiating difficulties brought on by severe tropical storm chaba The storm was packing maximum winds of 68 mph

South China Sea Hong Kong Hong Kong
Fresh update on "hong" discussed on AP News Radio

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 13 hrs ago

Fresh update on "hong" discussed on AP News Radio

" An industrial support ship operating in the South China Sea has sunk in a storm, with over two dozen crew members feared dead. Rescue planes and helicopters were dispatched to the area with at least three crew members being brought to safety, emergency services footage showed one crew member being airlifted onto a rescue helicopter, as wild ways slashed below them. The accident occurred about a 186 miles south of Hong Kong, Hong Kong's flying service said that crew members were negotiating difficulties brought on by severe tropical storm chaba. The storm was packing maximum winds of 68 mph. I'm Karen Chammas

South China Sea Hong Kong Karen Chammas
 Xi arrives in Hong Kong for 25th anniversary of handover

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 2 d ago

Xi arrives in Hong Kong for 25th anniversary of handover

"China's Xi arrives by train in Hong Kong for a major anniversary of the handover Supporters mass at the train station waving Chinese and Hong Kong flags chanting welcome welcome warm welcome as Xi Jinping arrives the Chinese leader is in Hong Kong ahead of the 25th anniversary of the British handover and after a two year transformation bringing the city more tightly under Communist Party control it's Xi's first trip outside of Mainland China in nearly two and a half years

Hong Kong Xi Jinping China Communist Party Mainland
Fresh update on "hong" discussed on Weekend Edition Saturday

Weekend Edition Saturday

00:39 sec | 18 hrs ago

Fresh update on "hong" discussed on Weekend Edition Saturday

"Hong Kong. Both of them born in 1997, the year Hong Kong reverted to Chinese rule. For the new PBS TV series, America outdoors baratunde Thurston cowboy up in Idaho. We gotta get you to address. Well, this is real cowboy stuff. He whitewater rafted in Appalachia. Let's get wet. You ready? Yes. Let's go rafting. And he hiked to a waterfall. He has a waterfall and Death Valley. That is so beautiful. He canoed, fly fish, ran alongside an ultra marathoner and snorkel to explore a Civil War shipwreck

Hong Kong PBS Idaho Appalachia America Death Valley
 Police patrol Hong Kong park to enforce Tiananmen vigil ban

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last month

Police patrol Hong Kong park to enforce Tiananmen vigil ban

"Police in Hong Kong are enforcing strict security on the 33rd anniversary of the Tiananmen Square crackdown in China dozens of police officers patrolled Hong Kong's Victoria park after authorities banned any public acknowledgment of the Tiananmen Square crackdown for a third consecutive year for decades Hong Kong traditionally held a candlelit vigil in the park to remember the violent military suppression of student protesters in Beijing's Tiananmen Square on the 4th of June 1989 the ban is seen as part of a move to eradicate any signs of political dissent and is evidence of Hong Kong's loss of freedoms as Beijing tightens its grip over the semi autonomous Chinese city Hong Kong resident Donald Tam told the AP Beijing's increasing control over the city is upsetting I'm

Tiananmen Square Hong Kong Victoria Park Beijing China Donald Tam AP
Fresh update on "hong" discussed on Weekend Edition Saturday

Weekend Edition Saturday

02:14 min | 18 hrs ago

Fresh update on "hong" discussed on Weekend Edition Saturday

"For a view to the future of Hong Kong, we're going to hear now from two people who have only known a Hong Kong after British rule. They're both 25, born in 1997, and a quark was born and raised in Hong Kong, but has lived overseas for years. She lives now in Washington, D.C., where she directs the nonprofit Hong Kong democracy council and a welcome. Thank you, Melissa for having me today. And we're joined also by a friend of Anna's who still lives in Hong Kong, where he works in finance. We've agreed to shield his identity because he's worried his views can make him a target of government reprisal for this conversation. We'll call him T that's the initial of his last name. T welcome to you. Hi, Melissa. As we said, you're the same age as this new relationship between Hong Kong and China. So your lives really mirror the ark of that history. How did growing up in those years do you think shape your understanding of Hong Kong in a way that maybe generations before do not understand? I think part of it is a lot of frustration. People always say that, oh, you were born in 1997, and that means something, right? And when you were still young, people would say, oh, you are going to be the leader of tomorrow and you're going to be the future. But then I question would be. So why did I not get a chance to decide on my own future? I was born into this arrangement of one country two system that is proven to be a complete failure from the start. Since we were born, we are told by the government or the propaganda I've used the word. We ask someone special, right? But at the same time, since Hong Kong has returned to China's governance, they are trying to draw the connection between Hong Kong and China people. What we have been treated is the other way around, I would say. Anna, you were living overseas during the big protest waves that swept through Hong Kong in 2014 to 2019. What was it like for you to be away from Hong Kong during those times to watch it from afar? For both times, it was a huge sense of guilt that I was not there with my friends. Not only my friends, but really Hong kongers in general. When the tear gases were thrown or dispersed by the police, I was not there to taste it with my people. Tea, I'm curious to hear your thoughts as you hear Anna talk about that about feeling guilty for missing out, feeling that she missed some really important part of history and taking part in that history. How Anna showed its feelings also my even living in Hong Kong. This sort of guild will always appear, seeing some of my friends getting arrested or beaten. I guess it made me try to think about how can I contribute to the community? Yeah. How did you resolve that question for yourself to you when you said you had to decide how can I contribute? I believe getting the finance could create much more value for me through my Friends with host community because on one hand, many politically active young generations, they're quite against getting into finance, because it's about making money. I'm trying to just a vibe of myself that I'm not letting myself get corrupted in this way. I believe after all, you can really earn money to help the people that you believe is served to be helped. As I was listening to tea, one thing that stood out to me is the question of how to make ourselves useful, right? Just to give a better backstory, there was a point where I had to decide between going back to Hong Kong and risking being arrested and jailed or staying behind in the United States and work on whatever projects or campaigns that I could think of, including efficacy work. And actually, someone told me very bluntly, if you want to go back to Hong Kong, surf gel time, that is actually a very selfish decision. And what they meant was that you were only going back because you don't want to feel guilty. But actually you are not going to contribute much to the movement by being in jail because I'm not a public figure at that time that could really raise any attention from the international media, but instead I have to think about it as a long game. I'd like to have you both think forward a bit. And think about whether you think change is possible in Hong Kong, you're looking at this period of a crackdown authoritarian government in Hong Kong, more and more control from China. What do you think about when you think about the other end of this tunnel? What happens in 2047, which is the 50 year mark of the transition. I can't really put a timeline. In a way, change has to be possible. Or else I'll be just gone not stay in Hong Kong if the game is set. At the same time, the change in our student when we talk about decades. We know that hope is important. But at the same time, it could be

Hong Kong Anna Washington, D.C. Hong Kong Democracy Council Melissa China United States
Charlie Welcomes Lauren Chen to the Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:46 min | Last month

Charlie Welcomes Lauren Chen to the Show

"We are joined by Lauren Chen, who is a social and political commentator. It's a fair way to put it. Anything but vlogger, I think about vlogger. Thank you for having me. What do you have to do to become a vlogger? I mean, pretty much just film yourself and put it on the Internet. It's a very low bar, which is why I try to avoid it. And usually what you're filming is like putting on makeup or you just do in pranks bro, so. Yeah, I mean, the thing that when I talk to younger audiences, when I know we have a societal problem, is when I ask them, what do you want to do when you grow up? They're like, I want to be an influencer. Oh no, no. And I'm like, there's nothing good that's going to come out of this. Yeah, I have my husband's little cousin. She's like 9 or ten and she wants to be a YouTuber. She actually for Christmas asked for like a ring light and stuff. And I know it's strange because I have a YouTube channel, but I'm actively trying to convince her again, so you don't want this. You don't want this. Don't do this to yourself. Yeah, I mean, if you want to know the road ahead, ask those coming back. There's nothing fulfilling. There's other things in life. So introduce yourself to our audience, you have a big following and are well respected, so you're from Canada originally. Yes, I'm originally from Canada, but I Hong Kong you said, right? You grew up in Hong Kong where my father is from. So pretty much my parents birthplaces just hate liberty right now, which is a little bit depressing. Things aren't going so great in the homeland. But yeah, I'm in Nashville. We love Tennessee and I do YouTube videos as well as write some articles. I like to talk about politics and culture and the way that the two intersect, which I think politics is downstream from culture, and I think for the longest time, the right was losing young people because we were so focused on politics and not on culture. And I wish I could just throw Thomas souls basic economics at a young person and have them be a conservative, but we know it doesn't work

Lauren Chen Youtube Hong Kong Canada Nashville Tennessee Thomas
Fresh update on "hong" discussed on Weekend Edition Saturday

Weekend Edition Saturday

00:25 sec | 18 hrs ago

Fresh update on "hong" discussed on Weekend Edition Saturday

"E Casey foundation. This is weekend edition from NPR news. I'm Melissa block. The 1st of July 1997 will be a day worth remembering forever. That's what then Chinese president Jiang Zemin said during the historic handover of the city of Hong Kong from Britain to China. It was supposed to mark a 50 year period of transition when Hong Kong would maintain economic and political freedoms. That transition has taken a brutal turn with China cracking down on those freedoms. Hong Kong residents held mass pro democracy protests in 2014 and 2019, even adopting a song from Les Misérables as an anthem

Casey Foundation Npr News Melissa Block Chinese President Jiang Zemin Hong Kong China Britain
The 2nd Amendment Protects ALL Other Amendments

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:31 min | Last month

The 2nd Amendment Protects ALL Other Amendments

"All the other amendments. Now, if we are not clear about why that is the intent of the Second Amendment, then it becomes nothing more than just a self defense argument. And then they'll say, well, then why do you need an AR-15 just to protect yourself? Now, there is a good argument for that. If you know about the LA riots and the kind of legendary Korean storekeepers that went on their roof and protected themselves using AR-15s against the rioters, there is a good reason for self defense. But that's not the intent of it, and it will make us profoundly less free as a country. If we're not clear about why we have the Second Amendment. So right now, about 26 million people in Shanghai, China, are locked down. They can not leave their apartment buildings. What would Shanghai look like right now? If they had a Second Amendment in China, what would Hong Kong have looked like a couple years ago, when China just annexed Hong Kong, if every one of the Hong Kong freedom protesters had an AR-15, slung around their back. Now, this means they had to use it, but as soon as the people have weapons, it becomes a negotiation, and it no longer is a hostage situation. If you do not have a Second Amendment, the government can take you hostage at any time. If only one side has the guns, then one side gets the determine whether or not you are free. Now, if you

Shanghai Hong Kong China Government
Fresh update on "hong" discussed on Climate One

Climate One

00:43 sec | 19 hrs ago

Fresh update on "hong" discussed on Climate One

"Turned control of Hong Kong over to China in 1997, children born that year were told they'd be the leaders of tomorrow, 25 years later, some of them are disillusioned. We know that hope is important. But at the same time, it could be very, it could be toxic. That conversation plus the latest news Saturday on weekend edition from NPR news. Saturday morning at 8. On 90.1. This is climate one. I'm Greg Dalton. The annual United Nations climate summit this year called cop 27 comes on the 30th anniversary of the Rio summit, which was a seminal moment in the global response that ultimately led to the Paris climate agreement. I asked Juan jira how she would rate the progress in the decade since Rio, and what faith she has in the UN process. You know, so with that

Npr News Greg Dalton Hong Kong China United Nations Juan Jira Paris RIO UN
John Zmirak: 'First China Came for the Uyghurs'...

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:22 min | Last month

John Zmirak: 'First China Came for the Uyghurs'...

