20 Episode results for "Hollywood Community"

#1012 I'm Bothered By You Not Being Bothered

The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

00:00 sec | 2 years ago

#1012 I'm Bothered By You Not Being Bothered

"Thanks for listening to the atom and Dr drew show on podcast one. Your yard takes a real beating from the constant, wear and tear and overcrowding of weeds leading to week thin grass. Achieved the lawn of your dreams by starting the Scotts turf builder program keep it simple with four simple feedings throughout the year. Your grass will be thicker, greener and more resilient a greener, stronger lawn fights against common problems like weeds and bugs it also stands up versus heat drought, and wear and tear. And with Scott's no quibble money back guarantee. If you're not satisfied, you'll get your money back, so take control and give your lawn. The boost it deserves start your Scots her builder program today. This is a Scots yard recorded live at guerrilla one studios with Adam Corolla and board certified physician and addiction medicine specialist. Dr drew Pinski. You're listening to the Adam and Dr drew show. Got them. Ben, Ben, boom, boom. That's true. Ski over there. Let's go and Andrea scheme. Above. Boop. Boop. I wanna thank lifelock is promo code Adam for the show and truecar dot com. And put your backs from code eight the S, what do you think drew? Did you get any crypt crap for being Mr. T? Oh, no. I I answer most questions. I was somewhat tweeting me about the the governor the governor Serm too much too many politics positions of my head. And you know, I I think there's a I don't mind, here's what I don't mind. I don't mind people sort of looking for patterns, and I don't mind people trying to connect dots and stuff. I don't like when people are burning calories. Trying to make you into something bad needlessly. One guy. Does something. And there is something historically called black face. But black face is not the same as dressing up as Diana Ross or OJ Simpson. Black face is black face its own thing with its own past. There's no historical. Mr. T pass that we need to go back and sort out in this country's history. I was dressing as Mr. T, I wasn't dressing and black vase. I was dressing as a guy a fan of as a nineteen year old. So this notion of like might I sent a tweet out that said, I'm not dressing a black guy. I'm dressing as Mr. T who is black which is different. And as far as the black face goes was Robert Downey junior being racist. When he played a black guy, thunder, whatever it was Trump. Thunder. Yes. No. I mean, he is now I guess now that everyone's woke I just wrote, you know, if you find that problematic than fuck off. And I said I answered this guy's tweet. It was just a fan wasn't his fault. I mean, I said everyone I'm racist. Anyway. So what am I what do I care? I mean what? What reputation in my defending people just think of a racist political party move yet? They say this you're becoming right? A democrats. You don't have to raise it enough to be racist. I am not racist. Therefore, I'm a democrat. It's a weird world. Like like somebody tweeted me the other day. They're like oh, David Alan Grier. You're wondering why not coming on if you're black? You know, the reason why it's like what what are we talking about? Exactly here. I wish David would come on and tell us. Well, I don't think he's going to. But my point is you thought more about that. Yes. No. It doesn't bother you. I'm never bothered by not being bothered. I'm not bothered by things. I don't I'm bothered by that offering you not being bothered about not being bothered bothered. I don't know. Look. There's something wrong. With me. I'm not bothered by people who are bothered me. If it's a it's based on sort of a false premise that you lose a friend that it should bother you, especially if it's a false premise, and it's all about nothing. So he somebody you care about is loss to you over nothing. Matt why am I not bothered in the situations? I'm guys bothered by lot of things, but I've not bother. I'm never bothered by this. Why am I not bothered? I'm thinking you just have so much on your plate. Kind of in other places. You don't really have time to stop and think about science try nice, try part of it a great job at all you work, by the way out there. I think you here. I'm not I I think that I. I ranch ship. I'm it was a fun friendship. I personally miss him. I imagine you miss him. And now you have to like lose it the that relationship is terminated lost over nothing. That's that's my definition of almost a tragedy. But if you said. Trying to I'm trying to sort this out if you said, I'm not talking animals for because he borrowed a thousand dollars and never paid it back. If I said that. Yeah. And I never borrowed a thousand dollars from you go. That's incorrect. And then you you keep going down that road, and I'd go. All right. Well, they're wrong. Like, that's that's your Aung. And it hurts it after lose a relationship over some weird delusion while I but but here's how I'm wired. If if that's who you are if that's if you haven't I know Dag is sensitive. Yes. Yeah. And he got something bothered him. We don't know what. And rather than him explaining it or sort of having an opportunity or something in his head that is Braun a wrong-headed or can be hashed out in my humble opinion. Or even if not would be nice to hear what it was number one. But number two that it doesn't bother. You bothered me all week. Well, there's a luck. It's here's what's going on. Here's here's to one. If you have such anger and resentment at him leaving over nothing, I get that. But if it's I feel nothing now that bothers me. There's something going on. Which is if you are not. Actively resisting Trump if you're not vocally actively resisting. If you're not if you're a member of the Hollywood community and your take is. I don't care I'm focusing on my kids in my family, my life, my business, and there's nothing to do. I can send tweets out all day long saying. Saying Trump's deck and Nancy Pelosi's addict, but it still doesn't I'm very like. I'm moving I'm working on a house. I got a thousand thousand project so, but you're you're I'm number of the Hollywood community that is not taken join the folks with pitchforks that want Trump thrown out of office or tarred and feathered or whatever I don't I don't I don't have the reaction to him that other people have I maybe it's because I have some pre existing knowledge of him or had some interactions with them or kind of. Got the way which way his wind was blowing. But I just don't have their action that other people have to him which is he needs to be. Impeached. I have but I don't have that reaction to any precedent. I'm just moving on someone's in. I'm all for, you know, lower regulations lower taxes. Let me let me live my life. And that's that's about it. So I don't have that reaction him. And I think the deal is if you don't have that reaction to him than you're on you've made it into the enemy's corral. And that's where does it interfere with relationship with Kimmel? No when I saw him the other day might it. I don't I don't. It's weird because people go like, whoa. You ever talk politics. And it's like there's not that much to talk about. It's weird. I'm i'm. More into almost everything else. And she me zooming that that that means Jimmy knows you're sort of mostly sort of agnostic if anything and and pragmatic, and so couldn't he broker lays off. He's pretty busy. I'm pretty busy. I just saw him the other day we hung out with a good time. Like, I hang out and have a good time. Most people in my world. You take a guy like Kevin Hench? Kevin hinch. Hates Trump with a white hot passion. Kevin Hench one of my best friends. We got to tenor we sit there, we talk about show business and family, and and whatever else and we enjoy ourselves, and you know, some once in a while Trump will come up and go God pompous as Virgo. Yeah. He is. And then it doesn't doesn't seem to have or have to have an effect. Yes. Yeah. And that's why I'm wondering why we're tolerating this rupture. Well, I'll I'll I'll flip the script on you. There's a few guys a few dad's in my neighborhood that are pretty pretty pro-trump. They they like Trump. We don't spend any more time together right now. He liked Trump. You like Trump? Now, you guys should be hanging around talking about Trump. I don't. I don't spend more time pro-trump and less time with people that are anti-trumps base it on this sort of agnostic. Well, I'm also. It'll be alone as sort of your note. The president is the president for the time being that the president. And then they'll be another president. And then we'll move on. I mean, I've I've seen that hair on fire, and Richard Nixon was in there, and then the sire relief when Jimmy Carter got in there, and then more hair on fire on Ford got in their forgot him before. And then the thing and heroin fire again Reagan got in there and Sira leaves funny. People forget the first two years of Reagan administration. It was tough. They hated him. Yeah. I'm just saying. The you and you're probably pool man Gardner and handful of neighbors have a much bigger impact on your life. Then who the president is now you can say, well, you're not black black racist. And he's declared war and black people. But I don't believe that narrative, I believe it's a false narrative. So then you can call me naive for thinking that. But I need some hard proof other than well. You know, he's a racist. I gotta see some some action as far as I'm concerned, if he's helping great jobs and the black community at high level employment. Then even if he hates black people. That's still a good. That's a good thing. It's a matter of fact, I'm not I'm not really interested. You know, my whole thing is like. Lindburg anti semitic. Ford, Henry, Ford, anti semitic. They still built willow run. They still built bombers I still bomb the, Nazis Lyndon Johnson horrible racist. Brought us the civil rights legislation. Yes. So he was a serious raises. Yeah. So I don't know what's in Linden Johnson's heart. I don't know. What's in Henry, Ford's heart? They don't like Jews. Lindburg didn't like Jews, but he worked as a test pilot for Ford, the built a bunch airplanes. They bombed a bunch of Nazis. Okay. So you ask me. What would I rather? How would I like to work out? Well, like the dots stat. Okay. Then what? Well, Ford to not be. Racist against Jews and Nazi said. Okay. Now, you have a choice you're gonna have love Jews and no, Nazis, dead or hates Jews and lots of Nazis dead. And I'll take the hates Jews with all the dead Nazis. So that's me. Okay. 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And they give you bacon for life for free twenty dollars off to free flam twenty dollars off begging for life. Just by going to butcher box dot com and entering the code a the S also. While I don't believe Trump is a racist. I don't think Hillary Clinton are how sharpen particularly love black people either. I think it's a little I have it's a two way street for me. I don't I don't see any evidence that they're doing anything moving the needle. Or whatever member I'm pragmatic that way, I don't know what's going on and Chicago, but I don't seem to see a lot of results in the streets or the school. So the housing project. So I don't know. Maybe I'm not maybe I'm not convinced about the fact that overwhelmingly school vouchers helped the black community, and all you rich white guys against school choice. Maybe maybe you're not as in love with the black communities. He claim to be remember. I'm just a pragmatic guy over here. I liked the idea of school choice for some reason. You take the subject like school choice. How we going to? How's that going to work where you paint me into some sort of racist corner because I'm for charter schools? I'm not sure the argument, but I'm sure there's a way. Well, Trump and his the clincher doesn't talk. I've not heard their arguments interested in boxing, you know, corner. Well, their arguments is they're the heroes, and I'm a villain. And I think Trump wants vouchers anyone school choice because you get a better result, especially in the inner cities. So I'm for that. The I must be a Trump fan or might just a sensible person believes, that's just a better way. There's a pragmatist. And if the last time I checked for some article that folks that were graduating from Crenshaw high. Under two percent were doing math at grade level. So maybe sixty percent of pressure. Highs foster kids sixty percent. So maybe maybe we could do better than two percent graduating at at grade level in math. You think so you think there's some I think you're not a math expert of how much room is there for improvement room. I'm not, you know, a little bit to five percent, Bradley. Well, it's a lofty goal graduating. This kids would argue the reason they can't teach them. They're too busy with the social emotional problems. They got those treated me. Look, it would all it all help. But I'm saying is start up a school. Let's bring some innovation to this. Let's let's let like you love like your beloved flying car. What I'm saying is why should there be a fucking monopoly on education? Why let me ask you the high is that what kind of job are doing. And how why they're not going to do any better jobs with the school than they are with the roads than they are with gay tuber in that. Yeah. I think Okaz Cortez might have something a point that in terms of the wealth tax because I know what happens with the government wants wants their foot in the door. You're next you are next. I don't care who you are. They're going to get your stuff two percent per year at what point are they just take it all the way down to whatever. So that's a horrible idea. But the reason we're in this position, I think people with lots of money are not collaborating invest, they're not using. Money creative ways to help solve social problems. And I wish they would come in and collaborate with the public sector and start getting very active or they're gonna come free money. If you don't start giving it listen again the schools, I love the schools. That's the way to start. Right. We like you say we got Silicon Valley in California. These guys can't spend a couple of minutes thinking collaboratively and creatively about solving our problems in California. Putting a couple bucks into it. Weird that we don't have that. I agree. All right. We'll take a call. Yeah. Line three talk to John thirty to Venice beach. And corolla. Always wanted to do that. Good to speak with you guys. By the way, drew real quick. I met some of the other day that grew up with your kids. So I asked him what you were like in person. He said, oh, man. Those pipes are three times bigger in person than they look in the pictures, and that's good. Good. Yeah. All right. Yeah. Yeah. So look, I've I've been listening. You know, twenty twenty five years have a problem. I saw my dad, and I have a good relationship folks put up when I was about ten and they both remarried his wife is just awful person treating me. She treated me pretty terrible. When I was a kid, right? It's fine. I mean, it wasn't like trauma or anything. And I've a pretty sick skin to see her like once a year at Christmas. So my strategy has been kind of grin and bear it whatever don't cause drama. Give us an example of some of her often behavior. Yeah, it's try to keep it quick. I mean, she it's some of it subtle. She's just very angry. You know, she never be pleasant to her ask our family is how she's doing. There's there's never anything that comes back. It's it's like just a lot of little shitty statements like. Oh, you're living in California. You know, you never come home. Which isn't true. It's kinda hard to do Justice in ten seconds. But she's she's just a mean angry person that makes people feel are you sure you're not carrying forward. I don't doubt that she's a negative person. But you sure you're not carrying forward your impressions from being ten having an evil stepmom come in and just setting up that relationship in stone into bringing it forward rather than going. I'm gonna freeze. I need that. I hear I hear maybe she's a little depressed. Maybe drink too much. I mean, what's going on with her on adult me back and be impassively sort of sensitive to this woman negatively sheep subjected to as a kid put it aside, and we'll be to adult. I've I've tried to do that for years. And I've I've I've asked you know, I've been pleasant I've spent time with them I've actually helped her family. I was a lot of stuff 'cause I you know, at the end of the day. I want them to have a good relationship. I wanna have a good relationship, and you know, at the same time. My I have a step dad, and you know, it wasn't necessarily easy as a kid, but we have an amazing relationship because he's a good person. So I hear you're saying I just sort of maybe accept the premise that that she is a terrible person more things. I accept she's a angry person in a negative person. And maybe depressed person haven't heard terrible person yet. Right. Doesn't like all right somewhat next. That's why. Well, that's okay. To Jesus Christ. He's looking for solutions. I'm trying to come up with them. Well, she's in what city. Back in Chicago. I don't ever see her. I don't know. Like, look, the great news about moving out and living in Venice beach in the old step, which is in Chicago. Like, it's you don't he? We haven't he has got his question which is dad. That's the problem. All right. Go ahead. John. Sorry. I'll be quick. So basically, so something happened recently where she's kinda -ffected our relationship I'll go into. So what I'm thinking? Now is I have all this resentment towards her and now a little bit towards him. And I don't like it. And I'm starting to think like gonna have a wedding gritty soon and have kids like I don't really want to expose them to her. I don't really walk her and my wedding. And I think she has been really unfair some trying to think about I you know, what what good. Would it do to just to even talk to dad about it? Is there really even an ask for him? Like, she's not going to change. You can't ask come to change her number one. And you can't ask him not to come to the wedding. That's really not fair, but you can distance yourself from them after that. That's that's that's on them. Yeah. And also. I feel like you're taking an unnecessary stand, you taking unnecessary stand. And and I've gotten into this myself up said this other people in that kind of stuff, you know, in situations like work situations stuff like that where it's like if you see that person once a year at the Christmas party, go say, hi, and then walked to the other side of the kind of a void. And then you've got a whole year for seem again, you know, voice, no reason to settle their hash crate this rift, or whatever it is just act as if and sort of move on and seem at the wedding. And then you won't see him for another fourteen months. That'd be fine. This thing where it's like what about the kids? That kids aren't dying to see people that are in Chicago. And they're not huge fans your kids like. Too much. Oh, man. My mom did a great one the other. Oh, you know why? No, great about it. It was it was on point. I mean, it was it was form. Good form perfect form. Hey about it in the second wears title group car man was given quietly strong. Truecar sixty seconds. That's how long this commercials gonna last. You know else you can do in a minute and get an offer on your car. He just go to truecar use your smartphone or your computer. Enter your license plate number. Watch. Your car's details. Pop up answer a few questions, you'll get an accurate true cash offer from a local certified dealer. No problem. Oh, you bring the car in. They'll check it out with you. Do it together? Ask questions get answers. No surprises, then Aleve with your check or trade in your car, and you leave with your new ride or your used car. So when you're ready for better experience and a better way to sell a trait in your car. You check out truecar today for better way. Part of life. I'm always kind of. Very interested in as the. Zero calorie burns burners were people are still wasteful or still hurtful, or so whatever, you know, unnecessary calories. Like, I it's always funny to me like sometimes when you're walking down the street and someone's walking the other way they have their dog and you go Hello. And they don't say anything they keep walking and people like maybe caught him off guard or something like I off guard like wave your hand, flap your arm, or whatever it is. It's my thing with the freeway signs. Click it or ticket or whatever come on. Just get some good on there. Sprinklers going off on the side of the freeway Pasadena the other day when I'm driving. I know you give me shit about this all the time to that people have imperfect a systems of attention that we're always double check Yar attentional systems. We're not sure we heard it. We don't trust now. Yes. I know you don't do that. But humans do that never one. And number two. We have a Moshe. It's now have feelings. So no, you have neither of these things. My sister was talking and. I didn't really grow up with my sister. She ran away. And I didn't see her much in baba blonde. She was claiming she was a huge Michael Jackson fan. That's sort of kind of news. The may. But fine, you know, getting I don't know twelve year old big Jackson Five fan. And so she said, oh my God. I was a huge huge huge Michael Jackson. I mean, I saw that one time at the. Supermarket over there in Sinoe that time man, I went nuts. I mean, it was crazy. It was like the. Look seeing the Beatles. And then. Tell the story then some points. She said to my mom, she's member we saw Michael Jackson and the Gallison's Sinoe my moment. Not remember that. And my. Bye. Now. My sister had to kind of continue the story, my mom to said now credit jar and also I don't think my sister's lying. Michael Jackson's compound wasn't Encino. I'm sure he went out to go get himself some split pea soup. Every once in a while, the gal sins, and I'm sure my sister song, my mom because Cher wiring, so horrible. There's two things are wrong with it one. Is she probably doesn't remember to read joy? Somebody talked about all the way home in the car. You know what I mean? Like, just go like, yeah. Like, you know, if if you know fifty years from now might son went time, you're you're with me and we saw tad girly. The Gallison's I'd go. There you go. I wouldn't go now or you know, you would I'm surprised at our member. Given how important that was you? It was just it was just what it was. I'm just gonna shut this down. Like somebody's having something doing something relating something expressing something. There's some sort of possible joy, and some sort of airing of something that's going on here. And I'm out I'm out and also. It's not verify -able. There's it's the easiest thing in the world to just go. Yeah. Right, right. No one's gonna question. You no one's going to check this Valence footage or anything. You just go. Yeah. And. Probably does have some vague recollection of it as my sister was talking about. I was started have a vague like then remember some story about something like that. Why not? Yeah. It's you're talking about eleven year old. Who's now in their fifties. But they're Levin dority with. Yeah. You didn't see depreciate the time. I ran away the next day. Well, I mean, that's a a glimpse into the wiring. Right. Oh, yeah. No. That's exactly the way. She always descr. You've always ascribing. Right. And not only was it. Like, it wasn't a no. And it wasn't like, no. And but I remember how much talked about Michael Jackson day when it was discussed muffins right now. No, no recollection of that. And stepdad there. Yeah. The here. He was he was here though, they were all together. Then right. You're still married to the your dad the was a family intact at that point still. I we were never intact. But it's true. If if you had said to my step dad by sister did. Twenty minutes on Michael Jackson, then told the story about running into them at the scene gilson's. And then asked my mom about it. She had no recollection of it, which I could have told by the way, this is my sister's fault, you don't say to her. Hey, remember that time because you're not gonna answer shall we ever taught. You to ever talk about that? You were share the next time. I see our laugh, I'll go, I don't know. Why ask mom she remembered something she's going to say now, would you sister? How to react to that? She'd get it probably. Well, I get defensive just got it, which is the federal bomb and get defensive rating. Not that much defend their she was the recipient. She's came out on the losing end of that right now if you talked about it for twenty five minutes, and then you said to my stepdad, John. What about you? Do you? Remember seeing him he'd say who? And then you'd be back to. Every back there. Yeah. So he would never somehow more satisfied. Full circle. Well, you got a coin toss chance John, but my mom would say, no. And by the way. No. And nothing else. We're we're done. Yeah. There's no more. And it's funny. It's crazy. How effective it is. Because my sister was. Maybe she had a glasses of champagne, and she was kind of doing. Oh, yeah. I had all the Michael Jackson. And then a big, you know, she's got. And then I turn on there. He was you know, all my God. I was going mom. You remember? No, I'm moving on. We we eating like, I mean it super effective. You don't even know how active it is. It's like shut going elevator door closed. We're going you just move right on weird. Right. But affective and a win serves its purpose. Also asserting a little power over the conversation. I don't like about it is. It's not it's not all just like, I don't remember. It's a little shut up. Yeah. Now, quiet you. Yeah. Moving on. I don't like this thing with your hands or moving around and you're smiling like Neta, Don shutdown. Told her what I told her. I know Trump a little bit day. Yeah. But you're not friends with him friendly. She's talking or son out of being friends with the president you. Yeah. Weird. Weird impulse. No. I know, you know him. Lifelock everybody that I know taxis and scammers are back. They never give you never give your tax documents to prepare until you're ready to go and they're verified, and they're credible through not send it to. God knows who how far in advance file early watch out for emails and personality the IRS. There's so many ways cyber criminals can take what's yours be aware of the threats while the only way to protect against phone scams is to not fall for them. It's important to get protection where you can good thing. Lifelock identity theft protection ads the power of Norton scaredy to help protect against threats your devices can easily you can't easily see or fix on your own. So you don't know what's going on. But they know what's going on. 'cause they're lifelock. There's a problem there agents will work to fix it. Right. Drew could prevent. Entity theft or cybercrime or monitor transactions at all businesses. But lifelock with nor and security can see threats you might miss on your own go to lifelock dot com or call one eight hundred lifelock use promo code Adam for ten percent off your first year that is promo code adamant, lifelock dot com or one eight hundred lifelock for ten percent off not tackle bell. Material. My stand up special. My I stand up special. You can see it live and theaters with other fans around the country, February twenty seventh and if you go dot com slash events. You can get all the details of how that's gonna work. So let's do that got him Kroll dot com for anything any drew is just curious is that a taped or live the live show that you do? They gets transmitted theaters all over the place. So one hour stand up special that is already been take got go to dot com. You the family pods there and Nunu doctor dark. Check it out and say hi to Laura Ingram on the Laura Ingram podcast, check that out show podcast. Podcast one till next that doctor say Mahala. This is Corolla digital. Napa know why get fucked quarts of Castrol edge full synthetic motor oil for twenty eight ninety nine because that's a good price for performance oil, and nobody wants mediocre performance. When's the last time your boss said here's a raise for being average. That's right. Never Castrol edge full synthetic just twenty eight and ninety nine quality parts helpful people. That's Napa know how how general states pricing sales president not include applicable state local taxes, recycled fees offer ends two twenty eight nineteen. A workplace shooting near Chicago Leafs, five people dead. I'm Jacky Quin with AP news minute. The police chief in Aurora Illinois. Kristen Zima says when officers responded to a manufacturing facility several of them were shot. Other officers went in to make a grim discovery victims inside the building at this time. We have confirmed that five victims are deceased the forty five year old gunman died in a shootout with police in California. A third storm victims been found a man swept away by floodwaters in sage east of Los Angeles. They're still a threat of mudslides. Worrying residents in sausalito. I don't think we've been a storm like this for decades and some three feet of snow in the Sierra Nevada's Chicago police say the two suspects have been arrested in a reported hate crime against actor Justice, small it. I'm Jacky Quin.

Trump Trump Chicago lifelock president Ford California John Michael Jackson David Alan Grier Dr drew Pinski Mr. T Michael Jackson Adam Corolla Hollywood Robert Downey Kevin Hench
John Leguizamo Wants To Set The Record Straight

The Frame

28:10 min | 2 years ago

John Leguizamo Wants To Set The Record Straight

"K._p._c._c. podcasts are supported by the netflix series mind hunter this season the unit interviews more notorious serial killers and starts to investigate high highprofile cases such as wichitas b._t. K. mind hunter season two now streaming only on netflix and h._b._o. Presenting game of thrones critics have hailed the final season as t._v.'s greatest show of all time an era defining nominated for thirty two emmys including outstanding ending drama series the most emmy nominations of any drama ever broadcast center at k._p._c._c. This is the frame. I'm john john horn on today's show. The dispute between net flicks and movie theater owners continues and this time it's martin scorcese who's caught in the middle then john lakewood samo has an emmy nomination for when they see us and it stayed showed latin history for morons won a tony he says both projects challenge flawed historical michael narratives and if the correct history was put out there that landon black people were really instrumental in the making of the united states then there'd be a lot more respect to us and people would not be so bold as to you know tell us to go back to where we came from all that coming up on the frame k._a._b._c. a._b._c. Podcasts are supported by the netflix series mind hunter inspired by events recounted and former f._b._i. Agent john douglas book mind hunter inside inside the f. b. I.'s elite serious crime unit this season the unit interviews more notorious serial killers and start to investigate high profile cases such as wichita. It's all kansas p t k and emerging serial killer in atlanta directive. I david fincher andrew dominik and carl franklin mind hunter season two now streaming only on netflix cts martin scorsese's big-budget netflix film the irishman will debut november i in theaters. There's but on a lot fewer screens than net flicks at hoped theater owners want to retain their long window of exclusivity typically about three months before a movie begins streaming rather than a national release. The irishman will now debut in a handful of smaller chains some independent theaters and others that net afflicts. We'll rent and thomson is editor at large for the digital news site indie wire and she says that even if the streaming company hasn't won the war with theater the owners they now have competing studios joining the battle. I mean remember where we were around. The oscars and steven spielberg organ green book doc and netflix was the enemy and all the distributors were sort of freaked out right now. There's a different shift. The real enemy is disney net. That's like this on the ropes right and they're trying to work with the theater chains and in a way the studios are supporting them now. They're letting being netflix. Be the the disruptor in a good way trying to find some place where they can meet but i didn't think they were gonna pull this off and they didn't. You're dizzy isn't he. Like net flicks is launching a major streaming and initiative and so are other studios like universal and i think those studios also wanna see this three month window now shrunken. What is the upside for a company like netflix to have a movie like the irishman play in theaters. Is it a financial word more of a prestige award with the benefit they have a number of different issues one is that they have a filmmaker. Martin scorsese who by the way was not going to get this money from anyone else. I mean the reported figures one hundred seventy five million. It's probably closer to two hundred and that looks can afford it. I guess what their real end game is is getting people to watch the service but why they're throwing one two three four five six seven eight nine other films out during this period y for the filmmakers to give them a theatrical showing to brand the titles to give them some marketing and reviews and some kind of identification patients so that they will do better when they're on netflix. I will never forget the producer who said to be nothing beats three weeks word of mouth in a theater and that's still true i i think if we had the actual voting numbers we would see that roma probably lost to green book by about a dozen votes in the best picture race and you and i think talk talk oskar voters who might have penalized roma for not being what we would call a traditional theatrical release so is that part of net flicks is thanking. Yes it adds ads credit but it's also about the oscar race as you mentioned. Roma did well. It got three oscars. It was in the best picture race and it was in theaters for about three months which a a lot of people forget and it was a singularly cinematic experience and alfonso koran was a studio filmaker already well respected within the hollywood community so that was an anomaly in many ways irishman they. They have to want to get some of their money back. They wanna build they wanna be in the oscar race and they want it to be taken seriously and that's why they're in theaters earlier. This year. I was at the cinema con convention in las vegas which is an i annual gathering of movie theater owners and i sat down with john fithian who is the head of the national association of theatre owners and i asked him about windows. How much much time goes between a movie premiering in theaters and win. It appears on a streaming service and here's what he had to say. There's a misperception often reported that ah there's a fixed ninety day window in the domestic marketplace. That's really an average and there are ranges of windows from like seventy days to one hundred twenty. The and movies being released theatrically today based on the type of movie. It doesn't feel though that the exhibitors are really that interested intriguing in those windows. So how is this story going to play out if it's not over the irishman if they're going to be a movie in the near future that theater owners want that still could be on and some platform maybe netflix. Maybe disney plus where they're going to have to give a little yeah. I think the theaters are being really foolish but i understand that that they're also frightened and they have shareholders and i think they're afraid that if they backed down and say seventy days i believe seventy days was the real figure they might have considered with stupor. He wouldn't though he wanted something as i understand it closer to forty five and forty i five was a place they weren't willing to go so remember that the theaters share a gross with the studios and so the studio's really really really want their marketing dollars colors to help with these streaming platforms not have this long gap between when a movie leaves the theaters and shows up somewhere else howard tiered pricing pricing which is different fees for different kinds of movies depending on. I guess their quality and how long they've been in theaters. How would that affect a movie like the irishman. This isn't going to happen anytime soon. The event movie gets a bigger price than the little in day. I just don't see it happening. The theaters really don't like this one but what could happen is something else where they let a movie like that play for a certain period of time with different kind of split and everybody's happy arkell might work yeah at least you can get up and go to the restroom without bothering a lot of people but i think it matters where you see a film and a movie like the irishman just like like a movie like roma. I really believe need to be seen in a theater to appreciate the quality of the overall filmmaking. I couldn't agree more john and and i worry as the studios move into the streaming future that the theaters are going to not have enough product that a lot of the mid level level stuff that we like the ford versus ferrari kind of movies that these movies are not going to show up in theaters if they get made at all. They're going to go straight eight to streaming. What are the theaters gonna do on marvel alone yeah and who knows how many marvel movies might end up on disney disney plus platform. It's going to be an interesting story story to follow over the next months and years and thomson is editor at large at indie wire where she writes the thomson on hollywood column and thanks so much for coming back the show these melodies coming up next on on the frame john lake was otto might have missed his calling as a history professor kim. These <music> k._p._c._c. podcasts are supported by h._b._o. Presenting sharp objects based on the bestselling novel by gillian flynn the the story focuses on camille precursor a journalist with a history of psychiatric issues who returns to her rural hometown to cover the apparent murders of two preteen girls the limited series was hailed by critics exquisite hauntingly compelling and a true masterpiece nominated for eight emmys including outstanding limited series visit the h._b._o. Dot com slash f._i._c. for more on sharp objects. K._p._c._c. podcasts are supported by net flicks. Dave chapelle is back with an on news. Stand up comedy special unflinching and boundary pushing dave gives his provocative perspective on the tidal wave of celebrity scandals the opioid crisis and more in trademark chapelle fashion dave chapelle sticks and stones is streaming now only on net flicks. John leguizamo has done a lot. He's acted on stage and screen. He's been a playwright filmmaker and even a stand up comedian. This year has been no different. He's getting ready to hit the road with his solo show latin history for morons starting right here in los angeles and he's nominated for an emmy for his his supporting role in when they see us the netflix limited series about new york central park jogger case in nineteen eighty nine leg was lived in new york at the time and remembers the media narratives around the five of us for black one latino who were convicted even though they were innocent but he said this dramatization dramatization a different perspective the beauty of when they see as done by eva <unk> is is that it brings you there. It makes you present present. It makes you be one of the kids and makes me one of the parents which nothing else could have done that. I mean not all the news articles written about it not the beautiful documentary by ken burns which which was one of the most masterful documentaries i mean because they really gave you the legality of it but it didn't make you one of the kids or the parents like the series does and even when i was reading the script it was so painful my i would rehearse for my wife and she would read the other part. She would keep so much. Go if you do the whole time. I can't rehearse for the because he can't understand what you're saying. That's how that's how painful it was. You know what had happened. I i was not living in manhattan. I was living in queens and so oh i just met with the paper said you know so. I wasn't connected to the community so i just believed that. Why would those kids do that. I mean i was like why would they go wild loudon out like that. Why why why giving us a bad name. You know that's kind of like what you felt. If you just read the papers if you weren't in the community and understood what what was going on i think there was also a common belief that all five of the kids were black and it was interesting to see that obviously your character actor son is latino and what was the reaction among the community about raymond santana junior because i think we all knew a little bit about how the african an american community reacted but i don't even remember the latino community and its reaction right. What were they were. They were to latin kids. They were six kids altogether but one one of the latin kids was smart enough. I don't know how he knew not to confess to anything wouldn't sign anything in the parents didn't neither and he got let go <hes> obviously in the land community a lot of people believed the the media they believe the news and so the santana's were were ostracized even by their own family it's like why are you bringing this this scourge into our into our family into our neighborhood you make giving us all a bad name and you recognize our you know our reputation here and <hes> you know mr santana by his own brother was asked to leave the his his brother was the <hes> the the superintendent asked to leave the building. I wanna play a clip from when they see us is when your character comes in and sees not only what has happened to your son but what he is confessing to even though it's completely untrue okay so so <hes> entra held her down with kevin taper right stop. Your son was witness to in central park so antrim was raping and what we do. I mean no one's gonna believe a kid like what you're standing. You've got to put yourself in their law. No wait a minute. What do you make yourself man thaw aw there you didn't hear a father is seeing his son admit to something that he can't imagine his son ever having done and of course his son hasn't done it right i mean and the the amount of confusion in that poor fathers head i mean here the cops who supposed to respect respect and believe here's your son who you know and you know his character and you know. He's just a child and he doesn't know what to do. He and he's trying nine two way at all and he's gotta make huge decisions that are going to be life changing for his son and it was very difficult to do. You know <hes> <hes> my scene was done. At the end of the night you know at the very last the poor kid marquees playing. My son had to go through a lot of scenes. You know where he's getting abused by the police i know he was exhausted and worn out but he just i it was. It was really painful to do these scenes change but important. I mean you you have to as an artist. Sometimes make yourself go to really painful things that are hard to shake after after after the fact but you know you have to in order to get an audience to really be there with you. This feels like a series not only about what happened but about how the the families of these children reacted and how they stayed together for better for worse when they were confronted by this horrible miscarriage of justice and it feels like that's very intentional in the series that this is a story not only about how these kids were falsely accused but about how their families dealt with it yeah yeah. I mean that that's that's how you brought us into their world. You know all the conflicts inside the families you know some of the parents turning against each other fear fear of losing their their their their child. You know forever the community that we created the actors to be able to go to these places these dark places you know we were we were nurturing. Teach other was very nurturing. Were very consoling. Each other everybody tweet each other with such kindness because we had experienced such violence in in the scenes you know on ask about the real raymond santana junior there are these portraits of the <music> central park five at the end of the series and they are very impressive looking men and i'm wondering was it intentional to have any kind of contact with with the real characters. Were you able to meet with them or did you want to keep your distance well. I'm very method you know. I said he would leave strasbourg for one day. <hes> my my acting actually killed them. I think <hes> he died that day but i don't know if i legend is that my acting strong yeah true story died nineteen eighty two i. I was six seventeen years old <hes> so i i've been method my whole life you know and method. Is you know you gotta meet the people you got to do. Research who got involve of yourself so you know i met santana senior and i met raymond junior and <hes> we went to dinner together. I took them to a really fancy restaurant. I felt it was the least that could do and i just asked and talked and wanted to understand what were the thought processes that allowed mr santana to sound that confession and how could you how did you live with that. You know and the poor man you know. He was a single dad. The mom was ill and they were separated the mamas zeal and hit a lot of responsibilities and he you know he was afraid of losing his job. He was afraid of getting there late and <hes> he knew his son was innocent. So some people believe just because you're innocent that somehow innocence is a shield against all evil against evil <music> intent and he just thought that his innocence would come to light some day and <hes>. That's a lot to bank on you know <hes>. I think the takeaway is don't confess to anything you didn't do. Don't sign anything and just ask for a lawyer. I mean that's the takeaway that i walked away from that. We're talking with actor john leguizamo. I wanna play a clip from your show latin history for morons when you talk about howard johnson's book a people's history of united states because even even in the first tap that he proves that our contributions were even bigger than what i thought because we also gave you tomatoes potatoes chocolate talent without that ma'am hammocks canoes chili peppers tobacco anesthesia brain surgery and people from jersey long island can hockey. I think there is a real clear parallel between latin history for morons and when they see us and that is the history that we've been taught and the history that is true and i'm. I'm wondering if you think about that as well because last week the new york times published at sixteen nineteen project about the history of slavery in this country and it feels feels like those two projects of yours latin history for morons and when they see us are telling us the story that we should know and that we haven't been taught that it should. That's a really interesting correlation. 'cause 'cause you're right. I mean it's the things that were not told about the history that sort of kept from us and erased because profiling latin and black kids the way the the profiled by the law and in job situations all comes from the fact that our history in the truth of our contributions to the making of america are not out there and if the correct history was put out there that landon black people were really instrumental in the making of the united states so many different ways then there'll be a lot more respect to us and they will be we will be much more respected and people would would would not be so bold as to you know tell us to go back to where we came from <music> coming up next on the frame more which leg was otto. K._p._c._c. podcasts cast are supported by net flicks. Dave chapelle is back with an all news. Stand up comedy special unflinching in boundary pushing dave gives his provocative perspective on the tidal wave evo celebrity scandals the opioid crisis and more in trademark chapelle fashion dave chapelle sticks and stones is streaming now only on that flicks. Let's get back to my conversation with actor and playwright john leguizamo. He's headed out on tour soon with his solo stage. Show oh latin history for morons. The show's website offers a syllabus of sorts that includes a long list of books but in order to create that reading list he. I had to do his own homework. I mean the genesis of the show was that my son was being bullied at school when he was twelve years old and i couldn't believe that my son in new york city in these modern modern times as being racially profiled and <hes> you know i was bullied as a kid. Obviously you know what i was. There was a lot of white flight. We would like the second latin family on the block and <hes> you know when we played games and you beat them at at stickball a stupid bald and everything will turn into racial slurs and and i never had an answer so you know except kick your you know loop but i didn't want that for my son. I wanted to elevate everything. I wanted to be involved parent and so i i wanted to give him information and knowledge in data in facts about latin people and when i started reading all these books i was like wait a minute. I'm the one that's being empowered on the one that's healing my my sense of feeling like a second class citizen because all this information is so powerful i mean when i learned simple simple facts like land people the second oldest ethnic group in america after native the native americans that we're the only ethnic group that has fought in every single angle war america's has ever had and were the most awarded these are huge contributions to the making of this country. We shed blood for the making of this country and for people to have the audacity to tell us to go back to where we came from. It's not being said to the french. It's being said to the irish irish or the russians is only being said to us. It sounds like you're talking about your show almost as a portable classroom when that'd be great i had a little van like a like a target taco taco truck just do show you premiered latin history for morons at berkeley wrap three years ago and let's say a lot has happened since he he asked why the united states should welcome immigrants from it whole countries he was running will not be a refugee holding facility won't be a week just as the families of the victims of the el paso attack were mourning those killed after what was the deadliest attack targeting latinos in modern american history. A massive immigration raid on undocumented workers took place in mississippi. We saw images of what does that mean to the show. Does it change in its machining. Do you change the words. How does it evolve as the country of's well. What's interesting is obviously the slings and arrows inflicted on latin and black communities didn't just start with this president you know with trump. It was there air before he has just woke up the white liberal. I mean he's done us a huge favor by waking up the white liberal and it's a beautiful time i'm in in in that sense that we were all a little too comfortable and thinking things had improved when they really hadn't you know <hes> and the things that my show has changed in those last few years. Is that obviously my my my attack on trump. Were really specific. When it opened on broadway they were very pointed and i've changed him a little bit <hes> i. I don't want to flip off the trumpers. I don't i wanna flip off republicans. I want to bring him into under underneath my arms you know i want. I want to open their minds and change their hearts. That's who might target audiences i i want i want to elevate my audience and show them how much we've contributed to america so they never feel like a second class citizen so nobody can ever tell them to go back to where they came from because they made this country and they should never feel like they didn't <hes> so. I'm working at a on different levels. I'm trying to you psychologically disarm a certain group and i'm trying to bolster and boost another group. There are a lot of blackboard that you use in this this show and you draw a lot of charts and graphs and maps. We also twenty five percent why twenty five percent jewish twenty lebanese and forty percent. I don't know what the grand total of one hundred eighty percent latino people about the genesis of the show. Your first play was mambo mouth in nineteen ninety one. What do you hope that this play accomplishes. And how would you define what it is. You're trying to do when you do your one man shows when i was at the apollo theater and i opened up the tour this young latin x young man nineteen years old said had all this rage judge and i didn't know what to do with it except tonight. I learned what to do with it. I learned that that knowledge is my weapon and i was like yes. That's exactly what i wanted this show to be. I wanted to show to trigger lots of lat next kids into finding out about the history that is not available to them in in in in their schools not available textbooks not available on on history channel discovery channel or ken burns documentary. I point them to the books and the syllabus to study it empower themselves in weaponize knowledge and that that was my goal with with the show <hes> one man shows to me for the second part of question. One man shows to me is the most personal intimate and artists can be with an audience. You know it's my thoughts. It's my ideas my philosophies and the on insists responding intuitively with me whether they're enraged whether they're saddened whether they're made proud by it. I mean we are exchanging and and they're very vocal. My audience is very vocal and they responded like in like and it becomes a conversation tation. You said something not long ago and i'm going to read it back to you. You said i grew up without seen people who look like me onscreen onstage or in textbooks lat next people people have been kept out of the conversation for centuries and and it's about time y'all hear what we gotta say unfortunately hollywood has contributed to the <hes> sort of demonizing of latin people because they constantly constantly put us as drug dealers as nefarious his characters or subservient and it's not a it's not the reality that i've experienced. I've seen you know i. I don't see the alexandria or cossio cortes or the houlihan castro's in hollywood movies. I i don't see the two sisters who colombian twin sisters. There's who discovered who discovered a chemical that that can absolve the <hes> absorb the <hes> the the oil spills in the oceans where where are those characters characters where those positive images that elevate and change the narrative. John leguizamo has an emmy nomination stars in the netflix series when they see us his solo show latin history for morons opens at the ahmanson theatre on september fifth breath john. Thanks so much for coming. Oh thank you for 'em. You wanna blast pleasure. Thank you and that is it for today. Remember you can follow us on facebook twitter. You'll find us at the frame. I'm john horn born. We're back here tomorrow at the mon broadcast center.

netflix John leguizamo Dave chapelle john john horn emmy united states mr santana martin scorcese america disney oscars ken burns raymond santana thomson john douglas new york hollywood editor
Ep. 200: Celebrating Our 200th Episode!

Happier in Hollywood

31:41 min | 5 months ago

Ep. 200: Celebrating Our 200th Episode!

"I have a new favorite tree which is something that production cut in a nice little. Welcome back for me in puerto rico which was glavas sticks. Have you ever heard of these. Are they like Like dr guava or something. Now it's more like a cookie apparently made from glava. they are so delicious. Like melt in your mouth. I can't wait for you to try them. Live probably have glued. What i was going to say. Oh no i'll still have one. Hi and welcome. To half your in hollywood the podcast about how to be happier healthier saner more creative more successful and more productive and a backbiting superficial chaotic unpredictable. Fundamentally insane world. I'm liz craft tv writer and producer living in. La and with me is my high school friend and writing partner. Sarah that's me. Sarah fain on this podcast. We talk about being writers. In hollywood how we balance a career and friendship and how to survive the war of attrition. That is life in los angeles and sarah. Today we are celebrating our two hundred episode of fear in hollywood. I can't believe it. I know like can't believe it either. I know you know. It's funny because gretchen. And i are celebrating our sixth anniversary happier. Ruben and i was saying to her that almost as soon as that started. I was saying to you. We should do a podcast about hollywood. And here we are two hundred episodes. I know and i remember being very excited about the idea and also extremely nervous. Yes and we started talking about like well. We have topics. What will we talk about. And we had so many things to talk about. We thought well we have to do this. Yes yes and more. Things arise every day in fact our two hundredth episode. We have to jump in and record early for one of those crazy things. That is happening. Yes i am going to go last minute to puerto rico for a few days to do a location scout for fantasy island show. Were working on for fox so we were like. Oh we better record this episode. Because it's going to be very hard to record from a van in puerto. Rico and then you and i will both go yes weeks. I was just imagining. You pulled over on the side of the road in san juan. Like sorry. I just have to do this real exactly and sarah just as i was thinking about this being two hundred episode. The thing that has been so great. I think for both of us is the community around happier in hollywood like i feel like we've made amazing connections with other writers but also with people who aren't necessarily in the business and it's given us an ability to reach out and invite people onto the show who You know just who were interested in yes like we got to talk to duke. Who have admired her as a poker player forever and she's so brilliant it was like. Oh my god here. We are talking to anti duke and we have people like our friend. Michelle tromble on. Who like in a pandemic. it's so hard to like. See people and talk to people but it's like we can go. Hey we can have this show on to talk about her. Show the really been a gift and of course we also have to talk about our incredible facebook group. Yes oh my gosh. Our facebook group has blossomed into this goto destination for when i just want to chat with people. See what's going on. It's about hollywood really so much more. Yeah i always find. If i'm just feeling a bit glum. I can go to our facebook group and people take non-hollywood questions their life questions and sometimes it's just like i'm looking for a new book. What great book have you read lately. And sometimes it's bigger weightier. Things i find the support that the people in our happier in hollywood community give is very smart and compassionate. It just always makes me feel better even if the question has nothing to do with my life hand with hollywood same. Yeah so anyone. Who's not in the facebook. Group wants to join Just go to facebook. And search for hyper in hollywood and requests to be put into the group and we will let you in and if you are in the groups thank you for just being so awesome and creating such as for people yes okay. Well sarah in the spirit of the two hundred episode. We asked listeners to let us know what they've taken away from happier in. Hollywood what little tidbit has resonated with them. And we got of course some amazing responses so he just wanted to share yes. Laura mentioned light the fire. She said i utilize that strategy yesterday. When you mentioned it in the podcast and finished four knitting projects. They required simple tedious fixes. That i'd put off. Because i was annoyed that i'd made a mistake when casting off or finishing the crown of a hat for example total time for repairing all four projects an hour. And now i've got a new cowl to where my morning walks and three friends have new hands. Oh yea of course you know. I love that one as a knitter yet. Well and also it's funny about that. Sarah's that's one we never would have had if you weren't in minnesota where you realized after fifteen years of not using the fireplace. You could do a small fix and be able to have nightly fire. Yes absolutely and then. Alice said she's taken away. Give good meeting. It changed my professional life. We have talked a lot about meetings and how to have a great meeting. Yes it's so important all the many elements of meetings. I feel like we have covered. Although i'm we'll find new elements to come home. There's always something about meetings and then brook said no win to quit and how to do it without burning bridges. Yes we did like a whole big segment on how to quit properly. Yes as you know. I had a traumatic nanny quitting experience which splattered that yes and it really just made us think like it's such an important skill and when you screw it up it can have long term in this case. It really doesn't matter but if you do it it in the wrong position or in the wrong company or in the wrong career e could really have long term effects knowing how to quit. Well is important so yeah. My melcher came and talked to us about that. That was great. Yes and then jacqueline says. Ripcord no-one to pull it so that similar. It's like when you quit. Like what is the moment of escape which you know. We've all been there. and katie. Said she most remembers having a nemesis. She said my husband. And i have determined that we have the same nemesis in the investment property world. Yes that is seventy the idea of a nemesis. It's not like an enemy. It's just someone who you sort of track and you want to see how you're doing against them. I guess we got. We got that from roxane. Gay who very famously has a nemesis. Maybe more than one i think. Yes and if you haven't read roxanne gay's book hunger. It's excellent coming up. We will talk about our favorite takeaway all times from happier in hollywood i this spring if you sell stuff online. You're definitely in the right business. More people are shopping online than ever. That means a lot of orders coming in and a lot of orders. You'll need to ship out fast. That's why online sellers like you need ships station. No matter how much you sell ship station makes it super easy to manage ship all your orders from all your sales channels faster cheaper and more efficiently. You'll spend a lot less time on shipping and a lot more time growing your business. You know my love for ship station. Sarah we've sold out of our merge and. I'm so sad because i haven't been able to use to ship station to send it out so we need more merge so i can get back to my beloved ship station was ship stationed. Small businesses can now access. The same rates usually reserved for fortune five hundred companies without the contracts or commitments. It's no wonder ship station has more five star reviews and any other shipping software ship more and less time. Just use our offer code hollywood to get a sixty day free trial. That's two months free of no hassle stress free shipping. Just go to ship station dot com. Click on the microphone at the top of the page and type in hollywood. that's ship station dot com. Enter offer code. Hollywood make ship happen. Sarah these are a couple. You and i go back to over and over again. Jodi says take the meeting and volunteers not recruits or my favorites. Honestly i take away a new perspective for my toolbox each week. Oh well that's nice tursis talking about take the meeting. And by the way we have several votes for take the eating and volunteers not recruit so we should talk about each of those hate the meeting. We have realised sarah over the years that even if a meeting seems useless seems pointless. Seems like why are we gonna put on makeup whether it's zoom or in person to take this meeting we have learned many times. That meeting can lead to something unexpected. Yes so many times. We've been like we don't know if we like that actor and then we have a meeting with them and we go. You know what they're actually perfect for this. It happens over and over same with writer same directors. you think. well. I don't know. I've seen this or i've seen that i'm not sure it's really applicable to what we're doing here and then as soon as you take the meeting. Just there's that little nugget that goes. Oh yeah this is the right person for this and the same is true of meeting on projects you might think. I don't know if we want to do this project about lottie da and then you get there and you're like lahti does amazing. I have a lotta well and what happens. Also is that you meet with a producer one year and you go. That was interesting but then three years later they have something you really want. And then you have a relationship or you. you're looking for someone to partner with and then you remember. I really liked that producer to meeting so also executives i mean executives who've around so they may be at a different network in six months and have something that they recommend you for. So you've just it's really worth the time to take the meetings. I mean that's sort of hollywood for us. Hollywood has such a meeting based industry right. Yeah but even for those of you not in hollywood. I think taking the meeting is usually the right move. And then of course. Volunteers not recruits. I'm gonna say is probably the single greatest piece of wisdom we have ever received and passed on. I am going to agree with you. I wish that i could claim credit for it. I wish it was hours. I wish it had emanated from our own heads but it did not. I think what's great about volunteers not recruits is. It boils down a lot of complex and competing things into just a very simple phrase. Yes so many problems can be solved by just saying volunteers not recruits and it goes both ways so we both feel that like when we're hiring people if someone is hedging. They don't know if they want to do it. We do not go out of our way to talk them into doing it. Because again volunteers not recruits but also. It helps us get over not being chosen for something like we also don't want to have to convince you down and sideways that were ripe or something. If you don't want us fine will find somebody who us right. yeah. I think the consequences of not living. By and working by the idea of volunteers not recruits are so often. Yeah i mean it really south so quickly and so badly so we i mean we make so many decisions with volunteers not recruits in mind. Yeah and it's funny anytime we might waver from that we can just go back to the origin story for volunteers not recruits sarah. I won't name any names but we were on a show or the lead actor really didn't want to be there was not our show i should say and the creator of the show said looking back he had had to really convince the person to do the job and the person really did want to but got talked into it and for years. It was just somebody who didn't want to be there. And that made everybody's life more difficult and so the crater said does from now on it's volunteer star recruits and anytime that we waiver we just think back to that experience and we remember the fallout of having a recruit to deal with and we move on quickly. Yes and then. Liz i love this. Brenda and lauren. Boasted said that strong calm kind has become a really important mantra for them. Lauren for parenting and brenda for her job as a middle school assistant principal boy definitely amazing motto. Yes i wish we could again take credit for it sarah but that is the motto of liz dolan One of the satellite sisters. You know we love the satellite sisters anyone. Who has it listened to their podcast please do. It's still eiffel and liz dolan said her work. Mantra is strong com kind and ice and she says she tries to be to on any given day. Not all three so then. I said my mantra was hysterical. And mean which i can be all three on any given day. We've got those nailed working on strong calm kind. I still need my week. Hysterical in mean mug. Didn't they get you in week. Hysterical mean mug. You got me strong com kind perfume. Yes it was like. I know i did jumping. The mug is on the way. I'll work on it. Okay good so yes strong com kinds there. That's what we're gonna take into a fantasy island at least try. Yes now victoria says. I love your original mantra. This is a fun job and we enjoy it and we got in that from several people and somebody said it's a fun job even when it's not and that is really the key to it's a fun job and i enjoy is knowing that every job has things right that aren't fun including ours but remember that we enjoy it. Yes what is it now is is a laborious lark. Yes that's right. It's a laborious lurk and we enjoy it. That's our new mantra. And then kelly she. Kelly wrote down with exclamation points. I think of you. Every time i check over an email before i it yes kelly. I'm still working on it. I have to say this is an ongoing thing. Sarah justice morning. I sent a double exclamation point message and i looked at it and i said i've just put to double to. I've just put two exclamation points here. Is that necessary. And i decided it was but it probably wasn't. It's a hard habit to break. Really is now lindsay. Said what stuck with her is. Stop apologizing say thank you instead of sorry. I think this isn't even just about work. This is in life. I think women especially have a tendency to apologize for everything. Like i've a friend who apologizes for walking into a room. Like oh i'm sorry i just walked in. I hope that's okay. It's like you don't have to apologize for being alive right and it takes away. Also the meaning of apologies apologies. When they're delivered sincerely are so powerful and have such power to transform a relationship. But if you're just constantly throwing sorry around then it stops being as meaningful. We become less powerful as we're apologizing a lot which is what trish pointed out. She said you taught me to take back my power and stop apologizing yes trish yes and it is true that if you say thank you instead of sorry you get the same message across so thank you for understanding that i had to leave work early to pick up by son at the airport is better than i'm so sorry i had to go pick up my son at the airport. Yes okay there this next one from erin. I believe this was something that came from you. The beginning of the pandemic. she said running out of fox to give early in the pandemic. I think we all had certain fox we were out of in could really relate yes that was from the country song my give a damn busted my give a damn was so busted. I'm i think it's still a little busted. But i'm working on it. I think now that we're deep into fantasy island might give a damn just sort of had to had to fix it so yes that helps for sure. Yeah it's interesting sarah. I assume many have had the same experience being really plunged back into a very consuming job has like eased a lot of my pandemic honest. Yeah because i'm just so busy that it feels like normal life. Even though i'm just like on the treadmill desk in my office at home it feels like a regular life absolutely and then vanessa said as a teacher. I can't say fuck in any meetings. But i assure you that i'm thinking it. Sarah wasn't safe fucking meeting like our very first. Hollywood hack or one of those. Yeah it was. I think it was the first. Yeah we should explain it For hall of those who didn't listen way back in episode one of two hundred We realized early in our career that as women writers we needed men to feel like we could hang so we decided we would always find a way to say fuck in a meeting which seems so like trivial and who cares but let's it sort sorta gave these men the idea that oh i don't have to watch what i say around these ladies. Yes i mean it is. I will say unfortunate. That that's still seems like unnecessary hack but it does absolutely things have not come all that far as much as them to have yes. We don't recommend this. Yes if you're a kindergarten teacher for job you probably best not to save you gonna. Meeting is your own best judgment these this one yes swift discretion and then cast said wearing a pair of dissent earings when you want to back yourself in a meeting. Oh we should explain. Descent earring sara. Yes so ruth. Bader ginsburg the former supreme court justice who was like so amazing she had a blythe variety of callers that she would wear and she had a specific caller that was known to be heard sent caller when she was sort of there was something she didn't like when she was writing the dissenting opinion on something she would wear her dissent collar so first of all when she died. I now have to pair of repeater ginsburg earrings. I have a pair of earrings that my aunt gave me. That has a picture of her. And then i have earrings that are the design of her dissent collar. So we were saying if you're going to a meeting and you want to just feel a little like you want to represent your dissension have something that you can wear. I think you're gonna have your gucci shoes beer descent item. Yes my black-and-white gucci loafers. Although i must say i mean nobody would see them at the streaming. Their little bit useless but i still feel dissenting wearing them in my home office. I like the person sarah who's descend item. I think they had underwear. That said pluck you on the back and they would just know when they turned around and walked out of the office that it was there even if the person can see it was amazing. They're set by people that so many wonderful descent like it really was delightful. Yes from this subtle little middle finger up necklaces. Those were so great yes coming up. We have a favorite takeaway that came from our former assistant turned fulltime writer. Brooke i is now that we're going to puerto rico. I am very concerned about having amazing sunglasses and fresh from san diego. California comes my favorite new. I wear brand blenders. I wear you are going to be justice. Hooked as we are when you see how. Awesome these shades. Are sarah pink with pink Lenses of blenders. I wear and they just make me happy unlike expensive. Big brand shades. That you've probably lost or smashed in the past. Blenders are actually affordable. So you're not gonna cry as much when the inevitable happens. Blenders team of in house designers are constantly coming out with new styles from orange. Polarized wrap arounds tortoise. Shell frames purple lenses to classic gold arms on black lens and it's not just sunglasses. Blenders has prescription glasses readers and blue lights as well as a snow collection with excess. Sary's to score fifteen percent off your blenders. Purchase visit eyewear wear dot com and enter promo code hollywood video. That's blenders eyewear dot com code hollywood. Vip for fifteen off. Blenders rocked with pride worldwide. So is this one comes from catherine. She said one of my favorite takeaways action is the antidote to anxiety. And i have to say once again. This did not originate with us. This originated with the amazing brooks at graves turner. That's right and it is very comforting to remember that like it actually helps if you do something like. I'm anxious about traveling after a year. Since i'm going to puerto rico but i am packing and packing relieves my anxiety. I'm sarah. Mike said. I forget what the advice was. It resulted in me buying new underwear that fit ha ha. I remember resonated with a few others to will now. I really wanna know what that advice was funny. But i'm very glad because an underwear that does not fit is spectacularly unpleasant. Good job mike. And then vicki said canary in a coal mine. Ironically miners saying fuck so in vicky is saying fucking a meeting she will know that circuit area in a coal mine and something is amiss. Sarah i was saying to you just last night. That my canarian coal mine seems to be buying like practical pants. Because i have been Going on a binge of buying practical pants to where to set. And i think it's because i have anxiety about just in general not just traveling but like just our whole taking on fantasy island yes and my anxiety is coming out through purchasing pants plot of practical pants. I can't wait to get to puerto rico and start like posting instagram pictures of them. All of your practical michelle said my fav- was recent where a listener shared her theory around. If you are not feeling fuck yes it's a pass. I mean that was brilliant. I feel like. I will carry that one for a very long time. If it's not fuck yes it's a no i mean. Of course yes. It's in the same family as volunteers not recruits. Yeah but it has a little more spice to it. And then becky said don't make a gift a burden. Sometimes i have to chant it before. I tackle the gift. Yeah actually caroline also said don't treat gift like a burden she said. It's especially helpful for me as i balance work and family during the pandemic on the days when i wanna work past five pm i say the phrase to myself because i know that the work needs to stop for the day and i need to relax and spend time with my family absolutely. Yeah don't treat a gift like a burden is almost like having a short therapy session. Yes exactly the that came. Sarah from Listener gretchen and i were doing a live show. I believe in seattle for happier. A listener had that is part of their manifesto. And that is something i came back said to you and we wrote it on the wall and we have really tried to live by that because a lot of times you know doing a show is is is what we want but it's also just huge amount of responsibility and work and so we remind ourselves when we get a show on the air. Don't treat a gift like a bird. Yeah well sara you know from me. She said the evil donut. Bringer is firmly in my lexicon. Liz you have succeeded yes to bring donuts to work. Yeah this is such an important element of now. Our kind of communal belief system that it actually comes up in the pilot of fantasy island. There's a little. Tv's oh liz and then we also love this one because it came from our friend. Michelle tromble joanna said. Get to step in. Got me away from an abusive toxic corporation and running my own business. It made me howl with laughter. When i first heard it and then it became a genuine and meaningful inspiration. I will always be great fall while joanna. We will share that with nichelle for sure. She listened so. I'm sure she will hear that and a shoutout to nationals. Brilliant mom and sarah really people need to go back and hearing the shell tell the story so go. Listen the episode eighty of happier in hollywood. I'm for the get to step in story and sarah z. Says don't stop. You can take a break but don't stop. I think this was from an episode about hiking frame and canyon. But i use it metaphorically and literally all the time when i am doing something difficult at work or exercising. Yes i think we were talking about going up the big hill freeman that horrible big hill which i have to say i miss so much of all about la there the like the things that i miss her. So specific freeman canyon even that hill. Sugar fish sushi and weirdly the americana at brand in glendale. Sarah when you come back with a hike that hill runs good. Puerto rico and then i will get sushi perfect and then. This is one of my absolute favorites. It's right up there for me personally with volunteers not recruits. fred said. remember the mahjong card. This is a goto expression slash image when feeling overwhelmed as you said mahjong starts with confusion but focusing and playing preparing for the possibility we may not get the tiles. We wanted quickly committing to a new strategy. Bring clarity. it's so true. I mean it's that thing of just like things that seem incomprehensible at first once you practice them and understand them and just gain more knowledge suddenly become totally clear. And when you're in that overwhelmed stage you just have to remember that murtha mahjong card and finally sarah. This is one of my favorites. Choose a personal symbol. Joann said choose. A personal symbol really made me happier idea with my work mate and now we both have personal symbols. She's given me some symbol gifts for christmas or birthdays which i get a lot of joy from there. You've done that for me. My personal symbol is lightning because television success. Lightning in a bottle and i love all of my lightning items one of my favorite shirts that i wear as lightning shirt. You gave me for christmas as a gift buyer. This is a really wonderful thing for people to adopt in their own. Yes as soon as you have a personal symbol for good or bad you will suddenly get an influx gifts in that arena. Yes thank you everyone for sharing your favourite takeaways. I think that's pretty good for two hundred episodes. Sarah feel like a lot of people who have taken things from the show and we've taken so much from all of you so thank you and keep it coming. Yes and that. Is it for this episode of happier in hollywood. This two hundred episode of happier in hollywood. We love to hear from you. E mail us or send us voice memo to happier in. Hollywood g mail dot com. Thanks for listening and please subscribe. You haven't already thanks to our executive producer. The amazing chuck. Reid's thanks to everyone at send cola sound you can follow them on instagram apps. Then cola sound thanks to everyone at cadence thirteen. And as always. Thank you to gretchen. Rubin happier in hollywood is part of the onward projects. Check out the other onward project podcasts. Happier with gretchen. Rubin side-hustle school and do the thing from hope thirties. Melissa urban and do check out the newest onward project podcast. Everything happens with kate bowler get in touch. I'm on instagram. At as and loses atlas craft. We also have a facebook group search for happier in hollywood on facebook to join in on the conversation. Till next week. I'm wizcraft. And i'm sarah fain. Thanks for joining us. It's a fun job and we enjoy all right. You ready to switch eared hundred. Yeah all right. We are rolling. Okay hi and welcome to happier. In hollywood the podcast about how to be happier healthier saner more creative more from the onward project.

hollywood sarah Sarah puerto rico facebook liz dolan sarah fain liz craft Hollywood Michelle tromble lottie da gretchen Ruben fox roxane trish san juan Rico roxanne jacqueline
Netflix's Reed Hastings says what he really thinks

KCRW's Hollywood Breakdown

04:34 min | 1 year ago

Netflix's Reed Hastings says what he really thinks

"KCRW sponsors include net flicks presenting. Martin Scorsese's the Irishman Robert De Niro Al Pacino and Joe Patchy Star in a saga of organized crime in postwar America. That chronicles the disappearance of union. Boss Jimmy Hoffa now playing in theaters. I'm Kim Masters and this is the Hollywood breakdown joining me as Bellany of the Hollywood reporter and Matt You know I. I have talked in the past on the breakdown. I think in on the business about watching Netflix the original streaming service move glacial early towards towards grasping the Hollywood way of doing things you know. They come in the disrupters their digital disruptors where they're not going to do we're going to do things a new way A. and then they figure out maybe there's a reason for certain Hollywood rules but this and Netflix was doing if bought a theater because it knows artists want movies and theaters. I mean it. It tries a limited theatrical. Run for the movies that it wants awards for little by little they've been they've done things to accommodate talent however reed hastings the CEO. Oh of Netflix. He gave a talk this week at the New York Times deal book conference and I feel like he just went through one thing after another which basically was what we're digital digital disruptors and we don't care you know whatever the Progressive Hollywood community wants we don't care in. The first headline grabber was he was talking about the the fact that Netflix had polled. Hold an episode of Care of Hassan nauseous Patriot Act in Saudi Arabia because it was critical of The crown prince who may actually have caused a journalist Washington Washington Post journalist to be murdered. They pulled that episode that was critical of the Saudi prince. And I'm quoting Reed Hastings of Netflix. He said we're not in the truth to power or business we're in the entertainment business. Now that is a statement of fact but that's not the kind of thing that we know especially with south park standing up to China it. It just doesn't go over well. No and if I'm Ted Sarande does or Cindy Holland or Scots Dubar. Any of these Hollywood focused executives for Netflix. Who are desperately aspirin? Trying to court the creative community twenty four hours a day and I see reed hastings kinds of comments. I cringe because that's not the message. They are putting forth to the creative community. They are saying we embrace you. We embrace freedom. We give you the tools you need to say what you WANNA say. And when Reed Hastings is making these comments it's like that and also defending this plan that they have to possibly speed up or offer a sped up speed for people to watch content on netflix which creators there's will hate because it alters. What their work is that kind of thing is perhaps better from a technological and digital and audience perspective? You've but not something that the creative team at Netflix wants to sell to their. Yeah he turned around two seconds later and said we do care about creators and creative a creative intentions but we also care about consumers undercutting the first part of the statement saying that any noted VCR's could speed things up but for but this is already Outraged filmmaker like jet APO. Who have been you know just indignantly talking about just how this is an affront to them as as filmmakers yes and certainly he's not the only one and then he read these things was not done yet he He talked about the fact that you know people feel. That theaters are risk because of the netflix model which is not allowing that normal theatrical window for movies and he said if if theaters WanNa carry net flicks films once they are net flicks because people want the group experience. That's great which is obviously ridiculous because people are not going to necessarily I mean maybe a few but generally speaking taking. That's not how it works in the movie business. No and it's also countered to the Netflix narrative that they are putting out there right now. which is that for a certain type of film namely awards films? They are going to do an exclusive run in theaters. Like they're doing right now for Martin. Scorsese's the Irishman and Noah Baumbach marriage story in a couple of others. And then you've got things saying well. We don't actually care about that. We I'm paraphrasing. We you know we want our. We want our movies to be on Netflix theaters. WanNa WanNa play them great yeah eventual went after we're done and after you could see it for you know your Netflix subscription. You can go ahead and pay it in the theater so that was three comments. That I'm sure did not sit well Maybe somebody needs to get the memo to read Hastings. Thank you matt thank you. That's Matt Bellamy editorial director of the Hollywood reporter. He joins me this Monday at one thirty on the

Netflix Reed Hastings Hollywood Martin Scorsese Jimmy Hoffa Matt You reporter KCRW Matt Bellamy Kim Masters Saudi Arabia New York Times Robert De Niro America aspirin Al Pacino Noah Baumbach Joe Patchy Scots Dubar Hassan
John Lasseter returns from exile

KCRW's Hollywood Breakdown

04:26 min | 2 years ago

John Lasseter returns from exile

"KCRW sponsors include Amazon studios, presenting Cold War, named best foreign language film by the national board of review and the New York Film. Critics Circle directed by Oscar winning Pablo Pavlovsky a words eligible in all categories. I'm Kim masters, and this is the Hollywood breakdown joining me as Matt Bellamy of the Hollywood reporter, and Matt I guess yesterday was a good day for accused sexual harassers who were hoping to make a comeback. John Lasseter who left Disney and Pixar onto the cloud of multiple allegations of inappropriate behavior got a job at sky dance animation the company that is belongs to David Ellison. The son of very very wealthy multi-billionaire. Larry Ellison who gifted his son with a few billion dollars to make movies in Hollywood. Yeah. This is caused a lot of backlash within the animation community and the Hollywood community at large because it is probably the most high profile person to have been. In quote, unquote, metoo out of the business, and now to be back in, and we know that John Lasseter had been shopping himself around for months trying to get meetings with different people. Most of these companies are studios that are owned by publicly traded companies took a pass on him. This seems to be the one place that was open to it. And like you said it is not a public company. It is a private company owned by a billionaire. So the reaction within the community not good. Let me be clear. This was my story. I broke that story. And that is what caused his departure does the immediate cause of the departure from Disney and Pixar John Lasseter is brilliant animator with many storied films. I mean, Toy Story two frozen. Everybody knows this who knows anything about animation. However, this was a bad situation that had been allowed to fester. And while sky dance is a private company funded by private billions, it has a deal with paramount. The amount is not only a public company, but paramount is part of Viacom, which is also the parent of CBS, which has had horrible public problems with horrible sexual worst than sexual harassment allegations. And this is an embarrassment to paramount and a problem and a lot of people paramount is supposed to distribute sky dance animated films. This is a huge problem. Also for paramount. Yeah, we're hearing that people on the paramount lot or really upset about this and word saying, a why don't we just not release them? I don't think that's legally possible. But you know, we had a story in hide reporter today about talking to some female animators, and they are going on the record saying, I will not work at sky dance. If John Lasseter is there. That's a big problem because you know, yes, he's a genius. But what you just not gonna hire women. Are you gonna have all male all-male, animation company forgetting men and women? Like, there's a lot of men who are upset by this. Absolutely. I just don't I don't know when you're in a talent oriented business and talent has strong opinions about the kind of people they work with how do you operate a business? Like this win that's led by such a toxic person. And I will say that, you know. Yes, there has to be a road back. But what John Lasseter did was to issue basically an apology by press. Release a brief statement saying Oops, I really thought this all over and I'm really sorry. If I made people uncomfortable, and that is not the road back. I think we can agree. So we'll see I if sky dance wants to stay the course. But there are women running animation companies. There's a woman running Disney animation. Now co running a woman running paramount animation woman just aimed to run DreamWorks animation. So there is that. Thank you, Matt. That's Matt Bellamy editorial director of the Hollywood reporter. He joins me this Monday at two o'clock on the business. I'm Kim masters, and this is the Hollywood breakdown KCRW sponsors include focus features, presenting black klansman G Q hills. Black klansman is. The movie of the year nominated for three sag awards, including outstanding on samba cast in a motion picture and four critics choice awards including best picture of the year. This podcast was made by public radio station. KCRW our status has nonprofit enables us to make bold and unusual programs. But we need your support to keep it that way donate or become a member at KCRW dot com slash join. And thanks.

John Lasseter sky dance Hollywood Matt Bellamy Disney KCRW reporter Kim masters Pixar Larry Ellison David Ellison Matt New York Film Viacom Oscar Pablo Pavlovsky Amazon studios DreamWorks harassment
No Spin News, January 14, 2020

Bill O'Reilly's Free Podcast

10:10 min | 1 year ago

No Spin News, January 14, 2020

"Welcome to the notes within news Tuesday January fourteenth. Twenty by your freedom so I saw something really terrible today and I'm going in a lead broadcast with it of you watch the Lsu Clemson game last night and congratulations to Lsu deserve the number one ranking in college football playoffs. You saw Vince. Vaughn one the actor talking with President Trump in a in a private and sweep sweep. They will watching the game now. So what. He's the president of the United States. And and Mr Vaughn is an actor and they're air in a suite so why wouldn't they converse right now the wrong with it. I know Vince Vaughn a little. It was on the factor. Nice guy very talented. Very funny I like him and so when I saw that it didn't really register other than on Avenue. Nice time well. The twitter monsters the fascists got on and now they WANNA ruin Vince Hawn's career now. Now this is stupid. It's foolish. You all know it. I know it Vince. Vaughn probably knows it but there's much more here then you would match let me run it down so right away. The Washington Examiner writer Sergiy Sergiy Hash Mi tweets out ladies and gentlemen. I regret to inform you Vince. Vaughn is cancelled now. The word cancel means. Your career is over for your black ball which is against the law by the way then the Palmer report never heard of it far are left. I guess quote Vince Vaughn as a chance to stand up to a rapist trader and child murderer and instead enthusiastically shook donald on trump's hand. Okay That's defamation. Right there Frederick. Joseph some kind of activists quote. I'm not sure why people employ surprise by Vince. VAUGHN willingly spending time with trump. He's a wealthy white guy. You sumptious should be that. All of them are make America America great again until proven differently. Racist statement no doubt about Barbara Mills. Again no idea but this is the twitter. The mob members of the twitter Ma quote all of you saying calm down von shaking the hand of the man who was held on destroying not just our democracy but our survival evil in the world community. Okay so yes these people are loons. There's no doubt about that but the message that this sends to the Hollywood community. Where Vince Vaughn makes his living as you hire him? We're going to try to hurt you. And obviously they're trying to hurt Mr. Aw this is fascism. This is what they did in Talon Soviet Union in Mussalini Italy Italy. In Hitler's Germany. Those are three best examples so all three of those countries. There was a social structure when the dictators assume empower. They sent a message if you dissent from. My point of views Stalin's point of view Hitler's point of view miscellaneous salinas point of view. We're GONNA destroy you. I will destroy your livelihood. That's what the Nazis into the Germans. We'll make it illegal for you. You too have a job to have a business. That's what these people are doing. There's no difference and anybody saying I'm overreacting is lying to you. There's no difference because these people hate trump. Anybody who even converses with the man wandered endorsing. Didn't do anything other than be polite. You Remember Ellen. Degeneres and President Bush. The younger the outcry over that well Mr Generous Ours is television program. You can fight back with the Dare Ellen. Degeneres talk with a former prison in the United States. Fascism fascists and if they ever get power the United States evaporates as we know it one final. Thank you see. Any of the mainstream media criticized this twitter mop now. No because they want. And I'm talking doc in New York Times Washington Post the networks CNN MSNBC they want the intimidation factor in place that if you support Donald atrop- we're GONNA hurt you. We're going to hurt you. Whether it's Vince Vaughn or some guy in the Deli Fascism ashes them. You are listening to a free excerpt from Bill O'Reilly Dot coms no Spin News broadcasts where you can actually see me. We'll be right back. After this message are studied by the Conservative Media Research Center they evaluated Network Work News nightly coverage of Donald Trump from September twenty four th to January first okay and they found around ninety three percent of ABC NBC and CBS Nightly News Coverage was negative toward trump. Ninety three percents. So so there's no argument about whether the networks are in the tank. They are because I can never happen then. Media Research Center and their research is is pretty good. I can't remember them ever having to correct anything. They broke down on minutes so impeachment. Ukraine got eight hundred forty forty nine minutes of news coverage in that period of time withdrawing troops from Syria one hundred and twenty six minutes fight against Isis seventy eight dealing with North Korea nineteen immigration seventeen minutes trade economy nine minutes from September twenty fourth worth to January first all right the total coverage on the three network nightly newscasts of the booming economy. Adamy was nine minutes. You go impeachment so it's going to set it as Zyppah predict it. It looks like the Senate will take it up next Tuesday a week from today after the Martin Luther King Federal Holiday on Monday I heard on. CBS Radio and I can't believe this is true that the impeachment and the Senate will take three to five weeks. I'll be stunned and so it's either. CBS's right or they're wrong but three to five weeks. If that's true that goes right right through the Iowa. Vote and right up to the New Hampshire vote. I just can't imagine it taking that long. We'll see I could be naive. You are listening to a free excerpt from Bill O'Reilly Dot coms no spin news broadcasts. Where where you can actually see me? We'll be right back after this message. So here's a final thought of the day and I've gone over this before. I don't want to be repetitive. But I'm GonNa Deli and I go to Delhi's because I'm not the greatest cook in the world. I WanNa Sandwich Hungry. I'm in a Deli. and His lady and she's very nice. I say I want a Turkey Sandwich on white lettuce and male male was my mistake. I should've said May Anees. She immediately kind of bread medium. I said I repeated the order Turkey Sandwich on white lettuce and male. It looked a little dubious went back came back do you want the bread. Toasted not on white not toasted okay goes makes a sandwich. Wraps it up gives it to me I take it home. It's got tomato on it. I didn't ask for tomato. I want tomato. I got charged extra for tomato. How come she didn't hear me because she is used to? The device used to be spoken word people interacted with words. People listen to each other. People responded in kind now. That doesn't happen. The kids the urgency. They text do each other. Very rarely does a phone ring from Irishman's very rarely do they speak on the phone. Anybody is much harder for them to absorb spoken and were they can absorb particularly if you're going fast. Boom boom boom boom boom. I mean how many times have you been in a place you place an order or you said something something to the clerk and they ask you exactly what you said. Ten seconds ago can't retain. It can't do it because listening is a disciplined. It's a discipline. How many letters do I get? How many people say to me? You said this when it's not even close to what I set listening is a discipline and it's evaporating boom. That's going to really cause problems down the road. Miscommunication is the word. It's not that its failure to communicate from cool hand Luke and you can't communicate with somebody who cannot absorb the words more and more and more. Don't forget I'm going to tweet tonight during the debate. Hope you with us. We'll see you tomorrow for analysis of what happens tonight and all the other news.

Vince Vaughn Vince trump twitter United States President Trump Bill O'Reilly Lsu Vince Hawn Donald atrop president Washington Examiner CBS Barbara Mills Sergiy Sergiy Senate football Degeneres Media Research Center Hitler
Bonus: Kara Swisher and Ben Smith Debrief on Jason Kilar

Sway

20:44 min | 8 months ago

Bonus: Kara Swisher and Ben Smith Debrief on Jason Kilar

"In promised land the first volume of his presidential memoirs rock obama provides a deeply personal account of history in the may obama reflects on the early years of his presidency navigating the challenges facing our nation at home and abroad he shares indelible portraits of his dedicated team world leaders and cabinet and congress members and also reveals his inspirations and quiet moments with family a promised land is available wherever books and audio books are sold visit obama book dot com slash sway for more information a who have swelled. Hey swain listeners. Welcome to a bonus episode with new york times media columnist. Ben smith here to talk about my latest interview with jason cuyler. If you haven't heard the episode what's wrong with you go back and listen. It's right behind this one in your podcast app anyway. Ben smith hello. Hi we've known. Each other i'm zillion zillionaires. I've been covering this area for a long time. You and i mean to say we're old so early this week. I spoke to jason cuyler He's the new warnermedia. Ceo who just killed movie theaters by a more but then it is but by moving. Warner's hold twenty twenty one slate two streaming. What do you think of it. I mean it's funny. Because i think the people in hollywood are losing their minds and because many of them like lin. Manuel miranda are going to lose a lot of money from this good reason to lose your mind. He's he has in the heights is going to be streaming. People in silicon valley are cheering. Because you all like to break things recklessly. And so of course you love and i think those of us in new york have kind of like balanced and sane view of the world thing. That's how i think Inevitable move. Somebody had to do it. It's sort of good or bad but it's the way of the future but i'm not sure the person who does it gets rewarded for doing it. I think there's going to be a lot of pressure on warnermedia to make hollywood by ultimately delivering jason's head on a platter. Really i don't think so. I think here's the deal. This thing has been going on since covering napster like this idea of winning. And by the way jason for those who don't know was head of hulu in a course he had this issues way back when and not just jason but a lot of people have had a problem with win doing this. Is this way of putting out movies where it goes to theaters. i and there's an exclusive period and then not what is right with an exclusive purely this. I think the vision that he lays out. Which is that. You make different deals for different movies. Maybe sometimes exclusively in theaters and by the way. The theaters are not like sticky floored rat-infested hell holes but they're beautiful experiences that you go to not grudgingly because it's the only place to see the new marvel movie but like you're really psyched because you can you know get drunk on rum. Infused milkshakes watching like whatever happens to be on the screen. I think that's a really. I love that vision. And i think it's likely going to be a big part of the future. That said the movie business is a simple relationship driven business. These apps on which they are delivering movies are not some you know incredible feat of technology. They're very very simple video players and a huge piece of the studio business in a foreigners. Business are these relationships with directors who they burned the hell out of all right. We'll talk about why. It took so long because i think we both realized this was coming in by the way. We'll get to movie theaters in a minute. But the lack of innovation there has been startling in terms of what's happening even as digital has grown movie theater experiences. Except for some you know. Bright lights like alamo draft house etc have not gotten better but from the hollywood perspective. Why would be so mad about something. That was so inevitable. Well i mean you know. It is perhaps inevitable that the new york times won't be printed. You know at some point in the future but if if tomorrow there were like hey of collins not running in print anymore. Sorry that something is inevitable. Doesn't mean that if you felt you had if not a contract at least kind of understanding that you were going to get that kind of promotion. Okay oh and by the way you were getting back end on it like of course you're going to be annoyed. All right but consumers like the app to consume. We gotta that they like it better. This is a better way to get their experience. Why does it matter what chris nolan. Thanks smoke consumers like the app. they don't really care. Which after watching the chris nolan movie and they wanna watch the movie. Yeah but they don't want the print version they don't necessarily want to go. They want a choice. What i'm saying they want a choice but ultimately if you decide to go to subject follow subset and if the reason you went with some kind of petty speak on the new york times is part and they screwed up the relationship and didn't handle you correctly. It's still bad for them. That you left for substance even if they were kind of right in some sort of like progress of history marxist principle sure but movie there's are not not getting these movies. they're getting releasing them simultaneously. They're required to compete. I mean what is the problem with that. If they're they're they're not saying we're just giving it to. Hbo max and theaters will get it later. They're getting the movies. They thought they had a deal. The terms of the dealer getting worse. Of course they're upset about it and then you know ultimately the people who make that town work which are the stars and the directors are happy about it. They're going to at least in this round of deals. Make less money. I i can't i don't really see why you'd expect them to be pleased about no. I don't want to make cleese but the ideas of what they're talking about this idea of romantic silver screen. Experience is not what most people have. Do you think movie theaters are done. I think that what jason said to you is really interesting. Which isn't so much of the world has moved toward this kind of experiential retail. And you know big stores have and they're all sorts of experiences that people pay for and movie theaters which are sort of the original retail. Experience are horrible and a run by these kind of generic chains. I don't think anybody is any real loyalty to regal versus. Amc and there is sort of persistent chatter right the disney or apple or somebody else. Who's great experiences could pick them up and transform them into something and cash that they told me that i could go to the movies next may yeah like i think there's a really good shot that winnowing or not. You're going to see the biggest box office next. Oh yeah one hundred percent. But i'm talking about what they have not done. I mean when. I talked to that of a movie. Cheney was mad at me for my call him they. We had soft chairs. And i was like i'm hanging up right now. This is what i'm hanging up. Because i don't you know and we're better. We're doing better imaging like you have to do better. That's sort of like the lowest bar to have to jump on imaging. Expect it and i don't wanna hear about it. Seats were their innovation. Comfy seats which i was not moved by road and they've relied on having this exclusive relationship with the producers of movies. They get because movies have continue to make most of their money in theaters. Most movies net flicks is more complicated situation. But basically they're saying sorry disgusting. Hotdog stand is the only place you can watch the marvel movie so we can save everything else and that's what they've been doing for so long that they are in a hole that it's very hard to see those companies getting out of now. When does the decision was made in part because of the criticisms of hbo max not having much original content. Tuck little bit about the mayor. Various services because disney is sort of put their foot in this with milan and different things Obviously netflix we'll get to in a second. It's a whole nother discussion. But do you think this is. Why because makes you a. Max didn't have much. Content was sort of a clumsy and sloppy rollout and this was pre jason. Cuyler this happened. Hbo max which if you were sort of stuck on a desert island with only one service you might choose. Hbo max it has everything that was ever on. Hbo has alfred hitchcock. It has incredible depth of content. That isn't particularly coherent right like nobody was going out. I wanna see a warner brothers movie. The way disney has a clear brand. But it's just full of great stuff but without a single defining show and rolled out in a very confusing way still not available on roku it has different names names and it's it's just incredibly important bat for that company and for the notion that that company will remain functioning operating unit of at&t and so in some sense. They're just throwing everything they've got and it makes sense for them to throw at. Hbo max even if that has short term costs mets literally. They have a bunch of movies on the shelf. They're gonna throw those into the service i do. Think the thing about it compare as opposed to many other apps that people try to get you to download is it really does have a may not really does like game of thrones the pretty good show. They have game of thrones. And they're doing this dragon. Show this pre-cold dragon show and things like that. And then they're going back and redoing gossip girl and they're doing. They're trying to come up with all kinds of new content. They have a whole bunch of new things. How difficult is that going to be two different. Because everyone's going to be on their own service and there's not a central place like a comcast where it all eventually did come together and cable. Yeah we're all we're all gonna kind of starting to miss the cable bundle and i do think that people are a lot of programmers. You know screw show runners and things are starting to feel like you know what. There's no such thing as a netflix show versus an hbo show versus an apple show you know people are subscribing subscribing to these services because they want to watch a show not because they feel sort of a profound loyalty to hbo. Max and that's not exactly the world. I think that the creators of those platforms water envisioned and you see like disney is just trickling out one new thing. Every you know thirty three days that might just be enough to keep you. Subscribing surfaces have made themselves totally totally vital but also a lot of them have made themselves things that you want. Bits and pieces of and a lot of people are subscribing to large numbers of them and so far so good. There's a lot of people watching a lot of tv in this country. Well what's interesting. Is that you you did that with theaters. And you didn't know that wwe studios excuse me didn't know at some studios were up. Some Was more pronounced when you add a big tv networks. Like i watched nbc is ahead because you wanted to friends bundle essentially so. I don't think it's that it's question whether they're paying. Do you think people will get subscription fatigue. That's an empirical question the people in predicting it for awhile and we haven't really seen it. I think to the degree to which people are getting subscription fatigue is still outweighed by the number of new people cutting the cord and subscribing. And so there's still just tons of room for growth. I actually bought them all. Because i want to watch different shows. I wanna wonder woman nineteen eighty-four. I wanna watch one no matter what and i what. I'm paying not more than i pay in a movie theater for one mind. If congress said that these things had to ask me every month eighty will. You still want to stay. Subscribe to this. Yes that's a fair point so could. Hbo max ever keller compete with net flicks is to be a winner of streaming war. And i want you to talk a little bit of netflix's music. They've done right because they were widely pilloried by warner calling them. The albanian army many years ago. That was jeff bucs. Yeah right right. Netflix is an amazing company. Has done you know. Just just kind of really knew what they were doing. And have any of the kind of trade that these studios have where they're worrying. Hey if we released this year. We can't make money on it over there and so just built us enormous lead. Sometimes people i think particularly people who come out of the tech industry and others sort of overcomplicate. The movie business. It really isn't business about making good movies. That people wanna watch and then they pay you. And i don't know netflix's starting to lose things some. Its beloved content that it licenses from elsewhere and maybe it won't have a hit for a year and it doesn't hit for you and somebody else's ahead people are gonna go over there i think. Netflix is enormous momentum and lots of great content people watch forever. But i think the notion that nobody can enter. Think they can be beaten. Yeah it's a culture industry. That's about hits. It's not some kind of mechanistic data driven business and netflix's used to pretend they were data driven. I think they've even stopped pretending. Yeah so christopher nolan again. The most famous directors in hollywood was really enraged by the decision. But he's not a range at netflix. Which is no one's ever really now speaking out against netflix. among these groups Let me read you what he told the hollywood reporter. Some of the industry's biggest. Filmmakers movie stars went to bed the night before thinking. They're working for the greatest movie studio and woke up to find out there working for the worst streaming service. Actually people people want us to understand the outlines of this. They should read kim masters in this. Read care swisher and those are like the two polls. I agree with you both okay. So did she. Kim against him as angry and i feel like him as the voice of i mean in that column you. Quoted is sorta voice of the hollywood community. So what what do you think of that. And do you think the filmmakers are gonna stop working with cuyler and mortar. I mean you know. I think that a lot of filmmakers are more likely to work with a place. The promises the matthias release warner can make those deals. And it's going to be deal by deal. Anybody can make those deals. And i think ultimately those blistering statements were partly and at gaining leverage. And what are now going to be a series of really intense conversations. That are going to dial back what jason announced. I suspect well. I don't think they're dialing back at all. I think they're not make deal. Better deals for these different people depending on who's a good filmmaker ripple make better financial deals or they're they'll figure out some kind of win doing thing and maybe get sued and there will be settlements. I mean i think you know he decided to sort of cut the gordian knot rather than go deal by deal and keep people come right. Were you surprised to that. He was thinking he's going to have his head on a pike so to speak. Game of thrones style. I mean i think it makes him a target right. I mean it means that if this thing is still garbage fire in six months and there are lawsuits and it's not going well that. At and t. management has the option of coming to the hollywood community with his head on a platter as a peace offering like he certainly made himself the target. but they don't seem to wanna make peace offerings. At and t. Not right now he wouldn't. He wouldn't have done this without full backing of. At and t. Come of course not for sure. So why would they give in if you have to finally make the shaft. Why would you give in. i think it's just. Let's see if it works right if it turns out that they don't gain subscribers from the billions of revenue hundreds of millions of revenue. They're giving up. This will look like such a good move and of relationships. I think a lot of this is sort of this. Fussy quentin tarantino kind of like. I love the look of the silva's that's i don't think consumers care for most movies right of the older generation of directors who just literally grew up in these movie theaters and the younger generation of directors. Less right. So i think that you know scorsese or something like that who got a better deal from net flicks in terms of window on netflix strife ridden and he negotiated enough where opened in theaters. I mean i do think. There's there's more flexibility in here to sort of move by movie than than the kind of really stark headlines suggest but also you know. Netflix wants and bidding wars for huge television show runners and deals with shonda rhimes candy and run murphy. None of which have really panned out well. I have a feeling britain's is going to be good. this is the shonda rhimes one. Maybe we'll look back. Sale actually took a few years. But that was a great deal. But i don't think anybody netflix's now saying hey. That was a great move. Let's go find more so cuyler. I have a couple more questions. Is tyler the right guy for this job. I think he's wanted to do this forever. I mean somebody had to do this then right like somebody. It just didn't seem like there was going to be a gentle way to make what is really a very dramatic break with these kind of embattled low-quality theater companies that are fighting like hell and so he did it. I think there's a question of whether the person who the first one over the wall is actually rewarded for that or do he and warner kind of get punished for fighting the first battle and then everybody else gets rewarded for their hard work. Do you suffer for doing the thing that we're everything's going you know. I'm not sure like the first legacy company to get on the internet. Bit was the winner right. The i mean. I think in fact the company. I'm actually thinking of the newspaper business which you know. We've both worked in our of our careers. The new york times was incredibly slow and allowed everybody else to make every mistake and very cautiously figured out what was working and followed whereas the washington post's sort of blundered over the wall and like you know drove itself into the ground and so i think i think the legacy company that is the one that pulls the ripcord isn't always the one that benefits from that. That would be what. I would be worried about for all right. Is there anything. I missed him. I converse with jason. Should i have been more kim masters. I felt like you got him to really express really really clearly what he's trying to do and i think that they are acting with real clarity and a kind of interesting way and kind of amazing that like the studio that invented hollywood is the one doing that when you think of where this is going to be in a year. Who do you think is gonna follow him. Do you think the other streaming services. Well you know. I think this opens the door for every streaming service to be negotiating more aggressively around windows with these theaters. I also think it just puts more pressure on the theaters to sell themselves to somebody with the cash to reinvent them to reinvent themselves. