35 Burst results for "Home Front"

Bristol's Jewish students fight for their University's reputation

Jonny Gould's Jewish State

03:45 min | 8 hrs ago

Bristol's Jewish students fight for their University's reputation

"Hi my name is. And i'm a final year english literature student at the university of bristol. And my spare time. I also freelance. And i've written articles for the telegraph the times the independent huffington post what is regional papers and i also am features editor of the top bristol So the last two years being jewish student has been quite hard at university of bristol as a result of elektra a sociology professor called professor dave Because in his class he teaches and matic conspiracy theories about jewish organizations. He has a lecture in his home against powerful module where he accuses zionism as being one of the five pillars phobia and he implies using this sort of weighed conspiratorial web that israel on british jewish organizations have a malign influence on british government. And sort of in that slide. He touches on a series of consoles tropes about jewish people and two years ago. My best friend nina freedman. Who was then president of bristol. Jason is now you diaz president-elect made a complaint against david miller on years later in the university still hasn't done anything about it and hasn't advised or supported jewish students in any way but the situation picked up again. I'm a week or two weeks ago. Because david millar appeared in a video where he said that zionism we must cool front end design. Ism were in. He touched on several of the anti semitic tropes of course it really is of course some people into target to join us at in relation to this community in particular done. This through interfaith were pretending that jesus was working together. We'll be an apolitical way of countries. Ism stylings though. It's is the horse for normalizing zionism in the community. I in islamic mosque for example where. The mosque unknowingly held this project of chicken soup with a together. This is really backed project to normalize is within the muslim community. And they're doing that time. During the attack on cobra on this sort of started a new upper on twitter and reaganite hit the movement to get david miller removed from bristol. University campus clinician nasty. Seeing jews everywhere even in loction soup made in mosques while bashing corbin the share arrogance of this man and in one glib soundbite he opposes generations and generations of jewish teaching centuries of daily prayers which users sites to return to. Zion is car us special envoy in combating antisemitism until january. Twenty twenty one. Sinus didn't start in nineteen forty eight zionism spring out of the first zionist cows. Zionism was born in russia. When god says to abraham go forth to a land that i will show you. Zionism reached its consummation in the exodus. When moses let the jewish people to the promised land and zionism found one of its clearest expression

University Of Bristol Professor Dave Because Nina Freedman David Miller Matic Elektra Huffington Post David Millar Bristol The Times Diaz Israel Jason Jesus Corbin Twitter Zion Abraham Russia United States
Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine deemed "safe and effective" by the FDA

Daily Coronavirus Update

07:10 min | 9 hrs ago

Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine deemed "safe and effective" by the FDA

"And johnson. It's been shown that they're vaccine is effective at preventing hospitalizations and severe effects of covid. Nineteen this from scientists at the fda we're seeing about. I think it's sixty six percent effective when it comes to moderate to severe cases of covid nineteen so matthew. Tell a little bit more about what we're hearing with. His johnson and johnson vaccine right so what happened. Is that johnson. Johnson released data about a month ago. You know press release but the process for evaluating these vaccines is that they go through the fda and the fda really unique in the world independently looks at the data and re analyzes the data that the company produces and its own report and then hold a public meeting which will be happening friday and so the documents before the public meeting came out and they had some good news both some really clear data on hospitalizations and a general sense of approval from the fda researchers. Sometimes they're not as positive so it looks like this may be another option now. The big plus is on. This is one. It's a one shot dose. So you don't have to go back for a second jab in the arm and also doesn't need to be kept frozen like the pfizer derna vaccines do so shipping and handling of all of this will be a lot easier much easier to transport and that's a big advantage. It does not look like we're gonna have a huge amount of supply the start off with so it doesn't dramatically change how fast we're going to be any shots into people's arms but for a lot of people i think in a lot of experts i talked. You think this'll be a great option. It's one and done. I think some of the numbers. I saw the might have about four. That are produced right now. Ready to send out so it gets approved. They can get those out really quick but it wouldn't be until april possibly where they can really ramp up production to start distributing that right and will also be getting over that where they're hundreds of millions of doses of the two vaccines have the madonna and fayza biontech vaccines. That are expected to arrive in the us by july. So there's gonna be a lot more vaccine available. The jj supply will ramp up and we'll be getting more of those other two vaccines that leaves. There's a vaccine coming from nova vacs. We don't really know about how much will getting the early results issued press. Release again good and we're waiting for. Us results on the astra zeneca vaccine. Now some good news. With his johnson and johnson one is its effectiveness against these variants. That we've been hearing a lot about so it fared better than expected when it comes to those. I the way to interpret. That is we'd seen some results and the new results that they showed today look a bit better than what we'd seen in terms of variants. There's still does seem to be decreased. Efficacy against the south africa variant. Three five. Which is really the one that we're all worried about but it did look better than what we've seen previously and what j. j. has said it seems like with those variants. This vaccine is still preventing severe disease and hospitalization. Which are the key things. We've always wanted from vaccine here. The idea that you'd prevent a symptomatic infection or mild cases kind of bonus compared to just making sure that people end up in the hospital hospitalizations numbers were good on that front. What did we see when it comes to side effects. I saw that there were a few unexpected side effects. Although these are very rare you know but The expecting side effects the kind of pain in the arm the headache fatigue. That's pretty much in line with the other two vaccines. We have that right now. There were some rare events that occurred more often in the vaccine in the placebo group. Keeping in mind that forty thousand people were in this trial. There were fifteen serious blood clots including some. Dvd's in that exciting compared to ten in the placebo group. That's something the fda plans to monitor there was also some rini ears in the vaccine group and not in the placebo group. So that's kind of an odd one that will wanna watch again. This is really a prelude to friday win. Some of the top experts in the world are going to gather on zoom call and go over these data that the fda assembled we'll be live blogging that stat. That's when we really find out a lot about any medical product. It's it's one of the amazing things. The fda does now an interesting thing in all of this so public health officials might have a messaging problem when it comes to pumping the johnson and johnson. One out when we're seeing guys like pfizer maderna's say that their vaccine is ninety five percent effective against corona virus. Just listening to numbers right. This says sixty six percent. So what are they going to have a challenge in getting people to want to take this one over the other or you know how how to work out. It's really important to realize that particularly between those three vaccines. The getting vaccine is much better than not getting a vaccine. The change vaccine may be on par after a second dose and that study is being done but unlike visor during the second dose is going to be months after the first and then also slows down the study. She gotta wait right for people to get their second dose. So we're not expecting those data until kinda summerish but the big thing is for a lot of people. There was also the appeal of a single dose here. And i don't think we should understate that. And the effect on severe disease is big so the problem is gonna be the in the initial rollout. You really want people to take whatever vaccine. They're giving because being vaccinated is so much better than not being vaccinated. And that is part of the path to get in the world back to normal and public health. Authorities are absolutely going to have to articulate that now again because there's not going to be that much supply of this initially. They're going to have time for a learning curve right now. the demand for vaccines clearly outstrips supply. That's why you're hearing so many stories of people desperately logging on trying to get vaccine. What scott gottlieb used to run. The fda has raised the issue of you know. We're we're going to reach a point where the people who wanna get vaccinated we'll have been vaccinated and we're still going to need to vaccinate more people and that's when convincing people who are less sure to take vaccine in to take the vaccine that's available is going to become more of an issue last question briefly pfizer moderna vaccines are based on 'em a. What kind of platform is the johnson and johnson. When using this like theatrics annika vaccine is called an ad no virus which is a kind of virus that is used to the same kind of ideas marin a the instead of traditional vaccines were you inject the protein that your immune system sees and then learn to recognize an attack. These sneak something into your body that makes a lot of proteins. You make a lot more protein and then the body recognizes that an attack it in this case they're using this virus which is kind of a cold virus to sneak some genetic material in and that makes the spike protein from the sars virus which your body then learns to recognize and thereby has antibodies that attack the virus

Johnson FDA Astra Zeneca Pfizer Pfizer Maderna Matthew Nova Rini United States South Africa Headache Scott Gottlieb Marin Cold Virus
Food bank demand surges among military families amid pandemic

KCBS Radio Overnight News

02:06 min | 12 hrs ago

Food bank demand surges among military families amid pandemic

"Military families have had trouble putting food on the table, and many are forced to turn to food banks. CBS News correspondent Mark Strassmann says This is one of the many economic effects of the pandemic. We are military and we're struggling way met this army family on the front line of a food crisis. All right, my love. What would you like today? Just everything. There's a Ray Alvarez, her three year old Elijah and six year old Mary Soul. This'd the first time that I've consistently had to go to bed being over and over again. Her husband's an E three private at joint base, Lewis McChord or J B L M. Tacoma. Washington is expensive for a family of four living on $2300 a month. Half hour away. Thurston counties Food Bank serves 1500 Military families like the Alvarez is high. A 22% spike since the pandemic began, you welcome necesita days. That hurts. May Lieutenant Colonel J. P. Smith, a chaplain at J B. L. M. Identified the downturn here. You take a a spouse who's normally working, unable to find work because of the covert pandemic. If they lose that second income, that's a that's a blow on anybody. Says right Alvarez used to work until the military transfer them here A year ago, their financial cushion collapsed, the family's income plunged more than half I really need to find a job. The Department of Defense estimates the jobless rate for military spouses is 22%. Other estimates run as high as 35% in San Diego families using the food bag of the armed Services Y M C. A surged 400% during the pandemic. We're couldn't even go a full week without having to go get help. I'm a food pantry. Our family is worth it were worth getting the help that we need families helping Defend America in a bruising battle against hunger. Mark Strassmann

Mark Strassmann Ray Alvarez Mary Soul Lewis Mcchord M. Tacoma Thurston Counties Food Bank Lieutenant Colonel J. P. Smith Cbs News J B. L. M. Alvarez Elijah Army Washington Department Of Defense San Diego America
Seattle still reeling from year of violent protests

News, Traffic and Weather

03:05 min | 12 hrs ago

Seattle still reeling from year of violent protests

"Seattle In the last year, we watched us some peaceful demonstrations evolved into riots, Destruction and violence. Doubles Jonathan Show looking at where protests go from here. Day after day night after night weeks, turning into months of protests, and then we've seen various leaders come and go, including City Council member Shama so want directing hundreds of people into city Hall. This moment, rallying cries are constantly changing. Moment. It's black lives matter and calls for homeless reform. Then it's to fund the police and raise the minimum wage, public parks and city blocks occupied and overrun the homes of elected officials like the mayor and Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos. All targets. Various groups continue to peacefully march while a mob dressed in black now remains a constant threat. Representing a violent and volatile mix of activism nearly one year after George Floyd's death sparked social justice demonstrations and emboldened others to mobilize Seattle is exhausted and wounded. Many city leaders remain silent and on the sidelines from the business community to neighbors living in hot zones like Capitol Hill. We absolutely not taking it anymore. Victoria Beach says She's trying to create a united front in her neighborhood. But the chair of the Seattle Police Department's African American Community Advisory Council is struggling to find others. Willing to courageously stand by her side. We have the power to stop it. So why aren't we coming together? We need every public official in Seattle to draw a really clear bright line and condemn. Violent acts. John Schools, the CEO and president of the downtown Seattle Association, he says it's hard enough for business is recovering from covert 19 profit losses. But when violent protesters continue to target the downtown core, that is gonna hold back recovery. It's time to stop any. If not, you're gonna go to jail and we will prosecute you. During last month's press conference, in from Seattle police chief Adrian de has once again made a clear distinction between peaceful marches. The ones led by groups dressed in black. They've tied up. A lot of our resource is DEA says Officers will continue to monitor evolving demonstrations adapt and be prepared for all scenarios. So we do have sufficient amount of officers even personally, asked the attorney, Pete Holmes, to get tougher and more consistent. With protests related prosecutions. The police are doing what they can what they're told to do with the courts or are telling them to do, which means no more tear gas for crowd control. But law enforcement consultant Jim Feudal believes the city will remain in a vicious cycle. Until these people are prosecuted and held accountable. I don't see anything changing after all the social unrest and ongoing protests Address. Your success remains undefined in elusive. One thing is clear. It's difficult to predict the future of demonstrations in Seattle, but history has a tendency to repeat itself. Seattle, Jonathan Show. Comeau News update Now to breaking news. We first brought you last

Seattle George Floyd Victoria Beach African American Community Adv Shama John Schools Jeff Bezos Seattle Association Seattle Police Department City Hall City Council Adrian De Capitol Hill Amazon Pete Holmes Jim Feudal DEA Jonathan Show Comeau News
Colton scores in NHL debut, Lightning beat Hurricanes 3-0

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 17 hrs ago

Colton scores in NHL debut, Lightning beat Hurricanes 3-0

"Ross Colton had a goal in his NHL debut and I'm very vast Leschi stopped twenty five shots in the lightning's three nothing shutout of Carolina cold put Tampa Bay on the board on his first career shot on goal during the second shift password when this guy would be I kind of blacked out right after the the play but from what I remember I think you know we had a good offenses on shift gone before that and kinds try to fight to get to find that and you know heavy wheeled around there and kind of just put in front that's Leschi had his twenty second career shutout and first since March twenty twenty against Montreal Blake Coleman Barclay Goodrow also scored in the third of four straight games between the two teams Alex padel coverage may twenty five saves for the hurricanes after shutting up the lightning in his previous start I'm the very