"Volkswagen back, I'm talking to John's mirac Jon it doesn't have people can read your stuff at stream dot org stream dot org. What else should we talk about? Well, Jason Jones and I co authored another piece at the stream called first China came for the Uyghurs and the Vatican said nothing. I don't know if people following China news. The most prominent Christian in China has just been arrested. Cardinal Joseph zen, 90 years old, he's the cardinal of Hong Kong. So he's from the part of China that was free until 1998 under British administration. And then was turned over to communist China. On the promise that it would retain its free political system. Of course, like all promises made by communists, that turned out to be a lie. And there have been crackdowns and arrests and China put into place a law that anyone in Hong Kong violated the Communist Party's authority could be shipped to Mainland China where the courts and the juries would be much stricter. Cardinal zen helped set up a charity fund that would help fund the defense of people against such extradition orders. China just arrested him and everyone else involved in the foundation.

China Cardinal Joseph Zen Jason Jones British Administration Volkswagen JON Hong Kong John Cardinal Zen Communist Party Mainland
Hong Kong reopens beaches, Beijing relaxes quarantine rules

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 2 months ago

Hong Kong reopens beaches, Beijing relaxes quarantine rules

"Hong Hong Hong Hong Kong Kong Kong Kong has has has has relaxed relaxed relaxed relaxed located located located located restrictions restrictions restrictions restrictions as as as as beaches beaches beaches beaches and and and and pools pools pools pools reopen reopen reopen reopen in in in in the the the the southern southern southern southern Chinese Chinese Chinese Chinese city city city city restaurants restaurants restaurants restaurants are are are are also also also also allowed allowed allowed allowed to to to to now now now now seat seat seat seat up up up up to to to to eight eight eight eight people people people people at at at at the the the the table table table table up up up up from from from from four four four four previously previously previously previously a a a a further further further further round round round round of of of of easing easing easing easing is is is is scheduled scheduled scheduled scheduled to to to to begin begin begin begin may may may may nineteenth nineteenth nineteenth nineteenth one one one one thousand thousand thousand thousand cups cups cups cups will will will will be be be be allowed allowed allowed allowed to to to to reopen reopen reopen reopen and and and and restaurant restaurant restaurant restaurant curfews curfews curfews curfews are are are are extended extended extended extended until until until until midnight midnight midnight midnight the the the the situation situation situation situation in in in in the the the the capital capital capital capital Beijing Beijing Beijing Beijing is is is is a a a a very very very very different different different different picture picture picture picture as as as as officials officials officials officials close close close close sixty sixty sixty sixty subway subway subway subway stations stations stations stations to to to to stop stop stop stop the the the the virus virus virus virus from from from from spreading spreading spreading spreading however however however however restrictions restrictions restrictions restrictions on on on on international international international international flights flights flights flights have have have have been been been been decent decent decent decent as as as as for for for for travelers travelers travelers travelers need need need need to to to to quarantine quarantine quarantine quarantine in in in in a a a a hotel hotel hotel hotel for for for for ten ten ten ten days days days days as as as as opposed opposed opposed opposed to to to to fourteen fourteen fourteen fourteen days days days days previously previously previously previously with with with with a a a a further further further further seven seven seven seven days days days days now now now now to to to to be be be be Spencer Spencer Spencer Spencer home home home home the the the the movie movie movie movie is is is is mainly mainly mainly mainly symbolic symbolic symbolic symbolic to to to to show show show show authorities authorities authorities authorities are are are are willing willing willing willing to to to to compromise compromise compromise compromise for for for for the the the the sake sake sake sake of of of of the the the the economy economy economy economy must must must must also also also also responding responding responding responding to to to to demands demands demands demands to to to to be be be be less less less less intrusive intrusive intrusive intrusive I'm I'm I'm I'm Karen Karen Karen Karen Thomas Thomas Thomas Thomas

Hong Hong Kong Kong Beijing Kong Spencer Spencer Spencer Spence Karen Karen Karen Karen Thomas
Who Is 'First Casualty' Author Toby Harnden?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:45 min | 3 months ago

Who Is 'First Casualty' Author Toby Harnden?

"Before we get into these amazing stories, Mike span, David Tyson, John walker lind, who is Toby Honda. Tell us about what you did in the British armed forces and your life as a journalist before you became an author. Yes, well, you know, we share a somewhat similar accent as listeners and viewers will detect. You still got yours. Our minds kind of rubbing off a little bit, but I don't know. I'm worried. I'm worried about mind getting a little bit Americanized. But I trust yeah, you're a bit soggy in the middle of the Atlantic somewhere. Yeah, I mean the ace. So yeah, I'm 56 years old, I was born in 66. My father was in the navy. We moved around, we sort of ended up in Manchester, industrial city in the northwest. You don't have a mancunian accent. I think the Royal Navy actually did for the mancunian accent, which was pretty skin deep anyway. But you know, I sort of, you know, I wanted to follow in my father's footstep, I guess there's so many sort of young men do. And I also wanted to get out of Manchester and see the world and it just seemed like a very kind of insular sort of small sort of place. And so all that teenage angst was just channeled towards working hard to get out. And so I got a sponsorship from the I joined the navy at 18. Went to Dartmouth, which is the Britannia royal naval college, kind of the equivalent of the U.S. naval academy at Annapolis, but not really because it's more basic officers training. It's like santas is shorter. Yeah, that's right. I mean, I was there for less than a year. And I threw the navy I got a sponsorship to Oxford to study modern history, so I went off whilst serving naval officer, although I barely wore the uniform for those years apart from a few months sailing around sort of Hong Kong and the far east and Australia. So I had some good times. Yes, exactly. So I was serving naval officer for three years at college and then graduated from college and was pitched in to a career. Which I enjoyed immensely, but you know, it was after the Falklands War, which was 1982, I was joining and supplying to join just sort of join the Falklands actually, age 16. But I missed that. I was stationed in Scotland for the Gulf War, tried very hard to get involved. They managed to that's a long way away from Iraq. I know. They managed to win it without meeting my services. And I remember my boss at the time said, listen to, we don't worry about it. There's going to be plenty of time for medals. And I remember thinking, no, there won't. And of course I left after ten years of service without a single

Mike Span David Tyson John Walker Lind Toby Honda Navy Manchester Britannia Royal Naval College Royal Navy Atlantic U.S. Naval Academy Dartmouth Annapolis Oxford Far East Hong Kong Falklands Australia Gulf War Scotland Iraq
Hong Kong's COVID toll leads some to eco-friendlier coffins

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 3 months ago

Hong Kong's COVID toll leads some to eco-friendlier coffins

"Hong Kong's deadliest corona virus outbreak is cost about six thousand lives this year and the city is now running out of conference the conference typically are wood or wood substitutes and there is a scramble to keep up with demand Albert Cole with the non profit funeral advisory group forget the not says some families are using eco conference they feel a little bit shameful to use it so called pay by cascade they fear that this is not it's not it's not respectful to the to Debbie loved ones co says the idea is to offer a more pleasant fare well without the fear of death we have over forty different designs covering different religions hobbies and also you know the color can be can be full of French Hong Kong is reported about two hundred corona virus deaths daily on average over the past week space constraints there make cremation a common burial practice I bet Donahue

Albert Cole Hong Kong French Hong Kong Debbie Donahue
Circus solidarity: Ukrainian performers find home in Hungary

AP News Radio

01:01 min | 3 months ago

Circus solidarity: Ukrainian performers find home in Hungary

"Circus performers from Ukraine have found a home away from the war in Hungary around one hundred Ukrainian art students ages five to twenty along with their adult chaperones escaped the embattled cities apart key and and key that includes sixteen year old Iraq may Perrotta understands when I constraining I just want to perform the incident was strolls after Russia invaded Ukraine the capital circus a Budapest along with the Hungarian school for acrobats arranged for the Ukrainian circus students to come there is my Cisco Hong addresses will direct your call for call back says there is no war within the circuit in circuits there is only productivity as a collective productivity thirteen year old analysts said Scott says she was initially heartbroken when she had to leave her relatives in Harkey best available nearby she said when I came here I didn't expect to be so well received and for it to be so nice the capital circus a Budapest is donating proceeds to help the Ukrainian performers I'm a Donahue

Russia Perrotta Hungarian School For Acrobats Hungary Budapest Iraq Harkey Cisco Scott Donahue
Conflicting Reports About COVID Deaths in Hong Kong & China

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:53 sec | 3 months ago

Conflicting Reports About COVID Deaths in Hong Kong & China

"Is Hong Kong part of China? Is Hong Kong in China? I'm so baffled by two stories. I've got two stories in front of me. One story says, well, China has experienced the first two COVID deaths in a year. Another story says the morgues in Hong Kong are overflowing and they're got people out in the streets again in refrigerated trucks. Because so many people are dying in Hong Kong. I just asked my team, Yuri, who's great on foreign affairs, and he said, well, it's a matter of perspective. The media tends to include Hong Kong in China, but they're sort of two different entities. That's the answer. Are people dying in China of COVID or not?

Hong Kong China Yuri
Hong Kong's COVID infections exceed 1 million amid outbreak

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 3 months ago

Hong Kong's COVID infections exceed 1 million amid outbreak

"Hong Kong's cuvette infections has exceeded one million amid a major outbreak Hong Kong's cumulative coronavirus infections that exceeded the one million mark as the city grapples with a widespread outbreak that's killed more people than the reported could be nineteen deaths in all of mainland China the total number of Hong Kong that's now he's five thousand four hundred and one exceeding the four thousand six hundred and thirty six fatalities recorded on the mainland the city of seven point four million is in the grip of an Omicron surge that strained hospitals and more trees most of the deceased have been elderly who were not fully vaccinated I'm Charles Taylor that's my

Five Thousand Charles Taylor Four Thousand One Million Nineteen Deaths Four Million Hong Kong Seven Point China Four Hundred And Six Hundred And Thirty Six Fat ONE Omicron
British Publishers Censor Mention of Taiwan to Sell Books in China

The Larry Elder Show

01:00 min | 3 months ago

British Publishers Censor Mention of Taiwan to Sell Books in China

"Trip off of this had to have forgotten man British publisher center mention of Taiwan in order to print books in China report, and this is the bottom line. Two British publishers have since your books in order to have them printed in China. Two people familiar with the matter told the Financial Times. This is a big story because what we're doing is we're losing, this is a, this is the western hemisphere. We're losing our influence. Don't you see what China is doing? Picture book publisher quarto deleted references to Taiwan and I we are way, way a descendant artist from Hong Kong in two different publications, another book was changed to refer to East Asian people in place of Taiwanese. The same publisher in 2020 released in New York Times Best Seller titled this book is antiracist, 20 lessons on how to wake up, take action and do the work. The publisher octopus books has also reportedly removed references to Taiwan from at least two books while the island nation of Taiwan fuse itself as an independent country.

