22 Burst results for "Holocene"

Boris Johnson says Britain needs its own Green New Deal

FT Politics

08:07 min | 6 d ago

Boris Johnson says Britain needs its own Green New Deal

"Boris johnson has always been keen to burn it his green credentials and put tackling climate. Change at the front of his government's. Agenda is done so again this week setting out a long-awaited plan to make the uk a world leader in green technology as with most government announcements. However that will plenty of spending commitments already made being re announced but the most auden criticism came from the tories who said it goes against. The party's new electoral base and could cost them votes but business secretary. Alex chama rejected this notion. This is about leveling up across our country. We're talking about twelve billion pounds and he has around. Four billion pounds of this is new money. Other money is money that's been pledged previously on deed lost budget in in in march Book very importantly This billion pounds will help to bring in three times as much in terms of private sector money and supporting create two hundred and fifty thousand jobs but the have been some critics of this plan arguing that it really doesn't go far enough. The shuttle business sexually. Ed milliband made this point. There is an urgency. That isn't enough ambition. That isn't a real plan. He's got to do better in all of our interests that he does better. We will keep pushing the government on ambition on jobs on appropriate plan to rise to the scale of the climate emergency. We face chimp. Let's begin with this. Ten point plan of boys. Johnson set out in article in the financial times. In fact what did you make of it and how much of it was new money and new policy okay so this was a very long awaited announcement. They were meant to originally Back in the summer and it slipped because of pressures on number ten prime minister announced twelve billion pounds states investment program when you went through the numbers at ten about three billion pounds this new at included five hundred million hydrogen one billion pounds insulation three hundred million pounds for nuclear industry. I think what was interesting even if the money was pretty small. Change when you compare it said of the countries like franz chemmy refute these comparisons jeremy kuban late manifesto prince lansing which lici tuten sums of hundreds of billions of pounds of buried money. Guns was agreement. Deo i think it's still a political moment because as always this tension between people saying let's go green other Saying it will damage economy People in cost known areas concerned type. Slutty jim republic who worry about paying extra tax also green initiatives ambrose johnson especially saying worry we can. Tiny's these things together. We make sure. Green economic growth happens in some of the left behind redwood areas and talking about place humble months for over northeast. police o'clock. It's wonderful to have you on the podcast. What were your thoughts. When you saw this announcement here because johnson has talked a lot about green policy arisons locked summer but it fuses if that rhetoric has increase as jim said that is new money on some new policies to go with it to there is a but by i know about this was a. It's brilliant. Hear a british conservative prime minister coming up with a plan like this. Because although we've had david cameron promising the government ever and then we had theresa may actually legislating for a net zero twenty fifty which was very pioneering for a country the size of britain at the time. The thing is. We really haven't seen a prime minister set out in a speech or in a plan like this thing as visionary really and it is a great vision. Unfortunately it's really not matched by detailed plans and considering that a large chunk of it is dependent on trying to mobilize private investor capital. I'm just concerned that it's really not going to make. Investors are not going to invest unless they see the detailed policy until they know what the shape of any sort of regulatory framework has got to look like really not going to get people plowing in at the rate needed to fulfill this and when it comes to actually meeting that net zero goal twenty fifty. It's really not on track to do that. Unfortunately the classic example about chocolate changing which is provided uncertainty from best is if you look at one of the atoms. Boris johnson announcement which was carbon capture storage. Which is basically succour Boats on you bury it. The browns the tools boom cameron government promised been impounds towards that twenty fifteen a group of plug on that money or johnston's done this year's he promised eight hundred pounds in the spring budget yet. Another challenge main pounds this week. Hey presto Where we were five years ago with basically almost leg progress on cca. Yeah that's exactly. It had this sort of crisis. Feel about it really. Is you know god. We've got to do something on climate. Okay what do we do on electric cars. Oh i know will bring the target ford. That's actually relatively easy to do. It's important but unless it's matched by holocene setting out how people are going to be able to buy more electric cars and how the rollout of the charging infrastructure is going to work. You know it's really difficult to see how it works. I expected a guest to say something a little more meditative parts of this plan on you when it comes to the targets for making sure that new homes not built with natural gas boilers in them. For example you know that's really quite important. And of course at target itself has been brought forward slightly from twenty five to twenty twenty three at same these support for hydrogen also important but again. You look at what germany's doing in its recovery plan. It's got around. Forty forty billion set aside for electric cars renewable energy and so forth and france around thirty billion euros set aside nine billion of that is for hydrogen renewables alone so compared to that. The u k plan does look a little small were jim. This is one thing critics of picked up on the plan. Even who is labour's shadow. Business secretary has said it doesn't remotely meet the scale of what is needed. I think greenpeace charity have said similar things to all those criticisms fad. You because when it comes to government spending you can always make the case you should be spending more doing more radical things and as please note. This is a conservative government. This is not natural territory. Full them yet. But i think the first point to make our show on the business sexually set on the radio. This is a down payment but that will be more. Fiscal events is quite possible than the spending review. The we see next week that could be more money for example nuclear. They could say they're gonna stop negotiation sizewell c Pass station which would of course involve more money. And i think as well now. He's talking about how these provides whole sums compared to labor government beginning right now the thing to remember Tackle climate change isn't just about state. Money is also about regulation so of course the bundle twenty fifty borrowing in new pets from these laws as an example of wet government does not have to spend the money it can regulate and things happen and so many of these decisions of stems from theresa. May's decision donning moments of her administration commit twenty-fifty net zero target. Only kind of off the thought. She the mohanchris coop suasion joyfulness. She bandied about it even now known. Would think theresa may is great green ahead and yet she took this decision from which all sorts of future decisions have the stem. But i think to remember names of bishops is very seats. Promotional world where Christie is coming from fossil fuels. Were kind of on talking for. I think you have to remember that. The british energy system like any other system But also transport system unfairly household energy or freeways needs to be decarbonised. And i remember whether we're on track to do that. Speed that needs to

Alex Chama Ed Milliband Boris Johnson Franz Chemmy Jeremy Kuban Prince Lansing Lici Tuten Slutty Jim Ambrose Johnson Cameron Government Financial Times Theresa David Cameron
Boris Johnson says Britain needs its own Green New Deal

FT Politics

08:07 min | 6 d ago

Boris Johnson says Britain needs its own Green New Deal

"Boris johnson has always been keen to burn it his green credentials and put tackling climate. Change at the front of his government's. Agenda is done so again this week setting out a long-awaited plan to make the uk a world leader in green technology as with most government announcements. However that will plenty of spending commitments already made being re announced but the most auden criticism came from the tories who said it goes against. The party's new electoral base and could cost them votes but business secretary. Alex chama rejected this notion. This is about leveling up across our country. We're talking about twelve billion pounds and he has around. Four billion pounds of this is new money. Other money is money that's been pledged previously on deed lost budget in in in march Book very importantly This billion pounds will help to bring in three times as much in terms of private sector money and supporting create two hundred and fifty thousand jobs but the have been some critics of this plan arguing that it really doesn't go far enough. The shuttle business sexually. Ed milliband made this point. There is an urgency. That isn't enough ambition. That isn't a real plan. He's got to do better in all of our interests that he does better. We will keep pushing the government on ambition on jobs on appropriate plan to rise to the scale of the climate emergency. We face chimp. Let's begin with this. Ten point plan of boys. Johnson set out in article in the financial times. In fact what did you make of it and how much of it was new money and new policy okay so this was a very long awaited announcement. They were meant to originally Back in the summer and it slipped because of pressures on number ten prime minister announced twelve billion pounds states investment program when you went through the numbers at ten about three billion pounds this new at included five hundred million hydrogen one billion pounds insulation three hundred million pounds for nuclear industry. I think what was interesting even if the money was pretty small. Change when you compare it said of the countries like franz chemmy refute these comparisons jeremy kuban late manifesto prince lansing which lici tuten sums of hundreds of billions of pounds of buried money. Guns was agreement. Deo i think it's still a political moment because as always this tension between people saying let's go green other Saying it will damage economy People in cost known areas concerned type. Slutty jim republic who worry about paying extra tax also green initiatives ambrose johnson especially saying worry we can. Tiny's these things together. We make sure. Green economic growth happens in some of the left behind redwood areas and talking about place humble months for over northeast. police o'clock. It's wonderful to have you on the podcast. What were your thoughts. When you saw this announcement here because johnson has talked a lot about green policy arisons locked summer but it fuses if that rhetoric has increase as jim said that is new money on some new policies to go with it to there is a but by i know about this was a. It's brilliant. Hear a british conservative prime minister coming up with a plan like this. Because although we've had david cameron promising the government ever and then we had theresa may actually legislating for a net zero twenty fifty which was very pioneering for a country the size of britain at the time. The thing is. We really haven't seen a prime minister set out in a speech or in a plan like this thing as visionary really and it is a great vision. Unfortunately it's really not matched by detailed plans and considering that a large chunk of it is dependent on trying to mobilize private investor capital. I'm just concerned that it's really not going to make. Investors are not going to invest unless they see the detailed policy until they know what the shape of any sort of regulatory framework has got to look like really not going to get people plowing in at the rate needed to fulfill this and when it comes to actually meeting that net zero goal twenty fifty. It's really not on track to do that. Unfortunately the classic example about chocolate changing which is provided uncertainty from best is if you look at one of the atoms. Boris johnson announcement which was carbon capture storage. Which is basically succour Boats on you bury it. The browns the tools boom cameron government promised been impounds towards that twenty fifteen a group of plug on that money or johnston's done this year's he promised eight hundred pounds in the spring budget yet. Another challenge main pounds this week. Hey presto Where we were five years ago with basically almost leg progress on cca. Yeah that's exactly. It had this sort of crisis. Feel about it really. Is you know god. We've got to do something on climate. Okay what do we do on electric cars. Oh i know will bring the target ford. That's actually relatively easy to do. It's important but unless it's matched by holocene setting out how people are going to be able to buy more electric cars and how the rollout of the charging infrastructure is going to work. You know it's really difficult to see how it works. I expected a guest to say something a little more meditative parts of this plan on you when it comes to the targets for making sure that new homes not built with natural gas boilers in them. For example you know that's really quite important. And of course at target itself has been brought forward slightly from twenty five to twenty twenty three at same these support for hydrogen also important but again. You look at what germany's doing in its recovery plan. It's got around. Forty forty billion set aside for electric cars renewable energy and so forth and france around thirty billion euros set aside nine billion of that is for hydrogen renewables alone so compared to that. The u k plan does look a little small were jim. This is one thing critics of picked up on the plan. Even who is labour's shadow. Business secretary has said it doesn't remotely meet the scale of what is needed. I think greenpeace charity have said similar things to all those criticisms fad. You because when it comes to government spending you can always make the case you should be spending more doing more radical things and as please note. This is a conservative government. This is not natural territory. Full them yet. But i think the first point to make our show on the business sexually set on the radio. This is a down payment but that will be more. Fiscal events is quite possible than the spending review. The we see next week that could be more money for example nuclear. They could say they're gonna stop negotiation sizewell c Pass station which would of course involve more money. And i think as well now. He's talking about how these provides whole sums compared to labor government beginning right now the thing to remember Tackle climate change isn't just about state. Money is also about regulation so of course the bundle twenty fifty borrowing in new pets from these laws as an example of wet government does not have to spend the money it can regulate and things happen and so many of these decisions of stems from theresa. May's decision donning moments of her administration commit twenty-fifty net zero target. Only kind of off the thought. She the mohanchris coop suasion joyfulness. She bandied about it even now known. Would think theresa may is great green ahead and yet she took this decision from which all sorts of future decisions have the stem. But i think to remember names of bishops is very seats. Promotional world where Christie is coming from fossil fuels. Were kind of on talking for. I think you have to remember that. The british energy system like any other system But also transport system unfairly household energy or freeways needs to be decarbonised. And i remember whether we're on track to do that. Speed that needs to

Alex Chama Ed Milliband Boris Johnson Franz Chemmy Jeremy Kuban Prince Lansing Lici Tuten Slutty Jim Ambrose Johnson Cameron Government Financial Times Theresa David Cameron
Boris Johnson Lays Out U.K. Plan To Go Carbon Neutral

FT Politics

03:05 min | 6 d ago

Boris Johnson Lays Out U.K. Plan To Go Carbon Neutral

"Johnson has talked a lot about green policy arisons locked summer but it fuses if that rhetoric has increase as jim said that is new money on some new policies to go with it to there is a but by i know about this was a. It's brilliant. Hear a british conservative prime minister coming up with a plan like this. Because although we've had david cameron promising the government ever and then we had theresa may actually legislating for a net zero twenty fifty which was very pioneering for a country the size of britain at the time. The thing is. We really haven't seen a prime minister set out in a speech or in a plan like this thing as visionary really and it is a great vision. Unfortunately it's really not matched by detailed plans and considering that a large chunk of it is dependent on trying to mobilize private investor capital. I'm just concerned that it's really not going to make. Investors are not going to invest unless they see the detailed policy until they know what the shape of any sort of regulatory framework has got to look like really not going to get people plowing in at the rate needed to fulfill this and when it comes to actually meeting that net zero goal twenty fifty. It's really not on track to do that. Unfortunately the classic example about chocolate changing which is provided uncertainty from best is if you look at one of the atoms. Boris johnson announcement which was carbon capture storage. Which is basically succour Boats on you bury it. The browns the tools boom cameron government promised been impounds towards that twenty fifteen a group of plug on that money or johnston's done this year's he promised eight hundred pounds in the spring budget yet. Another challenge main pounds this week. Hey presto Where we were five years ago with basically almost leg progress on cca. Yeah that's exactly. It had this sort of crisis. Feel about it really. Is you know god. We've got to do something on climate. Okay what do we do on electric cars. Oh i know will bring the target ford. That's actually relatively easy to do. It's important but unless it's matched by holocene setting out how people are going to be able to buy more electric cars and how the rollout of the charging infrastructure is going to work. You know it's really difficult to see how it works. I expected a guest to say something a little more meditative parts of this plan on you when it comes to the targets for making sure that new homes not built with natural gas boilers in them. For example you know that's really quite important. And of course at target itself has been brought forward slightly from twenty five to twenty twenty three at same these support for hydrogen also important but again. You look at what germany's doing in its recovery plan. It's got around. Forty forty billion set aside for electric cars renewable energy and so forth and france around thirty billion euros set aside nine billion of that is for hydrogen renewables alone so compared to that. The u k plan does look a little

Cameron Government David Cameron Theresa Johnson JIM Boris Johnson Britain Browns Government Johnston CCA Ford Germany France
Humans Have Caused the Most Dramatic Climate Change in 3 Million Years

The Science Show

11:14 min | 2 months ago

Humans Have Caused the Most Dramatic Climate Change in 3 Million Years

"Recently Assad with some research colleagues at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, a look at a brand new science article in which are climate model for the first time had recreated the climate on earth over the last three million years, which covers the entire geological pleistocene epoch. The Pleistocene is so important as it constitutes a point of reference for life on. Earth. Because although sure our planet has existed for four point, five, billion years it's only in the last million years. That earth has looked at least roughly in the way as we know it, the continents were roughly where they are today. The North and South Poles were covered with ice. The atmosphere had a similar chemical composition to what we have today. Planet, Earth. Our earth has only existed for three million years. All, comparisons further back in time are quite meaningless. And the manuscript I hold in my hand is not just reaching. My brain is also striking straight into my heart. A deep humility settles in when look at the graph showing the variations in mean global temperature on earth over the past three, million years it shows that we have never throughout the whole plasticine exceeded two degrees global warming compared to our pre industrial average temperature of approximately fourteen degrees. Never. This means that Earth despite all the stresses and natural shocks from fluctuations and Solar Radiation Volcanic eruptions, asteroid impacts and earthquakes has regulated itself within an incredibly narrow range minus four degrees. Celsius were in deep ice age plus two degree Celsius. We're in a warm interglacial period lasting three million years. It's absolutely incredible. Especially since we know why. It's earth's ability to self regulate the ability of the oceans to absorb and store heat the ability of the ice sheets to reflect solar radiation the ability of the forests to absorb carbon dioxide and the ability to be a safe and store greenhouse gases. The planet is a biophysical self playing piano whose music sheet stays. Within the minus four plus to scale. If that is not caused for humidity than I do not know what humidity is. And a deep concern in hundred and fifty years. In the geological blink of an eye, we risk now tearing this Planetary Symphony to shreds. Let that sink in. The global average temperature is now changing hundred and seventy times faster than over the last seven thousand years and it's doing. So in the wrong direction upwards when the current orbital forcing meaning are distance to the sun and the current low level of solar activity means that the temperature should in fact, be slowing down. You don't have to be a physicist to understand that we have a problem. Climate skeptics like to argue that historically the climate has fluctuated so much. So why shouldn't it be fluctuating now? Obviously. It fluctuates. But we are now racing towards plus three to plus four degrees warming. Sceptics like to bring up the little ice age the time when Swedish King Call The tenth Gustav Marched His army across the deep frozen great belt and the little belt in sixteen fifty eight to beat the Danes or that the vikings grew grapes in Greenland during the medieval warm period. Yes. Of course, this is true but it all occurred within the natural boundaries of minus four and plus two degrees. And it's here within this sweet spot that we must remain for our own sakes and our future? In August two, thousand, eighteen at the peak of that year's drought and fires in Sweden and Europe. We published a scientific paper where we tried to establish whether we are at risk of pushing the entire planet away from its current state of equilibrium, the Holocene epoch where we have been since the last ice age. This is fundamental. Our Planet Earth can be in three different states. It can be in a deep ice age as it was twenty thousand years ago with large is. Extending over the northern and Southern Hemisphere with over two kilometers of ice above our heads here in Sweden an ice extending as far south as Berlin. This is an equilibrium state as it is not only lower solar radiation that keeps earth in an ice age. It is also the feedbacks caused by ice. As the ice sheets grow earth gets whiter, which means that more more incoming heat from the sun is reflected back to space more ice means it gets colder which means even more is and suddenly you have a self reinforcing mechanism. This is what makes an ice age and equilibrium earth remains. They're not only because of the external forces from the sun but also thanks to these inbuilt biophysical processes in this case, the color of ice. Earth can also be in an interglacial an intermediate state, which is what we have today where was still have permanent is sites at the polls and we have glaciers on land and the biosphere with forests, grasslands, and lakes roughly as Earth as we know it. It is these two equilibrium states and only these two states that the planet has been over the last three million years that is during the entire Pleistocene. But then there is a third state when earth tips over from self cooling feedback loops to self heating feedback loops, which leads to an inevitable journey to becoming a hot tropical planet that is four, five, six, potentially seven, eight degrees warmer than today where in principle, all the ice has gone and the surface of the ocean is more than fifty meters higher than it is today and where the conditions for live is fundamentally different all over the entire planet. This is what we call hothouse earth. Or Highs Zaid hot time in German where the article when we published it drew so much attention doing this burning heat wave in the summer of twenty eighteen that highs Zaid was chosen as the word of the year in Germany. In this research, we tried for the first time to identify the global mean temperature at which we are in danger of tipping over from our current state, the Holocene interglacial, and embarking on a journey that would inevitably take us to highlight our conclusion is that we cannot exclude that the planetary threshold. The tipping point where we kickoff unstoppable processes of self amplified warming is at two degrees. Bear in mind we are today at one point one very mind were moving fast along a path that reaches one point five in potentially only twenty, thirty years and two degrees in forty fifty years. This is one I would argue of the biggest. Challenges of all to test whether we are right. Can the planet cope with or Canet not cope with higher temperatures than two degrees? But. My conclusion based on the knowledge we have today is that the planetary threshold to avoid triggering high Zaid is most likely at two degrees. Of course, it's not so that Earth will fall off a cliff at two degrees. The risk is rather that we would then pass a threshold where the shift towards hindsight would become unstoppable. In other words, we face an urgency at the timeframe whether we pushed the on button on not triggering stoppable warming is within the next few decades meaning essentially. Now, if we pressed the UNBUTTON and kick off the great planetary machinery with feedback loops causing self warming, then the full impacts may play out over three four, five, hundred years before we reach a new equilibrium state hothouse. A planet with over ten meters, sea level rise temperatures, and extreme droughts, floods, and heatwaves making large parts of earth uninhabitable a planet we do not want a planet that cannot support US humans. This requires from us that we understand two different time horizons. The short term time of commitment. When do we push the unbutton but then also the long term time horizon when we have the full impact hitting on people these are different but ethically, I would argue only the trigger moment counts, we cannot leave a damaged planet beyond repair to future generations. So to summarize the decisive moment when we press don't press the button lies within the next ten to twenty years. With consequences for all future generations a moral, bum. Are High site article concluded that degree Celsius is our ultimate planetary threshold that we need to stay away from. This article actually came out six months before our climate modeling showed that we've never exceeded two degrees throughout the whole pleistocene, the last three million years. In Two thousand nine, our planetary boundaries size showed that one point five degrees is a boundary we should not transgress because then we enter a danger zone of uncertainty. So perhaps you do understand my feeling a deep concern of humility in the face of our latest scientific findings, which really only says, one thing tipping points are real and if they're crossed, they lead to unstoppable changes, which requires a new relationship between us and our planet, and that we realize that we are facing a new ethics. What we do today will determine the future on earth for all our children and their children.