Leschi Ross Colton NHL Tampa Bay Carolina Blake Coleman Barclay Goodrow Alex Padel Montreal Hurricanes
Thousands In Texas Still Don't Have Power As Lawmakers Investigate ERCOT

All Things Considered

03:34 min | 18 hrs ago

Thousands In Texas Still Don't Have Power As Lawmakers Investigate ERCOT

"Last week's mass power failure continues, and so does the political fall out. Have been resignations from the body that oversees the grid and lawmakers open their investigations tomorrow. Joining us now is Dominic Anthony Walsh of Texas. Public Radio. Hi there. Hi. First. How's the recovery going? How are people doing? So the majority of the state does have power and water back. But there are still thousands of residents, especially in the Texas Hill country, for example, who don't have power and their electric provider isn't sure when the power will be back. So for thousands of people of this crisis has stretched on for more than a week. And you know bodies are still being found. Local officials are saying it will be weeks till we know the full number of people who died in this disaster, but it's already in the dozens and is expected to climb to well over 100. And these are people who couldn't power medical equipment people who froze to death in their homes or in their cars, as well as people without housing, who froze to death outdoors, experiencing the worst of the conditions. Wow. So in the face of that staggering death toll, the hearings begin tomorrow and the actions of ERCOT, the body that manages the Texas grid are likely to be front and center. What do you expect to come up? Is gonna be a lot. But one key question. Why wasn't the power grid ready? But ERCOT, which again is at the center of all this doesn't actually own the physical infrastructure that provides power. Rather Okay, just oversees the flow of electricity. Here's Peter Crampton, now former member of their cots board. He spoke at his final board meeting earlier today. Cutlets flying a 7 47. It had not one but two engines experience catastrophic failure. And flew the damage playing for 103 hours before safely landing in the Hudson. In my mind the men and women in their car control room here out. So in this analogy, those engines that blew up could be power generating units owned by public and private power companies, not ERCOT again. Haircuts rule was to do an emergency landing. That's the order of so called Syria's of controlled blackouts. So that and even worse crash when it happened like the entire grid going off line, which, according to Urquhart, could take a weeks or months to repair. So far, Kat is likely to argue that they were just doing the best they could with a bad situation. Are there other places Lawmakers might look to hold people accountable. Absolutely. First, there is the Public Utility Commission of Texas. It oversees our cod and has a three member board appointed by Governor Greg Abbott. Second, there's the railroad Commission, which actually oversees the natural gas sector, not railroads and the natural gas sector failed to provide enough power during this crisis. Those two agencies, the Public Utility Commission and the railroad Commission have regulatory power. ERCOT does not. And of course, there is the state Legislature itself, which actually makes the laws that these agencies are supposed to enforce. One proposal mandate that all plants whether as against cold weather, and there's a debate around that who pays for the weatherization taxpayers or the company's And finally, people are already resigning. Tell us about why So Peter, cramped in who we heard earlier, along with a few other board members resigned after taking heat that because they didn't live in the state now did them living out of the state caused these blackouts. No, but Governor Greg Abbott was quick to welcome The news. In the short term market officials will face hearing from the state Legislature tomorrow, and there will be tough questions for them. But again, Ultimately there are other bodies that hold most of the power is actually mandate changes after all of this.

Ercot Dominic Anthony Walsh Texas Hill Peter Crampton Railroad Commission Texas Governor Greg Abbott Public Utility Commission Urquhart Public Utility Commission Of T Hudson Syria KAT Legislature Peter
Houston Weather – Scattered showers start your weekend

Sean Hannity

00:35 sec | 23 hrs ago

Houston Weather – Scattered showers start your weekend

"Week. We have been up in the eighties the last couple of days and we've got more mid and upper seventies coming up for Thursday Friday. There's some rain coming down with a cold front to Texas Thursday Friday and then some scattered thunderstorms in early March over the weekend 62 degrees Arlo for tonight. Very mild afternoon showers. Tomorrow. 73 meteorologists Scott Larrimore, the weather Channel Spring like now, 78 sugar Land 78 Katie 79 under mostly cloudy skies in Houston of the ktrh Top Tax Defenders 24 Hour Weather Center. Ktrh news time. Three old one Our top story in today's ERCOT

Scott Larrimore Arlo Texas Hour Weather Center Houston
House to vote on $1.9 trillion COVID relief bill this week

Morning Edition

03:29 min | 1 d ago

House to vote on $1.9 trillion COVID relief bill this week

"Trillion coronavirus Relief bill will go to a vote this week. Republicans in Congress say it is too much money. Here's Congressman James Comber from Kentucky. Congress already appropriated $150 billion in the cares act for state and local governments. And not all this money's been spent. So the Biden administration is looking outside of Washington, D. C to build their case. Here's NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith. When Mesa Arizona Mayor John Giles looks out his window at City Hall, he can see the convention center. It's become a hub for those seeking help in the pandemic. And on alternating days it is people that are there too. Up there drunk and get £50 of food, putting their trump or its people. They're waiting in line to get the vaccine. So it's a pretty sobering view from the mayor's office. His city got $90 million in relief funds last spring spent it all and Giles says they easily could have filed receipts for double that. Sobering view from his office window explains why this Republican mayor is pushing hard for the $350 billion in funding for state and local governments in the bill. You know this is it's just too important to engage in silly partisan debates. Most cities and towns didn't get direct help, like Mesa did. They had to wait for it to trickle down through their states and counties. The deadline to spend it isn't until the end of this year, so some are trying to make it last as they manage strapped budgets. For months now, a bipartisan group of mayors has been pushing for more. In July. We called ourselves July or bust. That's Dayton, Ohio Mayor Nan Whaley, a Democrat. Her city's budget has been slammed by the pandemic so much so that she isn't sure they'll be able to train a new class of police officers or firefighters. This year. We're not like the federal government, we have to have a balanced budget. So if we don't get a federal money, no fire class Dayton is recruiting new firefighters and police officers but may not be able to bring them on board without more money. When it comes to the schools. It's a similar story. Congress has approved about $68 billion so far for K 12 schools. Well, not all of the funds have been spent. Education officials say the money is spoken for, and they need more. In Pennsylvania Palisades School District Superintendent Bridget O'Connell says they were able to reopen in the fall. And that meant hiring more teachers to reduce class sizes and to teach online So it is a staff intensive endeavor to educate kids during a pandemic Staff aren't paid up front, which is one reason why it may look like funds or unspent. And the bulk of the money Congress approved for schools last year is just now going out. Superintendent Sean Record from Pema, Arizona on Lee found out last week how much his district can expect to get. I have a list of all you know of things that we need in order to be able to You know, provide better social distancing more safety for teachers, more safety for students. They've been open nearly full time since the fall making do with the money. They have his message to critics who point to unspent funds and say schools don't need more. It isn't a light switch. The money doesn't get approved one day and spent the next And that's why President Biden and Democrats are pushing ahead with new funding and say they can't wait for Republicans in Congress to come around tomorrow. Keith NPR news

Congressman James Comber Biden Administration Tamara Keith Mayor John Giles Congress Mesa Mayor Nan Whaley Dayton NPR City Hall Arizona Kentucky White House Giles Pennsylvania Palisades School
The people who caused the climate crisis aren't the ones who will solve it

TED Talks Daily

04:35 min | 1 d ago

The people who caused the climate crisis aren't the ones who will solve it

"We don't just have a climate crisis. We have a climate leadership prices. We've acted as though an environmental crisis created by corporate and government elites can now somehow be solved by these same corporate and government elites people on the frontlines the people most impacted by wildfires pollution. Rising sea levels have no other role but to suffer censoring. The leadership of these communities in leading us out of this crisis isn't only the just thing to do. It is the most important thing that we can do to actually solve this crisis because people when they take anymore they rise up and they lead us to a better future. Desperate times lead to creative and just solutions by those most impacted. I know that from experience because like so many other low income families searching for livelihoods when my mother brother. I emigrated from colombia. We made our homes alongside landfills incinerators oil refineries power plants and waste treatment plants in neighborhoods that serve as the sacrifice zones to fuel the economy of this nation and oftentimes the world in the seventies in southwest detroit. We live in the shadow of the marathon oil refinery and in the eighties in queens new york we played handball in vacant contaminant. Lots unknowingly breathing in dangerously high levels of sulfur dioxide from power plants nearby in the. Us if you're poor and your indigenous black middle eastern pacific islander asian or latin necks you most often than not live play pray and work in a sacrifice on. I'm saying this because i've been assaulted by. Pollution violence my whole life. And although i've been on the front lines as a climate justice leader for twenty years. I've been envisioning solutions to the environmental crisis. Since i was a kid dreaming up a better world for people like me. People in sacrifice owns that are also leading adjust transition away from this extractive model of development to one feels just for all of us in the name of climate justice so what is climate justice. It's simple if climate change was created by ecconomic and racial injustice than effective solutions to the climate crisis have to include economic and racial justice climate justice centers. The struggle the solutions of those on the frontlines of the crisis communities who have been under resourced and played by everything from police violence racism struggling schools and so much more these same communities have been historically and disproportionately exposed and subjected to pollution and contamination from industry these are the workers who are essential but treated expendable by big corporations corporations and this wildly unjust economic system in which we live in front line communities. Aren't the people whose homes on the beach are being threatened by rosia in their communities and families whose homes are already underwater children already camry from asthma and neighbors who are ready drinking polluted water poisoned water in the midst of a global pandemic multiple uprisings for racial justice democracy and record wildfires droughts storms. It's time we finally realized that we can't fix injustice with more injustice. I'll go so far as to say that frontline communities are the only ones that can get us of this crisis and in fact they already are and there's so many great examples but to give just one in washington state. A rural farming community

Handball Colombia Queens Detroit New York Asthma Washington
What we know about Tiger Woods' crash, condition and what happens next

ESPN Daily

05:00 min | 1 d ago

What we know about Tiger Woods' crash, condition and what happens next

"Thank you so much for joining me tonight hush. I wasn't pablo so ramona. You have just spent many hours right outside. The hospital where tiger woods is being treated. What was the scene like where you word it you know. It's it's weird you go stand outside. Hospital in the middle of a pandemic is a lot of stuff going on right. And there's a lot of news trucks helicopters everywhere. You know mostly news helicopters hitting a lot of a lot of reporters but i was just. I was out of the hospital. But i was mostly just working the phones all day. And it's you know it's pretty sickening. Pablo it's know as a reporter you you go and you cover something like this and each one of them kinda hits you right because it it speaks to the fragility of it. I'm i'll tell you one man who was a locally said you know he knows somebody who died on that road in that same spot similar area when a coyote jumped out in front of their car swerved and he was just a really dangerous patch road so ramone. I want a time stamp this for the listener right now because it is ten twenty one. Pm eastern time is therefore seven twenty one pm out where you are in l. a. What's the latest right now. What's the latest information that you've received from authorities from medical sources from anyone from tigers camp. Well you know. Tigers camps dot pocket a lot more than the initial statement. But what my understanding was that he had he had his some of his camp was with him. And when i was. When i was there at the hospital just just an hour ago which would have been about. Six o'clock i think is when i left pacific time. My understanding is he was still there. He was either still in surgery or just finished. You know it's kind of hard to get a minute by minute. There's nobody coming outside the update the reporters kinda have to be be be working phone to get information and you know they. They you know the people. I had spoken to said the most important thing. Is that you stabilize these injuries. And you wouldn't wanna move somebody to another hospital. How if they moved them. They'd probably move him to ucla westwood. Which is another world class hospital. And that's probably a little easier to control the scene there. He probably get a private room there. You could probably if he's going to be there for a long time. And and i think this is going to be a a a lengthy stay in the hospital This is the kind of thing that you've gotta you've got to take your time and and You wanna be comfortable and it probably going to be multiple surgeries So to me it's a really it's it's this is going to be unfolding over the next few days and weeks not hours so on those surgeries and about what's required year. It has been reported ramona. That there's a compound leg fracture a shattered ankle. But what do you know. What's the latest about tigers medical status. How serious is all of this. He he he has. He basically had crush injuries. That's putting you you look at the car k. Cars crushed the front of the car so his legs were in the front of the car. one of them is a is a basically shattered ankle. It's the tallus bone. The other is the is a compound fracture of the fibula tibia Sorry that's shinbone. Basically but there's also a vascular component and that's your circulation. That's your that's just your blood vessels that had been really severely impacted the nerves. That's actually a little more dangerous even more dangerous part of this of these injuries that they have to stabilize first before they ever even think about. Okay let's get him walk in or anything like that you just. You've gotta get him stable. It's very it's a very dangerous thing. And then there's then there's issues post up post operative complications of leeson's like this if it's if that was actually open i don't i don't know if it was open i've heard that but we'll wait for the official medical On that but if it was opened infection issues blood clot. There's a lot of post operative conditions that you'd have to look at and work on. And i think that's you know everybody i've talked to whether it's you know in the gulf war all the medical world just in l. a. Because everybody in la is is talking about this today. It's all just concerned for tiger woods. The man not tiger woods golfer as for the