Hong Kong China 2020 TWO Two People Financial Times 20 Lessons Two Different Publications Taiwan British East Asian Taiwanese New York Times At Least Two Books
COVID-19 cases, deaths continue to drop globally, WHO says

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 4 months ago

COVID-19 cases, deaths continue to drop globally, WHO says

"The World Health Organization says the numbers of new coronavirus cases and deaths continue to drop around the world in its latest report on the pandemic the World Health Organization says there's been a five percent decrease globally in the number of new covert infections deaths are down eight percent continuing a two week trend only the western Pacific saw an increase forty six percent in Hong Kong there have been one hundred fifty deaths per day the highest rate recorded in any region there and I'm a client search has overwhelmed the city prompting mass quarantines and overflowing morgues I'm Jackie Quinn

World Health Organization Western Pacific Hong Kong Jackie Quinn
Death toll nears 6 million as pandemic enters its 3rd year

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 4 months ago

Death toll nears 6 million as pandemic enters its 3rd year

"The world is on the verge of another milestone in the corona virus pandemic and Ben Thomas with the latest numbers Johns Hopkins university's tally shows more than five million nine hundred and ninety seven thousand people have died of confirmed covert nineteen infections around the world as of mid day Sunday that's just three thousand short of six million deaths over the past two plus years while many places including the U. S. are relaxing precautions evidence suggests the pandemic is anything but over remote Pacific islands are just now grappling with their first outbreaks Hong Kong is battling its worst in Eastern Europe is seeing a spike in deaths amid the surge of refugees coming from Ukraine meanwhile the US is nearing one million deaths I'm Ben Thomas

Latest Numbers Johns Hopkins U Ben Thomas U. Pacific Islands Hong Kong Eastern Europe Ukraine United States
Hong Kong's new virus cases top 10,000 in spiraling outbreak

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 4 months ago

Hong Kong's new virus cases top 10,000 in spiraling outbreak

"Hong Kong's announced another sharp rise in new because it nineteen cases to more than ten thousand in the latest twenty four appeared as it battles its worst outbreak of the pandemic health officials say the new daily count who's topped ten thousand of the climbing to eight thousand earlier this week in the spiraling outbreak the city's been reporting about fifty deaths today too many among the unvaccinated elderly mainland experts and builders the putting up ten pre testing facilities I'm building isolation centres to humble the burgeoning caseload the zero copay to pro choice for quality the isolation of anyone who test positive even without symptoms to prevent spread I'm Charles the look as much

Hong Kong Charles
Stock market futures rebound after S&P 500 closes in correction

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 4 months ago

Stock market futures rebound after S&P 500 closes in correction

"Global stock markets and Wall Street futures rebound over sanctions on Russia for sending troops into Ukraine London Frankfort opened higher Shanghai Hong Kong and Seoul advanced Japanese markets were closed for a holiday oil prices edged higher on unease about possible disruption to Russian supplies yesterday the S. and P. lost one percent putting the broad market index in correction territory the nasdaq sank one point two percent and the Dow closed down one point four percent I'm

Shanghai Hong Kong Frankfort Ukraine Seoul Russia London
Hong Kong orders mandatory COVID-19 tests for all residents

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 4 months ago

Hong Kong orders mandatory COVID-19 tests for all residents

"Hong Kong will test its entire population for covert nineteen in March as the city grapples with its worst outbreak driven by the Omicron variant the older for city wide testing comes off the mainland Chinese authorities dispatched health workers and medical resources last week to help contain the outbreak in the semi autonomous Chinese city Hong Kong has reported about five thousand you daily infections since February fifteen with the number threatening to overwhelm its health care system since the search began at the beginning of the year the city's recorded needed fifty four thousand cases and one hundred forty five deaths I'm Charles de Ledesma

Hong Kong Charles De Ledesma
"hong" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

The New School with Christine Hong

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"hong" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

"Do you hear that someone left job. They hated and found a new position. That such a better fit. And you everyday excited to go to work because of the booze. That is such an incredible feeling before kobe. If i wore amuse sweatshirts sometimes people would come up to be on the street and be like views and let me use it and the cat is the best feeling because you came up with something in your brain and then your blood sweat and tears pushed it into the world and then total strangers. You don't have the arc of their life changed because of something you did. And it's why. I like also working really meaningful problems because your career is so court help so many of spend days i think in a in a more tactical sense you know something i love about. My job is how different every day is an how many different parts of the business i get to interact with. I love that. I can spend an hour in the morning digging into a comprehensive marketing strategy and then an hour in the afternoon hearing about some of the pros and cons of a product initiative or technical architecture decisions and then in the afternoon i can get on the phone with a customer and understand their pinpoints. You know an end be on the line with our account management team as we talk about like what parts of the muses product are working for them and how we can continue to work together. And i think it's just i feel like it's a business boot camp and it's just a you know it's an incredible chance to especially if you build a great team to learn from a global people and lead them pursuit of a big lofty goal. That's very motivating. I was wondering on the converse. What's the least favorite thing about your job right now. I think the stress can sometimes be a challenge. I take the music extremely personally. And i wanted to do well. And so when something goes wrong. Or we don't deliver in the way that we should or there's just a challenge in the business it can really affect my mood. And i think that is hard because correlation between how much you care about something and how much it can hurt you and so the beauty of caring so much about a company that you build is matched by you. Know it's its ability to to cause pain. And i think you should be careful not to let the business become you in your mind. You have to remember that those two things are separated and that can be hard awesome wit. So i've noticed for pickings. You've been really heavily feature as a career expert. It's probably because that's what your company's about even wrote a book on the topic called the rules of work right. when did you start feeling like occur. Expert i'm wondering like what does that feel like. Well it's funny. I always joke. That i didn't start the muse. Because i was an expert in careers. I started the muse because i needed that expertise and so people started asking me to give career advice very early far far before i felt like i was ready and i always used to say. I'm not the best person to ask. But go to the.

kobe
"hong" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

The New School with Christine Hong

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"hong" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

"Founder entrepreneur is really weighing which pieces of feedback do you need to internalize and consider and change in response to and which pieces of feedback do you not. And you know. It's it's sometimes easier if somebody is really rude about their feedback but there's also a lot of really thoughtful smart kind people who tell you good ideas that are just not right for your business and you've got to develop that sort of iron core inside that gives you the confidence to say. Thank you for that. I've listened. I'm open to it. But i'm going to go in the direction that i believe is right. I'm kind of wondering what's your current day day. Like now in how. It's kind of like change the past nine years since you've had the muse my day to day today is wildly different from the early days. So at this point you know the news has guess about sixty seventy full time employees and we're working remotely because of covid. Although previous to the pandemic we had big office space in midtown where most of the team worked out of so today i got up in the morning. I had a couple of big projects. I needed to work through. On some kind of strategic imperatives the muse. I spent a couple of hours emailing. I had several meetings with one with my finance team about our board deck which is coming up on thursday. Then i might have a meeting about com strategy for a certain team about how someone on the team is doing. I'm constantly tongling between everything from team and hr issues. Investors in capital issues our customers revenue sales team etcetera the product which is a big area that i love spending time. You know the marketing and the content teams. I think one of the things. I love about being ceo. Is that you really. You have to spend the whole business. You have to understand all of the different pieces. You don't necessarily understand them as well as the people who are close to it. And i think the humility of knowing that many people on your team have a perspective. That might be different from yours. They have better or just different information. You have to sort of toggle the fact that you need to be on top of everything while also allowing for all of these different opinions and perspectives on data from all over the team and i love that and i think that in the very early days of the start of start up.

"hong" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

The New School with Christine Hong

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"hong" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

"Back I think this is a question. A lot of potential founders hab basically like it was your first time fundraising for a start like a seed round. Was it hard to figure that out. Like what was that process like that out. It was incredibly hard and there wasn't a lot of content online like there is now about how to even pitch to investors. And so i mentioned before. I used to go to a lot of tech events after work i would try and meet other founders that i could ask them you know. Can you tell me how you raise your seed. Round what worked. What didn't work for you. I tried to learn as much as possible from other founders. So that i could make you. I can make new mistakes as opposed to existing like the same old mistakes that other people had made before. And i also learned by trial and error so the first couple pitches that i gave did not go well in fact i often now recommend a founders that they try and find some people to test out. Your early pitches on the you know. Don't pick the investor of your dreams to pitch to first or second. 'cause it's just probably not going to be that good and so you know i. I had to learn by trial and error. I also started to recognize different patterns. Such as i was very good very comfortable pitching the muse on stage so when i got invited to a startup showcase or a pitch competition. I often did well. And i was able to pick up potential investors and can build relationships there at the same time when i met somebody in a coffee shop i i was more likely to be treated like just a for lack of better words like a little girl and that was one of the hard things. Well i think honestly fundraising is just challenging. No matter who you are no matter. What your businesses. Some businesses have an easier time than others because they kind of hit on zeitgeist or they hit into a particular theme but generally fundraising is very difficult. And then on top of that. If you don't look like a classic tech ceo you know if you are a different gender a different race in different ability etc a lot of people even if they don't mean to they bring all sorts of unintentional biases into that conversation. And so even though you know there were a lot of ensure really kind you know. Goodhearted mid twenties men getting funded for their seed round a lot of people who met with me. We're like oh you seem to nice to six. You know you've seen so sweet. What are you sure you want to do this. It's hard and i'm very driven and very tough. But the way that tough and driven showed up in a twenty five twenty six year. Old woman didn't always look the same as tough and driven in the twenty five or twenty six year old man. And so you know. I got turned down one hundred forty eight times for our seed round before we ended up raising but a million dollars and that was fun. I dealt with self-doubt. I felt like i eight rejection for breakfast but again i believed so much in what i was building and also it helped in a weird way. It helped that some of the rejections were just patently ridiculous and that made stainless like the smart thoughtful investor really looked at the business and took me seriously and treated me with respect and then decided not to invest like that hurt because it made me feel like what am i am. I not good enough..

Round
"hong" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

The New School with Christine Hong

05:21 min | 1 year ago

"hong" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

"Own ability to create a solution to figure it out that dovan and so it's definitely an unconventional path auburn recommend to found irs. It's there's still much lower in startups based but how you have to like. Just quit your job dive right away but i actually think it was really beneficial that i started working on this idea. I as a side project. And if i could go back and redo my career part of me thinks that i would have been better served working at a startup before i tried to start my own so that i would get some of that. Learning you know about building a technology company. The way when i was still getting a paycheck versus really like learning everything when i was supporting myself out of my savings. That's so funny. I felt so similar to you right now like you're beginning stages because i left my job at tinder in december after his side project for six months. Because i was like. I'm not getting that much on nights and weekends. So i've been working on my app fulltime for like almost like ten months now and just released last week and i was like i was just like oh live for year so we'll just see what happens but i got a lot of flack when i quit my job and i quit. My job layer than i wanted to because we were like. Are you crazy like you get things like that. Yeah for sure for sure and the thing is look. There's no perfect time right like if you wait long you feel like oh my gosh. I could have done it earlier if you go. If you quit too fast. You know you might run out of money. And i think like i got so much pushback when i quit my job and the thing is most people give advice or not advice. Most people react based on how they would react in your situation and a lot of people don't have the risk tolerance and that's okay but it means that just because someone else thinks that what you do is crazy doesn't necessarily mean it's crazy for you. It might just be crazy for them with their circumstance. They're set of hopes and dreams and fears. And i think that you do have to eventually take the plunge like i would never have been able to build this company if i hadn't been willing to let go of the safety of a paycheck and divan. But i do think it's a. It's a decision that there's pros and cons to both sides and i just always liked to represent the perspective that you know it's good to do what you did which is working i while you still have a paycheck if you can because also that that's where you learn. Do you really love the thing right. If you're willing to work on outside of work yeah okay so you worked on it fulltime and yeah when you something fulltime even on daisy fills stock. I noticed even. If i like. Well i have no idea do this but after a day or two feeling sock. You're like oh you kind of just figure it out because there's nothing else to do. I feel like if you have worked. You're like oh. I guess i'll just do work instead but you said that it was not a failure after that first year savings in you probably like discovered this and year. So what did you knew next. Would that immediately leads What happened well. The the short version is that the business itself was just starting to click. We were starting to see the number of users grow. We're starting to figure out a business model..

auburn irs daisy
"hong" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

The New School with Christine Hong

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"hong" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

"Get to hear about in the classroom every episode. I talked to someone with an interesting life path and learn about how they got to where they are today. Hey everyone thank you for joining us for another episode of the new school podcasts. This is actually our last episode before the holiday season. And i'm so excited to say will be ending with a banger. Our guest today is katharine. Minhsiu whose founder and ceo of the muse. Which is the go-to destination for the next and workforce to research companies and careers his such a special amazing episode. Because catherine not only walks us through what. It's like to be an entrepreneur and found a company but also gives tons of career tips because that's where her company is all about and is episode. Catherine i shot a bell her frustrations with job platforms before founding the muse. The tough decisions. She had to make to leave her stable job and found her first company. P. y. p. Which later morphed into the muse and how to do day of a ceo changes as your company grows. I seriously loved catherine's on life and her insights. I can't wait for you to hear this interview. Well catherine first of all thank you so much for being on the show so much for having me. I'm really excited to be here. So if you had to describe your job to our audience what would you say it is. I am the founder and ceo of a company called the muse which i founded nine years ago to help job seekers find the best fit role and employers make hires and so as the ceo and founder. I guess i do a little bit of everything. Sometimes i joke that i'm the chief cat herder. What chief cabinet. Or he loved her of cats. Like i just feel like when you're starting a business you just do a tiny bit of everything all the time based on business needs. Why do you think the muses different from other job platforms out there. I started it. Because i was so frustrated with other job platforms. My own career was pretty winding. I had worked in global health management consulting briefly. Thought it might be a career foreign service officer with the us state department and i was frustrated by how hard it was to figure out what you actually want to do. And so i had been on indeed and monster dot com which was a big job search sites at that point in time and they just felt so transactional and so i built the muse to be the opposite of that. I wanted it to be all about helping you really understand the culture and values of a company before you joined helping you get context on.

