23 Burst results for "Holocene"

The Anthropocene Radical: The Scientist Who Saved the World

Science Friction

01:38 min | 5 months ago

The Anthropocene Radical: The Scientist Who Saved the World

"Reaching this week. With a dummy speed was year two thousand a month was february and a bunch of top. Scientists are meeting in mexico there with the international geos fee biosphere program which investigates global change australia. Climate scientists will stephanie's. He's eats executive director at the time and a presentation is underway talking about recent changes and get referring to the hall of fame now. The whole scene is the last approximately twelve thousand us a birth history epoch geologic on skill a stable warm period and it's the one that's allowed humanity to agriculture villages cities as we know today before the holocene was the pleistocene the ice age and that lasted over two and a half million years. Geological time is epic until that meeting in mexico though the hall of fame was definitely considered the geological age. We are in but someone important in that room. And i could see paul. Getting agitate was about to lose his tampa. It would sort of build up to something and you could. You could see visibly that he was getting agitated with what was being said. We'll stephens talking here about dutch scientist. Paul crutzen the pioneering cast and nobel laureate and finally he just burst out and interrupted new. Stop saying the policy or not in the whole scene anymore. And then he said we're in the and then he stopped because he had actually worked out what he was going to say they were in and then he just blurted out and throw cosc-

Mexico Stephanie Australia Paul Crutzen Hall Of Fame Tampa Stephens Paul
Boris Johnson says Britain needs its own Green New Deal

FT Politics

08:07 min | 11 months ago

Boris Johnson says Britain needs its own Green New Deal

"Boris johnson has always been keen to burn it his green credentials and put tackling climate. Change at the front of his government's. Agenda is done so again this week setting out a long-awaited plan to make the uk a world leader in green technology as with most government announcements. However that will plenty of spending commitments already made being re announced but the most auden criticism came from the tories who said it goes against. The party's new electoral base and could cost them votes but business secretary. Alex chama rejected this notion. This is about leveling up across our country. We're talking about twelve billion pounds and he has around. Four billion pounds of this is new money. Other money is money that's been pledged previously on deed lost budget in in in march Book very importantly This billion pounds will help to bring in three times as much in terms of private sector money and supporting create two hundred and fifty thousand jobs but the have been some critics of this plan arguing that it really doesn't go far enough. The shuttle business sexually. Ed milliband made this point. There is an urgency. That isn't enough ambition. That isn't a real plan. He's got to do better in all of our interests that he does better. We will keep pushing the government on ambition on jobs on appropriate plan to rise to the scale of the climate emergency. We face chimp. Let's begin with this. Ten point plan of boys. Johnson set out in article in the financial times. In fact what did you make of it and how much of it was new money and new policy okay so this was a very long awaited announcement. They were meant to originally Back in the summer and it slipped because of pressures on number ten prime minister announced twelve billion pounds states investment program when you went through the numbers at ten about three billion pounds this new at included five hundred million hydrogen one billion pounds insulation three hundred million pounds for nuclear industry. I think what was interesting even if the money was pretty small. Change when you compare it said of the countries like franz chemmy refute these comparisons jeremy kuban late manifesto prince lansing which lici tuten sums of hundreds of billions of pounds of buried money. Guns was agreement. Deo i think it's still a political moment because as always this tension between people saying let's go green other Saying it will damage economy People in cost known areas concerned type. Slutty jim republic who worry about paying extra tax also green initiatives ambrose johnson especially saying worry we can. Tiny's these things together. We make sure. Green economic growth happens in some of the left behind redwood areas and talking about place humble months for over northeast. police o'clock. It's wonderful to have you on the podcast. What were your thoughts. When you saw this announcement here because johnson has talked a lot about green policy arisons locked summer but it fuses if that rhetoric has increase as jim said that is new money on some new policies to go with it to there is a but by i know about this was a. It's brilliant. Hear a british conservative prime minister coming up with a plan like this. Because although we've had david cameron promising the government ever and then we had theresa may actually legislating for a net zero twenty fifty which was very pioneering for a country the size of britain at the time. The thing is. We really haven't seen a prime minister set out in a speech or in a plan like this thing as visionary really and it is a great vision. Unfortunately it's really not matched by detailed plans and considering that a large chunk of it is dependent on trying to mobilize private investor capital. I'm just concerned that it's really not going to make. Investors are not going to invest unless they see the detailed policy until they know what the shape of any sort of regulatory framework has got to look like really not going to get people plowing in at the rate needed to fulfill this and when it comes to actually meeting that net zero goal twenty fifty. It's really not on track to do that. Unfortunately the classic example about chocolate changing which is provided uncertainty from best is if you look at one of the atoms. Boris johnson announcement which was carbon capture storage. Which is basically succour Boats on you bury it. The browns the tools boom cameron government promised been impounds towards that twenty fifteen a group of plug on that money or johnston's done this year's he promised eight hundred pounds in the spring budget yet. Another challenge main pounds this week. Hey presto Where we were five years ago with basically almost leg progress on cca. Yeah that's exactly. It had this sort of crisis. Feel about it really. Is you know god. We've got to do something on climate. Okay what do we do on electric cars. Oh i know will bring the target ford. That's actually relatively easy to do. It's important but unless it's matched by holocene setting out how people are going to be able to buy more electric cars and how the rollout of the charging infrastructure is going to work. You know it's really difficult to see how it works. I expected a guest to say something a little more meditative parts of this plan on you when it comes to the targets for making sure that new homes not built with natural gas boilers in them. For example you know that's really quite important. And of course at target itself has been brought forward slightly from twenty five to twenty twenty three at same these support for hydrogen also important but again. You look at what germany's doing in its recovery plan. It's got around. Forty forty billion set aside for electric cars renewable energy and so forth and france around thirty billion euros set aside nine billion of that is for hydrogen renewables alone so compared to that. The u k plan does look a little small were jim. This is one thing critics of picked up on the plan. Even who is labour's shadow. Business secretary has said it doesn't remotely meet the scale of what is needed. I think greenpeace charity have said similar things to all those criticisms fad. You because when it comes to government spending you can always make the case you should be spending more doing more radical things and as please note. This is a conservative government. This is not natural territory. Full them yet. But i think the first point to make our show on the business sexually set on the radio. This is a down payment but that will be more. Fiscal events is quite possible than the spending review. The we see next week that could be more money for example nuclear. They could say they're gonna stop negotiation sizewell c Pass station which would of course involve more money. And i think as well now. He's talking about how these provides whole sums compared to labor government beginning right now the thing to remember Tackle climate change isn't just about state. Money is also about regulation so of course the bundle twenty fifty borrowing in new pets from these laws as an example of wet government does not have to spend the money it can regulate and things happen and so many of these decisions of stems from theresa. May's decision donning moments of her administration commit twenty-fifty net zero target. Only kind of off the thought. She the mohanchris coop suasion joyfulness. She bandied about it even now known. Would think theresa may is great green ahead and yet she took this decision from which all sorts of future decisions have the stem. But i think to remember names of bishops is very seats. Promotional world where Christie is coming from fossil fuels. Were kind of on talking for. I think you have to remember that. The british energy system like any other system But also transport system unfairly household energy or freeways needs to be decarbonised. And i remember whether we're on track to do that. Speed that needs to

Alex Chama Ed Milliband Boris Johnson Franz Chemmy Jeremy Kuban Prince Lansing Lici Tuten Slutty Jim Ambrose Johnson Cameron Government Financial Times Theresa David Cameron
Boris Johnson says Britain needs its own Green New Deal