Ramona Tigers Camp Pablo Tigers Ucla Leeson LA
Interview With Quincy Larson, Founder Of freeCodeCamp

Developer Tea

04:10 min | 1 d ago

Interview With Quincy Larson, Founder Of freeCodeCamp

"Do you feel like you're not learning enough quickly enough as a software engineer. That is the feeling that i talk about amongst other things with today's guest quincy larsen and if you missed out on the first part of my interview with quincy i suggest you go back and listen to that part first quincy is of course the founder and creator of rico camp Which is something that many of you probably either came to this show as a result of you actually heard about developer because of free co camp or you are going through it right now. Three co dot org in of course free co camp dot org slash donate if you want to support other engineers who are going through the beginning of their career by the way Quincy just to be clear. Did not pay us in any way to plug that Here on the show. Thank you so much to quincy for joining me. Let's get straight into the interview with quincy larsen and that feeling something. I'd love to hear your thoughts on the feeling of inadequacy because you're dealing with a lot of people who are probably invulnerable points in their lives especially people who are changing careers or there at the beginning of their career. They have a lot of uncertainty. And there's a mountain of learning in front of them curious you know. Do you see a lot of people who are in that vulnerable place. In what advice do you have for them when you encounter them while empathy is very important. And it's one of the things that i perceived lack of i was learning to code and keep in mind. I'm you know a middle class white male who has a graduate degree right like. Imagine if you're somebody who's been working as a cashier whose job just evaporated or or a restaurant and you don't have all those benefits of The those layers of privilege right in those layers of just general like oh. Yeah i see how this works. I understand the system so not afraid of it right. I understand how higher education works for example. A lot of people don't have that benefit so for them. It could be even more daunting and one of the things that we do. Is we just try to frame is realistically possible. We start from the premise. Coating is hard in fact when you create a new free co game account I added this blurb at the top when you first get into free co cabinet it basically tells you like this is going to be hard anybody who tells you that learning code is easy is trying to sell you something right. Because it's going to take years and you're going to be daunted in. You're going to be baffled. You're going to have tests telling you failed failed failed you're going to have you know your interpreter telling you air and you need to be able to power through that and the most important thing is to know that everybody goes through this process. A lot of people don't remember it. They don't remember what it was like learning to code because it's so long ago maybe they were one of the lucky people who got a computer when their kid in there. The parents Encourage them to learn programming. Or maybe they just had a natural inclination toward early on if they have years and years of extra experience that accounts i mean that definitely speeds up the rate at which they can learn new things so i would tell people you know. I learned when i was thirty. I didn't have a lot of experience with programming. Was undaunted essentially. And i think that more people if they can remain undaunted and if they can just power through the doubt than they can learn to so the community aspect is really important. Just having a support network in a lot of people can find that on twitter. They can find that through like separatists. They can find that through. Different forums and dischord groups. They can find it on the free cocaine form. There are lots of ways that you can find kind of your tribe and have them have your back in help push you forward and i think that that is absolutely key but but the most important thing again just know. This is hard now that anybody who says program is easy has just forgotten how hard it was when they were first. Starting

Quincy Larsen Quincy Rico Camp Twitter
FAA grounds certain planes after engine failure over Denver

KCBS Radio Afternoon News

00:19 sec | 1 d ago

FAA grounds certain planes after engine failure over Denver

"We've just learned that the FAA is ordering the immediate inspection of all Boeing 777 planes with the type of engine that was involved in an engine failure over the weekend in Denver. The FAA says operators must conduct a thermal acoustic image inspection of the fan blades. Located at the front of each engine.

FAA Boeing Denver
Tiger Woods In Stable Condition, Suffered ‘Serious Injuries To Both Legs’ In Los Angeles Rollover Crash

Newsradio 830 Programming

07:12 min | 1 d ago

Tiger Woods In Stable Condition, Suffered ‘Serious Injuries To Both Legs’ In Los Angeles Rollover Crash

"Tiger Woods car crash that did occur today. Early this morning at about 7:10 A.m.. Pacific time They just had a press conference. It's still ongoing will play Ah little chunk from that will start it off with Alex. Little in the way of who is the L. A County sheriff. Today at 7 12 in the morning, Lomita Sheriff Station received a call of a solar vehicle collision. In Harbor or Hawthorne Boulevard north of Follows. Word is drive. We arrived on scene at 7:18 A.m. and discovered this solo vehicle collision and the sole occupant was again Tiger Woods. And, uh, deputies. At the time. They did not see any evidence of impairment. Anything that of concern. Obviously, the life setting majors. They had to be taken for the occupant of the vehicle, and chief Osby will speak to that regard. And it was a solo vehicle. The vehicle travel several 100 ft. From the center center divider at the intersection and rested on the on the west Side of the road in the brush. Sustained major damage the vehicle you've seen all the images of that. Well if the deputies arrived on scene, there's a vehicle has rolled over. There's someone inside the vehicle. They can't remove him. Obviously that Z. We'll leave it at that. He was he was he was alive and he was he was conscious. And That's the extent of that There was no evidence of impairment so subsequent to that we're not gonna make any. There was no effort to draw blood, for example, at the hospital scene, no evidence of impairment at this point in time, but I'll let Chief Cosby Morning conscious when you got there. Did he say anything to the paramedics who arrived? And can you tell us a little bit more? If we didn't use the jaws of life? How exactly that that extrication process take place. Okay? The information I got back from my personnel, and the things that they do is they would do a scene assessment. Was brought to my attention that he was conscious now exactly what was said is unknown, but he was conscious. Our personnel making assessment to make a determination that level of consciousness, make sure that they're breathing, control any serious bleeding and then control and address any serious injuries. It was brought to my attention that he had serious leg injuries and that was assessed at the Internet. The jaws of life are used as part of the package to extricate people that are trapped in vehicles. But it was later determined and brought to the attention that the jaws of life we're not used to extricate Tiger Woods. We use the Holiday Inn to what is to use for prying. We also use an ax to pry him from the vehicle. He was taken from the vehicle with see a collar and a backboard for spinal precautions. He was had the proper splints because of the nature of the Internet being a solar vehicle rollover on the fact that it required it next location that meant trauma center criteria, the nearest trauma center to the area's harbor. Usually hospital where he was transported the state serious but stable condition, which leg That I do not know. It was my understanding that it serious injuries to both legs. Well, the interior the Cabinet of the vic was more or less intact. The front end was totally destroyed The bumpers everything was destroyed. Airbags deployed all of that. And however, thankfully, the interior was more or less intact, which kind of gave him Cushion to survive What's otherwise would have been a fatal crash. Wow. So there you go. Once again. Those were the voices of L. A county Sheriff Alex Villalta Wave and the fire chief Darryl Osby. So just the kind of recap that no evidence of impairment was little bit bizarre to may. Where they said that twice and there were still reporters and I get reporters have to ask questions. But how many times you gonna ask the question? Where things removed from the scene like it's almost as if the reporters not that they were rooting for it. But as they didn't want to accept that there was no evidence of impairment. So, according to the other county sheriff Alex Dylan, the way of a no evidence of impairment. He was conscious. At the scene. When the authorities did arrive. At first we thought jaws of life were used. Not the case. And there were injuries to both legs. Now the extent of those injuries we don't know Jason Sobel. He did have this tweet. He's a Gulf writer for the action network. Reports from the scene between paramedics and this was actually from ESPN are that Tiger Woods is potentially broken both of his legs. He was alert and conscious when they took him from the car. And placed them in the ambulance. And then the last piece of information from that. When you did hear it was either Daryl or Alex speak. Was that the interior cushion of the vehicle allowed him to be alive. Otherwise it would have been a fatal crash. So clearly you see the photos right now, and I see the video of the car being removed. And you look at that vehicle. Tiger Woods is lucky to be alive now. I don't know how he crashed his car. Heck. I think some of the speculation quite frankly, I get why there's speculation, especially with this past. Why? I think some of the speculation is just wildly unfair and gross and we'll see what it does turn into B. But all we could tell you right now is what the authorities say that there's no evidence of impairment. So I take their their word for what it's worth, and I'll accept that. And I think everyone is or almost everyone has been in a car crash, whether it's minor or major. There could be multiple reasons why someone crashes a car. You may be unfamiliar with roads. You could be distracted whether it's Texan. Or you didn't get a good night's sleep the night before. I don't know what the reason is why this crash did occur. And maybe it's what Fox News said he was late. What happens when you're late? I think we've all been in a car before. And you've been late. And you're speeding. And when you're in a frantic state, not done saying tigers in a frantic state, But when you're trying to get to some place knowing you're a little bit late, and Fox, who said he was going to meet as part of this shoot with Drew Brees and Justin Herbert, and sometimes the speed of the car does go up. And according to what we've read, he was going at a pretty high speed. We don't know what that number was, and maybe just simply lost control the vehicle. So that's the latest

Lomita Sheriff Station Osby Chief Cosby Sheriff Alex Villalta Darryl Osby Alex Alex Dylan Pacific Jason Sobel Follows Tiger Woods Cabinet Daryl Espn Fox News Justin Herbert Tigers Drew Brees FOX
Seeking Refuge On The Open Road

The Indicator from Planet Money

07:57 min | 1 d ago

Seeking Refuge On The Open Road

"When we reached bob wells. He was camped out of the grid in his white. Gmc savannah van in the middle of the california desert. Some twenty five years into his experiment in mobile living. How did this whole journey start for you. What was your life like before you discovered this this lifestyle while i was either very very lucky or very unlucky depending on your point of view it was the winter of one thousand nine hundred five. Bob was living in anchorage alaska where he'd worked for over two decades in a union job at safeway saint job. His father had worked until his retirement. At the time bob was going through a divorce and after alimony and child support payments. He says he was no longer making enough to clear his rent. He was desperate and that is when he noticed old beat up box banned for sale on the side of the road for fifteen hundred dollars and he decided he had to go for it. That was all the money. I had left in the bank. But i had to have a place to live and so i bought it and That night through a backpacker. Sleeping bag. Down and i began my van dwelling adventure in the winter and the cold van and i That first night. I cried myself to sleep. I literally cried myself to sleep. Or when you're going through a divorce you you cry yourself to sleep on a pretty regular basis ends but sure just of course greatly compounded here. I was homeless bomb living in a van on the streets. And how much lower can my life get. But bob done a lot of camping in his life and you had to make a small space cozy and after a few weeks eat figured out how to cook and stay warm deal to bed and cabinets used his gym membership to shower. Figured out how to make it sustainable. And the money. He was saving on rent. Meant he didn't feel like he was always on the knife's edge it slowly and subtly shifted from. I despise my life to. This isn't really that bad to hey. Every month i keep the money and put it in my pocket to. I kind of really really liked this. And that's the way it's been every sense. Was it difficult at all to kind of switch. Grand narratives about What trajectory you're supposed to take as a productive member of the economy absolutely it was a traumatic transition you know. We are trained from birth to death. Our purpose in life is to be good productive citizens and so it made me question everything i had done. Exactly what society and told me to do. I'd gotten a job. I wanna house. We'd had kids. I was following the american dream to the best of my skill level and ability. As i could and then i was forced into living what society told me was the life of total failure homeless in the van and for the first time in my life i was happy well that raises a lot of existential questions and when i looked around at all the people i work with work eat sleep. Working sleep work. Eat sleep. I said what society told me it was not true. I've finally found a way. That's happy for me. Let me try to understand that. My life and for the life of others a few years later bob had saved up enough to quit his job at safeway and by supplementing his union pension with seasonal stints as a campground host. He was eventually able to take to the road as a full-time nomad in two thousand five about a decade. After he moved into the van. Bob decided to pay forward. Some of the techniques developed the started a website called cheap. Rv living the serve as a kind of resource for other people interested or in many cases forced to move into a vehicle. I started the sole intent of letting people know there wasn't on alternative. You didn't have to live under the tyranny of the marketplace and the way to do that was to eliminate your biggest cost in life. Which is your housing with cheaply. Live frugally and then you can live well for a long time the site just kinda mosey too long picking up you know few page views here and there in two thousand eight happened. Bob says in the wake of the financial crisis. He was inundated with desperate messages. Have lost my job. I we moved in with my family now. My family is lost their job. Now we're all losing our own. What are we going to do. And that was the question. I got over and over and over again. Even after the economic recovery started to pick up the number of inquiries and page views and people in the community continued to grow. Fueled partly by the rise of social media. Bob started his cheap. Rv living youtube channel in two thousand sixteen and has since become just one of many popular nomad influencers but unlike a lot of the glossier more glamorous content associated with the hashtag van live crowd. Bob's videos are all about helping people struggling to keep their head above water financially and they're filled with the nitty gritty details of living behind the wheel. Today we're gonna talk about heat today. We're gonna talk about taking showers. The topic of today is poop. You can cut your behinds. Not one of them. You want that thing to be clean all the time. Bob also does these little interview profiles of people living in different kinds of vehicles cars to trucks to buses. Welcome back fellow nomads. Today we're going. Meet a new friend of mine. Joe sale load everyone relax. They're really out. There doesn't look like there's a bunch of people out there. Yeah thank you that video for the record. Two point five million views and counting. Bob says his videos have become so popular that he's now making more money than ever before. I think eventually the second break but it gets great reviews on amazon which is why i'm recommending ads in affiliate marketing. Help him bring in over one hundred fifty thousand dollars a year. Bob makes enough to have two full time assistants helping him with his work and because he says he never plans to live in a house again. He makes a very healthy profit. I'm make much more money than i ever thought. I could possibly make in my life. And i live in a van. My expenses are pretty darn low with that extra money. Bob started a nonprofit homes on wheels alliance to support people transitioning into living in their vehicles. They've started to outfit and give vance to people in dire need of a new vehicle. And bob says he saving up to buy a plot of land for an in person resource center. It isn't clear how many people are living on the road at this point. But in two thousand ten when bob started this annual gathering van and car dwellers in the arizona desert called rubber tramp rendezvous it had a few dozen attendees by two thousand and nineteen. They had an estimated ten thousand people show up and as a central node in this growing community. Bob has had a kind of front row seat to the massive disruptions of the past decade. And he's watched as certain demographics have borne the brunt of those changes. It's a surprisingly large female. Contingent older women in their sixties and seventies. When they were girls they were told get married. Stay home raise a family and so they never go up so sturdy and then now they're living on five hundred to eight hundred dollars a month so skirt and he cannot live in this country on five hundred two thousand a month so sturdy and live in house and you just can't do it and so they all desperately needed the solution as well and i told them all. If you move into your plan you can live reasonably well on that. You won't be rich but you won't eating dog food and there's hope bob says he has seen an uptick in views and inquiries about van dwelling over the last year. But so far he says the stimulus checks and the nationwide moratorium on evictions have slowed. The number of new nomads. Still he says as the baby boomers continue to age into social security and as the effects of climate change intensify bob expects the movement towards van life to surge and he sees it is his mission to try to help however he can. I've got a string of lifeboats. And i want to get as many as i can into the lifeboat and i think the hammer blow of two thousand eight really put a crack in people's confidence and i think when you combine that with this cheers a natural disasters and the epidemic. I think people are just going to be abandoning the american dream in droves. That's all i'm trying to do is get people out