Minhsiu catherine katharine Catherine us state department
"hong" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

The New School with Christine Hong

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"hong" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

"Don't normally get to hear about in the classroom every episode. I talked to someone with an interesting life path and learn about how they got to where they are today. Hey everyone welcome to another episode of the new school podcast. I'm your host christine. Hong today will be speaking with mass service soon. An expert in all things martial arts semester soon leg many others on the short had a different dream growing up before realizing what he really wants to do of his life before he became a martial arts master soon had tried his luck of a music career after getting signed for labels make a few albums he realized. The music industry wasn't right for him. He decided to go full time into martial arts. He opened his own school for martial arts in new york city then los angeles and the rest is history in his episode master soon. Shares of me. How he became interested in martial arts was like to switch from a music career to one in martial arts. What it was trading under grandmaster william cheung who introduced bruce leadership man back in the nineteen fifties and some of his celeb- clients that he currently trains at his los angeles school. I am really excited. Share his story with you. And i know you're gonna love it more. i saw. They used so much for being on the show. Excited have you. I was kind of wondering for audience. If you had to describe your job right now what would you say do it. I'm passionate about what i love by. Teach martial arts. And because i teach martial arts i have these avenues. You kind of do all different types of things get to train. Children adults all different types of people. Different walks of life who have different kind of expectations. Afraid of martial arts so like everyone wants to be. You know mike tyson or streetfighter but some people do some people just really want longevity and health. Some people want peace for they wanted to some type of exercise or something. So i pretty much customized training to the people that you know what they want because not everyone kind of wants the same thing and that also get to do different athletes get to do fight. Choreography for films is pretty all around. Pretty fulfilling job raga teach and train people and get to learn about obama. And it's a it's a give and take so. Yeah i don't know i teach martial arts and that's kind of the easy package but it's so much more than just the job. Oh yeah are you kidding me. See when i was a kid really really young. 'cause i had two major lows in in life i guess it was music and martial arts of always martial martial-arts since i was long enough to remember. I've always been interested in music. I've had a piano in my house. Since before i was born and my aunt was a musician and massad got me interested into music so i was always either into music..

obama massad los angeles school william cheung christine los angeles Hong mike tyson new york
"hong" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

The New School with Christine Hong

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"hong" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

"She can <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> I think there's a lot we can all <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> learn from her stick around <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> to the end of the episode <Speech_Female> for a sneak preview <Speech_Female> of our next guest <Speech_Female> make sure to check <Speech_Female> our website the new <Speech_Female> school podcast.com <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> there <Speech_Female> you can find links to anything <Speech_Female> mentioned in the episode <Speech_Female> in our show notes <Speech_Female> and you can suggest amazing <Speech_Female> guests for the show <Speech_Male> you like to see we <Speech_Female> also have a newsletter. You <Speech_Female> should definitely sign up for <Speech_Female> it's the ultimate <Speech_Female> we could guide to turning <Speech_Female> your passions into <Speech_Female> a meaningful career <Speech_Female> get every episode as soon <Speech_Female> as it drops by subscribing <Speech_Female> to the new school wherever <Speech_Female> you get your podcasts <Speech_Female> and if you have a <Speech_Female> minute we love if you <Speech_Female> rate and review us on <Speech_Female> Apple podcasts <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> to stay up-to-date <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> on home. Things in New School <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> follow us on <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Instagram at the new school <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> podcast and <Speech_Female> on Twitter at the new <Speech_Female> school pod <Speech_Female> next week. We're talking <Speech_Female> to The Sensational <Speech_Female> gritty <Speech_Female> Eric Linden <Speech_Female> and Let Me Tell <Speech_Female> You Folks. This is one <Speech_Female> episode. So you don't want <Speech_Female> to miss Eric <Speech_Female> defied his small-town <Speech_Female> Origins pursue <Speech_Female> a seriously <Speech_Female> ambitious career. He <Speech_Female> moved out to LA to <Speech_Female> become a step man <Speech_Female> in Hollywood and <Speech_Female> he is doing <Speech_Female> amazing. <Speech_Female> He started out working <Speech_Female> really brutal jobs <Speech_Female> as an <Speech_Female> extra on <Speech_Female> set but it has now <Speech_Female> worked in sense for <Speech_Female> various features, <Speech_Female> like suicide <Speech_Female> squad and <Speech_Male> Avengers <SpeakerChange> endgame <Speech_Male> a lot <Speech_Male> of the stone community <Speech_Male> is word-of-mouth, <Speech_Music_Male> you <Speech_Male> are <Speech_Male> auditioning <Speech_Male> for this stunt coordinator <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> say good things <Speech_Male> about you later. <Speech_Male> Where you cool <Speech_Male> onset. Did <Speech_Male> you do your job <Speech_Male> where you on <Speech_Male> what time did <Speech_Male> you say you can <Speech_Male> do a backflip <Speech_Male> and then <Speech_Male> you got on set <Speech_Male> for you. <Speech_Male> Could you do the backflip? <Speech_Male> Did you accidentally <Speech_Male> hit the actor? <Speech_Male> Did you go too far? <Speech_Male> Did you land where you're <Speech_Male> supposed to like <Speech_Male> girls? The stuff <Speech_Male> you get your one opportunity <Speech_Male> to go in there <Speech_Music_Male> and they're going to like <Speech_Male> blow <Speech_Music_Male> up the whole room <Speech_Male> and then you're <Speech_Male> going to have a squib on <Speech_Male> your chest. And when that thing <Speech_Male> goes off you need to <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> fall down don't mess it <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> up because <SpeakerChange> they're blowing <Speech_Male> up the entire <Speech_Female> room. Make sure you're back <Speech_Female> here next Monday to hear <Speech_Female> from Eric how he got <Speech_Female> his very first <Speech_Female> stunts roll how <Speech_Female> he said he cleaned <Speech_Female> up the Hollywood ranks <Speech_Female> to become a stunt <Speech_Female> coordinator and <Speech_Female> hear him dishes you're <Speech_Female> on what working on a <Speech_Female> movie is actually <Speech_Female> like, <Speech_Female> all right guys, have a great <Speech_Female> day. Try <Speech_Female> something new today. <Speech_Female> The new school with Christine <Speech_Female> Hong is produced <Speech_Female> by Jennie Snyder <Speech_Female> clear Wiley and Alexia. <Speech_Female> Marsala <Speech_Female> editing by Sidney. Sulk. <Speech_Female> John Simpson. <Speech_Female> Joseph Cho <Speech_Female> special thanks to our marketing <Speech_Female> team who help us spread <Speech_Female> our mission and put the new school <Speech_Female> name out there. KO <Speech_Female> sakee, Lena chaye, Marissa wolfsheimer and Giovanni Cortez.

"hong" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

The New School with Christine Hong

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"hong" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

"It cool. Well, that is the end of our interview. Sorry went so long. I was wondering if n is your we usually give our guest sexy seconds to pitch anything. Like is there anything you'd like to pitch? I love that for me I think wage. I was just do like a life pitch. I think it's something that I've gotten a lot of clarity of recently and I think it's as you continue to grow older whether it's graduating college or you're going through college earlier like 30. Now a lot of times you're influenced by the outside noises. I think you have to ask yourself. Like what did I want to do when I was six, you know, and like what did I want to do or who did I want to become when I was sixteen you want to use your youth as your Prime Compass because I think at that time when you're younger was when there was more truth to what you wanted to do. There is no what if there's no buts. It was really nice. Like what fuels you what drove you what excited you and if you always use your youth as a private Compass it's going to really lead you to an eventually a dream job that aligns with your values and you're going to remember like this is what keeps me curious. This is what keeps me fulfilled and this is what gives me that Adrenaline Rush don't look to your other peers that are much older than you or that are doing this and that no one really cares about that just honor that six-year-old wage. You like what did I want to be when I was six and you know try to do something that still is in that field where that that real and that has always excited you since you're young amazing. Thank you so much. Caroline. Hey guys. I hope you enjoy a conversation with the magnetic Caroline show. There really was such a lot of wisdom. Especially life wisdom packs into this episode. I think the thing I've admired most about her faith is how she really got to know herself and use that knowledge to get the most Joy from life..

Caroline
"hong" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

The New School with Christine Hong

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"hong" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

"Hey guys, it's Christine Hong and the new school is coming back for back-to-school season this Monday October 5th. My name, you know this but the new school star from my own struggles with figuring out my career growing up. I suggest for people with interesting careers on LinkedIn are through my career alarm Services by going to grab coffee and then ask them endless questions on how they got to where they are today and what their day-to-day their job was like one day I was cut off. Why is this not public information I should just be recording these conversations which is how the podcast originally started were continuing these podcast coffee chats this season with some amazing guests for you. We've got off Neil m'bala who grew up in rural Nigeria. It was able to start his own Aerospace company at age twenty-eight the first week. I was in California. I dusted up my suit and I went to the SpaceX building and try to walk in the security guard stopped me and said you couldn't go any further than that. I stood outside kept asking people and people who worked at SpaceX of like I I need alarms number. I need to cancel and I finally was able to get the vice president of propulsion to talk to me only after about two weeks of my stay in the US Carolyn shown who's one of the youngest housekeeping chores at the Four Seasons is had if you let people be the color and the room and you give these compelling characters the space to let their colors come to life and really understand what excites them but their personalities are. Why are they travel pass? What did the kids like all these little details you'll be able to create this experience and to stay that is going to completely blow them out of the water. And that is what excites me Arab and who is worked in stunts for Marvel's Avengers endgame Suicide Squad and Lucifer. A lot of the stuff Community is word-of-mouth. You are auditioning for this stuff coordination to say good things about you later. Where you cool onset. Did you do your job where you on time? Did you say you can do a backflip? And then you got off said for you. Could you do the backflip? Did you accidentally hit the actor? Did you go too far? Did you land where you're supposed to like all the stuff you get your one opportunity to go in there and they're going to like a blow up the whole room and then you're going to have a squib on your chest. And when that thing goes off you need to fall down don't mess it up because they're blowing up the entire roof and much more. We're releasing a new episode. Yep. Mondays don't hit that subscribe button to stay tuned..