Zaid Sweden Potsdam Institute For Climate Assad Physicist Holocene Europe Gustav Vikings United States Canet Southern Hemisphere Germany Berlin
"holocene" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

02:55 min | 9 months ago

"holocene" Discussed on WEEI

"After the hour here goes sixteen thousand years ago on this planet it was the end of what's called the Holocene warming period the ice age was ending and the temperatures were warming as a matter of fact that was the end of the lice last ice age arctic ice began to melt and the water in the air temperature was climbing ten thousand five hundred years ago it started cooling off again it was a prolonged period of ice age van it began to warm again five four thousand years ago which was called by the NASA it was called the climatic optimum warming conditions temperatures were about two degrees warmer then they are today great civil ancient civilizations began and formed five thousand years ago cooling trans drop in sea level and the emergence of islands does that sound like now well it does a little bit four thousand years ago oh my goodness it warms up again up to two days temperatures three thousand years ago cooling trans the renewed ice growth C. level dropped by six feet bolo present day levels two thousand years ago slight warming and another climatic optimum period of time one thousand years ago cooling trend the Nile river and the Black Sea actually froze now into the first century another climatic warming period matter of fact the warmest climate since the climatic warming period and since the Vikings establish settle in grab an ice on now back to the year thirteen hundred of our common error an extreme to the extent that most.

NASA Nile river Black Sea Holocene
"holocene" Discussed on Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"holocene" Discussed on Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

"Raiders. Kirk rose I'm never prepared for that end. Never never happy that. I don't have my headphones in case you like when you go to a game they just you get you a nice little group. They hey adult beverages and that's all they do the whole game. They only watch the game. They turn several years. They've had no real reason to watch the game. They literally the field is facing forward. They will turn around and just look at everybody in a crowd and just go eh but I I love him. I mean again sometimes. That's the best thing you can do in that stadium because your other option is watched the team because they want someone to tell them. Hey Hey what do looking for. I remember when I went to USC. That's back when the raiders. Were still playing Holocene. I was more scared of the Raider fans then. I was of the local bangers that used to often be around campus. Like generally left alone by them- Raider fans were looking to fight right. Anybody they were just looking maybe looked at sideways but they are still in. Yeah they're in the playoff mix. They need the Texans to beat the Titan wreck the Ravens to beat the steelers and the colts beat the Jaguars then they need to win their own game this week in four team parlay take it or shake it. It happens for the raiders and they're in the playoffs Kirk. Wow I gotTA shake.

raiders Kirk rose Holocene Jaguars USC Raiders. Ravens steelers colts
Shaping the Emerging Bioeconomy

The Bio Report

08:52 min | 1 year ago

Shaping the Emerging Bioeconomy

"Trump administration today about technology and how Whoa doesn't understand. Its potential to reshape the economy. Yeah so I can't speak for the White House So I think Alexander Titus was the gentleman who you are referring to spokane Zimbabwe. I Alexander was involved in the bio calm the day and he was also with us during the congressional as well so I can only speak to what we've learned and what we are speaking on and educating legislators and policy-makers around And I will tell you that. This effort has largely been bipartisan. We met with science technology and Space Committee And and the representatives that appeared were equal sides of of of the aisle. Everybody sees this as as a huge focus for For the United States and making sure that we drive this economic development so I can't speak specifically to wear the White House or you know individual congressional leaders stand on the issue. I can say from our experience. We've received very positive feedback including the White House visits but also on the hill as well. I know in two thousand twelve. The Obama Administration had published a national bio comic blueprint. This included a set of strategic investments intended to lay the foundation the nation for a future bio Konami is that roadmap still being used in any way wasn't executed on wasn't successful. Yeah IT'S A. It's a great question and I you know again speaking personally. I was living in Germany at that time so it wasn't. I wasn't too involved in in the creation nations that the documentary that process. I am familiar with it I have reviewed the documents. I will say that it definitely aligns. Too much of the initiatives that that we feel are important important to ensuring that the bio Tommy doesn't forward You know there is current legislation that is under consideration There's a bill. Hr Four three seven. Three which is the Engineering Biology Investment Bill. And so this has been In Committee for an extended period of time and I'm happy to share air that passed out of committee Right before the The recessed now back in session the prior to the recess they pass out of committee and this is one of I legislative priorities. The bottom line is to ensure that. Hr Four three seven three. which is the engineering? Biology Investment Act Get sponsorship and we're looking to really drive have this Into both the House and we've got good one site to support on the house and then finding sponsors in the Senate of driving across the line but again this is a perfect good example of of how we feel. We can be active and really advocating for these types of bills. which really look at? How are we allocating funds and infrastructure picture to support the development of our economy infrastructure being basic science training all the way through to it and computational signs of a shorter required to really orange biology? Maybe you can touch on some of the other policy issues of concern. Are you focused on. Issues of regulation workforce in public investment in our D-. What are the big issues driving the concerns of industry right now? Yeah I mean so many of those things that are important to us so so you know. Regulation is important elements of the industry and you feel that. Proper regulation comes from proper education. So our focus now is really educate h Regulators and policymakers around the opportunity as well as areas where regulation may be required Investment is a huge area that we're looking at and I you know I use similar. We know that. NIH funding has significantly increased over many many years Below we've seen as we've seen a reallocation of funds ends with an age and so on colleges become a huge area funding. And if you look back ten fifteen twenty years ago it was a smaller area. Funding overall financing hasn't changed significantly. We've had ones. We are trying to drive much of that again by autonomy alliance to look at areas where we feel incremental investments or require player and perhaps it can be a real alignment of of internal funds and resources but it's not exclusively through an age you mentioned. Dod Darva Department of Energy Number of entities are actively engaging in creating the Viacom in manufacturing and bringing more through biology but other owners for Russell important as well you know workforce issues is important that we have access to the smartest most driven best trained scientists on the planet. And you want them to you come to the United States and working business established business and want to ensure that those who are here in the United States have a have a line of sites who in education that will enable for them to move into the workforce that is a biological workforce versus perhaps a industrial base workforce. So all of us topics are very important. Join US are there big challenges that need to be addressed through precompetitive issues that need to be solved by public private partners ars. So it's it's it's a great question you know I'll say the have you know we have great examples incredible public private partnerships such as the first genome. Don't project right To sequence I I Hema Jim was was the joints between age and genome sciences and different commercial entities. is in fact when I was on the hill. I kind of preface my comments with me just think about what is the next moonshot project for our vile economy or biological thinkers in the country. You know the the Human Genome Project was one of those moon shots and we've got a lot of others out there that we should think about you. Know from fundamentally a trying to sedate the operating mechanism for biology and understanding what biological components can be put together into organisms to due to drive a new paradigm and manufacturing to really get into understanding Inter Cellular Communication Nation. And how do we look at creating environments of microbes that can communicate with each other respond to stimuli responsive wind. Listen to different response. which may again from a manufacturing process produce a compound or remediate? Something that's happening in the nature So a lot of big challenges could be put on the table and this is one of the kind of I'll say the thought experiments we've done Tommy Lines. What are some of the asset we could go for? And that's what we're working together positioning papers when you think about the biggest barriers to realizing the potential of the opportunities force today what you said they are scientific holocene economic or something else. Yes so so I believe eight largely at scientific at this point and I say that because you know as we've seen scientific innovation and come online we see the economics around that scientific innovation come together quite quickly and we can all that pretty pretty routinely as we look at you know you know go back to the example precision. Helter you know the advent next turner she sequencing sequencing targeted sequencing Really enabled us to lose today. The biology hav driver mutations within tumors which then of course informs which therapies are are prescribed to the individual. I think we're at a similar precedence. Right now and understanding biology from a manufacturing perspective of food due to feed materials perspective. Where you still fundamentally don't understand the rules to biology and I'll say that this is the largest challenge around synthetic biology synthetic biology being a interesting blend in biology and engineering and computational science you know from engineering perspective if you understand hand all the principal components you can build anything and I think when we initially went down the road of synthetic biology thought? Well we'll figure out what the parts are living organism that we can combine those into a new organism and we've learned that biologists complex and we don't really understand those principal components hence we need the new tools to loosening those components. Soon we do. We'll see those economic models fall in line so to your question. I I do believe that way now. The scientific challenge is the largest challenge. which is what we focused on through? The vital COMU- lines and ensuring that funding is flowing to the proper areas of research to enable that elucidation the principal components to enable development of the Diakonie. Jason Ganic Chief Commercial Officer script at a founding member of the bio combines. Is Jason. Thanks so much for your time. Today it was a pleasure. Thank you so much.

United States White House Principal Tommy Lines Alexander Titus Space Committee Jason Ganic Konami Zimbabwe Spokane Germany Obama Administration NIH Inter Cellular Communication N Dod Darva Department Of Energy
"holocene" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"holocene" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"The story of amphibians and kindred shouldn't be looked at in isolation because it's raised all kinds of questions about what the role of humans in conservation intervention some people have argued that kindred is the natural pathogen so maybe these extinctions population declines are naturals well yet that expression you're making. I'm also like i'm not. I don't buy that highly skeptical expression. Everyone because what it does is that i mean that viewpoint fails to consider or acknowledge the role that humans have played in the spread of kindred ed around the globe like diseases. Don't just pop up everywhere at once out of nowhere. Nope that's not yano and there's also some some kindred emergence and climate change seemed to be in some cases acting in conjunction with each other so yeah again and humans. This is human human induced climate changes. This human caused climate change. They fad anyway but the other reason that you can't tell the story of amphibian decline as one on single event is because it's part of a massive and terrifying trend. That's happening globally right now. We're in the middle of and the cause of the sixth extinction. I wanted to talk a little bit about extinctions. Let's make this a more depressing episode. I mean meet and what my favorite courses in college was called dinosaurs in disasters so this is really gone back to my my roots route okay so you might have heard this term. The sixth extinction or the holocene extinction used a lot quite a bit lately particularly in talking about climate change inge impacts or exploitation of natural resources and often along with the word anthropology scene but what is what is the sixth extinction basically sigli since the first vertebrates evolved there have been five massive extinction events and we can see these in the fossil record the first one took place four hundred hundred and fifty million years ago which is just incomprehensible amount of time. Yes and the most recent one happened at the end of the cretaceous period around sixty five million years ago. That's the one that wiped out all the dinosaurs and tara sores. Please you soars and all the other cool animals and based on the population declines minds and extinction rates of not just amphibians but many other species some researchers believe that we're in the midst of the sixth grade extinction event and the really the only debate that seems to be left is where to actually put the starting point of that because a lot of people believe that humans were responsible for the extinction of the prehistoric mega-fauna like the giant ground sloth and mastodons and all you know all of the amazing cave bears as an irish elk all. I love getting so sad talking about this. I wish i could time travel so much. What what makes a mass extinction mass extinction because animals do go extinct for various reasons occasionally and by looking at the fossil record paleontologist can estimate about how many species of a certain group of animals like but say mammals go extinct over a long period of time and that is what we would call a background extinction rate just a normal baseline level of extinction and it's when that extinction rate skyrockets beyond the normal background great that we call it a mass extinction particularly if there are multiple groups that are undergoing higher extinction rates at the same time so i'm going to borrow a metaphor from paleontologist michael benton he suggests you think of it as the tree of life as the tree grows you have little twigs or branches that may break off along the way just as part of the growth process part of the normal weathering and a mass extinction event is like a tornado coming through in ripping off an entire half of the tree or huge branches at random places that won't grow back the background extinction rate for for infineon's is hard to estimate since there are fewer fossils than there are for something like mammals but researchers think it's very low probably around one unfitting species going extinct every thousand years. Wow whoa oh that's oh dear. The extinction rate currently is estimated to be two hundred eleven times higher than the background rate or if you take into account endangered endangered species as much as forty five thousand times higher. Oh no yep assuming endangered species are very unlikely to bounce back going to go extinct immediately yeah right yep..

michael benton infineon holocene cretaceous sixty five million years fifty million years thousand years
"holocene" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"holocene" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Geologic. Periods of time give are given pretty, you know, exciting names, I should say to make it simple. It's an ice age. So the younger dry is to the mid Holocene climactic optimum, which was the thermal maximum paleo limited illogical is the study of past lakes. So we're looking at lake and we're looking at an ice age to a thermal maximum, and what we can see preserved in the mud there. Okay. So you got your hands dirty with this one essentially right looking at sediment from Walden pond. Dating back as you say all the way to the ice age. What did you find? So we took nine meters of core at Walden pond. And we found that different isotopes. So we looked at carbon nitrogen and sulfur. They all have different reactions to temperature. And so if we were looking at the ice age up until our thermal maximum, which is a lot warmer. We can see distinct shifts and what the carbon nitrogen and sulfur are doing. And I'm put it on more simple terms. We're able to relate those three isotopes to things that are commonly happening in a lake setting. So we looked at carbon which we relate to productivity so what are little biological critters doing? How are they eating are they dying? Are they living.

Walden pond Holocene nine meters
"holocene" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

SciShow Tangents

03:35 min | 1 year ago

"holocene" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

"We get together we try to one up amaze and delight each other with facts about the universe. We are playing for glory. But we're also playing for Hank books, and they will be awarded by how we do on the different activities that we we will banana-producing throughout the show. We were we can't stay on topic here at sei tangents, but it is called tangents. So if we do divert divert from our topic at hand and had down paths to treachery. That we will decide that we must deduct a Hank buck from you if deem your tangent unworthy unto start the podcast off finish MO science bowl. We've got Stephan throughout the history of the planet. Many times creatures bodies have expanded their sizes increase sometimes exponentially as they failed their niece giving us so many of these mega sized beasts from hostile eagle to mega Don from Titanic boa to the marsupial lion. And who could forget the terror bird terrifying. There's no better word, but eventually in the late Pleistocene humans began to arrive on the scene, and whether it was from hunting climate change or just disease. These species were under siege. There was a mass extinction of creatures with great mass as human activities began to surpass, and they could never recover what a huge fail, but I guess at least we still have the blue whale. Huge. I'd love it. So I was told that this was very large ancient things not just for and fauna. And now, I'm worried about my fact, does not well, I've neither is mine. Okay. Good. It's old big old and bay. Okay. Mine is old and bit. Okay. Why is everything like before the Holocene? Everything was huge insects were bigger like. A lot more oxygen in the atmosphere. I think which is part of the reason like insects could be very big because the oxygen concentration was way up. I think the world before the Holocene is directed by Michael bay. I think that might have more to do with oxygen and working hypothesis. We haven't carbon dated him. So we don't know how old is true. So Seri have you? Brought us sub explanation for what the thing is. We're talking it's pretty broadcast olden bake stuff. I think it's more than oxygen though, that makes things when they are older because that that was specifically insects in the first period. But I think when it comes to mega-fauna I feel like it's more than oxygen involved. I didn't bring anything. Yeah. Yeah. I definitely agree with you the evolutionary pressures that makes them get very very big are weird. And also like it's very hard to say anything with certainty about the ecosystems of you know, hundreds of millions of years ago. I think that comes up a lot with the onces that. Things will grow or shrink to accommodate whatever Nisha vailable, right? So if there's a niece that's white open to be a larger before, and there's like, no big predators around than your body's is can expand to that role. Yeah. But then if the no longer confers an advantage. And then if you're say like a giant Armadillo that doesn't move very fast. And there are people with spears chasing. You becomes very bad. Yeah. Yeah. One of the one of the sort of untucked about advantage of being large is that you can eat food that has less nutritious. 'cause you have more space in your body to extract the nutrition, which is weird. You don't think about that? But like your testings are just longer or you can have multiple stomach's digestive system can be longer..