BOB Bob Wells California Desert Safeway Anchorage Alaska Youtube Arizona Desert Vance JOE Amazon
A new way to invest that doesn't involve buying stocks hyped on Reddit

Clark Howard Show

06:18 min | 1 d ago

A new way to invest that doesn't involve buying stocks hyped on Reddit

"So lately. All the buzz his been about well. Bitcoin and other crypto currencies. Bitcoin recently fifty thousand dollars a bitcoin and people who've been buying the stocks that are being touted on read it and it was all that mess that went on with Game stop and other stocks. That went up like rockets and then like rockets can do crash back down to earth and my son is in this investing group at school. He's fifteen and they're investing not real money but they all have their stock portfolios and wanna read you to texts from him from this morning. They're really funny. Is said in the last nineteen minutes. My stock portfolio dropped by six sixty. Then he texts me eight minutes later and these eh. then it went up by eight hundred dollars. And i the other night. When he was trapped. In the car with me i started boring. I'm trying to talk about how my philosophies investing work very differently than matt worrying about day trading and options and all. That was going to happen up to the minute and if you thought a father could be more irrelevant to sun then i was that minute you you couldn't be no interest in anything i was saying because to him. This is sport and that's what investing has been of late call. Investing is really speculating. And that's not my thing. I mean i'm the dulles person alive and i invest in a dull way because the ideas i wanna make money over time and so. That's why i get excited about really accessible. Investing opportunities for small investors did allow you to build reasonable wealth over time instead of trying to get the quick score and my son's a sharp kid hill. Eventually get it and will not that. It matters what you're buying and selling minute by minute. And by the way he's asked me if he can have a real investing account. Will you know you'd have to have what's called a custodial said yeah yeah where where you were the pretend owner but i'm the one doing the investing and i don't know what to do you know. Give them a couple of hundred dollars and let him play. And maybe learn the value of term investing. But you know it fifteen. What is long term. That's like three days from now. It's hard to explain a concept where you build wealth over time well do you know goldman sachs is goldman sachs is for rich people like crista. People was massive amounts of money. Who work with a personal financial manager. Who handles their money for them. That's right krista. That's what you do with your millions. Yeah no no okay. So there are. There are very wealthy people. That's what they do and goldman sachs has been doing some stuff lately that doesn't fit at all their historical pedigree They're the ones that issue the apple card for people that have the apple credit card and they have Savings accounts and all that kind of thing with no minimums will now. They've launched some cold. Marcus invest which allows people to use goldman sachs incredible financial analysis investment analysis till build robo investing portfolios for you using very low cost funds. And this is something you would ask somebody. Ten years ago if goldman sachs would ever being looking to provide investments an investment advice to everyday ordinary. People they'd say you're crazy. That will never happen. Well they're not doing what fidelity investments does where a dollar is enough to open an account many cases schwab one hundred dollars. They're doing what vanguard. Does you have to have a thousand bucks to open an account but once you have that thousand you can get advice that is tailored to your personal financial goals and outlook. The money can be and a retirement account or an investment account use what are known is exchange traded funds. Etf's and typically for the advice and the investments you pay roughly a third of a percent per year for them to handle your money. So i guess ten thousand dollars be thirty five bucks a year. Is that right. I think that's about right. three dollars. Fifty cents on a thousand. I think that's right so this is an opportunity for you to do. Investing through the nation's big boys big money houses and their whole business plan is pretty similar to what you'd have if you were with Betterment or wealth front that really started this whole investing idea. And i'm sure neither of them are very happy the goldman sachs through. Marcus invest is playing in their ballpark.

Goldman Sachs Bitcoin Crista Matt Apple Krista Marcus Schwab
Fire & Explosion In Texas After 18-Wheeler Carrying Gasoline Collides With Train

Rush Limbaugh

00:27 sec | 2 d ago

Fire & Explosion In Texas After 18-Wheeler Carrying Gasoline Collides With Train

"Site, an explosion and huge fire after a train hit an 18 wheeler near Cameron in Milon County. This morning, Sheriff Chris White explains what the train was hauling the train was carrying in the front compartments, coal and gasoline. And so that's what caused the huge fire and all the smoke. White says. No one was injured, but one house nearby was burned and some people nearby were evacuated. Cameron is located about 60 miles

Milon County Sheriff Chris White Wheeler Cameron White
Massachusetts Rep. Jon Santiago, an ER doctor, running for Boston mayor

WBZ Morning News

00:50 sec | 2 d ago

Massachusetts Rep. Jon Santiago, an ER doctor, running for Boston mayor

"Hall is not even cold. Another candidate announces a run for mayor of Boston. My name is Jon Santiago. And this is my story. State representative in Boston Medical Center physician John Santiago with the campaign rollout this morning, releasing a two minute video announcing his candidacy to be the next mayor of Boston. He has represented the ninth Suffolk District for the past two years in his campaign rollout. He spoke about his work on the front lines during the global pandemic, and now the same families impacted by covert 19 Santiago joining other declared candidates in the mayoral race, including city councilors Michelle Woo, Andrea Campbell and Annie Sasabe. George City Council President Kim Janey is slated to become acting mayor once Marty Walsh is confirmed as the next labor secretary. She has not said whether or not she's running in 2021. Jim McKay

Jon Santiago John Santiago Boston Medical Center Boston Michelle Woo Suffolk Andrea Campbell Annie Sasabe George City Council Kim Janey Santiago Marty Walsh Jim Mckay
The Floor, not the Ceiling: The Supreme Court in 2021

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

07:56 min | 3 d ago

The Floor, not the Ceiling: The Supreme Court in 2021

"Welcome back background boroughs. Ashanti here and we have another episode for today. I'm so excited to talk to. Bagnoli gilmore the state media campaigns director for planned parenthood federation of america onion. How're you doing today and doing. Well thank you so much for having me very excited to. Have you very excited to talk about the important work that you do today at planned. Parenthood really diving into the attacks that we've been seeing on reproductive justice reproductive freedom abortion rights and educating our listeners on how they can help fight back before we dive in intrude fashion. We have to know what brought you to this work awesome. Well i am a huge fan of your work and this podcast. I'm really excited to be here a little bit about me. I am in asian american woman. Born and bred in white middle america foreign raised in kansas city missouri. Where i still live today doing this work before coming into reproductive rights work. I was a journalist for ten years. And i think my work is a reporter. Gave me a front row seat to the every day. Impact that policies have on our lives. I was a healthcare reporter and solve the direct line between what happens in our state legislatures. What happens in our city. Councils and how that impacts our daily lives in how we go about it. And in the midwest that also means a very white dominant culture that sets the tone and the conversation and passes policies in that lens and i spent ten years covering those issues and decided to transition into media work for an advocacy organization that i have long admired and loved for the work that we do at our health centers across the country though now i focused on state policies state fights as we call it here at planned. Parenthood and the intersection. Those policies have on our ability to access reproductive healthcare went you said about how white men dominate policy. It's so true. And i want us to talk about what. We're seeing happening at state houses across the country. Most our listeners. Know the bg is one thing that i do my full time. Job is on the president of merge we focus on recruiting and training democratic women to run for office and we've had a huge focus on state houses in making sure that we're getting democratic women in there. I love talking abou nevada. Colorado new mexico all of those states are majority women and their state houses due to emerge alums and we see the impact that women have on the policies that come out and in a lot of the houses though where unfortunately seeing policy that is not the best when it's coming to abortion access so only two months into twenty twenty one were seeing these attacks on reproductive freedom in state houses and this statistic is crazy more than one hundred bills have been introduced in state houses in the past few weeks that target abortion access. There are so many reasons why state legislators are important. But this is one of the main ones hang you tell us about some of the things that are happening. Yeah impact that number continues to grow today when we're talking. That number is up to more than one hundred and eighty anti-abortion bills that have been filed or are pending an in early february. And that's why all. Because i only saw that hundred number last week. Yep we've seen almost another hundred a week. Yup absolutely And over forty. Five percent of those bills are some form of an abortion ban. And so you know. I think we're sitting at a moment where we are staring at an immense amount of opportunity and hope and change because of new presidential administration because of pro reproductive healthcare majority in congress yet our state legislatures do not reflect this reality where policies are made. I believe it is twenty nine states right now where anti-abortion politicians hold majorities twenty nine states over half And we are seeing a targeted attack on reproductive freedom our ability to control our bodies in lives because again this is about power and control. This conversation is rooted in white supremacy and has nothing to do with the health and wellbeing of any person who needs access to health care with really clear about that because that is what you will hear these politicians wax on about right and they'll even coop racial justice movements to talk about you know black babies and abortion end it is all rooted in white supremacy and the real question that we need to answer is who gets power and control of our bodies and our lives and our future right it be the politician predominantly white men or should it be being able to control that and so these are the policies that are getting past at the state level. And they're not just. Abortion bans a lot of these. The majority of these bills are incremental restrictions. That make it harder. Particularly on people with low incomes women people of color emigrants to access reproductive healthcare basic healthcare birth control annual exams cancer screening and of course abortion.

Bagnoli Gilmore White Middle America Planned Parenthood Federation Ashanti Kansas City Missouri Midwest New Mexico Nevada Colorado Congress Exams Cancer
"home front" Discussed on The Takeout

The Takeout

02:26 min | 9 months ago

"home front" Discussed on The Takeout

"Nine when we had the sort of damage. That wasn't technically. It was a pandemic. Were very concerned The wine flu you know. The initial reports was a bad hat at a ten percent case. Fatality rate. You know folks night turned out to be nothing like that Partly because at pandemic was so mild there was a lot of speculation and it was all about profit making for vaccine manufacturers and even some pretty respectable journals There was a you know that speculation was was voiced so that was almost in the main stream causing quite in the mainstream but close to it and many experts. We've talked to said that experience gave us a false sense of security about all this question of pandemic preparedness Before I let you go for the radio and it's don't make sure they hear this. How did you get interested in this topic? That's a longer story than what you say you know. When I was a kid I wanted to do two things I wanted to be a writer and I wanted to do medical research and I can remember the moment in time and why but the way too. Long the story as to why. I said I'm not going to do that. And then I wanted to write a book that would have expanded a chapter in an earlier book. I written that we would have been about the Home Front World War One and nineteen nineteen one. The United States practically exploded one of most interest in years in American history And I got deflected from that larger book and ended up writing a book about the pandemic exclusively by the pandemic. And when you were finish with it was the thing you found most surprising in that research. Actually that probably that nobody it. Ridden a bike before it was wide open that it was wide open. That's a great feeling now why it was more in. This is a question I get asked a lot. Awful lot of people died. And there's practically literature about it. You have a novella not even.