SpaceX LinkedIn Christine Hong vice president California Neil Nigeria US Carolyn
"hong" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

The New School with Christine Hong

06:07 min | 2 years ago

"hong" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

"These packages to corporations. Because my goal is to help thousand people this year, and so if I work with larger businesses out, be able to roll it out to the employees, especially now like that people are working from home and getting these tools into more people's hands, because I can only like see a certain number one on one clients, but offer it as a corporate wellness package I can help a lot more people. Yeah, so is hypnotherapist here. Dream career? What yes? Oh, turns out it actually is. Going to school to get my incredible site. The association, of American hypnotherapist is only for doctors that use hypnotherapy, so that is like my next stop excellent. Yeah I feel what is the most difficult decision you had to Mexico Fill your destiny hooding my first business, like on the back burner, Kinda like stepping away from it and shifting my public identity, and so it was hard just starting over especially after you've had a career for a decade. Now like I was on podcast topping business funding the money person money coach. It's like now kind of like switching into. More received ing and Kinda going complete one eighty I. think the defining moment was. I suppose out good things. Come to those who hustle now. Good things come to those who ally. That's so funny. Yeah, going from your incher like hi. I'm Julia voted money catch. Now I'm a therapist. xactly. Yeah, that was the hardest part just like letting go of the identity that I built for so long. Do you think you've have a biggest mistake humane in your career? I would say in the beginning charging too little I was thinking I. Want to get into so many people's hand and like I. Just I didn't charge a lot because. After learning what pricing money really is to people I was doing them a disservice as well charging so low. I need to start charging more so they. Proved themselves there making the stuff in completely new direction to give them that energetic to give them ability to shift its hyper person to invest so much into their mindset. That's already a transformation for them makes sense. Yeah, I've noticed this. It's so weird to charge more to be taken more seriously exactly congress. Is there anything you did? That was the best thing for your career. I would say I gave a lot away for free is, either you charge what your work or just give the rest for free, but you know like the little trip wires or little stuff for this like just give away. Let them get this transformation. You're free stuff. At then they buy into it. They know that it will work for that. As that's been the best thing creating so much content around this business with the business funding, it was really on referrals and advertising. It's like you're LEMme. Sure. I would like somebody though it by now like. Did you know that your subconscious mind is responsible act like really teach people about themselves before they felt confident enough to tap into that. Yeah, it's like the freemen model and business basically exactly yeah. Cool for any aspiring hypnotherapist south there. People just want to try it out in. See what it is. You have any advice for them. Yeah, I would say to check out youtube like a lot of hypnotherapist. Start to create like content on Youtube so you can learn the differences between hypnosis and meditation on my channel I started to go into the detail, Abbott playlist about hypnosis how you can use it in your life outside of video about why I became a hypnotherapist, so they watched that if it resonates with them, I'm also going. Going to post a video about five signs to know that you'd make a great hypnotherapist because I wish I knew that when I first started like. If you're someone that is able to create processes like that is ideal skill. If you're a good listener, if you have great memory, but you can be hypnotized to improve your memory so and if you just feel like that, your purpose is to be someone to show people the way than battling for you, so those are the videos on your channel. What's your channel caught on Youtube? Is Juliet Great. Do you have favorite video on someone else's channel? There is Maria here. She has a training institute for notice. He's based in the UK, but she like. Classes here in the US as well. He has great videos are she's been doing it longer than i. have so that someone that I actually look up to. COOL SO AL links above. Youtube channels are show nuts, says end of our interview, so usually like to give our guests sixty seconds pitch anything you want. During the pitch today. Yeah I'd love to. If you guys could check out my brain trainings on. Ford Institute dot, com and so went. My brain trainings is thirty three days we focus on a particular outcome, and so this gives you the benefits of both NLP and hypnosis, so you'll be able to go under south notice, and it combines it with meditation, Neural Activation and subliminal audio's so you can actually sleep your way to a new you. How do you afford institute. F W. R.. D. Institute DOT COM. It used to be on the show I loved those great like kind of looking back on my journey here. Hey, guys hope you enjoyed our interview with Giulio Bodo I found her journey so so.

Youtube Ford Institute Juliet Great Giulio Bodo Mexico Julia US UK Maria Abbott
"hong" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

The New School with Christine Hong

08:17 min | 2 years ago

"hong" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

"Mind, so you happy and healthy. You're feeling bad about the people that are sick at your subconsciously sick to you know like no, no, no, we're not. We're five. We're here. We're just you know sympathizing, so you could still sympathize symphorien. Bet You move that emotional layer empathy and not tap into the new story emotionally. Around the worst hypochondriac like as soon as people were coughing. To I have it like might throw was grow? Your it's crazy. It's like that auto suggestion consistently has people like coming down with symptoms, even if they tests negative, right hopeless CBO fact exactly we'd so you had your first hypnotherapy experience. You said it was mind, `boy, how does it feel to you? He said it felt like being reaffirms the child Yes. So this was sniffing. HYPNOSIS was for money. Like there are other types of. So, this one was to remove the money blocks and I didn't realize why I had my relationship with many. Essentially, you have to go back from birth to age seven. Because that's when the subconscious programs most powerful, and so I went back to at least seven years old, and I remember sitting at the lunch table with my friends, and then they were saying something about some girl like she did it have like a nice lunch and the Nice like high seas she had like store bought used to something and I remember thinking as long as I have my name brand stuff I'll always have friends and people always likely. Interesting so after this experience, your mind was blown. Did you think I? WanNa look into this. Or what was your next? Yeah? I was like? Let's clear some more stuff, so she doesn't offer one on one sessions, but it led me to other. If not there S I didn't see anyone that was like my age or like the energy that map station being passed, you know. Oh, I stumbled onto a place to get certified, but it was. WAS IN LA Times. I was in Brooklyn and I was like I'm actually ready for a change, so if I do this for one year like I would love to just move to La one-year inches. Do this study and I went from beginning hypnosis to now I'm a trainer, so I train if there is now so I discovered this school I was doing business funding in the marketing agency and I'm right now going to be a hypnotherapist. Insecure at all our. Yes, yes, so I was so insecure I didn't tell anyone. Why was La and then also philosophy that I had on this old business account was just like work hard. Get it girl like very very late. Know Feminine, energy, and Maskill, energy, bike. Pull not like gender, but the energy wise so energetic I was always like. I. Worked for Redo it, do it. I would post stuff like you know. Good thing and I realize this is not. The way that things fell into place was that you might Brooklyn apartment? Because they sold the Brownstone and so I was in New Jersey I found a place in Venice each and it's funny. Because I started to do like really active manifestation, I started to really start doing exercises and one of the exercises I did was to imagine the end seem and create a mental loop at some big win NRP. You elaborate what an L. P. is! While? NLP is neural listrik programming and so. Each person has their own idea of word. Certain words mean things to people and so as a collective. Agreed on certain words meeting certain things, so if I said having to send you a contract look at it versus ham over the agreement, and you can take a look at silent. Send it over. The words create certain feelings and certain mental images in your mind as newer linguistic grammar I start to use certain phrases on words to help you access. Access different parts of your mind and see different thing and I. Ask you certain questions to elicit specific responses, and we all so can use imagery with our words to help get rid of cravings like if you're addicted to a certain craving, we can do swish pattern to remove back so for example with wish pattern if you just can't stop eating French fries. Ask You like what's that? Don't Mike. Okay, so through New Orleans mystic programing. You would go through a series of stops that would make your mind all of a sudden associate French. Fries with Allah's. Then you're like. French fries either introducing so it creates new connotations for existing words, thoughts images in your head exactly yeah, and then you use hypnosis to locked in Okay I. get how they pair really well together. Is that common by the way, no a lot of people. Are just like an practitioners, or they just do hypnosis and I noticed to. A lot of people don't feel comfortable doing hypnotherapy. They made you like they call it guided meditations. They don't take the debate. Need to and I feel I. It's a disservice. It's like you did this trading and you're free to share because of like how. Other people take it in, but there are people that really need this. You know you know I had it. They're pissed. You know so. Therapy offers you clarity essentially so you? Have the problem by hypnotherapy new can really essentially get rid of the problem in a short time period, and then still have your therapist to check in, and we calibrate you know it's not wonder other people say oh, so I could get rid of my therapist of like. No, you wouldn't get rid of your doctor like outside. have to go dock more now that I have a fitness train- it's holistic. You know you're not. Not just one dimensional person and I think we treat ourselves that way. That's where the problems are created so in Venice. You're trying to hypnotherapy program you. Considering the idea of getting is caught. You've become a master hypnotherapist yet. and it's funny, because even like I had this idea and I had this clear Pat I. Still Fighting because when I landed in La accumulate I'm GonNa have fun I. Don't need to do hypnotherapy. my identity was still as of business funding coaches. Owner, it was not like. What am I doing? I never really talked about mindset before. Like by giving people advice, you know and add business funding. I give people advice. I'm good at finding ways to really do things the right way and custom, but I still night justify myself as someone to do that. So the first day of class subconsciously I was self sabotaging but I overslept as I was. Just like I'm not GONNA go inside. Call to see if I could get a refund. It was actually the founder that picked up. And so like, she never picks up the phone, so it was like bap moment. She's like it's me I'm wanted founders. No just come is fine. I was like. It's fine, so he said something fishy. Adult P me as all of a sudden, the Uber like. I went each day and then I started to get relaxed housing. This is really cool and then doing the exercise, other classmates in doing it on my sow. And I started to see things differently, and I was just going to do the basic program. Just so I can help. The plan was to incorporate it into my business funding practice site can help clients and their mindset with business funding, because I noticed how mindset is important for everything raising for startups on even just like a fine to different loans and different..

La Brooklyn Venice LA Times CBO New Jersey Maskill NRP New Orleans Allah L. P. founder Pat I.
"hong" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