Holocene Michael bay Hank Stephan Nisha vailable Seri spears
"holocene" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"holocene" Discussed on Here & Now

"So I think there's a kind of weariness I think many Thais feel that they weren't disastrous, and they did kind of settle a very conflicted country, but the, but it's time for them to go. And if the current situation is as you describe it, a thorough -tarian light is the next situation likely to be democracy light. That's a good description. Another political pundit, he described it as a hybrid democracy. Well, the military has done is they so determined that Mr. Texan his sister Yang lack in their party won't win. And all the poll say they will do quite well in the election that they've designed an electoral system, which will make it very hard for them to win a majority as they have done in the past. And they've all. Also allowed for an entirely appointed Senate now for house two hundred fifty seat Senate, which the military is appointing and that will have a lot of say over the government. They're allowing an unelected prime minister to be chosen. I think hoping a whole load of smaller. Parties will be persuaded to back the current prime minister general pro channel or the man who led the coup to carry on. They really have you could argue rigged this election in a way, which makes it very likely will see a continuation either of some form of semi military rule semi military semi democratic rule or a very weak democratic government that relies on the military and the military is also puts in the constitution that there's a twenty year plan and economic planner a real reform plan that all governments have to follow which it has also drafted. So it's influence influence will definitely continue whoever comes out on top in this election. That's the BBC's Jonathan head joining us from Bangkok Thailand. Jonathan thank you. Jeremy good to talk to you. Well, many of the world's business and political leaders gathered this week in Davos, Switzerland for the World Economic Forum. President Trump did not go which means he missed important message from British naturalists or David Attenborough famous for presenting the planet earth series and borough is ninety two and as he accepted an award for his work on TV he told the audience that humans better hurry to deal with climate change. I am quite a tree from another age. I was born during the Holocene the name given by scientists to the truth our year period of time attic stability this allow humans to settle from and create civilizations. Them's conditions. Fostered are unique minds giving rise to international trade in ideas, as well as goods and making us the globally connected species that we are today and Berra has seen more of the world and its life forms than most of us ever will from the penguins in Antarctica to the zebras of Africa. But this week he was in the mountains of Switzerland. Speaking to another species, very wealthy human beings, Goebel, businesses, international cooperation and striving ideals. These are all possible because for millennia on a global scale nature has been largely predictable stable. No in the space of one human lifetime. Indeed. In the space of my lifetime. All that has changed. The Holocene has ended the garden of Eden is no more. We have changed the world so much that scientists say that we are now in a new geological age the anthroposophic in the age of humans. When you think about it? That is perhaps no more unsettling than fort the only conditions button humans have ever known. So far are changing and changing fast. It's tempting an understandable to.

prime minister Holocene David Attenborough Switzerland Senate Berra President Trump Davos Yang BBC Jonathan head Jeremy Goebel Bangkok Thailand Africa twenty year
"holocene" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"holocene" Discussed on Here & Now

"Well, many of the world's business and political leaders are gathered this week in Davos, Switzerland for the World Economic Forum. President Trump did not go which means he missed important message from British naturalist David Attenborough famous for presenting the planet earth series and borough is ninety two and has accepted an award for his work on TV he told the audience that humans better hurry to deal with climate change. I'm quite tree from another age. I was born during the Holocene the name given by scientists to the truth thousand year period of climatic stability this allow humans to settle foam and create civilizations. Them's conditions. Fostered are unique minds giving rise to international trade and ideas as well as goods and making us the globally connected species that we are today and Berra has seen more of the world and its life forms than most of us ever will from the penguins in Antarctica to the zebras of Africa. But this week he was in the mountains of Switzerland. Speaking to another species, very wealthy human beings, Goebel, businesses, international cooperation and the striving ideals. These are all possible because for millennia on a global scale nature has been largely predictable stable. No in the space of one human lifetime. Indeed. In the space of my lifetime. All that has changed. The Holocene ended the garden of Eden is no more. We have changed the world so much that scientists say that we are now in a new geological age the anthropology the age of humans. When you think about it? That is perhaps no more unsettling than fort the only conditions button humans have ever known. So far are.

Holocene Switzerland President Trump Berra Davos David Attenborough Goebel Africa thousand year
"holocene" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"holocene" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"That you think if these solutions were implemented scale would be twenty fifty oh, well, we get it just we just scaled them. And then we start to tweak them say realis- exceleron this one little more. Do this. You know, so forth, and we can do at twenty forty five. We can do at twenty forty. I mean, we can do it even sooner. It's it's interesting. But what we did is just took the scaling rates that were there rather than sort of imposing projecting upon them. And when we hit the total button because you can't model a solution by itself. Nothing exists by itself, and every solution interacts dynamically with so many other sectors of society. I mean food being probably the most complex in that sense. And so two months before the book came out, April seventeenth, we had laid it out we designed it. We had the plates not the publisher. And we waited the last moment to put in the numbers because you never down with a model every single model is. Wrong. And every so often you can make a model, that's useful. The only time they grind them as useful. You it's about the future. Nobody knows if you so we waited right into the end cosmologists better and better and we hit the tone about in February twenty seventeen and we were shocked. We were so surprised they're going how big my gosh. Oh, yeah. It's like this. Who would we get down to times or how how far back can we get in? What sense? Well, if we implement all these hundred solutions. Well, what to say is that when we hit the toll about an eight of the top twenty or food related. Yeah. Food. That's what I want to get back to food related like who knew right? Exactly. It's shock to me. I mean, I always knew that climate change in issue right here about factory farming of animals, methane and the release criminal side the way we farm here about the use of energy through the fertilizers. We use the pest size. We were all petrochemical and transporting foods was one fifth of all our fossil fuels are used to fuel animal production and also agriculture practices. So that's a. That's a lot twenty percent. But you know, I didn't think it was such a big solution. Like, you said it was a big hot for me. And I've been in this business for a while. So I was sort of shocked to hear that. What what you're saying? Is that the food sector isn't necessarily the biggest contributor to climate change. Although it is the second biggest right after energy apt to transport transportation, which is a lot of energy right cars or see us as ships. Yeah. So that that's pretty big. Yeah. Number two. Yeah. And and yet it's the number one solution to climate change. Which is because it's a twofer. Yeah. It does two things one is when you take agricultural practices and move away from Kato's confined footing feeding operations for ruminants an picks you not only reduce and avoid emissions. Stop putting greenhouse gases up there. But you can actually sa- question. Right. And you know in regenerative agriculture food for us. It goes on and on getting rid of wait Huckle to cops. I mean, it's such centers. So no other sector can really do that. That is stop emitting and put back home because all the carbon that's up there. That's in question in the sense that it's greater than the proximity. Two hundred eighty AM that was their up and down during the Holocene period pill last ten thousand years that carbon the extra carbon which is now CO two at Faro nine PPM. We put it up there. And so really drawdowns about coming bring it back home because it actually is ancient sunlight, that's what call gas and oil is ancient sunlight, it's ancient photosynthesis and his photo, synthesis. That can actually bring it back home and start in the soil per centuries and thousands of years so on to break the conversation down. There's there's the big picture of what are the top sectors? And I just want to briefly go over those who will put it in context. They wanna talk about the food sector in a sense of how is our food system, contributing the climate change. What are those big things that are happening that we're doing in our food system that are making it worse. And then let's go through the saloon. So I'm going to walk you through. Let's start with the big picture..