Home Front World United States writer
"home front" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

04:44 min | 10 months ago

"home front" Discussed on American History Tellers

"Nineteen forty four. Allied forces were swiftly gaining momentum but victory was still far from guaranteed American factories. Continued to churn out record. Numbers of planes and munitions but already debate was a rising over when and how to rollback defense production and resume the focus on consumer goods a process known as reconversion. The outcome of reconversion would determine the future of the American economy and its workforce for more than two years. Donald Nelson had led the mobilization effort as head of the war production board now after prolonged struggle to coke private industry into the war. He would throw his energy behind getting them back to making civilian goods. Nelson proposed lifting restrictions on raw materials no longer needed for war production so that smaller companies could get back to building household appliances railroad equipment schools and hospitals. He also wanted to help. Retrain wartime workers for civilian jobs. Something that earned him support from organized labor on the other side of the debate. Were military leaders who were adamant that the nation devote all its resources to war until victory was achieved. They argue that shifting the economy away from defense production before the war was won was unpatriotic they would make Americans complacent and damaged morale. Big Business agreed but for different reasons the giants of US industry feared that while they were still funding defense contracts and churning out war supplies. Smaller companies would get a head start on reconversion. They wanted to make sure that when the war was over they returned to the marketplace as they left it leaders of industry the controversy came to a head in the summer of nineteen forty four after the D Day landings the Allied advance stalled and Roosevelt felt. He had no choice but to keep production devoted to the war effort. Roosevelt Ease Nelson Abbas post sending him on a special mission to China. He then appointed a new head of the war production board. Who is more friendly to the military's point of view but keeping the economy focused on war. Production had human cost. Americans feared the end of widespread prosperity. Once the war ended. They worried that when the defense plants shut down millions of. Gi's came home. There wouldn't be enough jobs for everyone. Women were especially anxious about their future in a post war. Economy government survey showed that three quarters of working women wanted to remain in their roles. One Union Leader declared that industry must not be allowed to settle the employment problem by chaining women to kitchen sinks. Eleanor Roosevelt had long championed. The capabilities working women and now she urged that the postwar economy give anyone who wants to work a chance to work but already women were being laid off at a rate. Seventy five percent higher than men. Some supervisors nudged women out by placing them on midnight shifts reassigning them to less desirable positions or closing down daycare centers but as the war neared its end and the military cutback work orders. Men to lost their jobs. Both parties in Congress were determined to find a way to avoid a post-war economic downturn. They focus their energies on returning veterans in the spring of Nineteen forty. Four Congress passed what is known as the GI BILL OF RIGHTS. Providing returning servicemen with low cost home loans education funding job training and unemployment benefits then in August nineteen forty five. The United States dropped two atomic bombs over Japan. Unleashing immediate and widespread devastation. Japan surrendered soon after at long last. A war was over all across the country. Americans poured into the streets to celebrate victory but still many wondered what the future would bring whether wartime gains could be sustained imagine September nineteen fifty in Long Beach California. You're just about to get out of class at Long Beach City College where you're studying for a business degree when you enlisted back and forty two you figured if you made it back home to Detroit you back on the assembly line definitely never saw yourself in college but you love the practical courses here and the place is full of other but today is not just any day on campus. You're standing outside. Feeling the warm sun on your skin waiting for your fiance to meet you. You've got some big news for her tired. You are class. It was good. Listen I s news. She looks at you nervously. You smile take a deep breath. I bought a house yesterday or face goes blank. Like she's looking right past you. Hello you hear what I said. I heard you just don't understand house with the walls and a front door and everything a real house with walls the front door and everything and did you consider that your future wife might have a say in that. I thought it'd be. I thought it'd be a fun surprise. Did you know how.

Donald Nelson Eleanor Roosevelt Congress Long Beach City College Japan Big Business Long Beach California Gi China United States Union Leader Nelson Abbas Detroit
"home front" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

04:53 min | 10 months ago

"home front" Discussed on American History Tellers

"The next morning. Detroit's mayor called on Washington for help. Six thousand federal troops swept through the city to quell the riot. Thirty six hours after the violence began twenty. Five black residents and nine whites were dead. Nearly seven hundred were seriously injured but african-americans only group to face hostility to address Labor shortages on the nation's farms the federal government signed an agreement with Mexico in nineteen forty two the do brought hundreds of thousands of Mexican agricultural workers call Zeros across the border to harvest American crops. On short term contracts. The workers formed a critical backbone for the nations food supply on both the battlefield and the home front but they often face rampant discrimination exploitation and terrible working conditions. The horse social climate also carried over to the cities such as Los Angeles were anti Mexican. Prejudice erupted in violence in the summer of Nineteen forty-three many Mexican. American teenagers were conspicuous because they wore zoot suits colorful outfits featuring balloon legged trousers. Long-tailed coats and exaggerated lapels first popularized by black musicians in Harlem zoot suits became flamboyant expressions of Mexican American identity but because the zoot suits flew in the face of convention and because they used a lot of fabric in a time of rationing many whites viewed them as an un-american challenge to the war effort a City Council Ordinance banning the wearing zoot suits and local newspapers aggravated white hostility by falsely claiming that the city's Mexican residents had caused crime rates to spike. The tensions came to a head for ten nights in June white sailors on leave crews Mexican American neighborhoods. They viciously attacked anyone wearing zoot suit dragging them out of movie theaters and diners. Tearing the clothes off their bodies and beating them while L. A. Police looked the other way even joined in in the violence. More than one hundred fifty people were injured. Police arrested more than five hundred. Nearly all of the Mexican American teenagers only a handful of white sailors the Los Angeles Times praised. Oh sailors declaring that the zoot suitors had learned a great moral lesson from servicemen in total nineteen forty-three sought two hundred fifty incidents of racial violence in nearly fifty cities across the country. First Lady Eleanor. Roosevelt said that the race riots put the country on a par with nauseam which we find the president to was well aware that racial strife threatened homefront morale and jeopardize the war effort considering making a statement about race but ultimately he decided against it so as not to anger southern legislators whose votes he needed to push through essential war bills instead government propaganda posters with slogans like United we win and Americans all promoted the ideal of diverse people joining together in common cause to defeat the Nazis. What as much as the government champion diversity and inclusion it also compromised on those ideals time and again wartime needs took precedence after Pearl Harbor. A naturalized Italian German and Japanese immigrants were designated enemy aliens and we're required to register with authorities but by the spring of nineteen forty two. The government abandoned the idea of relocating Italian and German non-citizens to avoid alienating Italian American German American communities but harsher treatment was reserved for Japanese Americans. They had long been subject to racism and discrimination but now outrage and shock over Pearl Harbor intensified anti-japanese prejudice at first the federal government was reluctant to relocate japanese-americans but paranoia about potential Japanese sabotage pressure from authorities and citizens of Western States led Roosevelt. To change course many white small business owners and farmers in the West saw economic opportunity and lobby for relocation hoping to rid themselves of their Japanese competitors on February nineteenth nineteen forty to president. Roosevelt signed executive order nine zero six six authorizing the war department to designate military areas from which people might be excluded though the order referred to all so called enemy aliens. The Secretary of war implemented the order only against Japanese Americans on the West Coast a few weeks later the military began the relocation and in terms of nearly one hundred twenty thousand Japanese Americans. Two-thirds of them were native born American citizens with a stroke of a pen. Roosevelt one of the most severe violations of civil liberties in American history when the Attorney General voiced is opposition. Roosevelt betrayed little remorse declaring. This must be a military decision in March nineteen forty two people of Japanese descent up and down the west coast. We're given less than a week to settle their affairs. Families were forced to sell off their homes businesses furniture whatever. They couldn't carry often for pennies on the dollar soon. The entire Japanese American population of California Washington Oregon part.

Roosevelt federal government Pearl Harbor L. A. Police president Detroit Los Angeles Times Los Angeles West Coast Harlem Mexico Washington City Council Ordinance Lady Eleanor Secretary California executive Attorney Oregon
"home front" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

02:00 min | 10 months ago

"home front" Discussed on American History Tellers

"You'll be proudly saying this is a Scott Yard during the war as demand for workers exploded new opportunities triggered a mass movement of the American people the largest migration in US history one fifth of the nation's population picked up and moved during the war. Millions joined the armed forces and even more relocated for jobs in defense production. Some seven hundred thousand African Americans in the South boarded buses and trains to seek jobs in the new factories. In the north and west thousands of native Americans left reservations to seek work and Latino laborers increasingly left farms behind to move to cities along the West Coast but the influx of these new workers often sparked fierce tensions with local residents. Hate strikes swept country as white workers shut down factories shipyards and transit companies to protest their new black co workers in nineteen forty one more than twenty five thousand. Packard workers walked out over the hiring of two African Americans in Mobile Alabama white shipyard workers rioted over the promotion of black welders seriously injuring eleven men and in Baltimore White Women. Employees shut down a western electric factory to protest having to share a bathroom with your black co workers but amid the strife there were some cases of interracial solidarity in one thousand nine forty four when black workers at the shipyard in Chicago on strike over discrimination in hiring and promotion. They won the support of many white workers as well as the local union. But these cases were few and far between and the tensions didn't end at the workplace as the growth in cities skyrocketed. Lack of housing became a crisis trailer and tent CAMPS SPRANG UP FAMILIES PAID EXORBITANT. Rents only to live in cramped dilapidated housing in response. The government built two million new housing units mostly temporary barracks and trailers it also launched share your home campaigns encouraging families to take migrants publicity.

US Baltimore White Women Scott Yard Packard West Coast Alabama Chicago
"home front" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

04:41 min | 10 months ago

"home front" Discussed on American History Tellers

"Three. The American war effort was well into its second year. When half a million coal miners in West Virginia Kentucky and Pennsylvania went on strike. The work stoppage jeopardize the critical source of fuel for the war effort and rage government leaders and sparked a searing public outcry. President Roosevelt and leaders in government and industry knew that the war not only dependent on military winds abroad but the collective effort of the American people at home. The miners strike was troubling blow to their campaign to mobilize the Home Front and promote national unity. These efforts depended on harnessing the Labor of America's diverse workers so far the war effort opened up new opportunities for those who had been sidelined in the economy of the past especially women and minorities. Americans of all stripes rallied around the cause of victory but tensions that had existed before the war in America persisted in some cases broke out into outright conflict strikes race riots and the forced internment of more than one hundred thousand. Japanese Americans. Expose the challenges of mobilizing Americans in common cause and tested the meaning of loyalty and patriotism. During a time of war. This is episode to United. We win once. America entered World War. Two in late. Nineteen forty one President Franklin Delano Roosevelt had waged a sweeping campaign to scale up defense production. But he knew that workers were the most critical raw material the entire mobilization effort the nation's factories shipyards steel mills and mines could not produce war supplies without the Labor of the American people but with thousands of men shipping off to war. The military was draining. The workforce and creating labor shortages in the spring of nineteen forty. Two Roosevelt created the war manpower commission to manage the growing demand for Labour. He tapped former Indiana governor. Paul mcnutt to lead the effort mcnutt was a tall smooth-talking politician described by one newspaper. As the Donnas of American politics but he got off to a rocky start mcnutt approach was to wait for workers to voluntarily move into war production. Jobs this waiting game left. Labor shortages in critical industries such is aluminum and logging and to make sure the draft didn't take too many essential workers out of the labor force. Roosevelt gave authority over the selective service which manage the draft eventually mcnutt created a system. Where men who worked in high priority jobs such as Schiller's an aircraft mechanics got draft deferrals while others and less essential. Jobs such as florists barbers and bartenders. God draft cards. As men left the workforce to fight overseas. A debate grew over whether to hire women to fill the void. Many employers argued women weren't suited for industrial jobs and resisted hiring them. Make not discouraged recruiting mothers until all other resources had been exhausted stressing the need to protect the welfare of America's children but pushing to bring women into the workforce was first lady. Eleanor Roosevelt after nearly a decade in the White House. Eleanor had redefined the role of first lady in her relentless commitment to social reform while her husband the president remained laser focused on winning the war. Eleanor insisted the victory abroad would only be worth it if America lived up to its ideals at home as early as February. Nineteen forty two. Eleanor argued that women should be registering for war. Work through the selective service justice men were speaking out in a radio broadcast. She declared if selective service value where men are concerned. It should certainly be equally valuable where women are concerned but with large numbers of men still unemployed throughout the nation. The President put off recruiting female workers but by the fall of nineteen forty two a sharp rise labor shortages caused those attitudes to shift an October fireside. Chat Roosevelt attacked employers who refuse to hire women declaring that the country can no longer afford to indulge such prejudices. Nas- the need for workers grew mcnutt reluctantly. Turned his attention to the task of convincing women to turn to work in factories. He believed that persuading women to work in factories and obtaining the agreement of their husbands and fathers would be a tremendous sales proposition. But he had a plan rosie. The riveter Rosie. The riveter became an iconic symbol of wartime women. Workers made famous by posters featuring a denim clad female worker flexing. Her biceps beneath a slogan. We can do it. Government and industry recruiting campaigns urged women to do the job he left behind and more than six million women answered the call. White Black and Latino women all join Factory Force. Many of them left domestic and agricultural work.