The New School with Christine Hong

07:33 min | 2 years ago

"hong" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

"For the first time, so in this episode I Juliet about what being hypnotized for the first time was like experience caused her to give up her cigarette sales business and become full-time hypnotherapist how she felt about that career change and expand to other people and what her day days like. When did you first hear about hypnotherapy? What was your first impression of it? So it's funny because arena fantasy novel where I introduced hypnotherapy to character in that activated like her power so hypnotherapy always like something magical to me. Was it something that I actually thought I would do? And so this is like twenty to thirteen. And then I had a break up. And I saw a ad for hypnotherapist. Instead heartbreak, and actually went to her, and it was amazing. Experience like that was like the easiest break-up I've ever had. eraser vice, not how that works, but. We can eat the energy between two, and the motion will break, so we cut courts. So flash forward to the end of twenty eighteen I just felt so. Lost like I was making money. And I hit my business goals, and I just was unhappy. I still felt duck, and I was excited for the next level, and by discovered a program and in the program. It's a mindset program. It was about manifestation, and so I would never into like manifestation and law attraction, but the way she presented, it was like the psychology behind this so with my degrees by 'cause I could get behind her explanation and so. Everyone had to do the hypnosis in the program and I was putting it off, and then I saw people like Oh my God I was like. Wow I'm from Brooklyn, so I don't know. About like it says let me do this thing I under hypnosis and. I healed my inner child. It was crazy I was. Yeah also. Is it raining in my room crying? You could do it for yourself like just off the Guy Wow. Yet yet self-hypnosis an issue. Did hypnosis within the program, so it was like we were primed and ready to make the shift. How does he discovered this program? What is it called Chi is. It's Mitch Academy by It was great because it introduced me to not just like Memphis, but he knows I was like this is what. Is Missing. From THESE MINDSET CURVE GRAB! It's interesting. That is not promoted as much eagles still kind of like our like all. Let's do meditation, but knows this is different because you're under a deeper trance and it's targeted suggestions. Baid leads to summarize what hypnosis is is imagine. What someone sent you when you were little kid like there's not onset you you're a little kid has always start with you even into adulthood. Is a belief that you have about something if it's road trips is about claims. If it's about cooking for yourself, it's about money. This belief was installed when you were little kit. Now with a hypnotherapist imagine go back in time to you as a little kit. For a year straight they tell you that you're amazing. You're smart. You can do anything that you wants to do for a whole year at the age of Seven. Someone told you that every day. Imagine how different your life would be. My God. Did that for my future kit, but also one. How did you discover that pamphlet was manifestation made I think she's running instagram out. We will link to in the show notes for our listeners to okay. I get the hesitation with the hypnotherapy. So when you're like okay, I'm going to try it. How did you perform on yourself? To? Intro is like you lay down in a quiet room, and it's almost similar to meditation at and the suggestions to bring you under your taken under with the guide, the guided imagery and guidance instructions, and then you do a deep ner, so there's something diener. Take person even warned to. US and then you do a convinced, because sometimes like I'm not at the ties, but. If you do the convincing you could check like. Yeah, okay so I'm hypnotized. And, then you create a metaphor or image so I, for example you're going into room, but the room actually represents your mind. and your unlocking doors within the room you're lucky doors with being your mind and self conscious mind thinks in pictures and feelings and sounds so you're saying this imagery will get the message directly to your subconscious mind so consciously you'll be like wow like why am I in the room, but Lee subconsciously so you want us to do XYZ cakes that imprint of information instructions. And puts it on the priority shell with things to do especially since we're all online. Exactly? Yeah, so it's like for example, twitter's agree stream of consciousness, and even like subliminal marketing, so you'll see something consistently for months. If you go. You've had a great relationship with manny gone on greet dates, and all of a sudden people are like guys just pay twenty dollars for dates. They don't want paper dates. They don't want to pay it relates to. Date and. Timeline and all of a sudden. You have a date and you're like. Oh! I, want for dates in the that's not my actual is just something. That I've been seeing consistently through thirty days. You'll Capri from doing that and you're like. Maybe I should start to talk after like. Try Not to you. See somebody videos like. All right savage. Thirty two my. makes. You realize you shouldn't be doing these repetition. It makes you realize that you should curate your social media as much as you can. Because media is the easiest way to speak to your conscious your subconscious mar because it thinks in pictures sounds feelings, so if you see a picture that make you feel a certain way, your subconscious law that in continuously log that. I do the opposite. Most I just don't check so. And I tried to like get diverse newsletters in trucks, diverse people over zoom but. I could create my own like narrow minded in Perth. It's funny I'm actually going to record a youtube video about how to brainwash yourself essentially, so what people can do and I posted a thread on twitter about how to not get controlled by the media, because all stuff is going to be coming answer now, so it's important for you to when you're looking at the news. You're watching trying to get these updates to remove empathy. You don't want to tap into what's going on emotionally. Than it feels like it's happening to you to.

twitter Juliet instagram youtube Brooklyn Mitch Academy Baid diener Perth manny Memphis Lee
"hong" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

The New School with Christine Hong

05:43 min | 2 years ago

"hong" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

"Else. Okay so I remember you said when you got your first free boards and sponsors. You kind of relate ooh! Maybe glimmer of hope right. So, what is you do next? You move to San Francisco at seventeen right now. My best friend had mentioned before him and his mom moved up there and so. I got free flights from Daddy worked for the airlines back in the day, so I would just fly up there and ended up falling in love with San Francisco just as escape skateboard city as a sitting self and. At the time you could skate anywhere was like a big part in the whole city pretty much. Just candy land for a skater and yeah. I just was like you know what when I graduate high school on moving up here and that's what I did I saved money I'd like I said at work and moved up there because there's a lot of industry opportunities up there and always kind of moved where the skateboard scene was so flight. You're in the middle of it. You can kind of have better opportunities to meet people. There's always people. People coming into that city, flying from all over the originally, how I got my main shoe sponsors, someone came into the bay area, and saw means skated, and then until it happened I about why San Francisco is a really big or the biggest skate cities in the nation pretty much New York. San Francisco for you know big La well La's big, but it's not like metropolitan so for skateboarding like when there's big buildings and you know. Huge downtown's. SF has hills and stuff like that does too but. You Know La's great downtown and all that back today. But it's more or less like theft static of downtown in a big city, and that's why you see a lot of kids in New York filming down the big streets. Just looks and everything about it is cool. There's there's tears. Your, City skateboarders your skate. Park skateboarders were they just do contests in the half pipe? Ones like Tony Hawk in South San Francisco. Your savings kind of cross your fingers for Awhile and the. Kind of work out, or were there any struggles on the way? Still struggles every day never is easy now. It was I was late in the game for skateboarding I was like I, said already nineteen twenty, and not even sponsored. That's in the game. Yeah, I. Mean Kids do like already getting noticed that age fifteen now I feel like in some kids turn pro at nineteen or twenty. You know what I mean. That's like the average I. Feel I didn't I didn't turn pro twenty five well. How long were you NASA until you're like I'm making enough money. That could just live off this I don't need savings anymore. There's like you become amateur and then become professional. And so when you're amateur, you basically get not really that much money you can. I got paid decently luckily enough when you turn pro, that's when you actually have your name on stuff, so you have real financial opportunity is basically. I was still amateur, still working. So I could make money and still skate, and then getting paid a little bit, but just not enough to live off oven, and then once. I finally started making enough money where I was like. Wow, I, now make more here because I started making like getting better sponsors and all that so then that's when I was like well I can now do this full time because I'm in the process of about to go pro, so there's like a huge money John. What's getting sponsors like you said a couple of upset with you have to proactively reach out to them at all I mean sometimes, but I think that reaching out is the best thing you can do nowadays especially with social media and everything like the adages to be noticed in. It's also like you don't WanNa. Try too hard because there's so many kids out there. That are too worried about being sponsored. It's just like. You can't worry about that because if you stay in really good and you're going to the escape parts. People are GonNA notice. You'RE GONNA. See you and then they're gonNA. Fill me in tag you and then that's how it kind of happens is. Word of mouth. Someone's going to sponsor you if your email him every day in. They're like okay. We'll just show me that you're skating every day instead of trying to be sponsored. What does it even mean again sponsor? It just means like if you wear their hat or something. Are there skateboard then they pay you are. It's just like being like for example like a basketball player when they sign a contract with the team. There on that team right so now they can use their name and they use them in their videos, and it's kind of like having a team. Where inspires other people want to get their product, so if you have the best team in Skateboarding, you're going to be like the coolest never going to be buying it like supreme. They started eight shop and look at him. Now it's like Bessinger. I, know they. They're marketing geniuses. What was the first team? Ron will first big ones where DC shoes in this one called Zoo York was out of New York. They travel like crazy. They're big companies. That made a lot of money, so that went well and now. You said Okay so you moved as when you're seventeen. Any became pro when you twenty five. That's eight years, so it was kind of the past becoming pro. What is pro even mean honestly as a skateboarder basically just means they can sell your name on things, and you've reached a level where you're really good and people want to buy your product. Okay, so when you are pro. Is that when you got your not Miller shoes. Also you get a design that shoe. I'm always so curious. Yeah, I mean there's some guidelines, but yeah had some inspirations in go into the office, and there's a full team and what I want and. I would have done like a complete different, too, if I had just my own design, but they. Guidelines and stuff, which is understandable, that's. So, you said you didn't really use social into getting, but I see a huge following now so win. That commenced pitcher..

San Francisco Skateboarding New York La Daddy NASA Tony Hawk theft WanNa basketball Miller Ron Zoo York
"hong" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

The New School with Christine Hong

08:18 min | 2 years ago

"hong" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

"Code. Now I will. Also caveat is with the fact that in Hong Kong Hong Kong was one of the earliest cities in the world to adopt a lot of private kitchens. Because RENT IS HIGH COOKS. We Cook creatively. But they can't afford to do it in Hong Kong because real estate is so expensive. They ended up doing them. Apartments and so private kitchens. are very popular. Dot Com. And most of them are not fully licensed by the health pirate but it started really important food movement in Hong Kong. So I would say if you're just having your friends don't worry too much about it. If you're trying to build a business of the pop ups you should absolutely be figuring out how to get yourself fully licensed and legal and ready to go okay. So the one you made when you were sixteen did you just location create the Menu. Invite friends friends friends more or less. Yeah that's YEP that's basically how it worked. You taught the people in team. Basic Skills Tasting menu back then so the service was a little bit more controlled so people are ordering off menu as they ate whatever we gave them and then we also took reservations in In advance anything normally think of that was really hard or anything. I'm you're glossing over a lot of proverbial culinary school education here right. Most of good cooking is just putting food out at the right time. The right temperature with the right amount of salt sugar fat and acid. Almost everything can be fixed with SALT. Sugar some type of oil in some type of finger or lemon juice or whatnot so make you have your basics down in. Don't forget those couple of things so you opened your Pub Restaurant Highschool for fun and then you went to college at Yale and majored in cognitive science. Did you think you are going to continue making public restaurants in college? I absolutely didn't I went to Yale under the illusion that I was going to be a philosophy major because my best friend's name in high school was Plato. And then soon after I met somebody by the name of K Teo who was a year below me and she convinced me to open pop-ups at Yale to so sort of despite my yell education that spent all my weekends cooking these pop-ups I'm of my dorm out of the basement. I was in speed. Dial for a lot of new haven restaurants Chefs when I was in class and I spent all of my winters in my summers cooking in Japan. Either finding restaurants or with grandmothers. And that's how I built up sort of my early understanding of food. Did you enjoy it? Of course absolutely that's why I'm doing what I do. Yeah I why did you decide to go into restaurants? Set of a philosophy internship or something. Well it just seemed like the right thing to do because I was already doing so much of my time. I suppose it was a genuine interest. I was very much attracted to kitchen culture. In the beginning kitchen kitchens are quite familial terms fraternal. They feel a little bit like sports. Teams also especial forces units or like parts of the military the very intense sometimes for better or for worse. But there's something very attractive about kitchen culture in for some reason instinctively had wanted to spend as much time as possible in kitchens. How did you find these first internships restaurant with the way they work in the culinary world is the dodgers in stages are basically unpaid internships? And the way you get establishes you turn up either between lunch or dinner service or first thing in the morning and you wait outside the door and you try to get compensation with the chef in say. Hey I love your food. I'M GONNA wash dishes in washes floors or I want to cook for you for free. I WANNA learn how it is to job here. Whatever it is and then you worked at further delile during which uses of the restaurant in the restaurant. Size you up. So it's sort of a cross evaluation where you tried to figure out whether this is the place for you in more importantly the restaurant sort of decides whether you're fit for the kitchen and that's kind of a tradition in how most people eventually get jobs there. You just have to be able to hang basically and you have to fit in well. Did you even bother contacting the restaurant beforehand or you just showed up. Some of them in Japan didn't because you know. I was traveling through Japan with my knives in my backpack in the test would stop in places and say. I really like your food. Can I do for you? But in places like Hong Kong. I might try to get into restaurants that really respected by just turning up for you know if I knew somebody in the restaurant place. Seattle Means to touch with your chef. I'm interested in spending of time here. Why were you hopping around so much restaurant summer? You want to see as much as you can and given that I would only really be able to spend the whole summer at each location at each restaurant. Three months is not a long time at all so why not cut it shorter in his bounce around in the photo has many places possible? What kind of stuff do you learn how to behave in kitchen to make food recipes? Nice technique that sorta thing was there any particular questions you want to work for that? You really had a good time in. Japanese restaurants are really fun. The culture really crazy. It's super super intense. I worked at the restaurant called Keeping Houghton. Kyodo that's three-star Michelin and that place. You would live in the restaurant that you cooked at. All of the guys live together in bunk beds while shower together and we worked basically seven. Am until one am six days a week and it was amazingly intensity was maybe the hard I've ever worked but the commodity was amazing because you're living and breathing together and everybody starts off as a first year as a junior which means that. There's no meritocracy it's all how long even at the restaurant and how hard you've worked. So when did you know you want to work full time? You keep saying you just kind of stumbled into it. Yeah I thought it was be definitely shift for a long time. I met my other CO founders In New Haven. They're doing their pasties masters degrees in. What not Yale. And then they came up to me and said Hey. We're GONNA build this Chinese concepts. Do you want in the beginning. It was just a Chinese fast casual and it. After I joined the team it evolved into something a little bit more ambitious a little bit bigger with a more sort of broad goal of trying to change people's understanding of Chinese cooking so they convinced me that we had something good going on. It would be exciting to work on it together. So that's how we started working together. Is that when you were like? I guess this is my full time job now. I know pretty much I met with them. A couple of times in an afternoon time may with him at a coffee shop in an remember just going back to bed and think to myself. I may or may not have been offered a job. I'm not really sure and a week. After we graduated we working at you know and three months later. The first restaurant is open. And I'm cooking there so you. It's one thing leads the next kind of heaven quickly. Yeah how did you meet the Jansy founders again Kim Pop pop-ups at you so they discovered you more or less to behead this silly idea of trying to open a restaurant with chef and then they were like wait a minute? We're opening restaurant. I guess we needed chef. There is a twenty one year old doing whatever. He's doing across the street in his dorm. Let's talk to him okay. Let's work together mets. How Nice so that was the first rush on? Newark was more permanent. So I was wondering it Founding pop ups I mean it's totally different as business. You have business goals you have. They expressed it need to accomplish something. In the case of everything we do is to accomplish this mission of getting people to properly understand the diversity with Chinese cooking so everything you do has to push towards that fact whereas in Hey that's pretty good food up there in. Try Not to screw it up so people want to come back when we do it again. So how did you go about tying this Russian? What was that like a Founding building it was building Zulic while you need a location. You need a team to hire a team. You.