publisher Huckle Kato Holocene ten thousand years twenty percent two months one fifth
"holocene" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

Quirks and Quarks

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"holocene" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

"We just happen to pass over high WAFA glacier on a regular basis. So over time we built up a record of measurements of the ice thickness. And from that, my Danish colleagues detected a conspicuous closed depression, which turned out to be an impact crater boy. So you saw this circular feature. How did you know that it was an impact crater? Well, we didn't know initially what we did know is that it was unusual. And once we notice the depression on the map, I went in and looked at the raw data, and what I could see was evidence of a an elevated rim around the edge. And then when you plotted those points, they fit a nice circle. So that was suggestive at the very least. But what it took for us to confirm? The finding was to do a more detailed airborne radar survey in may of two thousand sixteen and then in summer of two thousand sixteen my colleague Kirk care from the natural history museum in Denmark. He actually went. Two two high WAFA glacier and gone on the ground via helicopter, and collected geologic samples essentially bags of sand that we were able to analyze the lab and confirmed that there was impact material in them. So do you have any idea? How old is impact crater is. Well, that's the the key question that we have the Larry of the ice was extremely unusual. What we saw how glacier did not resemble. What we'd seen elsewhere in Greenland the larynx for during the Holocene epoch? So the last eleven thousand seven hundred years the period of relative warrants since the last ice age that leering was well behaved normal, but before that the lowering was much more complicated. And we saw folding we saw disturbed blaring. We saw debris and trained within the ice. And that suggested to us the outside possibility that the impact might be extremely maybe only slightly predating in the Holocene when we put all of our circumstantial evidence about the age together. What we concluded is that the crater self is unlikely to predate the Pleistocene era, which is last two point six million years when ice sheet of some form has existed in Greenland. So then you've got a range here from two million years two point six million years to twelve thousand years when it could have happened. Yes. So that's a pretty large range, of course..

WAFA glacier Greenland Holocene Kirk Denmark six million years eleven thousand seven hundred twelve thousand years two million years
"holocene" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"holocene" Discussed on KQED Radio

"For the most part so the coastline would be a little bit to the west of there and so the dinosaurs that we find in new jersey are what we call the boat and float dinosaurs so these are dinosaurs that died on the beach ended up in the water probably initially sank when they get along full of water and then the body starts to decay and as those decay gases build up in the body the carcass floats they become like this big giant bobbing meet buoy at sea and as the body decays then pieces of the skeleton start to drop out of the carcass and settled to the seafloor and that's what we find in the cretaceous deposits of new jersey and those cretaceous deposits mark a geological era in eras are how geologists measure time and they usually created by these big world changing events and so in the dinosaurs go extinct and seventy five percent of life goes extinct after meteor hits the planet that's an era boundary that's when we changed from the meszaros to the senate zoe so think of an era catholic an hour on the clock right it's a lot of time tens of millions of years and like an hour it's made up of smaller increments but instead of minutes and seconds they're known as periods and epochs in our case we are in the senate zoellick era which started at the end of the time of the dinosaurs we are in the quaternary period which is within the senate zoa gera and within the quaternary we are in the holocene epoch the holocene epoch basically defined by the development of our human civilization but in geological time the holocene is tiny only the last eleven thousand seven hundred years or basically since the end of the last ice age it's roughly correlated with that the technical definition the holocene has to do with the extinction of a snail species in sicily right.

zoe zoa gera holocene senate sicily eleven thousand seven hundred seventy five percent
"holocene" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"holocene" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Formations i'm driving over well if if you were back in the cretaceous period the last of the time of the dinosaurs and you were driving from new york to philadelphia on the new jersey turnpike you would be driving across water for the most part so the coastline would be a little bit to the west of there and so the dinosaurs that we find in new jersey are what we call the boat and float dinosaurs so these are dinosaurs that died on the beach ended up in the water probably initially sank when they get a lung full of water and then the body starts to decay and as those decay guess is build up in the body the carcass floats they become like this big giant bobbing buoy at sea and as the body decays then pieces of the skeleton start to drop out of the carcass and settled seafloor and that's what we find in the cretaceous deposits of new jersey and those cretaceous deposits mark geological era in eras are how geologists measure time and they're usually created by these big world changing events and so when the dinosaurs go extinct and seventy five percent of life goes extinct after a meteor hits the planet that's an era boundary that's when we changed from the mesozoic to the santa zoe so think of an era catholic an hour on the clock right it's a lot of time tens of millions of years and like an hour it's made up of smaller increments but instead of minutes and seconds they're known as periods and epochs in our case we are in the senate zoellick era which started at the end of the time of the dinosaurs we are in the quaternary period which is within the senate zoa era and within the quaternary we are in the holocene epoch the holocene epoch basically defined by the development of our human civilization but in geological time the holocene is tiny only the last eleven thousand seven hundred years or basically since the end of the last ice age it's roughly correlated with that the technical definition the holocene has to do with the extinction of a snail species in sicily just one is they have to find a yeah they have to find a marker.

new york philadelphia holocene cretaceous senate sicily eleven thousand seven hundred seventy five percent
"holocene" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

04:41 min | 2 years ago

"holocene" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Holocene has to do with the extinction of a snail species in sicily that really yeah wow just one they have to find a yeah they have to find a marker wow so other geologists can say will there it is there's the snail there's not the snail that's one we set the boundary humans here's your age of snail died in italy right yeah but here's the thing a lot has changed since that snail died in italy we humans have made our presence felt on the planet more than any other species in earth's history and what that means for our future isn't yet clear and so it was winston churchill who said the further back you look the further ahead you can see and so if we want to know how the earth's biosphere is going to respond to the things that humans are doing to the planet right now the only evidence that we have is is how biotic systems have responded in the past and based on the past several million years we know the earth goes through natural cycles of cooling in fact twenty thousand years ago most of north america was covered in a giant ice sheet might have been a mile or more high at the north pole that extended all the way down to east brunswick new jersey or the lehigh valley in pennsylvania or deep down into illinois in the mid west just south of that where southern new jersey is that was tundra and based on that passed we know that the earth it should be getting cooler right about now but it's not it's getting warmer and the divergence between where we know we ought to be and where we're going we can attribute that to the human influence that we're having on the climate and for that reason some scientists have proposed thinking about our place in geological history differently that the world today is a lot different than it was when that snail died in italy in that we need a new term for a new epoch the anthroposophic the anthropology in essentially would be the time of human influence on the planet this controversial though because geology is a retrospective discipline the the rocks of the postseason haven't been deposited yet really but at the same time i think it's a real really useful tool in the same way that we would discuss the the iron age or the bronze age certainly we have entered into a new age on our planet we're changing things in many cases in irreparable ways and that will certainly be recorded in the geological record there's no doubt if you could go five ten fifteen million years into the future and dig down to two thousand sixteen you would be able to find the geological evidence that humans occupied the planet so today on the show the anthropic seen ideas about a new human age in age that's changing our planet in unprecedented ways and what that might mean for our future chem like var returns later with the story of one dinosaur that reveals a lot about where we're headed but first how should we relate to the idea the anthrax seen right now can we just can we just clarify this anthropic seen or enthroned or anthroposophic anthro passing i i've heard that it's a us uk difference this is emma marras she's a writer and she's covered nature and the environment for years when you say i guess i say anthrocene now you do and throw pasino my interviews am i gonna sound like a pompous jerk you know what it's possible that either version makes us sound like posture okay all right however you say it emma believes the world is full of signs that were living in the anthroposophic no matter where you are no matter what you're looking at no matter how many days you spent hiking away from the road you're still in a landscape that was shaped by humans because of climate change every place on earth has more carbon dioxide in it than it used to the sort of influence of humans is everywhere even in places we think of as untouched emma picks up the idea from the ted stage places like yellowstone or the mongolian staff or the great barrier reef for the seren getty places that we think of as kind of identified representations of a nature before we screwed everything up and in a way they are less impacted by our day to.