FT Politics

08:07 min | 11 months ago

Boris Johnson says Britain needs its own Green New Deal

"Boris johnson has always been keen to burn it his green credentials and put tackling climate. Change at the front of his government's. Agenda is done so again this week setting out a long-awaited plan to make the uk a world leader in green technology as with most government announcements. However that will plenty of spending commitments already made being re announced but the most auden criticism came from the tories who said it goes against. The party's new electoral base and could cost them votes but business secretary. Alex chama rejected this notion. This is about leveling up across our country. We're talking about twelve billion pounds and he has around. Four billion pounds of this is new money. Other money is money that's been pledged previously on deed lost budget in in in march Book very importantly This billion pounds will help to bring in three times as much in terms of private sector money and supporting create two hundred and fifty thousand jobs but the have been some critics of this plan arguing that it really doesn't go far enough. The shuttle business sexually. Ed milliband made this point. There is an urgency. That isn't enough ambition. That isn't a real plan. He's got to do better in all of our interests that he does better. We will keep pushing the government on ambition on jobs on appropriate plan to rise to the scale of the climate emergency. We face chimp. Let's begin with this. Ten point plan of boys. Johnson set out in article in the financial times. In fact what did you make of it and how much of it was new money and new policy okay so this was a very long awaited announcement. They were meant to originally Back in the summer and it slipped because of pressures on number ten prime minister announced twelve billion pounds states investment program when you went through the numbers at ten about three billion pounds this new at included five hundred million hydrogen one billion pounds insulation three hundred million pounds for nuclear industry. I think what was interesting even if the money was pretty small. Change when you compare it said of the countries like franz chemmy refute these comparisons jeremy kuban late manifesto prince lansing which lici tuten sums of hundreds of billions of pounds of buried money. Guns was agreement. Deo i think it's still a political moment because as always this tension between people saying let's go green other Saying it will damage economy People in cost known areas concerned type. Slutty jim republic who worry about paying extra tax also green initiatives ambrose johnson especially saying worry we can. Tiny's these things together. We make sure. Green economic growth happens in some of the left behind redwood areas and talking about place humble months for over northeast. police o'clock. It's wonderful to have you on the podcast. What were your thoughts. When you saw this announcement here because johnson has talked a lot about green policy arisons locked summer but it fuses if that rhetoric has increase as jim said that is new money on some new policies to go with it to there is a but by i know about this was a. It's brilliant. Hear a british conservative prime minister coming up with a plan like this. Because although we've had david cameron promising the government ever and then we had theresa may actually legislating for a net zero twenty fifty which was very pioneering for a country the size of britain at the time. The thing is. We really haven't seen a prime minister set out in a speech or in a plan like this thing as visionary really and it is a great vision. Unfortunately it's really not matched by detailed plans and considering that a large chunk of it is dependent on trying to mobilize private investor capital. I'm just concerned that it's really not going to make. Investors are not going to invest unless they see the detailed policy until they know what the shape of any sort of regulatory framework has got to look like really not going to get people plowing in at the rate needed to fulfill this and when it comes to actually meeting that net zero goal twenty fifty. It's really not on track to do that. Unfortunately the classic example about chocolate changing which is provided uncertainty from best is if you look at one of the atoms. Boris johnson announcement which was carbon capture storage. Which is basically succour Boats on you bury it. The browns the tools boom cameron government promised been impounds towards that twenty fifteen a group of plug on that money or johnston's done this year's he promised eight hundred pounds in the spring budget yet. Another challenge main pounds this week. Hey presto Where we were five years ago with basically almost leg progress on cca. Yeah that's exactly. It had this sort of crisis. Feel about it really. Is you know god. We've got to do something on climate. Okay what do we do on electric cars. Oh i know will bring the target ford. That's actually relatively easy to do. It's important but unless it's matched by holocene setting out how people are going to be able to buy more electric cars and how the rollout of the charging infrastructure is going to work. You know it's really difficult to see how it works. I expected a guest to say something a little more meditative parts of this plan on you when it comes to the targets for making sure that new homes not built with natural gas boilers in them. For example you know that's really quite important. And of course at target itself has been brought forward slightly from twenty five to twenty twenty three at same these support for hydrogen also important but again. You look at what germany's doing in its recovery plan. It's got around. Forty forty billion set aside for electric cars renewable energy and so forth and france around thirty billion euros set aside nine billion of that is for hydrogen renewables alone so compared to that. The u k plan does look a little small were jim. This is one thing critics of picked up on the plan. Even who is labour's shadow. Business secretary has said it doesn't remotely meet the scale of what is needed. I think greenpeace charity have said similar things to all those criticisms fad. You because when it comes to government spending you can always make the case you should be spending more doing more radical things and as please note. This is a conservative government. This is not natural territory. Full them yet. But i think the first point to make our show on the business sexually set on the radio. This is a down payment but that will be more. Fiscal events is quite possible than the spending review. The we see next week that could be more money for example nuclear. They could say they're gonna stop negotiation sizewell c Pass station which would of course involve more money. And i think as well now. He's talking about how these provides whole sums compared to labor government beginning right now the thing to remember Tackle climate change isn't just about state. Money is also about regulation so of course the bundle twenty fifty borrowing in new pets from these laws as an example of wet government does not have to spend the money it can regulate and things happen and so many of these decisions of stems from theresa. May's decision donning moments of her administration commit twenty-fifty net zero target. Only kind of off the thought. She the mohanchris coop suasion joyfulness. She bandied about it even now known. Would think theresa may is great green ahead and yet she took this decision from which all sorts of future decisions have the stem. But i think to remember names of bishops is very seats. Promotional world where Christie is coming from fossil fuels. Were kind of on talking for. I think you have to remember that. The british energy system like any other system But also transport system unfairly household energy or freeways needs to be decarbonised. And i remember whether we're on track to do that. Speed that needs to

Alex Chama Ed Milliband Boris Johnson Franz Chemmy Jeremy Kuban Prince Lansing Lici Tuten Slutty Jim Ambrose Johnson Cameron Government Financial Times Theresa David Cameron
Boris Johnson Lays Out U.K. Plan To Go Carbon Neutral

FT Politics

03:05 min | 11 months ago

Boris Johnson Lays Out U.K. Plan To Go Carbon Neutral

"Johnson has talked a lot about green policy arisons locked summer but it fuses if that rhetoric has increase as jim said that is new money on some new policies to go with it to there is a but by i know about this was a. It's brilliant. Hear a british conservative prime minister coming up with a plan like this. Because although we've had david cameron promising the government ever and then we had theresa may actually legislating for a net zero twenty fifty which was very pioneering for a country the size of britain at the time. The thing is. We really haven't seen a prime minister set out in a speech or in a plan like this thing as visionary really and it is a great vision. Unfortunately it's really not matched by detailed plans and considering that a large chunk of it is dependent on trying to mobilize private investor capital. I'm just concerned that it's really not going to make. Investors are not going to invest unless they see the detailed policy until they know what the shape of any sort of regulatory framework has got to look like really not going to get people plowing in at the rate needed to fulfill this and when it comes to actually meeting that net zero goal twenty fifty. It's really not on track to do that. Unfortunately the classic example about chocolate changing which is provided uncertainty from best is if you look at one of the atoms. Boris johnson announcement which was carbon capture storage. Which is basically succour Boats on you bury it. The browns the tools boom cameron government promised been impounds towards that twenty fifteen a group of plug on that money or johnston's done this year's he promised eight hundred pounds in the spring budget yet. Another challenge main pounds this week. Hey presto Where we were five years ago with basically almost leg progress on cca. Yeah that's exactly. It had this sort of crisis. Feel about it really. Is you know god. We've got to do something on climate. Okay what do we do on electric cars. Oh i know will bring the target ford. That's actually relatively easy to do. It's important but unless it's matched by holocene setting out how people are going to be able to buy more electric cars and how the rollout of the charging infrastructure is going to work. You know it's really difficult to see how it works. I expected a guest to say something a little more meditative parts of this plan on you when it comes to the targets for making sure that new homes not built with natural gas boilers in them. For example you know that's really quite important. And of course at target itself has been brought forward slightly from twenty five to twenty twenty three at same these support for hydrogen also important but again. You look at what germany's doing in its recovery plan. It's got around. Forty forty billion set aside for electric cars renewable energy and so forth and france around thirty billion euros set aside nine billion of that is for hydrogen renewables alone so compared to that. The u k plan does look a little

Cameron Government David Cameron Theresa Johnson JIM Boris Johnson Britain Browns Government Johnston CCA Ford Germany France
"holocene" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