President Franklin Delano Roos Paul mcnutt Eleanor Roosevelt America president Home Front West Virginia Factory Force Pennsylvania Kentucky Indiana Schiller White House
"home front" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

05:16 min | 10 months ago

"home front" Discussed on American History Tellers

"American industry would provide almost two-thirds of all the allied military equipment supplying troops from France Great Britain and the Soviet Union. You would make the difference between victory and defeat this mobilization miracle would not have been possible without the extraordinary growth of the federal government. That's hands on approach to managing American industry. As a result the executive branch became far more powerful than it was even during the new deal. But it wasn't just the nation's factories that mobilize for war all across the country. Americans themselves were pitching in buying war bonds and planting victory gardens every household will have to bear the burdens of the war. Effort civilians were facing a collective effort. Never before attempted in American history and to win this war they would have to grapple with unprecedented changes to their daily lives. Hey Adam grant. I'm an organizational psychologist and the host of work life. A podcast from Ted as the world has changed dramatically in recent weeks. Our jobs have changed to. If you're looking to explore the science of making work not suck in these trying times checkout work this season. You'll learn how to procrastinate less how to negotiate more effectively and how to fight loneliness at work. Listen to work life with Adam grant wherever you get your podcasts. As America brace for war the government stepped in to mobilize industry on a scale never before attempted but even as factories and assembly lines finally began to turn out war supplies. It became clear that changes were also coming to the economy and Americans everyday lives in ways that would be far reaching and controversial. The cost of World War Two was staggering. The federal government would spend more than three hundred billion during the war. Almost twice as much as it had spent during the country's entire one hundred fifty year history which meant the government had to figure out how to foot the bill one option was to simply print more money but that would drive inflation through the roof. Inflation was already a huge risk. Americans were doing well. There was nearly full employment and people wanted to spend their disposable income but with the factories focused on defense. There weren't enough consumer goods to satisfy demand the rising incomes and the fall in available consumer goods was dangerous recipe for inflation government needed to both pay for the war and reduce American spending power taxes formed part of the answer before the war. Few Americans paid federal income taxes instead. Government revenue mostly came from tariffs and excise taxes. Mobilization changed all of that soon. The Federal Government started withholding taxes from paychecks for the first time still taxes paid for less than half of wartime costs for the rest. The government turned to borrowing it launched campaigns encouraging Americans to buy US Treasury savings bonds to finance the war. The government even recruited celebrities including Betty Davis Bob Hope and Frank Sinatra to host bond rallies but taxes and war bonds weren't enough to siphon purchasing power out of the economy and check inflation for that the government needed to introduce price and wage controls and create a rationing system for goods in short supply to manage this delicate balancing act. President Roosevelt turned to Leon Henderson. A brilliant and aggressive new deal economist. The overweight curly-haired Henderson with a cheap cigar stuck in the corner of his mouth would be dog in his fight against wartime inflation in August. Nineteen forty one. Roosevelt appointed Henderson to lead the office of price administration or Opie a by early nineteen forty. Two rapid inflation led Henderson to freeze prices. On a wide range of consumer items but price controls weren't enough and so on January Henderson and the opiate introduced rationing to prevent inflation and guarantee that stores could continue to stock the essentials for everyone first up was sugar which Americans began hoarding after Pearl. Harbor Henderson called the hoarding of sugar. Traitorous and encourage consumers to sell access sugar back to their grocers soon falls including butter coffee. Meat and canned goods were rash to housewives devise creative substitution to the limited supply of staple ingredients replacing bader with margarine and sugar corn syrup or molasses first lady. Eleanor Roosevelt tried to set the example. Promising the White House. Kitchens would be relying on Corn Syrup when possible replacing desserts with salads and with so much of agricultural production focused on feeding the troops overseas. The government encouraged Americans to plant victory gardens to supply food for themselves. Propaganda posters urged families to convert backyards and abandoned lots to sow the seeds of victory and dig for plenty at their peak. There were twenty million victory gardens and they accounted for more than one third of the vegetables grown in the US nineteen forty-three while Americans understood the need for rationing. They grew frustrated with the restrictions on what they could buy. Families could finally afford goods after a decade of scrimping and saving during the Great Depression and rationing seemed to fly in the face of American ideals of freedom and abundance. It didn't help that buying rationed goods. Involved a jumbled mess of coupons stamps and stickers rationing.

federal government President Roosevelt Leon Henderson US Adam grant Harbor Henderson Soviet Union executive Ted Betty Davis France Pearl Britain White House bader Frank Sinatra
"home front" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

01:49 min | 10 months ago

"home front" Discussed on American History Tellers

"Hundred and forty wound closed with the Nazis marching across Europe. They occupied France and Britain. It would soon be next on December twenty ninth. Roosevelt took to the airwaves to urge the nation to accelerate its mobilization efforts since the Depression Roosevelt had used his radio fireside chats to speak directly to the American people and build support for his policies that night millions of Americans tuned into hear the president call on the American people to work toward a grand vision. We must be the great arsenal of democracy for us. This is an emergency as serious as war itself. We must apply ourselves to our task with the same resolution. The same sense of urgency the same spirit of patriotism and sacrifice as we would show. Were we at wall. Roosevelt declared that so far the country's production efforts had fallen short he urged the country to discard the notion of business as usual and summoned its energies to the production of ships guns in planes. He argued to aware public. That ramping up support to the British would lessen the chance. The United States would have to get involved to that end in January Roosevelt. Ask Congress for the Authority to lend ships and planes to Britain in what was known as the lend lease program. Americans remained resolute and their desire to stay out of the war but they also didn't want to see Britain knocked out. When the lend lease bill passed on slater polls show? Americans divided with just over half in support of aiding Britain. Mobilization continued to stall in nineteen forty one in January. Roosevelt replaced the advisory board with a new organization the Office of Production Management to be run.

Roosevelt Britain Europe France Office of Production Managemen Congress United States slater president advisory board
"home front" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

02:39 min | 11 months ago

"home front" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> before <Speech_Music_Male> that the house had been a village <Speech_Music_Male> doctor's surgery <Speech_Music_Male> during which <Speech_Music_Male> time it had been <Speech_Music_Male> burned down <Speech_Male> by a stray cigarette <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> but cost <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by neglectful nurse. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Luckily <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the house was the <Speech_Male> only casualty and <Speech_Male> was subsequently <Speech_Male> rebuilt. <Speech_Male> The low <Speech_Male> sings the stone fireplaces <Speech_Male> needs <Speech_Male> room to the square <Speech_Music_Male> in the of the <Speech_Male> one time dispensary <Speech_Male> the House. 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Drive <Speech_Music_Male> in long disused. <Speech_Music_Male> Well is a two-storey <Speech_Music_Male> bombed <Speech_Music_Male> that was sold off by <Speech_Music_Male> a few years <Speech_Music_Male> ago. <Speech_Music_Male> It was here that my <Speech_Music_Male> three older brothers had stockpiled <Speech_Music_Male> newspapers <Speech_Music_Male> that they claim to be <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> delivering to the village <Speech_Music_Male> sensing <Speech_Music_Male> danger in that potential <Speech_Music_Male> discovery. <Speech_Music_Male> They attempted <Speech_Music_Male> to the <Speech_Music_Male> evidence and <Speech_Music_Male> almost a whole <Speech_Music_Male> bomb down with them. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Having long since <Speech_Music_Male> left. My Childhood <Speech_Music_Male> Home House now <Speech_Music_Male> holds a different place <Speech_Male> in my heart <Speech_Music_Male> gone is the <Speech_Music_Male> phrase parquet <Speech_Male> floor as of the molly <Speech_Male> and windows and the <Speech_Music_Male> dispensary door. <Speech_Music_Male> The ones verdant <Speech_Music_Male> ivy is in <Speech_Music_Male> decline and the <Speech_Music_Male> crab apple tree <Speech_Music_Male> along with the tool elms <Speech_Music_Male> that line. The Front Garden <Speech_Music_Male> have succumbed <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to disease in wrought <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> but they <Speech_Male> live on in their accounting <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of them. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> It's only natural to <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> whitewash walls. 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We're filling in <Speech_Male> in order to live in <Speech_Music_Male> them and living <Speech_Music_Male> can be messy <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> sometimes blemishes. <Speech_Music_Male> Do tell better stories <Speech_Music_Male> than manicured <Speech_Music_Male> edges and flush <Speech_Music_Male> finishes after <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> all old houses <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> may be als <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in name and even <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a stint of years <Speech_Music_Male> or decades <Speech_Music_Male> for that matter <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> but they carry <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a greater meaning <Speech_Music_Male> than the fripperies <Speech_Music_Male> we project onto them <Speech_Music_Male> and fill them with <Speech_Music_Male> while <Speech_Music_Male> aspirational refits <Speech_Music_Male> and talk <Speech_Music_Male> of. Home Improvements <Speech_Music_Male> Rodney preoccupies <Speech_Music_Male> particularly <Speech_Music_Male> when we will lockdown <Speech_Music_Male> at home. <Speech_Music_Male> It's also comforting <Speech_Music_Male> to consider that <Speech_Music_Male> the bashes and blemishes <Speech_Music_Male> can represent <Speech_Music_Male> experienced <Speech_Music_Male> and mega <Speech_Music_Male> houses into <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> homes <Speech_Music_Male> for Monaco. <Speech_Music_Male> On Josh Bennett.

"home front" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

02:18 min | 11 months ago

"home front" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"Up on the show. I thought I'd share a few reflections of my own on the importance of home. A few years back with Monaco was compiling. It's fetching guide to cozy homes. The editorial team undertook a little introspection. Some home truths if you will. What turns a heap of bricks and mortar or stealing glass into a place? That's apt to linger how to a memories of childhood homes frame. Our futures in the nests that we eventually feather for our families and with all of the talk of refits renovation and renewal should we spare a thought for the knocks and bumps and bruises the show character. I tend to think so. It's no secret that Foam San las about us from the hood. We call home to the hugh of the walls and the books we keep. Plus THE BEDS WE CHOOSE. The Act of homemaking is an enjoyable and creative one and of course. The press has fascinates today when we cooped up at home more than ever libraries of books cattle glimpses into how other people who've gone about it and they devote pages to advising and decoding plus refining the age. Old Active nest building bought in scrambled to improve our houses. We rarely Speth for the bumps and the bruises and the imperfections that make them homes at all my own earliest memories that come from nineteen thirty's art deco. Which was both auction by parents? They had four children entire in a fledgling business and they converted the Ivy covered semi derelict. House into the home. I knew and grew up in my own. Earliest memories first steps in old associated. Family folklore happened there the house? It was still occupies a semi mythic status in my mind to of course I moved out many years ago. There was the basement populated by monsters of my own imagining and the muddy ducks filled paddock outside. That was the reassuring underfoot. Click of the parquet. Floored Foyer these. Idiosyncrasies remained strangely more poignant than any of the renovations on new coats of paint and plaster that were added over the years in which lived there. Thinking back on the House itself was lucky to be there. Having narrowly missed by bomb in the second world. War Won't exact threat. The Germans saw in a small village in Northamptonshire remains a closely guarded military secret.

Monaco Northamptonshire
"home front" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

04:42 min | 11 months ago

"home front" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"Or full answers to those questions but definitely as a time when maybe some more investment is going into that mall focuses on that it's his good opportunity is ever to start resolve some of those kings so. I'd be surprised if design journalists and comes out of this period in exactly the same state. It went into it very intriguing. We're GONNA talk a little bit about technology now the design of APPs in particular as platforms for people to track the disease. And you know even as you mentioned to read their journalism how the development of APPS and to change over this period as well I think suddenly the so much traffic through there was anyway that hasn't been changed by corona virus but they are an essential outlet to the world. They bring information in so the thing. I've been really intrigued by in the past. Few days is looking at some design tweaks to those APPS and also changes in regulation around them so one that caught my eye is what's APP which has limited the number of people you can forward virus messages to. It's a soft limit so basically what it does is it makes it a less intuitive process to forward a message on you have to do individually whereas previously you could send it to multiple groups at once now. The reason that what's happened that they've done this is to help. Prevent the spread all fake news false information which particularly in the time of the pandemic. I think a very good intention. I know that some social media has quite a big role in spreading. That ludicrous. Rue melling King Five G. Networks to create new virus for instance tightly baseless preposterous. But these things seemed to catch fire on those systems Maschera in mass communication. So I think what's up is an early example of some tweaks on that kind of platform and I would expect to see more as a period guys all amazing and Just for a lighter story perhaps at the end you have identified some new technology which you're finding of interest To do with the lighting industry I must say again. Probably being a bit forthright and narrow the I'll be called up on the. I wonder if incandescent bulbs I've ever been rivaled by. Led's the beauty of the light that they cost. The lighting industry is struggling between these ideas. We fishing and beauty as suppose all aspects of design. But what's this new technology? What's laser based lighter and got to do the only yes? Oh this story my colleague every hold dugout touch lead some encouraging results from the EU graphene. Flagship now these very early days. But the team of scientists have found a way in which they can use lasers to create commercial lighting potentially and the way they do it is an artificial faulk which is a sort of web made of hexagonal. Boron nitrite so that's material with the same structure as graphene. It's a load of Polo microchips. And basically what happens is when you pass a laser into that match. It starts sort of being randomly. Scattered by those nanotubes and the result is it creates what's described as quite a nice white light now like you point out. I'm sure that white light is a lovely as that traditional incandescent ball which is what led struggled with for so long to sort of match the quality of light but this is supposedly a very efficient way of creating light. You get a very bright light with very low energy input. So it's quite exciting and I think the thing design which really matters. Of course there are all of these efficiency. Sides and sustainability which super bowl to the other thing is design often leads from the light source of all the Great Lighting Designs of the Twentieth Century based around the nature of incandescent light bulb. In the twenty first century. I think the most interesting examples of light make play with the form of led's which you don't set up in the same way as a light bulb it's a different light source designed for it differently so when you have this laser light. It's clearly a number of years often. Who knows whether we'll come to anything in yet? But potentially you have a radically different light source. And then as a result you should get designers to radically different things with it so we might start to see some really quite progressive luminaires over the next few years if all goes well many thanks to Ali Stratford. He's the editor in chief of design. Your magazine you can order a copy of their box. Fresh spring issue which is out sued and seek out the company's new newsletter podcasts. Head to design your daily Dot Com for more of that. This is a monocle design. I'm Josh Bennett and to stay.

Ali Stratford King Five G. Networks EU Led editor in chief Josh Bennett faulk
"home front" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

08:59 min | 11 months ago

"home front" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"Next up on the show I reached out to all these Stratford. He's the editor in chief of these strapping Lee. Beautiful Design quarterly. Design Your magazine. I wanted to get a sense of the stories that he's following and to find out why design. Journalism is in his opinion more important than ever during the lockdown. It's a pleasure to be out of the house digitally at least physically very much still locked in the house. I'm currently sat in my living room at the table so far. I've been lucky I'm healthy and safe on my friends and family are in the same boat so the worst I've had to deal with is the sort of feeling of great boredom. Her being stock paired with huge anxiety. Over how this is affecting from society in Baltimore. Anxiety quite strange bedfellows. You don't normally get those two feelings at the same time. So that's taking a little bit of getting to grips with absolutely but You taking some solace in rethinking. The house endlessly seeing the cushions thinking about the piece of artwork. You might buy is there. Any I don't know sense of nesting that's going on which is giving you a bit of comfort. Maybe a bit of a green space outside somewhere or a window box can hope I'm reorganizing bookshelves. Like a demon yeah. That's the project suddenly does time and space to do all those kind of life maintenance things you've put aside for so long keeping myself busy. I'm delighted to hear that and I wanted to To Stop by asking you about this disruption oversee. The pandemic hasn't will changed a lot of things that seemed like certainties in the past some of those certainties for people in the world of design were biennial 's design weeks they would fund that Chavez they were textile shows clearly the calendar has been swept aside so people can stay home and to keep people safe. But what effect do you think that's had on the design industry? The lack of these places to rallied to meet to trade and talk has a huge effect. I mean they play a major. Social Roles are chance to bring everyone together to share what brands designers have been doing. In the past year they have a huge economic effect so the postponement and then subsequent cancellation of the slow nater. Mobley for instance Sablan Trade Fair. Which is the heart of the designees calendar that has a devastating effect on the city of Milan which gets a huge amount of revenue from it and tubs of tourism. And so on. But also the companies that had invested a lot of money to go into stand design already and loss future profits as a result of not showing their work. So these things really matter and Milan. The headline but any number of smaller design fares have also been canceled best pound those play no role to that really important to smaller. Regional design seen sight loss of turmoil. Really yeah absolutely and a lot of people's lives disrupted. Do you think that? Could be some positivity hidden amongst the terror the unknown. Do you think there are ways in which these says are being staged perhaps online and is there may be time to rethink whether everyone who does go so the Milan furniture fair or I am Cologne or Maison objet in Paris is a bit of time to rethink about how many of those people actually need to physically go there. What have you seen? Is there anything giving you a bit of hope that these things could be staged differently in the future? Or those words could be shown differently. Now Yeah for sure. I sometimes worry it could be seen as little bit. Gauche to look for silver linings in situations like this which are absolutely devastating. But there's no doubt that the trade fair fall flat has been criticized for number of years mainly around sustainability whether it makes sense to be shipping. These things all around the world for a week setting up these stands which that destroyed the rally recycled and everyone flying in so this is a format which has required some former for vision. Now it sticks the crore little bit to describe the current situation as an opportunity but certainly brands and organizations are being forced to think of different ways in which they might be able to show their work. One of the main ones has been spearheaded by design. A mega run of chill design festival. People have talked about doing sign festivals online in the past and they've always come undone a little bit or wrecked on the rocks of the fact that they lacked fat social element this. That's not an option. So something like this able to go ahead I think on the whole it's a good idea and something that's good to try have to say. The Virtual Design Festival has had a lot of pushback. I think particularly in Italy. Originally it was launched under name. Digital Milan and that was perceived as rather inappropriate or in a particular timing particularly. The event wasn't put together in consultation with this learner. Mobley all the city so it's a shame that something which is a good idea and is worth investigating has some baggage out there. But I think. We'll see more initiatives like that very interesting all the always giving a little bit of a nuance idiosyncrasy. There which I hadn't realized completely good point. I want to move on to something that you and I both obviously passionate about an investment and that is the publishing scene around design architecture that's magazines and publishing houses and how this affects them. I mean you know from the monocle side of things physical distribution of magazines as much tougher lots of advertisers who understandably in some instances. Don't want to be associated with appetizing. At this time it generates a real problem for revenue and for the model of good enquiring design journalism which people have more time at home to see but perhaps not more capable of getting in front of them. I don't know how you see The impact on design magazines. Of this pandemic yeah. I think it's absolutely as you describe the interesting thing that asses you suddenly realize in situations like this quite how dependent you are a various networks and infrastructures so we have just luckily gone to print with our spring issue which comes out on the twentieth of April and we happen to strike it lucky that we were at a good point in the production process to get that finished an out but you suddenly realize advertising has dropped off massively for everyone the reasons he sat out also dependent upon those distribution networks which is suddenly hamstrung printing as well. That's a real problem if someone test. Positive Covet. Nineteen on the principal. That's an entire walks out of action so the physical infrastructure is definitely a little bit. At the moment I think will the loss of media is doing is looking for ways around that and that suddenly the case with descend you so we're launching new podcast series called the credit. We've actually been working on it for around about a year now but it's sort of perfect timing in a sense to be able to have a stronger ditched loud put. The other thing we're doing is an expanded newsletter called input outputs the first edition of which goes out later today. And I think our experience is going to be common across design magazines. You'll see that greater attention given over to digital because you have more control over. Their platform may not so much a hostage to fall chain. But this is going to have a huge afterlife. While we're all in lockdown journalists can't go out and do to kind of firsthand reporting which really is the bread and butter of that industry so a little bit of an uncertain future at say. Yeah absolutely and again. I'm always willing to risk being little Gauche but I do see an opportunity as well where people have more time at home. People are potentially willing to pay for news and journalism that they think provide some clear considered answers. So you know Monica doing the same thing as you're doing relaunched newsletters last year. We've had a radio station since two thousand eleven and ugly the uptick in those two. Things has kind of offset a lot of the setbacks of print. I suppose I agree with you. Ali that there are challenges to but do you think they're also opportunities for people to I don't know discovered for the First Time Find Brilliant Architecture magazine that they love really get into that kind of three four five and up put thousand word story. Yeah I think so anniversary going anywhere. We've got time to kill him. One sense so it is a great time to work alone for journalism a little bit like those trade fairs. Everyone has known for quite a long time. Their issues with the way journalism works online. Too in terms of how it's funded in tubs of people not paying for journalism in tubs of. What's the reading experience like? Is it comfortable and pleasant to actually read these long-form features on digital platforms traditionally? I don't think people have necessarily had great.

Design Your magazine Milan Mobley Beautiful Design quarterly Stratford editor in chief Sablan Trade Fair Digital Milan Lee Baltimore Chavez Maison objet Italy Paris Ali principal Monica
"home front" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

08:48 min | 11 months ago

"home front" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"A very warm welcome to Monaco on design at first up. I have a question for you the listener. How would you react in a crisis? A few short weeks ago that question might have felt a little far fetched but now for many of us. We're living out the answer each day. And what's more it's a little mundane. Yes of handling the single biggest health emergencies since the Second World War by well hoovering active rearranging bookshelves or repulsing the focus and who saw that coming knowing that many of our readers and listeners housebound and in need of a few diversions and sound advice this spring. We've devoted the May issue of monocle magazine to the notion of home. We launch a manifesto for building. Better buildings show you some point residences and offer some gardening tips to but more than that. You'll find considered opinions and a roadmap for Kinda friendly future with plenty of advice and ideas on creating figurative pillow fort in which to hunker down. And to hide out social distancing mayfield a bit more like an endless Sunday than the Normandy landings and yes many of us. The Battle of the bulge has a different connotation. Could the virus allowance a little time to rethink the design industry from Trade Fast Technology? And also the value of manufacturing. We'll that rethink reframe. How we feel about our homes and the objects. We filled them with well to find out more. I spoke to Monaco's design at a certain Ireland. Giles Nolan is our design editor. You take a lead on everything from architecture to industrial design. Why did you decide to focus on the home in your section? And why is this such an important thing to discuss now? Well I had nothing to do with the fact that I've just bought a new apartment and in the process of decorating it getting it good to go buying furniture for it. Nothing to do with that at all I was thinking more. Broadly about everybody else around the world and the situation that most of us are in right now which is a situation that is a very domestic one the idea essentially was really home manifesto to kind of explored this topic in and kind of a fun way away that will make you feel a little bit more empowered at home a little bit more secure at home just really the celebration of what the four walls that confined you if you want to look at it that way can be in a positive way. Yeah absolutely and having looked through the issue. I think it looks good. Everything from the front cover which shows people out on their balconies to a great report by business editor on how companies are targeting us at home. Is this a message about kind of beautifying the things that surround you about thinking about the cross? That goes into the Furniture Nolan. Or is it about US really rethinking the notion of home? I mean it's very rare that any of US particularly in our line of work journalists but more broadly I think our listeners would have just spent such a sheer amount of time in their home. There's only so much pillow Garcia and plant watering can go on. Do we need to really think the role of the home? Is it somewhere where we need to be safe and stable and secure? Yeah it's really interesting and I think for the first time may be people that do like to think about their home and the design of the home get to look at it through the lens of interior design. When someone's thinking about the home then might be missing things just like the way. The light comes in through a window at a certain time. The materials that they're using anywhere from the kitchen to the bedroom the warmth attack Tilleke essentially. You know you can really boil down the aspects of the home and this is kind of what we've tried to achieve in this manifesto and we are sort of addressing the issue of the changing home as well. So we've highlighted some beautiful flat. Pack Furniture from a company called tact in Copenhagen which is suitable for kind of younger people who might be Well not right now but when they can moving around from house to house a little bit more frequently than perhaps their parents did. But it's a real back to basics approach that we've taken to this it's about material so we highlight. Some beautiful cork bowls from vitro and how designers are choosing to what with more sustainable materials? But also still applying that warmth tech and obviously a good design into the product. And no I want to take this opportunity to use your expertise. I've always been a bit. Skeptical of the world minimalism. The people telling you throw everything away. But I have always thought that that kind of Joseph Morris idea of surrounding yourself with things that you believed to be beautiful in useful is a good thing. I guess you'll probably somewhere in the middle of that. You realized that having too much stuff can limit the amount of space in your home but he can drag you down a little bit. What do you have to say manifesto about that? Is it about choosing wisely? And it'd be great to hear some of the people that you spoke to as well 'cause I realize it's not just about products. They're also opinions and brands that you went to for advice. Well firstly something that I've highlighted here in my introduction. Call them and I think someone that you can agree with is that you can never have too many plans too much greenery in the home particularly now. You know. Many of US isolated. Some of us are actually by ourselves. Having these green friends around in the home can make all the difference. Oh natural touches from greenery and then looking at furniture. We've kind of highlighted this. We've gone quite history and woody in our selection and one of the most interesting brands. I think in the mix here is a Finnish. Furniture Company called Cola and they've just been quietly plying their craft in Finland's nineteen sixties. Really building this beautiful timeless endurable furniture with wood and then obviously upholstery as well and it's actually the children of the original founder. Who are now running the company but really kind of continuing. The father's values says it's lovely quote where he says homes should be filled with pieces that last for so long that you can't tell when they were built and designed and I that's just kind of that should be everyone's philosophy absolutely and I think that we are all well. I'm speaking for myself in grossly generalizing. Burt listeners. To this show will no. I do not very often. You know you look at the value of the things around you and I wanted to segue neatly to another story that you did for the magazine. I was very jealous Soviet. But it's a brilliant idea. The story about a British furniture brand alcohol run by the Italian colonial family. I believe originally. You went to visit the factory Nolan and this really bears out. The I dare in the philosophy that you brought to life in the manifesto that they're amazing companies that have weathered probably as big storms is covered nineteen their firms that make things with honesty and integrity still out there and kind of these are the products that we should aspire to surround ourselves with. I say that because I'm sitting on a call back chair. That's been nice to renovate it and which took money for but Tell me about your trip to the factory and just a little bit more. Generally what we should expect from our furniture craftsman that make it so basically. I traveled up to Buckingham. Show which isn't too far away from London actually particularly Malabar and where we're base. It's only an hour away on train but it really feels like a different world. I mean I don't want to criticise British manufacturing but when I went into this beautiful light filled factory where they're producing all this amazing timber furniture seeing these craftsmen and women at work. Refining sanding shaping creating joints beautiful joints on these chairs and tables. You know I said to the owner feels like I'm back in Italy often. We visit northern Italy in the past. You kind of just see this real level of care and passion towards the making of furniture which is quite a rare thing these days and it really resonates at age and that that's partly because it's a family company like you say and I think that these values and this passion have been passed on from. I believe it's the fourth generation now so the third generation is still running the company. The fourth generation will move on and continue to run the company and I think that makes a big difference and actually if we're going back to the manifesto piece I spoke to Julian. Montana who also is part of a very famous Italian furniture. Family called the multi knees and she. Obviously her company are dealing with a very tough time being in northern Italy right now when having difficulty even having their factories running but she kind of illustrate the point that their family company that always thinking about the future any way. They're in it for the long haul. They've always been in it for the long haul. And they will get through it just like they've gotten through world wars in the past. So there's definitely a lot of positivity to take and I think those values that we're talking about thinking about longevity and design and construction you know they're the things that will get these companies through it many things to Nolan jaws. He's The design editor of Monocle magazine. The May issue which is out this week. If you'd like a copy delivered to your home and given the current disruption to newstalk. That may be preferable you can pre-order it at monocle dot com. This is Monica. Loan designed to do is stay tuned.