Yale Hong Kong Japan Hong Kong Hong Kong dodgers Kyodo SALT Houghton Seattle New Haven K Teo Newark Jansy Kim Pop
"hong" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

The New School with Christine Hong

12:18 min | 2 years ago

"hong" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

"Vogue magazine has named the sweet green of Chinese food. Today we're going to discuss how he started his interest in food how. He helped launch multiple restaurants. What his day. Days like as a culinary director and chef before we start to trump interview was recorded before the outbreak of Kevin Nineteen and does reflect pre quarantine conditions style Interest in to begin for you usually when I speak to journalists on podcasts or otherwise what want me to say is that my grandmother was a cook which is true and that the passion for is in my blood which is also true but that is by no means the entire answer to the question. I don't really know where the interest in through came from. I'm from Hong Kong people in Hong Kong food. We'd like to think culturally in critically about food. My Grandmother was a cook that was trade but by no means was she excited or passionate about being a cook in fact one of the first things. I remember her ever telling me was. Don't be a cook. It's one of those things I've been in the industry basically for ten years and it's gotten to the point where it's just what I know how to do But I feel like there must be more to that. Well I mean to put it bluntly I suppose. I think I've always thought it's important to think deeply about food. Food is a really interesting and easy medium through which to tell cultural stories. It's a really good starting point because if you like certain cultures food you tend to like their people. It's a really great way to bring together. A lot of sort of modes of thinking purchased to learning. Thai food is like kind of people. Is I for into anything? Die Young and the more you're invested in that food more you invest in culture and the people in learning and trying to mark mindsets and whatnot In no small part why Chinese food. I'm really interested in trying to change. Mostly Americans understanding of Chinese food. Chinese food seems to be this monolithic thing of the US. It's like over the last one hundred seventy or whatever years that has been developing in the. Us We've come to understand has one thing but really my understanding of times. It's diverse it's very colorful saying Chinese food to me is like someone a European food. That's how diversities we have twenty three plus provinces we have fifty plus ethnic minorities we have hundreds and thousands of cuisines and techniques in ways to. Cook food. We've been making Chinese food definitive Chinese food for at least four thousand years so there's a lot to mind a lot to explore with a few. They're playing in your childhood. You realized you're like war into food than the average person. I don't think I'm more than the average person. I just chosen as my industry. I am by no means a Foodie. Keep with food news really care about trends. I think three times a day which is pretty average. I think okay but you did open your first pop restaurant at sixteen and embedded newspaper factory in Hong Kong. So what prompted that then right? I mean a good time hanging out. Teaching French cook serving people being able to tell stories through food. Yeah you might be true. That might be ally. It's just there's a writer in Potter called Edmund Divall and he spoke at school wants to says every is basically a poet. It's just so happens that my former poetry is pottery so sometimes I feel like that you know like you just go by the World Trade to investigate the world understand more about it so happens. Your medium is food. Your medium is cooking. I think my career in food is an for curiosity about culture as oppose. And perhaps the question that I've set out to answer in the last couple of years is y. Is Chinese food so good? Why Chinese food so great and why does it it the recognition that deserves okay? So I was wondering though I'm being making a popcrush on takes a lot of effort. You have to assemble waitresses. Get people show up. I'm in amid doing that right now. With my roommate 'cause he's really looking and I was like you should open population at our house. I mean it takes a long time. So was it just kind of like. Oh Yeah I WANNA do. It seems finer. What did you have any hidden purpose center? There was no hidden purpose. Who was more like a? Why not type of thing? I was in high school and it all started because I was hanging out with my dad and I was sixty nine Last summer in Hong Kong. And what you WanNa do this summer as a island what I wanna do he said. Why don't you open a master in my thought was? Yeah why don't you like? Why wouldn't you and we just went ahead and did it. What's really fun about Papa? Best rants in particular. Is that the process for putting up a restaurant together is often quite haphazard it bootstrap -I and it's Kinda step by step. You roll up your sleeves and you just do it and you make it happen. You don't know your obstacles until you come across them which is a wonderful feeling. Ama- causes your cooking to be a little bit more creative in reckless than in a restaurant setting because you're beholden to nobody Restaurant basically there often isn't even expressig need to make a lot of money. It's a fun little type of business model and a project that is also most of the time illegal but a lot of fun to try. Yeah how did you decide? What's on the menu? It just seemed easier to cook food that you news Invented this idea for cuisine called Hong Kong cuisine Hong Kong cuisine and Cantonese cuisine but on cuisine as Hong Kong food. That's an amalgamation of all the influences. That Hong Kong had absorbed over the years whether through a British colonization or Japanese occupation or an affinity for Korea or American influence or capitalism. Or whatever answer the cuisine in Hong Kong weird mix that was very homey and felt real authentic to me. So that's how we started was cooking this Hong Kong cuisine. A really good example is for whatever reason a lot of families would eat at home. Would eat pan-fried codfish with teriyaki sauce. And the codfish usually would be bought from a Western supermarket. It would be frozen and it would often be imported from somewhere in Europe. The teriyaki sauce would be Japanese brands from Japan in a bottle. Ready to go and the way that butchered this fish. They cut the fish steaks. What's the word Dorsal laterally? Straight through this fine and it's a very odd way of cutting fish that is popular in Europe with the Japanese sauce. Hen Fried in peanut oil. Which is sort of Kennedy's oil in Hong Kong home? And that's the type of thing that was kind of interesting and odd but that's the type of reserve the first Called goes back from when I was in Hong Kong without sixty question fail. I only know how to follow a recipe online. Like step-by-step exactly. So I'd never really made my own recipe. A what was the first recipe really felt. It was your own. Who's no such thing as those thing? Has Authenticity things making things up. But every time you cook you know let's say you follow a recipe for a Mac and cheese and you taste Mac and cheese wins on the plane. You're like Oh this is salty. Nothing you add more salt Original recipe so. That's the first step. You believe that you have more control over the situation than a recipe gives you and you innovate by having things here and there and all recipes. All Cook Learn by learning basic ideas or concepts for recipes. Exception you innovative upon them you substitute ingredients for the other ingredients. You substitute techniques for other techniques you change measurement of specific ingredients for example. And you end up making a dish that is different enough that you might be able to claim as original. Do you have something you remember making that? You're like really proud of my first signature dish back when I was sixteen. Was Clay Pot. Rice in Bowtie in Cantonese refers to a small clay pot. But it's also boats I as in both I five in both is fine as Klay Pot rice and this sort of Hongkong Southern Chinese Cantonese style way of cooking rice in a clay pot. Clay pots are wonderful. Because they're semi perforated which means that as you're pushing into a clay pot that heats in that steam gets trapped inside the pot with hot air pushing air through clay. So you have this sort of like lovely Tursi earthy aroma to the rice without having to add any ingredients into it rice. It's pretty technical dish which also known as kind of peasants or rather low cost dish because on top of the rights you would put chicken sausages or whatnot that would release the oils in flavor. The right so it's kind of like a one stop shop for your meal and so that was my first signature dish and we originally had been doing with pork belly which isn't super common in Hong Kong but the Came from me traveling in Shanghai for a little bit before. We opened that pop in fall in love with shanty-style braised pork belly so there's a little bit fusion there but that was our original dish. Sometimes it would make with Taro. When it was the winter just because it was a little bit more starchy warming. It was pretty good for others. Who MAY WANNA try making their first. Pop Oppressed Sean. Was wondering if you kind of had a guide will mentor. Lots of up and coming to coax and families and people in general who are excited about opening the first pop ups and obviously the most important thing to just go for it. It's a little chaotic. And it's the haphazard process but you won't really learn from unless you go through the motions and you actually do it. That's usually my first piece of advice. I work with the city. Seed in new haven for Appro- employed the food business accelerator often which has new haven locals. Who are hoping to build their businesses. Just hey my mum makes delicious. Food might partner makes amazing sausages. We want to figure out how we can do this. In the puffs out place people love events. People love experiences. People love things that are odd and special. So pop-ups are really great sort of like activation 's for cuisine for example. Can you imagine doing a Filipino? Pop Up in new haven. Most people have not had Filipino before in Oakland so cool. This is a great way to learn about the so I was the vice gopher if you want to get a little bit more technical and you have aspirations to move your popup into something that's a little bit more sustainable business wise. I would strongly encourage people to start learning how to write up business models so in my line of work. It's a little romanticized. It seems as chef spend most of the times in hot kitchens yelling at each other quickly and have tattoos and they're really sexy but really most of what shifts do is kind of boring and difficult and annoying. We don't often get to do what we want to do. All the time. A lot of administrative work a lot of writing. Business Puzzles looking at your. Pnl's inventory management hiring firing HR. It's a lot of business stuff in restaurants tend to be smaller companies than. Let's say a retail operation so the chef or the head of the kitchen who comes up with creative ideas for food ends up doing a lot of these administrative things so I think people who started in pop ups who want to build a sustainable business out of it should definitely learn how to do some of those things at learn how to write basic business models and do basic accounting or if they wanted to do maybe a one time event or a short while. Unita location I officially on the record should say yesterday the perfect you know the key here. Is that once you start charging people for money. You're providing service and if you're opening up to the public it becomes a health hazard if you don't.

Hong Kong Europe new haven Vogue magazine US Clay Pot director Kevin Nineteen Die Young Klay Pot Ama Hongkong Southern Chinese Cant Rice Pnl Unita Oakland Hen Fried writer Mac Japan
"hong" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

The New School with Christine Hong

03:30 min | 2 years ago

"hong" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

"And also helpful to really. Early stage founders. 'cause sequoia prides itself of always being in what we call the pre seed and seed business. And then working with those super. Early Company is all the way through IPO and beyond so we measured it on the number of seed stage companies that wanted to talk to us even before they may be even needed funding. How did you achieve goal once making sure? The existing founders were supported. I mean it was actually two very different ways. One is in what I would call the spoke help. How could me or the investors helped them and their companies with individual problem solving or growth opportunities. So that could be helping them with. Launched helping them in a crisis situation helping them higher. That was first and that's obviously very specialized to each and company and then the other way was how am I eighteen? Much more scalable ways that had to do with connecting founders with founders and building community. There's a few as sequoias done that. One is through events so we have an event called base camp where we take all of our founders camping or it really gives founders and opportunity to reflect in connect with each other and certainly we bring in great speakers and deliver great content and then from there. We started what I would call founder boot camps. A program called aunt with stands for amplify mobilize and propel it's like a ten week intensive where our founders really young companies that seed and series as companies come together and they meet every Thursday for four hours in the evening going through critical business building concept and then they get to connect with each other at the end of the day. Most founders have the skills that need they just need the support of a great network to help them solve problems in the moment to those were a couple of ways that we built loyalty either very specific or building community interesting. Is that how you try to stand out from other brands? Those are two ways that we really do. Try to stand out. I think the other way is just. We have a very small dedicated team. That's all in we think of ourselves partner versus an investor and will stand by you through each stage of the journey and we also have expertise at each stage of the journey as it really does vary depending on where you're at for goal to. You're saying you want to make sure no companies that were awesome like didn't apply to quite. You're like one atop the companies. Do you actually have trouble with? I would say we have trouble in that. People may not want to come meet with us before they feel like. They're ready because they really in many cases. May WanNa work with US. But they feel like they want to be perfect and that in fact is the worst thing because we can actually be most helpful when companies are still rough around the edges. And I don't think it had anything to do with us. Sides the fact that a founder sees brands like airbnb or dropbox or Google. And they think Oh. I'm not done yet. But those companies. Were you know two or three people in our offices when they first started so. I think it's telling those stories that it's never too soon to start with sequoia and then also being helpful to them even prior to going into business with those companies that makes sense. I don't think I would even think of talking to sequoia unless I had at least a million users or something and that's detrimental to our business to because we don't want you to wait that long because we can probably help you get to those million users. So when's a good time? So what stage? I think. Obviously it depends. You don't have to have product market fit yet. You have to have a compelling market size.

founder sequoia US partner airbnb Google
"hong" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

The New School with Christine Hong

12:32 min | 2 years ago

"hong" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

"Who mainstream network to be willing to take just by chance that you were there. It's so difficult. When news breaks people expect it so quickly? Now that if you're there and you're an option prompted. Have you always been this lights graphics reaching out with that just easy radio? It's probably always been there right but like the lifestyle that I lived in Florida never needed that? I guess you would say so. It was very surprising to me to be able to pull that stuff off. You know in those handful years. I had traveled bottles. Dozens of countries just sorta on my own as a freelancer and was like really shocked. That I was able to start to pull it off but I wanted it really bad and that's usually a pretty good motivator whether you have the skills or not yeah so when you move you didn't know anyone and you just sir hit the ground running looking for stories. Biscuit US Nairobi. Kenya as my base hand had rented a room from fellow American. Who lived there? Who essentially I would say like took me in from the streets of our hilarious to think about but I had moved into a Kenyan boys youth hostel because he will target eight dollars a night and provided free breakfast like the hood of Nairobi and was working with a local Kenyon College student who is working in journalism and I kind of offered up to my said. Hey I'm coming to Kenya. We work together. You help me. You know is a term for an in our world. We call fixer somebody. Who's like a local knowledge local? He drives to you. You can translate for you. He knows people know sources nice sort of commandeered him ham coming. I've got access to these networks. We work together. I could tell stories. I can help make you money. We can help movie stories law together and we worked together there for a couple of months then eventually ended up. Being an American Jew was buying cars from Dubai and importing them through Bossa on the coast and selling them in south Sudan got a free ride into Sao sedan when he came to drop me off back in Kenya and he's like radio listeners. Like no no come live with me. Look we're great friends to this day? That was sort of the start of that. It's like a wild wild ride. Wow okay ended up and so just as yeah exactly so many stories so many untold stories. Some of the best reporting. I think I've done. I really love it out there. I still back. I love that area of the world is so much to me. Had you even gone before you said you chose it because it seemed like there is a lot going on their story? What I hadn't yeah had been there before I had done tons of research and I had met people who lived. Today I landed was the first time I had ever been in the area. I mean I looked at it strategically of like I could stay Miami and try and travel to these parts of the world. The logistically no savings student loans. You really like struggling financially. Didn't make sense to Miami. Trying poverty story had to strategically put myself for Ford -able relatively close interesting and to sort of Nairobi. Popped up on the math for me. How long did you live? There is a freelance journalist. So I was there for seven months in Nairobi and I continued. My freelance work. After that side moved from Nairobi to Mexico I had done some boarder trips previously and at the time that was starting to pop off again the sort of like NOCCO war that plays a game of whack a mole so I went back to Mexico. There for few months went to Cuba for a month. I started trying my hand the Latin American World. I was born and raised Miami. Keeping Puerto Rican. I've always been interested in that world and being a part of that coverage which is what I do more or less now and then from there. I believe I was in Mexico. I had just gotten back to the US and found out about an opportunity to embed with US troops in Afghanistan. And that was my first time heading back out to that. Central Asia region. Minute was with a newspaper called Stars and Stripes newspaper. How do you decide where to go next? Line as you leave Nairobi. After seven months I thought it would would go back in fact still had an apartment there motorcycle that I left there. I was very sure I was going to go back but in my mind. I was sort of globe-trotting freelance journalist can't hold me down. I'm making moves ended up a Latin America. Really enjoy that for a little bit. But I wouldn't mind. I sort of lived in. Kenya would always end up going back. And then when I got wrapped up in the Afghanistan Gig. That was thirteen months. That was over a year that I was there. It sort of changed my mind a little bit. You know but it was a really intense year for me. And that's when I started looking towards. What sort of reporting can I do stateside? That will allow me to work internationally but still grab a little bit more stability allies back in the US. And that's when the opportunity. Cbs News actually came up. Okay so that comes to be so I had just done thirteen months embedded with troops in Afghanistan. I had talked to some executives at. Cbs News Cryer to freelance work. In sort of throughout the had always had interest in having me sort of joined the network but we never found the right place yet man. There was an executive. There was always in constant touch with sending him stories so after my year in Afghanistan and I knew that I didn't want to resign that contract I reached out to them and I basically told them had this new set of skills that have been able to form abroad. Which is being this one man van who can shoot who arrived at it from radio to television to produce these long-form pieces. No is there a place for me at the network and the networks are really attempting to adapt to these new types of mediums. That like that. The the new demographic that they're always going for for using mobile and quick videos to podcasts. Nellie staying do these things and there was an appetite for it at CBS time. So they traded and I think those are like two or three years prior to me. This job is called digital journalists. Just like very all encompassing everything's digital. Everything's journalism I call Swiss army knife so the network that anywhere across the globe whether it's in New York City whereas looking at a time or pt in Brussels or in Asia anywhere. It happens that we could be the first ones that we could be so quick. We have these digital tools on hand getting back quickly enough that we would be valuable to the network and so they hired me and I was based out of New York. Did that for three years. But we would sit in his newsrooms and watch these news. Blurbs come across the street snipe it was something that was big enough and we can get to it. Quick enough it will launch out the door and within less than a few hours. You could find yourself anywhere across the globe today would just Stanley play. There's a yeah I mean that's nothing new journals and that's the way it goes but I think that the amount of time that it happens because there's so many flights now and technology is so much more streamlined constantly constantly road. Actually I had done the math just recently because of the year ended but I think I spent hundred seventy something days in the roadmaster. I like He lay by like is under side. Don't think you would be able to last like that if he didn't really love it. You know it's an industry that we people out very quickly because it is such a fast pace just like very traumatic way of living every day. Something New and craziness that you're seeing and things that you're experiencing with different people gotta love it how long you can do. It is another question. It's like you know definitely takes its toll on you but for now. It can't be exactly picture what else I would do. Which may be a problem. I don't know but so I definitely love it. How does it feel to have a company paying for you to fly out now having to fly yourself and get the data and pitch them? It's a very nice. It was one of the reasons that I actually wanted to eventually make poetry. I was doing a lot of good work but it was without a doubt limited in resources in funds. Quite frankly safety often times because of the amount of money I was able to put into place I mean we were sharing progress sometimes with other freelancers. We just didn't have the resources as I always knew that I really wanted to have the resources to the audience. Which is we're talking millions versus publishing on Youtube and twitter in states that have to eventually get to the network so it was a great feeling knowing that you have this entire organization that was going to back. You Back Your Story Sack Your Passion. Segovia just convincing the others at the store you want to cover should be covered. That's the daily struggles journalists. I was going to ask about that. You flee yourself to Nairobi South Sudan. Afghanistan did usual safety entire time for all your stories. Well Safety is relative It's true because there are some people across the globe. Who will look at? What's going on the United States and say well? Do you feel safe where you're at you know when you look at some of the alarming numbers of gun violence and crimes this year so. I usually answer that question with that safety relative because you can go to. These areas of the world absolutely. I'm not trying to downplay the violence. Where the Traumat- that these people experience? That's why we're there to highlight and to shine light on those issues but to say that because I lived in Kabul Afghanistan was constantly endangered. That would be accurate. These are cities. I can talk specific cities but let's use Kabul for example because a lot of people have this alarming reaction so you lived in Afghanistan for so long and we rented a compound in a relatively wealthy area of Afghanistan. There was a lot of diplomats and foreign NGOs that live there as well. It was a high walled compound with security. You could walk to the market ten or fifteen minute walk. I definitely blended end a little more than some others might in the area address in local out the shower. You know so I could get by a little more for the most part. You can wander a little bit and as long as you were smart and you knew what was going on. At the time you could check the news of the day. Make sure you know there was no retaliation expected. You can live a relatively again. Relatively normal it would come in waves. There was times when we knew that there was mass bombings happening throughout the city. And we need to stay inside so sometime stateside for like a week or so. And that was out of precaution. So of course. There's waves like the idea that like you're under this constant bombardment. It's not accurate because we're talking about a country with millions of people who go about their daily lives and for the most part can hopefully at least forget the Going on inside the obviously that could be very useful so now. Cps You are a digital journalists clash producer. What does that mean exactly? It's a way of saying what we need. We'll get that done for you. I've always worked in the realm of creating new titles for myself because what I've done have necessarily fit any sort of like traditional silo positions. They had established already so digital girls. While I didn't create position. Cbs News was like relatively new at. Been trying to mold into what I do so what that means for me is like what's your story happens so I've been doing a lot of border stores like a new policy in effect. That's affecting the border. But you get there first and you start interviewing people getting all these things on tape saying that back. Then they'll send in. Let's say this is a big story? We need to anchor. Okay now. He turns producer about interesting therapy for the anchor to come interview and then owner is breaking news happening okay back to journalists mode. We're GONNA go to where it's happening. We're GONNA film it. We're GONNA get live on television. So all the technical aspects to the actual interviewing to the writing all encompassing term of digital journals and the idea is just to basically be whatever the network news or whatever information. He's telling what's next for you. What do you want to be doing that do know? Yeah it's always like a really interesting question for me because I enjoy where I'm at right now in terms of the company and having the resources to tell the stories that I want to television world. It's sort of strange experience being at whether networks because the networks are nationwide and in terms of media United States some of the largest media companies in the world some happy with where a matter of gaining audience. It's probably the biggest audience. I'll be able to garner what I'd like to do. More of continue working within the realm of International Latin America Caribbean and sort of build a resume revolving around that but. I don't know that there's like another job title that I'm trying after you know it's so broad I'm produced. What do you do? You like eastern produce youtube videos you can produce like award winning documentaries select titles fine. That's great gets the job on what I'd like to do within. It is definitely continue. What might be called deep stories that I'm very passionate about. Is there a person out? There has trained career. I don't know that there's one person that hides the job title. I want people who are doing the stories I want but the weird thing about that is like once it's been done it's been done. You know you WANNA BE. This guy.

Afghanistan Nairobi US Kenya Mexico Miami Cbs News Asia Youtube producer New York City Cbs Florida Kabul Latin America Cuba Dubai Latin American World Kenyon College