09:14 min | 1 year ago

"holocene" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"And welcome back to Costa Coast. George Noory with you, Graham Hancock with us as we talked about his latest work America before. In a few moments, we will be three minute video up a coast to coast am dot com will let you know about that. The tide lights Many of the things Graham has been talking about in his book America Before Grandpa. Why's It So controversial for archaeologists and others who purport that Columbus did not find the Americas in 14 92 as the first person but that the civilizations were there way before that. Why's that so controversial? Yes. I mean, you're right there. That was a long held view. Horrible idea that the Americans were quote unquote discovered by Columbus. I mean, what? What nonsense Even even in the unorthodox archaeology, we know that there were human beings in America for, uh, for and more than 10,000 years before Columbus. What's controversial is the notion that there were human beings in America. Not 10 or 12 or 13,000 years before Columbus but 130,000 years before Columbus this changes the whole story of world history. It changes the whole way We look at the origins and the development of civilization. I think that there was a very deeply rooted view that civilization belongs to the old world. Catania, Egypt Uh, later on Europe. These where these were considered to be the Heartland of civilisation to places where civilization grew up on, But it became so fixed in in the psyche of archeologists and so fix generally in the way that we look at the past, but it became Very difficult to consider that America might have had a huge role to play in the origins of civilisation in the first step. Through that realization is understanding that the Americans were not recently inhabited by human beings. They've been inhabited by human beings so longer than Europe was inhabited by human beings. And once we take that step and start looking at the evidence A whole new picture begins to emerge, and this is why I wrote America before. I think the Americans have bean neglected in studies of world history. They've just been set aside, and it's like a huge piece of the jigsaw puzzle is missing from the picture, and I tried to pour That piece of the jigsaw puzzle and, of course, When we talk about a lost civilisation. We also have to be talking about how and when it became law on right back to my first book on the subject of a lost civilization, which was fingerprints of the gods. Published in 1995. I was drawing attention to the period of around 12. 1005 100 years ago. Originally 10,500 bc a time when something really awful, devastating and cataclysmic. Happened in the world and white, the whole civilizations from memory bank When I wrote fingerprints of the gods, I was I was absolutely certain that there had been a global cataclysm around that period, and I explored a number of possibilities that might account Oh, that Catholic Cleveland. But what? I wasn't to know that at that time that view is extremely controversial. It was not supported by any mainstream scientists. What I wasn't to know was that many years later in 2007 and subsequently in hundreds of academic papers. Would come an investigation by leading mainstream scientists revealing that indeed, a massive global cataclysm did occur in exactly the window that I had indicated way back in 1995 in fingerprints of the guards in that window. Is the geological epic episode called the Younger, Dry as it starts 12,800 years ago. You know, at that time the world was gradually emerging from the ice age. It was warming up. Things were looking good. And then something really terrible happened and send everybody back, didn't it? Sorry. It's sending everybody back and we set the clock if you like. There was a massive foreign global temperatures, huge, deep freeze, kid. But just at the beginning of that deep freeze, there was an anomalous. Very puzzling, very sudden rise in sea level. A lot of water had been released from the ice cap and mainly from the North American icecap because the evidence that's come out since 2007 And the most recent papers were published in nature just in March this year in 2020. Eyes that the earth and counted the fragments of a disintegrating comets Comets a very curious thing that it's possible to have a giant comets, which are more than 100, kilometers in diameter. Come in, from interstellar space and to the solar system and get trapped in an orbit around the sun, and sometimes those old, it's cross the orbit of the Earth. Comics. Have a habit once they get close to a star. And our son, of course, is a star. Once they get close to start, I have a habit of fragmenting of breaking up into multiple parts. Instead of one object. You have hundreds or thousands of tens of thousands of objects. And those objects. If you're dealing with a fragmenting giant comet, those subjects could be a kilometer or two kilometers in diameter individually, and that could be hundreds of thousands of them on the evidence is that the path through such a cloud of debris? 12,800 years ago, There were massive impact in North America directly on the North American ice Cap. North America, roughly north of Minnesota, was completely covered in ice on DH. The impacts were on the North American ice captain. That's why there was this. Rise in sea level 12,800 years ago why we see the dialogue of the megaphone of the masses. Extinctions. The evidence is that there were a series of further smaller impact. And then 11,600 years ago, another Series of gigantic impact on another to drive in the level and that's when we enter. What is thought of as the modern geological age, the Holocene and that's where our memories seem to begin. And what I'm saying is that our memories go back long before that, that they've got scrubbed in this horrendous global cataclysm. What happened to this civilization tens of thousands of years ago in terms of relics, how they lived their bones. Where are they? There's so much evidence I was talking before the break about about these ancient maps. They're very compelling because they show the world as it looked during the last ice age. Did something. Just imagine Math. Or is it based on real observation? Then? As we get closer to these maps and look into them, we find that they incorporate really evolved science. They incorporated freely, accurate relatives longitude. Do longitude is is a difficult technical problem, especially if you need tohave an accurate chronometer, which will work on an ocean. In order to get accurate longer. Choose on a map on our society didn't have the technology to do that until the late 18th century. But these very ancient maps that we stated this off his map. He based his map one More than 100 Horseman. It shows a huge island off the coast of North America. On running up the middle of that island. Very clearly depicted is a row off huge megalithic. That island is now underwater on that row of huge megalithic, the famous enemy road, which I have dived on. It's shown above water in material Reese map and that takes us back precisely to this episode of cataclysm, the last time that this area was above water, so There is evidence that we're dealing with a civilisation that understood that we live on a planet that the planet is the globe. They measured the planet. They We're able to navigate accurately at sea, the great Pyramid. Incorporate the dimensions of our planet if you take the base perimeter of the great painted and multiply that by 43,200. You get the equatorial come from here if you take the height of the great pyramid Multiply it by 43,200. You get the pole, a radius of the air on the number. 43,200 isn't random. It's derived from a key motion of the earth itself. Which is called the profession of the axis about profession unfold that the rate of one degree Every 72 years on 43,200 is a multiple off 72. So they've given us a monument. That is almost precisely aligned to true north. The great Pyramid weighs six million tons has got a footprint off..

America North America Columbus Europe Graham Hancock Costa Coast George Noory Catania Cleveland Holocene Egypt Minnesota Reese
Humans Have Caused the Most Dramatic Climate Change in 3 Million Years

The Science Show

11:14 min | 1 year ago

Humans Have Caused the Most Dramatic Climate Change in 3 Million Years

"Recently Assad with some research colleagues at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, a look at a brand new science article in which are climate model for the first time had recreated the climate on earth over the last three million years, which covers the entire geological pleistocene epoch. The Pleistocene is so important as it constitutes a point of reference for life on. Earth. Because although sure our planet has existed for four point, five, billion years it's only in the last million years. That earth has looked at least roughly in the way as we know it, the continents were roughly where they are today. The North and South Poles were covered with ice. The atmosphere had a similar chemical composition to what we have today. Planet, Earth. Our earth has only existed for three million years. All, comparisons further back in time are quite meaningless. And the manuscript I hold in my hand is not just reaching. My brain is also striking straight into my heart. A deep humility settles in when look at the graph showing the variations in mean global temperature on earth over the past three, million years it shows that we have never throughout the whole plasticine exceeded two degrees global warming compared to our pre industrial average temperature of approximately fourteen degrees. Never. This means that Earth despite all the stresses and natural shocks from fluctuations and Solar Radiation Volcanic eruptions, asteroid impacts and earthquakes has regulated itself within an incredibly narrow range minus four degrees. Celsius were in deep ice age plus two degree Celsius. We're in a warm interglacial period lasting three million years. It's absolutely incredible. Especially since we know why. It's earth's ability to self regulate the ability of the oceans to absorb and store heat the ability of the ice sheets to reflect solar radiation the ability of the forests to absorb carbon dioxide and the ability to be a safe and store greenhouse gases. The planet is a biophysical self playing piano whose music sheet stays. Within the minus four plus to scale. If that is not caused for humidity than I do not know what humidity is. And a deep concern in hundred and fifty years. In the geological blink of an eye, we risk now tearing this Planetary Symphony to shreds. Let that sink in. The global average temperature is now changing hundred and seventy times faster than over the last seven thousand years and it's doing. So in the wrong direction upwards when the current orbital forcing meaning are distance to the sun and the current low level of solar activity means that the temperature should in fact, be slowing down. You don't have to be a physicist to understand that we have a problem. Climate skeptics like to argue that historically the climate has fluctuated so much. So why shouldn't it be fluctuating now? Obviously. It fluctuates. But we are now racing towards plus three to plus four degrees warming. Sceptics like to bring up the little ice age the time when Swedish King Call The tenth Gustav Marched His army across the deep frozen great belt and the little belt in sixteen fifty eight to beat the Danes or that the vikings grew grapes in Greenland during the medieval warm period. Yes. Of course, this is true but it all occurred within the natural boundaries of minus four and plus two degrees. And it's here within this sweet spot that we must remain for our own sakes and our future? In August two, thousand, eighteen at the peak of that year's drought and fires in Sweden and Europe. We published a scientific paper where we tried to establish whether we are at risk of pushing the entire planet away from its current state of equilibrium, the Holocene epoch where we have been since the last ice age. This is fundamental. Our Planet Earth can be in three different states. It can be in a deep ice age as it was twenty thousand years ago with large is. Extending over the northern and Southern Hemisphere with over two kilometers of ice above our heads here in Sweden an ice extending as far south as Berlin. This is an equilibrium state as it is not only lower solar radiation that keeps earth in an ice age. It is also the feedbacks caused by ice. As the ice sheets grow earth gets whiter, which means that more more incoming heat from the sun is reflected back to space more ice means it gets colder which means even more is and suddenly you have a self reinforcing mechanism. This is what makes an ice age and equilibrium earth remains. They're not only because of the external forces from the sun but also thanks to these inbuilt biophysical processes in this case, the color of ice. Earth can also be in an interglacial an intermediate state, which is what we have today where was still have permanent is sites at the polls and we have glaciers on land and the biosphere with forests, grasslands, and lakes roughly as Earth as we know it. It is these two equilibrium states and only these two states that the planet has been over the last three million years that is during the entire Pleistocene. But then there is a third state when earth tips over from self cooling feedback loops to self heating feedback loops, which leads to an inevitable journey to becoming a hot tropical planet that is four, five, six, potentially seven, eight degrees warmer than today where in principle, all the ice has gone and the surface of the ocean is more than fifty meters higher than it is today and where the conditions for live is fundamentally different all over the entire planet. This is what we call hothouse earth. Or Highs Zaid hot time in German where the article when we published it drew so much attention doing this burning heat wave in the summer of twenty eighteen that highs Zaid was chosen as the word of the year in Germany. In this research, we tried for the first time to identify the global mean temperature at which we are in danger of tipping over from our current state, the Holocene interglacial, and embarking on a journey that would inevitably take us to highlight our conclusion is that we cannot exclude that the planetary threshold. The tipping point where we kickoff unstoppable processes of self amplified warming is at two degrees. Bear in mind we are today at one point one very mind were moving fast along a path that reaches one point five in potentially only twenty, thirty years and two degrees in forty fifty years. This is one I would argue of the biggest. Challenges of all to test whether we are right. Can the planet cope with or Canet not cope with higher temperatures than two degrees? But. My conclusion based on the knowledge we have today is that the planetary threshold to avoid triggering high Zaid is most likely at two degrees. Of course, it's not so that Earth will fall off a cliff at two degrees. The risk is rather that we would then pass a threshold where the shift towards hindsight would become unstoppable. In other words, we face an urgency at the timeframe whether we pushed the on button on not triggering stoppable warming is within the next few decades meaning essentially. Now, if we pressed the UNBUTTON and kick off the great planetary machinery with feedback loops causing self warming, then the full impacts may play out over three four, five, hundred years before we reach a new equilibrium state hothouse. A planet with over ten meters, sea level rise temperatures, and extreme droughts, floods, and heatwaves making large parts of earth uninhabitable a planet we do not want a planet that cannot support US humans. This requires from us that we understand two different time horizons. The short term time of commitment. When do we push the unbutton but then also the long term time horizon when we have the full impact hitting on people these are different but ethically, I would argue only the trigger moment counts, we cannot leave a damaged planet beyond repair to future generations. So to summarize the decisive moment when we press don't press the button lies within the next ten to twenty years. With consequences for all future generations a moral, bum. Are High site article concluded that degree Celsius is our ultimate planetary threshold that we need to stay away from. This article actually came out six months before our climate modeling showed that we've never exceeded two degrees throughout the whole pleistocene, the last three million years. In Two thousand nine, our planetary boundaries size showed that one point five degrees is a boundary we should not transgress because then we enter a danger zone of uncertainty. So perhaps you do understand my feeling a deep concern of humility in the face of our latest scientific findings, which really only says, one thing tipping points are real and if they're crossed, they lead to unstoppable changes, which requires a new relationship between us and our planet, and that we realize that we are facing a new ethics. What we do today will determine the future on earth for all our children and their children.