monocle magazine Nolan US Italy Furniture Nolan editor Furniture Company Giles Nolan Monaco mayfield business editor Garcia newstalk Copenhagen Joseph Morris Ireland Finland founder
"home front" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

01:58 min | 11 months ago

"home front" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"Oh sure of SKI IS PROUD TO PARTNER Monaco on design the World Ski Journey is a glittering tale of a crystal manufacturer cut from humble beginnings. That's grown into a global brand over five generations the company has continued to innovate and to grow..

"home front" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

01:37 min | 11 months ago

"home front" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

"We're just GONNA keep moving April fifth Sunday today worked in the ER situation and the the heaviness the impact of all of it On though workload and the emotional toll that it takes and and just looking around and seeing may colleagues. My team who've looked tired but there's the other side of me that is hopeful hopeful that may be social. Distance saying is starting to make a difference that may be all of the people who are listening to the guidelines and following them and staying home. are saving lives. I hope so. I think I'll hang onto the hat today. She is in Michigan. I should tell you today. Republicans in the Michigan State. Legislature started advocating. That Michigan should loosen up some start. Loosening up these stay at home orders such drag. Why would we want people to be stay home right now? When their healthcare providers are coping with that One of these front line providers. So we have been talking to one who has had corona virus himself and fought it off and come back to work himself a really big response to some footage that we had of him within the last couple of days. He's going to join us. Live here next and you will want to meet him. He has an incredible story. Stay.

Michigan Michigan State Legislature
"home front" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

02:29 min | 11 months ago

"home front" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

"Npr for reporting this in such a way that caused the backlash that resulted in the federal government. Changing its mind. So we'll we'll continue to have this smattering of federally supported testing sites in place in a dozen states. What this means is that the federal government didn't inexplicably undo tomorrow. The one damn thing they were actually doing in terms of getting Americans tested for this disease but we remain beyond that without any national testing plan and without good access to testing all over the country. Data continues to be all over the place yet. New York states do and a lot of testing but every state is having to make do on its own in terms of how many people they're testing how they're doing it and how they're getting access to the materials they need to do that. Testing with the Patchwork of systems and different levels of government trying to put together a response. We're starting we have some data about how many cases that we've got we've got some snapshots some places. Some states tells more information than others. We know enough to know. We have the worst outbreak on earth by far but the details of where. It's the worst. Frankly they just have to trickle up through the seams. We don't Avenue National Response and so we don't have national information and so you look at local coverage sometimes to find out where things are at their worst. This was local news coverage today for example from Hayward California coverage of local nursing home in Hayward where Of the thirty five residents who have tested positive enough civility Six have already died. Staff has started to test positive at that facility in pretty good numbers as well. I only came across this local news report today. Because Hayward is the city in California where I was born right we're right near where I was born and where I grew up and so this happened to catch my eye today this tragedy in Hayward California but just try this if you if you have some spare Internet access you have a few minutes look around the local press where you grew up or where you were born or where. Your parents live now or where? You're grown kids or grandkids have moved off to just pick a place somewhere in this country. Pick THE LAST AMERICAN PLACE. You went on vacation or pick the last town where you got a speeding ticket. When you're driving on some cross country trip pick anywhere in this country and look the local press there and I will tell you what you.

federal government Hayward Hayward California Npr New York California
"home front" Discussed on Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

09:04 min | 1 year ago

"home front" Discussed on Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

"Situated with the baby on my lap. And I'm worried if I move she's GonNa up and start screaming. It's a matter of minutes. I spoke with Rachel. Passer Director of the center of Health Services Research at emory and her husband. Dr Justin Traeger. Who's a physician in emory's emergency department and ask them how? The Corona virus has affected their family. Life Yeah so we have a six year old almost seven year old. She's a first grader. And we have a pre K. As son he's almost five turns five and a few weeks and then we just had a baby. So we've got three kids now and it's a lot to handle especially when Justin's not in the house at the moment. Justin is in the garage right and this is a little apartment that you have attached to your garage. Which because you're an emergency room doctor and oftentimes work odd shifts. You sort of already had this but now this has become your permanent home or at least temporary permanent home. Yeah So we just Kinda sat down a few days ago and said. Hey you know if I'm going to keep working in the ER keep trading people and it's possible for me to be infected and not know it or have no symptoms or minimal symptoms and infect our little baby it would be well. There's a incredibly hard decision. Yeah it's a new reality for for you and I think A new reality for a lot of people in different ways. Rachel I mean I so I have three kids as well. How are you managing the? You're trying to home school. Your kids alone and a newborn. It's definitely challenging for me and I think I'm doing the best I can and I'm trying to give myself a little bit of grace and understanding when I have to put the kids in front of the TV. Longer than I anticipate you know emotionally. It's it's certainly challenging. And then of course up all night with the baby and she's eating every two to three hours and so I'm tired and my my patients is more limited than it normally. Is You know it strikes me Rachel that you all are being very diligent about this and in modeling grape behavior and I hope people are listening. But you know there's been a lot of stories about people still not taking this very seriously Not physically distancing themselves and I'm just wondering how does it make you feel when you see those stories and I think that that really motivated a lot of emotion for me days ago. When I saw pictures over the weekend we had a beautiful day in Atlanta in fact that morning when this before Justin had moved up to the garage. We went on a hike that you know there weren't that many people out but then I had a friend texts me a picture of people out in about it bars and restaurants and they were you know within a foot of each other lots of people in crowds. And I think that was really hard for me to see and to know that Justin's got to go back in there and it's GonNa be worse and worse if people aren't listening to the public health advice. It seems Rachel sometimes the sentiment is. I'm not taking it seriously as an epidemiologist. How do you convince people that does make a difference? I think trying to explain the you know that this is an exponential risk that if you have it you're likely to infect at least two others and then there likely to infect to others if you can convince other friends and your family members to do the same modeling that behavior really others. Can I add onto something? Rachel said so What I worry about the most in my er. I'm working. There is if all of a sudden there's a tremendous number of people that need services and the only way that happens is if people are exposed all at once the best way to prevent that is to keep your distance. What scares me the most is if there you have an Italy type situation where hundreds of thousands of people fall ill simultaneously. It has your your daily work changed. I mean are you still seeing the same number of emergency room patients for other things as you used to or is it predominantly corona virus or not much over half of our patients are now there with respiratory symptoms of some sort. They're under under investigation for potential corona virus whereas before a much smaller percentage. You know we talk about social or physical distancing from people but it really does strike me even when I've been at the hospital recently just in that. It's very hard to actually obviously do that in a hospital and I'm not talking just in terms of care of patients. I'm talking just in terms of moving around the hospital. The team the team work that is required. It's hard to practice what you preach within your own job. Sometimes WE TRY TO BE. Cognizant of it remind each other not to touch our faces. Share food not passing around. We do our best you know. I know and it's very much appreciated. I think by everybody and look people are listening to you too. I mean Rachel. You tweeted about your family situation. And it's safe to say that it went viral. I'm not sure that we should still be using that. Term Obama re tweeted you and he said I bet you were surprised. It was definitely a shock. I mean I just tweeted that out of frustration. When I'd after Justin? I wear face timing after the kids were finally in bed and are numerous in my arms and I just this feeling. I guess something emotional as expected when you have a newborn and just you know thinking about in seeing those images of people over the weekend outside and out and about and feeling kind of some of that frustration and. I didn't obviously think that it would go that far but I think there must have been something that really resonated in that message. That other people were feeling as well so Woke up the next morning and realized that it really had taken off. Why think it helped a lot of people I mean it made it very real justin? I you know when you were describing the decision obviously of living in this apartment in the garage away from your family. I got a little pit in my stomach Because you have a newborn baby who is just a month old now and you don't get to hold your baby and you've done this with your other kids I don't want to to be gratuitous but how emotional has that been for you You know it's not gonNA lie. It's very tough to be separated especially from you know from Sadie and just be able to hold her. Spent time with her. Get to know her. Let's just say deplete your reserve your resiliency drops a little bit when you don't have that extra little bit at the end of the day to look forward to. How will you decide Justin when you feel that? It's safe to go back to a more normal life where you can spend time with your kids again honestly. I do not know the answer that question. I mean I'm GONNA and a try and keep my ear to the ground and have a lot of contacts. That were can ideology. Cdc A lot of friends in Atlanta that work there and pretty much every day. I'm you know I'm asking them for more information and trying to get inside track on because as my primary goals to get through this operate can every healthcare provider in the whole country's feeling same way. I don't know how I'M GONNA decide. WanNa say for me to just head back into the house and be around the baby. Yeah I don't know something you know. We didn't talk about when we made this decision and I think that is also something that I really struggle with is. Just when is it going to end in? How long this will this go on? How old will our newborn b-be when her gets to hold her a gun. But I think it's also very aware of if Justin second can't be there in the hospital you know. What does that mean for the patients that he needs to treat and might be this attrition and in other places it's a law which you guys are going through right now so I really. I really applaud you because I think you're doing a lot to educate people and we all everyone of us over a decade gratitude. So thank you very much for your time. Thanks for having us. Thanks for having us. So if you're feeling isolated maybe a little scared no that doctors and nurses around the globe are but they're making the best of a bad situation even if it means living in the garage if you're still considering going out for a drink think about those on the front lines and do a facetime happy hour instead do it for all of our healthcare workers remember you can always head to CNN dot com slash corona virus and sign up for daily newsletter which features the latest updates on this fast moving story from CNN journalists around the globe. We'll be back Monday. Thanks for.

Dr Justin Traeger Rachel Atlanta emory Director CNN Obama center of Health Services Rese Italy Sadie Wan
"home front" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"home front" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Three recorded this at home in cincinnati you're in cincinnati today as we talked to you and this is where you grow up right yeah this is the home front ray here now some people listening to us might not know that cincinnati has this whole long rich history of funk and salts where you started adam and king king record where were you got your start this yes cincinnati level king records was kinda like our motown it was the spot where all the stars were eddin when they came in town you would wanna go see um and get close to home if he could and so that was the spot and nobody could actually glowing in until we may france with this one guy who was a pnr whose name withdrawal sperling and we asked him to come here as we lose all excited you know and he actually came in and us and thought was pretty good next thing you know invited this over the king and that's how we gad in the front door of cain and you were how china the ahead of be like around 60 and i didn't get to meet james brown until i was like around eighteen but doing all it tom i got a chance to work inside of king with different art is and that's how james brown heard about us that's how well we actually wound up woody wow data but damon hill wish the sudan that you know now what would you what advice would you give to the.

cincinnati adam sperling cain james brown sudan france china damon hill