Holocene sicily five ten fifteen million years twenty thousand years million years
"holocene" Discussed on Channel 955

Channel 955

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"holocene" Discussed on Channel 955

"The hells what is that is classic in his early holocene is there a vittal said i was like what is that but there was like a bomb or something in the studio was like what is going on around here oh my god all right mojo in the morning man we have the dirty coming up here in a little bit what what's on the way with the dirty so this new twist in angelina jolie and brad pitt's to your custody battle that's becoming very large and jamie foxx a story about jamie foxx not a good story about him slapping a woman with his junk and get into that good lord coming up in the turkey all right so you yesterday on the show we started off the program to our surprise finding out that slim was buying a moped i wanted to replay a bit of that so everybody could hear the conversation because you might have missed it if you don't listen to our show early at like six o'clock in the morning or if maybe you don't check us out on the iheartradio app if you do thank you for doing that by the way the iheartradio app in the mojo in the morning channel that we have their replace the show commercial free in its entirety after the show is over with but he drove his moped to work today and it's about to rain there's a there's a my app just alerted me that we're moments away from rain and it's parked out in the parking lot here at the station.

holocene angelina jolie jamie foxx brad pitt iheartradio
"holocene" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"holocene" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"Do they call it proxy okay which was samples of trees which were supposed to be showing when temperature was going up and down in trouble is and these are very old trees and they could see the tree rings and actually understand whether it was hotter or colder at times in the past the trouble is all of these proxies you know treat proxies for example or not just controlled by temperature they're controlled by things like precipitation and you know whether or not the tree is invaded by insects and things like that so that's not actually something that i'm an expert in dr ball is an expert in that he's very much working on that particular field but from what i understand the problem is hockey stick showed essentially that there was fairly flat temperature for many centuries and then it suddenly skyrocketed in in the past century but in fact we know that's not true because the medieval warm period for example around two thousand ad the vikings were sailing in waters that are you know now i always covered with ice you go back even further you get to the roman period when jesus christ was on the earth and you have the minoan warm period there's all kinds of warm periods the warmest jury actually since the end of the last glacial was something called the holocene optimum and those were the days when they thought that warming was good and in fact in general warming is good and so indeed it's it's a mistake to think that the small amount of warming experienced is in any way a problem come here 'cause my guess executive director international climate science coalition tom here we have about a minute left but but but ninety seven percent of scientists believed that manmade activity is causing all these dire effects on our planet what did the ninety seven percent well you know they never ask the right question they ask scientists questions like do you think humans contribute to climate change and that maybe the case we'd probably do in fact we do in a lot of ways the real question and then they never do polls on this kind of question is they should be asking experts who focus on the causes of climate change that we will we will cause dangerous climate change in the.

hockey holocene executive director ninety seven percent
"holocene" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"holocene" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"I mean that was the hardest part you know drawn bigs be had basically been reading before you told the his whole life he all he did was in fact the last couple of decades of his career just kind of red books and drank himself into obscurity so he is you know all he had been doing his whole life was researching for this script or or not the script but the bottom of the original mapombere on and not me you know having to and other stuff so uh them so when uh the hardest part was all of the research you know of because i wanted to make sure that the weren't mistakes and wanted mature that we were fair to every point of view and that every point of view was was basically reasonable phnom that was the goal whether it's been achieved or not i don't know but that was the goal on so that was the single hardest part definitely was her riding in while the theological no i remember that in the in the in the in the process of writing the difference the drafts i mean honest that was one of the reasons that i you know put off making this movie was it was a so intimidated it was intimidating to make a sequel to movie that so many people love so much and basically just open myself up for euro you ruined everything uh which is inevitable uh and and the sheer amount of work it was going to be to to learn all this crap and write about it you know intelligently well yeah i mean you never predict when an audiences is going to do i wrote the last halloween movie in prior one you know.

halloween
"holocene" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"holocene" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"Um i don't know how casse i've blacked out counter the way women forget giving birth i've forgotten how no i mean you know unfortunately unfortunate whatever like my whole you know quote unquote career is making lowbudget movies you know um so you just get used to that i mean how many how many locations word to your dear mick recall um uh you know we were like two days of the college and we were the girls apartment and leak owes apartment was was the same location so that was a day and then at the you're out in the woods for his sojourn was a day and you know arts house was a day but it we did something else that night i'm sure uh the the basement was a set we actually built a sat on a stage which is just amazing for lowbudget movie and we were on that for two and a half days on any other half a day we did did all the driving stuff on you know i forget now also you you have a three of the same actress from the first peace what's at you have three the same actors for that from the first movie yes the last one supposed to be a surprise right like when harry turns up that's supposed to be for people that are big fans my hope is that for people are big fancy the original movie you know when when they see harry the go in like it'll be a really big thing bathroom so in terms of the the the card and the horse a were you committed to getting those actors if you had not gotten william cat for example the w what how did you make certain that you've got the actors and a well however that process worker a guy gotcha on well the first thing i did was meet with david lee smith and make sure he was gonna wanna do it and scared the hell scare the hell out of me when i first saw him because he hid dumb.

mick harry david lee smith william two days
"holocene" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"holocene" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"What i finally landed on was the idea of trying to get a tv series and of doing the tv pilot um and we tried raising money for that but we couldn't raise money for independent tv pilot so that's one had the idea of going back to what i grew up on which was you know like when you see the hulk or the sixmilliondollar man or kung fu it'd be this ninety minute movie that you'd see on tv and then they make a series out of it like months later the be a serious insult cool they turned that movie new series i mean i in retrospect against those were pilots but they were featurelength pilots so we thought will make basically a featurelength pilot and presented to the world as a movie but then try to set it up as a tv series that's how we made thank you again okay well uh obviously this one is i mean they sume a lot of people here seem we're by the way is eric harrison irks here there's the producers and cowriter eric wilkinson and all around great guy this one is far more uh logistically expansive and uh obviously required a lot more of production value have had a lot more production value the first one was shot a essentially in one room in one cabin and it's it's obvious how you can keno keep costs down although one hundred ten thousand dollars is is really i shot a movie in twelve days on one location and it costs three hundred thousand dollars so did it for one hundred is like astonishing to me but this one is m is far more expensive and uh you know just just wh wh i wanna ask you what the budget is i mean you were generous enough to tell us where the budget the first when his but what how did you deal with the far greater and more ambitious production in this sequel while just tell you i don't care was shot the movie in twelve days of for just under three hundred thousand dollars.

eric harrison eric wilkinson three hundred thousand dollars twelve days one hundred ten thousand dolla sixmilliondollar ninety minute