Zaid Sweden Potsdam Institute For Climate Assad Physicist Holocene Europe Gustav Vikings United States Canet Southern Hemisphere Germany Berlin
"holocene" Discussed on Switch4Good

Switch4Good

11:23 min | 1 year ago

"holocene" Discussed on Switch4Good

"India so I said Okay I. I went to the edge of the desert in Indian Rajastan where people see. All the Tigers gone pretty much you know. So the jungle is a dying The desert is moving in so you can see the desert expanding and of course I went and asked them. Do you think that it's climate. Change happening is it of course is happening. We're talking about happening now is happening. No because they don't have AC they're they're experiencing it so they feel it so they know things are changing and I asked him. Why do you think things are changing this? Because God's angry with us I said why is got angry with you because we cut down the trees in the event straight to the root of the problem. They understood the root of the problem. Being I'll treatment of nature. This is Oh treatment of nature in the relationship with nature. That is the main the Cox of it right. See if our relationship with nature in which via treating nature as sacred as something. That'd be a here to take care of everything will be fine but if the organizer on that not just talk about it. We have to organize on that goal here to of nature so for that we have to tell a different story see. That's what I had to find this book because I started working on the research for this book when my granddaughter was born and this book is called Carbon Yoga for those watching our youtube channel and just listening. It's called Carbon Yoga the vegan metamorphosis. Right see I I. I became Vegan in two thousand eight very quickly after I started working on then mom and because I realize the Dulles number one thing you could do to address an mom so this is one of the systems changes they believe is very important. It's up it's the foundation of the new system of novelist. Nonviolence is weakness the current system of normalized violence. The foundation is violence towards animals. If that's normalized in our society like it's got that did yeah. It's accepted widely right. Yeah it has to be normalized because if you don't if you cannot commit violence an animal's how can you commit violence and other people right? How can how wars are you have endless wars so you have to have that violence towards animals as the foundation so this is why a night is built on document but once you talk about egoism this is why people in the current system? Don't WanNa talk reaganism because it's completely antithetical to the current system. So when you say you know I don't want to hurt any animal for any reason whatsoever. Obviously you don't WanNa hurt people either right so it becomes completely different system. There is no longer a hierarchy. It's hard treating everyone with respect the trenice so creating a system of fairness right from the outset. That's what a system of nominal as non violences normalized nonviolence. Yeah because now we have violence that is just so normal normalized. It's the opposite You Talk The really the the core the nucleus of of where you speak from his transformation and There's a quote on your site. Changes inevitable but transformation is intentional. What is this mean in relation to climate change in the Environment? And what we can do. Yeah I'm a change a signal from nature saying nor more system anomalous violence. You're done gay the more you continue with this the heart. I'm GonNa hit you. That's what she's saying. That's nature's is is basically nature just physics chemistry and biology. Not This is just simple. Science reaction. This reaction duo at actions so the more react violently nature the more violently nature is going to act towards US violence with You know animals and humans But to the actual planet and the environment and so going in and just clearing all of the trees and not looking around to see what's alive or what still needs for two for animals be grazing ride. Not just leading three nominally cutting trees but pouring all these chemicals or the pollutants plastic out there. It's so you that's his Weiland committing on nature. Right and then senators reacting to that in this is all the consequences of our actions and it's gotten to a point where it's becoming louder and louder the few listen to the wind yesterday my God. It was horrible. When when do you think what year or group of years do you think was the first whisper of this? This has been going on for a long time gained. So this is. The research did was Was to understand. When did it start? And how did it start and can we do now to reverse it to heal the planet? Gay What can we do now? And what I realized it during research that we are part of nature but we have been part of Nature. We like it or not. We have been part of nature and now Nicholas told us you are the climate regulator species of the planet. I don't want anyone ice ages because we had one hundred ice ages in the last three years and in the current Interglacial period the Holocene be as human beings started deforesting and we kept the temperature constant for ten thousand years and be prevented the autumn going back on the race age because of deforestation if this was before my understanding was that climate change was. I don't know if started as a right but certainly accelerated in the last one hundred thirty years because of the industrial resolute revolution and the burning of fossil fuels. But you're saying it started way before way before so what I'm saying is that by deforestation. We actually kept the CO two levels constant in blue entered it from going down the kept the temperature constant for ten thousand years and then no the last two hundred years we discovered fossils and the industrialization and technology may have raised it by another one degree Celsius erase it by one degree Celsius but in the process we have technology to understand what we did right because without that understanding. You don't know what you're doing so good now. We understand what we did. And now we have the tools and technologies to start cooling by about those tools and technologies. So we have the internet which allows us to organize in a decentralized fashion gay. So he can now create a system in which people know that they are treated fairly is not that inau. You'll have have to deceive people into thinking you tell them all created equal and then you have the most unequal society in human history. That's deception mass deception right. You tell them you know. We'll have a NI inalienable right to liberty and then he had the most incarcerated population in human history. You're talking about the United States of America these days. I'm just saying that we have great ideals so when ideas and reality don't match that is something wrong in what we're doing right so say to. As an engineer look at a specification and implementation. Many specification doesn't matter implementation. You're not listening to nature. So how is the inner is the Internet showing the truth because people can communicate with each other? Watch Al Gore's talks here us today etc. Yes I mean. Without the Internet. The vegan movement would not be growing as fast as it is a without Internet. We would not have documentaries that we can put put out there and reach millions of people right away and so information is spreading. People are being able to. They're able to sift through and say okay. This is real that that I was lied to in. I was like two over there. So we haven't Innate understanding of the truth within us. That's silence I hear so many people say I love animals and or I'd like to stop eating me but I just can't or people I feel like they have the facts but that doesn't move them. It might have moved you when you heard Al Gore because you have that kind of mind as an electrical engineer but why are people changing so many people I I would say that everybody in America pretty much can see the factory farm system and not be able to justify it not to be? They can't justify testing on animals for Mascara but yet they sit by and they continue to buy that Mascara and eat that meat right and that was us. You was us at one time but yes that's right exactly no although I did stop buying Mascara very very quickly when I learned about the bunny rabbits but the food did take longer for me for sure. tell me about how. Climate healers changes educates people and then gets them to actually change by. Syed support the heart more than the mind. It's your heart. You have to have a reason from the heart to do it right and we have been told that these things unnecessary for you meet as necessary without meat you're going to just wither away and die. You won't have enough protein. That's the story we were told. And then you discover. There's actually more protein in Broccoli. You know for Calorie for Calorie than there is in beef. So you've been lied to right so it's only through lies that you mismatch implementation specification it has to be lice if you follow the truth. Wherever you're saying is what you'll be doing. Guess that's so we know when we have this mass mismatch between what you're saying and what we're doing. There are a lot of lies fundamental lies. That'd be a that are built a society gay so we have to know. Identify those lies and tell people look. There's plenty of brought in in other things plenty of calcium in In Greens it on need to drink milk so then people realize it's not necessarily I've been light to. Why did they lie to you? Because then they can make you sick than they can sell pharmaceuticals see. Tell them the whole story and they realize that they're being lied. To and being used there being factory farmed human beings subbing factory fund notches. Animals ecological psychologically. I always begin my talks and I talked to a predominantly Mainstream audience. I start by asking them. How many of you would deliberately hurt an innocent animal.

Al Gore United States engineer America Tigers India youtube Indian Rajastan Holocene Weiland Nicholas Syed
"holocene" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"holocene" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Of all time don't prepare a paleontologist and geologist put it this way we are geologic force in and of ourselves mankind's overall impact on planet earth has been so dramatic that some scientists think a change to the geologic time scale is in order according to them we should be classified the very recent past as a new unit in time defined by communities long lasting marks on the world's climate geology and biological make up posted it has a name interpreting apoc meaning the age of human it's about four point five four billion years old I'll just have split history into large blocks of time called eons which are further subdivided into those in turn are made up of smaller units called period finally the divisions within a period are known as a box so right now we're living in the coronary period of the Cenozoic era which is part of the federal so icky on the question is what's the current apoc if you'd asked someone a hundred years ago that said the Holocene epoch but there in lies the debate earth's most recent ice age and it's eleven thousand seven hundred years ago that point in time is recognized as the end of the Pleistocene apoc which began just less than two point six million years ago and the dawn of the Holocene epoch the dividing lines between a box correspond with important moments of earth's history like abrupt changes in the climate evidence for these events is typically found within the layers or Strattera on our planet ice core samples may also contain clues are there explained nowadays books are defined by section of rock that has distinctive boundaries at the top and bottom she added that specific I box are also sometimes characterized by the presence or absence of key fossils hello note that larger changes like the mass extinction of the non avian dinosaurs are marked by changes in eras our son is like era for example is the age of mammals the end of the last ice age marks the beginning of the Holocene and established its lower boundary it's traditionally been thought that this particular box is still going on today but in the year two thousand Nobel laureate Paul Cranston helped popularize an alternative viewpoint that year he biologist Eugene F. stormer argued that recent UN activities have pushed the world out of the house scene and into a new epoch earlier stormer had coined the term anthracene derived from the Greek word for human as a possible name for this hypothetical new unit of geologic time its stock the international commission on stratigraphy is the body that standardizes the geologic time scale it has yet to recognize the interpreting it as an official app Bach although the topic has been discussed as of this writing the commission maintains the Holocene is still ongoing but maybe scientists will feel differently Sunday there is heard it argued the geologists living in the far future perhaps even tens of millions of years from now quote could tell when humans were here because we left so many traces in the rocks chemical traces as well as actual physical objects like trash the water absorbs about one fourth for carbon dioxide emissions this is led to widespread ocean acidification which will doubtless leave telltale limestones behind dissolved carbon it's in the settlement are going to be another one of our calling cards future paleontologists may also noticed the sudden disappearance a great many species from the fossil record we would also expect as yet unborn researchers to discover the radiometric signatures of nuclear weaponry all around the world plutonium to thirty nine which is uncommon in nature was embedded inside of instantly exposed to the air during the nuclear tests of the nineteen forties and that brings us to a bone of contention about the interpreting it really is a legitimate geological epoch what moment in history should be recognized as a starting point one argument is that the enterprise he began in the nineteen forties when the first atomic weapon technicians occurred like the famous Trinity nuclear test of nineteen forty five another option might be to define the interpreting it as everything that's happened since the industrial revolution kicked off there is that others have wanted to push the lower boundary date all the way back when humans really started transforming the planet at the beginning of civilization agriculture at least ten or eleven thousand years ago regardless geological community ever officially split up the Holocene and re brands these past few decades century or millennia as the intricacy in a potential benefit might be the jester symbolic value Kristen and many others hope it would send a powerful message governments and private citizens alike they're upset when.

geologist
Shaping the Emerging Bioeconomy

The Bio Report

08:52 min | 2 years ago

Shaping the Emerging Bioeconomy

"Trump administration today about technology and how Whoa doesn't understand. Its potential to reshape the economy. Yeah so I can't speak for the White House So I think Alexander Titus was the gentleman who you are referring to spokane Zimbabwe. I Alexander was involved in the bio calm the day and he was also with us during the congressional as well so I can only speak to what we've learned and what we are speaking on and educating legislators and policy-makers around And I will tell you that. This effort has largely been bipartisan. We met with science technology and Space Committee And and the representatives that appeared were equal sides of of of the aisle. Everybody sees this as as a huge focus for For the United States and making sure that we drive this economic development so I can't speak specifically to wear the White House or you know individual congressional leaders stand on the issue. I can say from our experience. We've received very positive feedback including the White House visits but also on the hill as well. I know in two thousand twelve. The Obama Administration had published a national bio comic blueprint. This included a set of strategic investments intended to lay the foundation the nation for a future bio Konami is that roadmap still being used in any way wasn't executed on wasn't successful. Yeah IT'S A. It's a great question and I you know again speaking personally. I was living in Germany at that time so it wasn't. I wasn't too involved in in the creation nations that the documentary that process. I am familiar with it I have reviewed the documents. I will say that it definitely aligns. Too much of the initiatives that that we feel are important important to ensuring that the bio Tommy doesn't forward You know there is current legislation that is under consideration There's a bill. Hr Four three seven. Three which is the Engineering Biology Investment Bill. And so this has been In Committee for an extended period of time and I'm happy to share air that passed out of committee Right before the The recessed now back in session the prior to the recess they pass out of committee and this is one of I legislative priorities. The bottom line is to ensure that. Hr Four three seven three. which is the engineering? Biology Investment Act Get sponsorship and we're looking to really drive have this Into both the House and we've got good one site to support on the house and then finding sponsors in the Senate of driving across the line but again this is a perfect good example of of how we feel. We can be active and really advocating for these types of bills. which really look at? How are we allocating funds and infrastructure picture to support the development of our economy infrastructure being basic science training all the way through to it and computational signs of a shorter required to really orange biology? Maybe you can touch on some of the other policy issues of concern. Are you focused on. Issues of regulation workforce in public investment in our D-. What are the big issues driving the concerns of industry right now? Yeah I mean so many of those things that are important to us so so you know. Regulation is important elements of the industry and you feel that. Proper regulation comes from proper education. So our focus now is really educate h Regulators and policymakers around the opportunity as well as areas where regulation may be required Investment is a huge area that we're looking at and I you know I use similar. We know that. NIH funding has significantly increased over many many years Below we've seen as we've seen a reallocation of funds ends with an age and so on colleges become a huge area funding. And if you look back ten fifteen twenty years ago it was a smaller area. Funding overall financing hasn't changed significantly. We've had ones. We are trying to drive much of that again by autonomy alliance to look at areas where we feel incremental investments or require player and perhaps it can be a real alignment of of internal funds and resources but it's not exclusively through an age you mentioned. Dod Darva Department of Energy Number of entities are actively engaging in creating the Viacom in manufacturing and bringing more through biology but other owners for Russell important as well you know workforce issues is important that we have access to the smartest most driven best trained scientists on the planet. And you want them to you come to the United States and working business established business and want to ensure that those who are here in the United States have a have a line of sites who in education that will enable for them to move into the workforce that is a biological workforce versus perhaps a industrial base workforce. So all of us topics are very important. Join US are there big challenges that need to be addressed through precompetitive issues that need to be solved by public private partners ars. So it's it's it's a great question you know I'll say the have you know we have great examples incredible public private partnerships such as the first genome. Don't project right To sequence I I Hema Jim was was the joints between age and genome sciences and different commercial entities. is in fact when I was on the hill. I kind of preface my comments with me just think about what is the next moonshot project for our vile economy or biological thinkers in the country. You know the the Human Genome Project was one of those moon shots and we've got a lot of others out there that we should think about you. Know from fundamentally a trying to sedate the operating mechanism for biology and understanding what biological components can be put together into organisms to due to drive a new paradigm and manufacturing to really get into understanding Inter Cellular Communication Nation. And how do we look at creating environments of microbes that can communicate with each other respond to stimuli responsive wind. Listen to different response. which may again from a manufacturing process produce a compound or remediate? Something that's happening in the nature So a lot of big challenges could be put on the table and this is one of the kind of I'll say the thought experiments we've done Tommy Lines. What are some of the asset we could go for? And that's what we're working together positioning papers when you think about the biggest barriers to realizing the potential of the opportunities force today what you said they are scientific holocene economic or something else. Yes so so I believe eight largely at scientific at this point and I say that because you know as we've seen scientific innovation and come online we see the economics around that scientific innovation come together quite quickly and we can all that pretty pretty routinely as we look at you know you know go back to the example precision. Helter you know the advent next turner she sequencing sequencing targeted sequencing Really enabled us to lose today. The biology hav driver mutations within tumors which then of course informs which therapies are are prescribed to the individual. I think we're at a similar precedence. Right now and understanding biology from a manufacturing perspective of food due to feed materials perspective. Where you still fundamentally don't understand the rules to biology and I'll say that this is the largest challenge around synthetic biology synthetic biology being a interesting blend in biology and engineering and computational science you know from engineering perspective if you understand hand all the principal components you can build anything and I think when we initially went down the road of synthetic biology thought? Well we'll figure out what the parts are living organism that we can combine those into a new organism and we've learned that biologists complex and we don't really understand those principal components hence we need the new tools to loosening those components. Soon we do. We'll see those economic models fall in line so to your question. I I do believe that way now. The scientific challenge is the largest challenge. which is what we focused on through? The vital COMU- lines and ensuring that funding is flowing to the proper areas of research to enable that elucidation the principal components to enable development of the Diakonie. Jason Ganic Chief Commercial Officer script at a founding member of the bio combines. Is Jason. Thanks so much for your time. Today it was a pleasure. Thank you so much.

United States White House Principal Tommy Lines Alexander Titus Space Committee Jason Ganic Konami Zimbabwe Spokane Germany Obama Administration NIH Inter Cellular Communication N Dod Darva Department Of Energy
"holocene" Discussed on The Good Life with Stevie & Sazan

The Good Life with Stevie & Sazan

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"holocene" Discussed on The Good Life with Stevie & Sazan

"I don't know whatever that that meant so much to me. I think it was because well, you know, after last week's episode we're talking about connecting more and being more intentional in our relationship after we had happy hour with your family. You know, there was an opportunity there for us to spend some time together. And it was something so small as me writing with you and your Jeep, but just that ten fifteen minute drive home allowed me to just connect with you. Instead of obviously driving in the other car with the baby teniente. It's like I just realized now being a mom and life being so crazy busy. Sometimes it's like you have to find like I said those little moments throughout your day where you can be a little spontaneous, which that's really not me feel. You are definitely the more spontaneous. So when I did it, I just I kinda did it with a little bit of intention after we had that chat last week about intention and all that. But I also wanted to do it like I actually missed our drives together where it's just you and me no baby in the backseat, and there was an opportunity there. So I just kind of like put my fear freezing my blood off the side. And it really wasn't that cool. We ended up going to hold who's after getting ice cream. And there was no rush to get home. And once we got home. I just noticed you were so much happier. And I could tell a lot to you just doing something so small like that so many more Jeep rights to come here because he wanted to spend time with me. And because I knew that writing in the Jeep is not in. Necessarily your thing. Did anyways to spend time with me it really honestly, all I was like kids elegant around. This means so much to me. What else we actually played our wedding song that we like walk down the aisle that I walked down the aisle to it's from Bonnie ver- in its Holocene. And we just played that song because we haven't listened to it in forever. And it just I don't know what it just we both belt so revived. And so in love with each other and sappy and all that it was sweet thanks for noticing. A while Suzanne have my dad's sweater tied at the top of our heads. Did I put it over my head? I looked like a penguin. Maybe I love you for that. You're the best. All right, y'all don't and I wanna do a new thing on the y'all where everyone's hearing news out there constantly. And why do I feel like it's always bad news? I'm always back during all this crazy stuff about the Jesse small. There's just so much division in the news and people are going back and forth on this. What I think in this. You know, what let's not even talk about all the bad news out there. And you know, what else you guys know we have a background in the whole radio TV, filming. That's where we met behind the news desk, anchoring, the nightly newscasts of our college. And we used to always kind of joke about how all of the most serious stories would be at the top of the show and means Steve which just kind of like college goofballs, and we're like why does the news always have to start the show out being so depressing. So we getting to be the producers of this show, we decided how about we start our show with some good news. Some good news says so we actually looked on the internet. Some of these stories are new and trending other stories have been. Out there for a while. But we found some good news. And we thought we would share the first one. Oh my God. It actually made us both quite emotional. This is really emotional. Are you guys ready for this? The headline throw you off a little bit. But just wait for it. Taco Bell cashier has written hundreds of kind messages on customer receipts to brighten their days. Oh, some examples. I love this. Okay. So basically, your name is Kelly Stuart and she lives in New York City of all places guys city can be crazy city. So so basically what she would do is. She would basically I'm trying to kind of narrow down this article. I haven't in front of me, she basically found time in her day every time customer would come. She's basically taking the time to write inspiring little notes quotes on these customer receipts to encourage them one customer told Syracuse dot com that she had recently left the fast food restaurant only to find one of Stewart's knows in..

Kelly Stuart New York City Bonnie ver Syracuse dot Holocene Suzanne Jesse Taco Bell Steve Stewart ten fifteen minute
"holocene" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"holocene" Discussed on Here & Now

"So I think there's a kind of weariness I think many Thais feel that they weren't disastrous, and they did kind of settle a very conflicted country, but the, but it's time for them to go. And if the current situation is as you describe it, a thorough -tarian light is the next situation likely to be democracy light. That's a good description. Another political pundit, he described it as a hybrid democracy. Well, the military has done is they so determined that Mr. Texan his sister Yang lack in their party won't win. And all the poll say they will do quite well in the election that they've designed an electoral system, which will make it very hard for them to win a majority as they have done in the past. And they've all. Also allowed for an entirely appointed Senate now for house two hundred fifty seat Senate, which the military is appointing and that will have a lot of say over the government. They're allowing an unelected prime minister to be chosen. I think hoping a whole load of smaller. Parties will be persuaded to back the current prime minister general pro channel or the man who led the coup to carry on. They really have you could argue rigged this election in a way, which makes it very likely will see a continuation either of some form of semi military rule semi military semi democratic rule or a very weak democratic government that relies on the military and the military is also puts in the constitution that there's a twenty year plan and economic planner a real reform plan that all governments have to follow which it has also drafted. So it's influence influence will definitely continue whoever comes out on top in this election. That's the BBC's Jonathan head joining us from Bangkok Thailand. Jonathan thank you. Jeremy good to talk to you. Well, many of the world's business and political leaders gathered this week in Davos, Switzerland for the World Economic Forum. President Trump did not go which means he missed important message from British naturalists or David Attenborough famous for presenting the planet earth series and borough is ninety two and as he accepted an award for his work on TV he told the audience that humans better hurry to deal with climate change. I am quite a tree from another age. I was born during the Holocene the name given by scientists to the truth our year period of time attic stability this allow humans to settle from and create civilizations. Them's conditions. Fostered are unique minds giving rise to international trade in ideas, as well as goods and making us the globally connected species that we are today and Berra has seen more of the world and its life forms than most of us ever will from the penguins in Antarctica to the zebras of Africa. But this week he was in the mountains of Switzerland. Speaking to another species, very wealthy human beings, Goebel, businesses, international cooperation and striving ideals. These are all possible because for millennia on a global scale nature has been largely predictable stable. No in the space of one human lifetime. Indeed. In the space of my lifetime. All that has changed. The Holocene has ended the garden of Eden is no more. We have changed the world so much that scientists say that we are now in a new geological age the anthroposophic in the age of humans. When you think about it? That is perhaps no more unsettling than fort the only conditions button humans have ever known. So far are changing and changing fast. It's tempting an understandable to.

prime minister Holocene David Attenborough Switzerland Senate Berra President Trump Davos Yang BBC Jonathan head Jeremy Goebel Bangkok Thailand Africa twenty year
"holocene" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"holocene" Discussed on Here & Now

"Well, many of the world's business and political leaders are gathered this week in Davos, Switzerland for the World Economic Forum. President Trump did not go which means he missed important message from British naturalist David Attenborough famous for presenting the planet earth series and borough is ninety two and has accepted an award for his work on TV he told the audience that humans better hurry to deal with climate change. I'm quite tree from another age. I was born during the Holocene the name given by scientists to the truth thousand year period of climatic stability this allow humans to settle foam and create civilizations. Them's conditions. Fostered are unique minds giving rise to international trade and ideas as well as goods and making us the globally connected species that we are today and Berra has seen more of the world and its life forms than most of us ever will from the penguins in Antarctica to the zebras of Africa. But this week he was in the mountains of Switzerland. Speaking to another species, very wealthy human beings, Goebel, businesses, international cooperation and the striving ideals. These are all possible because for millennia on a global scale nature has been largely predictable stable. No in the space of one human lifetime. Indeed. In the space of my lifetime. All that has changed. The Holocene ended the garden of Eden is no more. We have changed the world so much that scientists say that we are now in a new geological age the anthropology the age of humans. When you think about it? That is perhaps no more unsettling than fort the only conditions button humans have ever known. So far are.

Holocene Switzerland President Trump Berra Davos David Attenborough Goebel Africa thousand year
"holocene" Discussed on The Pat McAfee Show 2.0

The Pat McAfee Show 2.0

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"holocene" Discussed on The Pat McAfee Show 2.0

"So Todd used to wake up every single morning to this fucking play. It. Turnley? On your left hand side. Hey, see, the little flicker on your left hand side to flick it up it's probably a vibrant right now. Did that turned it on? I thought I could just sit and play. But. Are you? Remember you remember when we employed gourmet didn't show up for twenty eight. Power. Oh, we go. Really willing. We're the underdog got to play like AT. Gets you going. She can't hate it more than the fucking of nuclear site. She cannot hate it more than a nuclear submarine. That's true. Cannot sure it's impossible the you're right. It's an improved. So wait, you're on me. Earlier about gained muscle. You're not gonna work out. I am but I was already like lifting, but I was lifting heavyweights. So I'm just going to go white for like three days. How you doing a home? We're we're heavy cardio. Okay. Cardio is our in this already. You had an opportunity to be in this fucking bitch. Tom. No, I didn't pitch out. I made a smart decision to just slowly diet. Holocene peanut Eminem. Diet. It's the second break. I'll work my way up. I'll get I had a salad today too. So you turn it around a little bit. I am proud of you, man. I'm thinking I'm thinking, I'm might move this to my lawn..

Todd Holocene Tom three days
"holocene" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

02:48 min | 3 years ago

"holocene" Discussed on Science for the People

"Well, we you know, that that is sort of the question is how old is this crater, and they have a guess based on the ice that they the image the ice using the radar within the bowl shaped depression that is probably a crater and they can see ice. They can see the ice that looks very clean and sort of linear layers that have been deposited year after year of snow and ice going back about eleven thousand seven hundred years, and that would be the beginning of the Holocene, the modern era and then layers that are below that are very jumbled up. And so it's very hard to say what happened before that? And based on some other features, including you know, what they call cross cutting relationships. So there's streams that were beneath the the the depression, they think it probably is younger than about two point six million years. So at somewhere between two point six. Seven and eleven thousand seven hundred years old, but within that don't know more that seems like a big region of air that is a huge region of areas. And you know, there are some scientists who are skeptical that it's, you know, even younger than two point six million years. It's it's it's very rare to have these kinds of impacts really, especially when that would be as large as this. So they're they're highly skeptical even even that that might be the age so is the complexity around dating this crater because it's buried under a bunch of ice. Like, if the ice wasn't there if we could actually get to it would it be easier to date or is dating craters. Just a tricky thing. Full stop. It would definitely be easier to date today. I mean, they can be tricky no chick Sula one of the things as tricky about that is that it's underwater. And so yes, I mean, the idea that this one is on land is very exciting. But it is under all that ice. And that is the thing. That's tricky. So if they really wanna get out there and date, it I think the team is hoping that they would be able to drill through the ice and down into the into the ground itself, but that is expensive, and it's very hard to get to this place. So so it's, you know, it's the challenge logistically. Yeah. I'm looking at both the photo that is in one of the articles on science news that you wrote and looking at where this crater is. It is definitely a non accessible place. It's it's helicopter accessible only is quite far north sort of on the far north westerly part. I guess it would be of yet. Yeah. So I'm not even sure how they'd bringing all the equipment yet. It's very tricky present was they had a very small window of time because they came in with a helicopter, and they are like, you know, scrabbling around in the in the earth outs in the ground right outside the ice margin to see if they could kit collect samples. To see what sort of, you know, chemical composition is in those sediments right outside the ice margin. But that's all that they could do on that trip. So it's mystery..

Holocene Sula eleven thousand seven hundred six million years
"holocene" Discussed on The Wellness Mama Podcast

The Wellness Mama Podcast

04:39 min | 3 years ago

"holocene" Discussed on The Wellness Mama Podcast

"Fodder in, I think plant based foods in that respect are more important to us than they ever used to be an during our long kind of Lucien luxury trajectory. And then it's also aligned with foundational principles that are supplied by human longevity research, which is an angle that most people in the John redoubt necessarily look at most people within the paleo movement are saying, well, if it was good enough for our ancestors, it's good enough for me, and they're reasons why I have a problem with that. So I use him longevity research to tease out based on the on. The foundational ancestral principles that I think are the only rational starting place, which of them actually served optimize our health and which of them, you know, might be less optimizing. And then I also take into account the uniquely challenging and world that we live in today and also are ready compromise genome. You know, ever since we adopted agriculture and modern industrialization. And then I also. Rashly, assume that we are much more alike than on a like in foundational, physiological design. And that's something you know, probably want to get into a little more, but you know it, it's a dietary approach that reaches back to our earliest Hamad beginnings and ended acknowledges that we were forged by conditions that are quite different than than the current time period. The current Holocene geologic time period, and it automatically also takes food sensitivities and the prevalence of autumn unity into account. That's an area of considerable expertise for me in part because I'm for for one thing, the only member of my family that doesn't have an autoimmune disease. And so I've had to learn a lot not only to help prevent my own descent into that in into all the problems associated with that and dangers, but also to help alleviate the suffering of people that I care very, very deeply about. And you know, finally. In the approach that sort of primal genyk approach is automatically committed to principles of environmental and and even economic sustainability. So it covers a lot, but it's kind of a no compromise approach. It's one that is highly principled and little purist, but you know the all there's an old saying that if you wanna hit the Mark, you've gotta aim bore over the Mark if you wanna hope to hit it. So that's my approach to things Hellman. Gosh, exactly. And I've made so many notes on points of that that were definitely gonna follow up on one small point. I wanna make sure we touch on because you explain it really. Well, you mentioned not too much protein, and I'd love to hear you explain why, because I think that is very common misconception in this world and the health world and kinda give us some guidelines on how much do we actually need and how much is too much. And I love that you made the distinction. Obviously, growing children need more pregnant. Women need more, but give. Some guidelines there, right? So this whole popularity. Now there's all new genera popping up the whole carnivore diet and it's like, oh, wow, really? Okay. I mean, we've sort of been there. You know, I think Atkins was ordered in that category is you know the early earliest incarnations of the paleo diet were all about. You can't eat too much protein protein protein, protein, protein power, whatever. Look, we all have of fundamental dietary requirement for protein, but we need to understand was that a main? I could probably spend an hour talking about this. I'm going to try to pull back on the reigns. You know, we, we share our genetics with the earliest primordial life that ever existed on earth and that earliest life on earth lived in an anaerobic environment right in, you know, in very ino- kind of in acidic in acidic seas and and no oxygen really available for us ration- or anything else. And the first two nutrients that were vague. Available to those earliest life forms. You know, these bacterial like organisms as archaic and things like that were glucose and protein. I mean debt was those were the two things that were available for for energy and reproduction. And so all of those mechanisms around reproduction of life kind of got a stab wished at that time and in is still kind of true to some degree you know today. And so when and then once once an oxygen based atmosphere evolved, then a whole new kind of cell came into being..

John redoubt autoimmune disease Lucien Holocene Hamad Hellman Atkins
"holocene" Discussed on Science... sort of

Science... sort of

04:10 min | 3 years ago

"holocene" Discussed on Science... sort of

"And so going back to Ryan statements, we might just have missed it because we're not measuring every volcano that's not active in. A lot of times attempt to justify the expense of measuring these kinds of parameters gas releases would justify them by when something becomes active in slightly more of a threat. You know, in at that point you kick in and say, all right, something is different than what was happening before. So we should pay more attention to it to. So we understand what, how it's changing. Does that make sense? It does. I, I have one more silly baseline question that will reveal that. I don't know anything about Roquetas. Well, the answer is it means kettle from old Norse at LA. What what is now? That's a good question I should've asked, but that's not the question that I had. My question is how many volcanoes of this sort are. There is Kotla one of twenty so proportionately it's producing about as much carbon as you would expect or are there like thousands of thousands of all canines like this l. in Iceland alone, there are about six or seven under icecaps that are significant. I believe that's just Iceland. There are not very many areas in the world that are both highly volcanically active end clay stated or actively being glaciated. You know, whether it's with glaciers is caps or whatever. Size of ice structure and article would be the other major one where we know there is a kenneka tippety happening little bit harder to detect that because there's, you know, tweet or four kilometers of ice over the cross in Tactica an-and there are some areas in the Andes that are volcanically active with some glacial cover that's quickly going away. That's just is symbol, Qena interactions. You know that. Number for the number of all cameras that are up in the past ten thousand years if you want that. Sure. One thousand four hundred thirty four that with eruptions that we know of from the last ten thousand years. That's the Holocene. That's the end of the last ice age currently as of today. Forty actually as of the twenty second of August. So as of a month ago, forty one volcanoes with ongoing Russians in the world. All right. And I know that because the Smithsonian Institution maintains a global Vulcan ISM program with databases of volcanoes of various kinds. Isn't that neat? It is fantastic. It's actually I received the weekly report. Really. I didn't make. It is fantastic. Until she award of all canines are still active. What a new canes have become active in the last week, what volcanoes have stopped being active or changed in their status of activity in the last week site very much encourage anybody who's interested in finding out what volcanoes are, even what areas or like Brian just found a how many are active. You can go to the volcano that as I does dot EDU of in this is fantastic Nedeli that they maintain this active database of eruptions in tippety. They also have a database of volcanoes periods so you can go in and pull up of all kaneohe and you'll have the entire history of ruptures for that volcano that we know of. And that's one caveat that will put on the number that Ryan just mentioned those the eruptions that we know of there are potentially. Hundreds of thousands more that we don't eight hundred. Eight.

Ryan Iceland Smithsonian Institution kaneohe Tactica an-and tippety Roquetas Andes Holocene Brian Kotla l. ten thousand years four kilometers twenty second
"holocene" Discussed on Science... sort of

Science... sort of

04:23 min | 3 years ago

"holocene" Discussed on Science... sort of

"That's the Dylan Evelyn canary process. And so it doesn't mean they're not continuing to evolve. It just means that they're ever Lucien is a maintenance of a strategy that works very, very well. And the way I'll often say is that the the water's edge body form is something you see in lots of other groups ambulance. And yeah, yeah, the early whale. Yep. You get a lot of those. You get a lot of the early Fabian. That had very crock, like body shapes the Fido sores, which look startingly similar to crocodiles, even with Osceola rooms, but are not is that that lifestyle is probably just a very convenient and stable lifestyle whilst the others may just not be quite as if things stable out. We may get to see running crocs again. But you know, when the times I hope the opposite. We'll side. I have thought through which crocks I would breed if ever I went mad scientists and would make them. So it's my, it's one of my favorite things, but is that maybe things you know the ecosystem bounces back from the the mass extinction that took so many of these big land animals. We will see these crocodiles branch out again, but when times are tough, go back to the water. 'cause there's always at the water because everything drinks. Cool. Well, with that David. What's your story, man? What are you up to. Well, I'm just chilling here on this podcast time for an segment. I started getting into paleontology also as a kid. I don't have a story that goes back to my young youths like wilda 's, but for me, it was just that. I like a lot of kids I cycled through interests, so I was into dinosaurs and it was in this space, and then I was into this and that. And by the time I got to high school, I realized that the one that always kept coming back was prehistoric creatures. And every time I went back to that interest, I would learn more Styve I had that there's more than dinosaurs, and then I learned about that and then this and that. And then in high school, I actually participated in a science competition. And I did a fossils event for science Olympiad, and that was the moment where I was like, all right, I could do this for ever. This is really cool. So I decided to go to college for that. And I looked for colleges specifically that had a paleo kind of focus in undergrad, which was very rare. They were like two colleges in the entire. Our country that had like a specified paleo focuses at undergrad level, and I went to the exact opposite of a very tiny little college. I went to Penn State university park, which had like forty two thousand students. It was enormous. University park has its own zip code. So they're I studied. I started getting involved with the paleontology people over there. I studied with doctor Russ Graham who the mammal paleontologist all tend to have heard of and they all, you know, I went in with this sort of dreams of doing prehistoric, reptiles, and of course they didn't have. They were looking at Pleistocene Holocene stuff than in dinosaurs. And one day I went into, I went up to Russ and I said, hey, everyone's got cool projects do cool project, and he said, well, we've got all these snakes and salamanders. No one's ever looked at. All right. And so I, my undergrad feces was looking at the snakes and salamanders from this cave out in the black hills and South Dakota and dad is went. That is when I fell in love with the best group of reptiles, not according to the poll, which are the mates recount I demand a recount so yeah, and then I enjoyed that so much. That I started looking for master's programs that where I could do more small, reptiles, stuff, Senna's, oik, reptiles. And I was introduced at s VP one year or two Jimmy who had just moved over to you, and that's how I ended up deciding to go there. Cool. Yeah, Jimmy is awesome. He's one of my favorite people to bump into every year at SAP and just just the were abundantly clear. The salamander side of things are Infineon's. The snake side are the reptiles. Yes, yes. I don't want to be unclear..

Russ Graham Penn State university park Jimmy Lucien Infineon wilda paleo Pleistocene Holocene South Dakota David VP Senna one year one day
"holocene" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

04:41 min | 3 years ago

"holocene" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Holocene has to do with the extinction of a snail species in sicily that really yeah wow just one they have to find a yeah they have to find a marker wow so other geologists can say will there it is there's the snail there's not the snail that's one we set the boundary humans here's your age of snail died in italy right yeah but here's the thing a lot has changed since that snail died in italy we humans have made our presence felt on the planet more than any other species in earth's history and what that means for our future isn't yet clear and so it was winston churchill who said the further back you look the further ahead you can see and so if we want to know how the earth's biosphere is going to respond to the things that humans are doing to the planet right now the only evidence that we have is is how biotic systems have responded in the past and based on the past several million years we know the earth goes through natural cycles of cooling in fact twenty thousand years ago most of north america was covered in a giant ice sheet might have been a mile or more high at the north pole that extended all the way down to east brunswick new jersey or the lehigh valley in pennsylvania or deep down into illinois in the mid west just south of that where southern new jersey is that was tundra and based on that passed we know that the earth it should be getting cooler right about now but it's not it's getting warmer and the divergence between where we know we ought to be and where we're going we can attribute that to the human influence that we're having on the climate and for that reason some scientists have proposed thinking about our place in geological history differently that the world today is a lot different than it was when that snail died in italy in that we need a new term for a new epoch the anthroposophic the anthropology in essentially would be the time of human influence on the planet this controversial though because geology is a retrospective discipline the the rocks of the postseason haven't been deposited yet really but at the same time i think it's a real really useful tool in the same way that we would discuss the the iron age or the bronze age certainly we have entered into a new age on our planet we're changing things in many cases in irreparable ways and that will certainly be recorded in the geological record there's no doubt if you could go five ten fifteen million years into the future and dig down to two thousand sixteen you would be able to find the geological evidence that humans occupied the planet so today on the show the anthropic seen ideas about a new human age in age that's changing our planet in unprecedented ways and what that might mean for our future chem like var returns later with the story of one dinosaur that reveals a lot about where we're headed but first how should we relate to the idea the anthrax seen right now can we just can we just clarify this anthropic seen or enthroned or anthroposophic anthro passing i i've heard that it's a us uk difference this is emma marras she's a writer and she's covered nature and the environment for years when you say i guess i say anthrocene now you do and throw pasino my interviews am i gonna sound like a pompous jerk you know what it's possible that either version makes us sound like posture okay all right however you say it emma believes the world is full of signs that were living in the anthroposophic no matter where you are no matter what you're looking at no matter how many days you spent hiking away from the road you're still in a landscape that was shaped by humans because of climate change every place on earth has more carbon dioxide in it than it used to the sort of influence of humans is everywhere even in places we think of as untouched emma picks up the idea from the ted stage places like yellowstone or the mongolian staff or the great barrier reef for the seren getty places that we think of as kind of identified representations of a nature before we screwed everything up and in a way they are less impacted by our day to.

Holocene sicily five ten fifteen million years twenty thousand years million years
"holocene" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

01:31 min | 4 years ago

"holocene" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"And a few thousand people have done that over the last decade believe it or not so our planned for the new one is to actually put the movie up ourselves in the pirate ecology with a message of the pirate ecosystem rather with a message saying if you're watching this without having paid anything ford please go to match earth account make a donation enjoy the movie i work in actually put that up ourselves the same time that it goes up through the the legal pay and we will see what happens when i know this this this idea of of putting bring something up m in having people pay i believe lucy k did one a few years ago where he basically have shown was like this a couple of bucks is very very cheap this the technology existed in his case was it simply again a kind of a voluntary thing o or or the were there is there they've got to be ways around whatever technology we come up with a protect ourselves right so it's is ultimately it kind of his the honor system yeah ultimately ziana system emily it it's incredibly easy to defeat any of these as a matter what kind of security they think they have you know i tunes thinks it's got you know the d r m technology you go boop in you downloaded dram removal software and then you can go shirt with anybody you want it's it's completely the honor system number more of a general uh kind of director question um you've done as most of us have i guess who had careers lasting more than a couple of years.

ford lucy k director
"holocene" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

01:49 min | 4 years ago

"holocene" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"I thought we had a pretty airtight agreement to make a sequel or a series of whatever and i i showed a to a lawyer and he said who wrote this and i said i did and he said yeah so his feeling was before he proceeded we should get like a real contract with emerson and so because i needed to go back to emerson and negotiate a rather because they need to go back to emerson and ask him to sign a real contract that opened up a negotiation and it wasn't really so much about money goes he knew we didn't have any money but it became about you know creative input approvals and stop and so it was very tricky dance for awhile um but finally emerson remembered how much he loved the original movie um and so he decided to trust me and we were able to now the movie has fairly uh define religious ideas in it is there a special kind of challenge your sensitivity that you felt when you're dealing with religious matters um you know to add did you care about offending do not care um but you're when you're dealing with religious cut specially that the figure of jesus christ as the character of philip you know clearly is is perturbed by it and i think i carr's we talked about this when you're writing the drafts in terms of making him human and not making him a cliche and i think the actor also you were well served by the kid i thought he did a really good job but but when you were in the writing and in the directing do you is that something you deal with in terms of learning more than you may might have known about the religions and also in treating them respectfully.

emerson philip carr
"holocene" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

01:34 min | 4 years ago

"holocene" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"That he's not actually alone and that if we did actually get too invest you know if we did get to exporters has either a tv series or as a series of one or two more movies that that that would may be factorin did the i forgot did emerson right call right the first one is well know what happened with the first one was that it was drunk well whose purely jewelry to hear emerson tell it he did write some part of it with his dan but i never knew what part and his dad had sole credit on the script so that even though i did you know a fair amount of rewriting i i didn't take any credit because i thought you know it's sean bixby is the merck her awoke and so emerson did call right the the set with with any on this one on the way this thing was eric and i worked up the story and then i wrote a draft and emerson had a lot of really strong feelings about the draft and wrote a bunch of stuff saying here's what i think you should do and and there was enough in there that i thought was good and that we should adopt that i gave him car writing yep i will i was wondering i mean you've got the son of of a father who had had died and obviously he's very proprietary a about not only the material but the fact that it was his father was that there were there in special challenges involved in in kind of having to negotiate if you really didn't like it's it's great if you like an idea but if you don't like an idea was that is a tricky matter or was it yet yeah yeah it was it was a it was a the problem was that that.

sean bixby emerson eric
"holocene" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

01:58 min | 4 years ago

"holocene" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"Um i don't know how casse i've blacked out counter the way women forget giving birth i've forgotten how no i mean you know unfortunately unfortunate whatever like my whole you know quote unquote career is making lowbudget movies you know um so you just get used to that i mean how many how many locations word to your dear mick recall um uh you know we were like two days of the college and we were the girls apartment and leak owes apartment was was the same location so that was a day and then at the you're out in the woods for his sojourn was a day and you know arts house was a day but it we did something else that night i'm sure uh the the basement was a set we actually built a sat on a stage which is just amazing for lowbudget movie and we were on that for two and a half days on any other half a day we did did all the driving stuff on you know i forget now also you you have a three of the same actress from the first peace what's at you have three the same actors for that from the first movie yes the last one supposed to be a surprise right like when harry turns up that's supposed to be for people that are big fans my hope is that for people are big fancy the original movie you know when when they see harry the go in like it'll be a really big thing bathroom so in terms of the the the card and the horse a were you committed to getting those actors if you had not gotten william cat for example the w what how did you make certain that you've got the actors and a well however that process worker a guy gotcha on well the first thing i did was meet with david lee smith and make sure he was gonna wanna do it and scared the hell scare the hell out of me when i first saw him because he hid dumb.

mick harry david lee smith william two days
"holocene" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

01:58 min | 4 years ago

"holocene" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"First question of course it's all about you know the and for your i guess the first question is this took ten years the first one is in two thousand seven is accurate what was the process of creating the sequel to a movie did the did very well it became kind of a cult hit in in many ways i know i know there were a lot of illegal downloads in view i talk about that that's kind of an interesting story as well but but what's the process of of of going from that film to this one i should probably talk a little bit about the original film of first of what happened was back in 1998 i i got a script mode measuring garrod to pew who's here i was a producer who are informed about a script called them the matt from earth by guy named aerobics being across a new drubbings be was because he had worked on star trek and twilight zone and all that stuff and so i got the script and i read it and i loved it and gary and i want to have a meeting with emerson bixby who was the son of a trump xp because jerome it died a year or so before and he had literally written the script on his deathbed it was the last thing after a career of being sort of an incredible science fiction writer this was a lasting eat ever written so and wrote it on like napkins a scraps of papers and stuff like that an amorous amazon would go home type it up and then jerome died in a after you know period emerson went out with it to try to get it made so i knew i really loved it we went to this meeting we all love each other we're going to get it made and then i never heard anything again and i found out later on that emerson's manager slash producer guy had said we'll of this guy likes it and he's nobody who's only made one or two movies we can get it to somebody really really good so they tried to do that for a long time but apparently it never happened sony years later on now it's like two thousand five two thousand six.

producer gary emerson bixby jerome writer amazon sony ten years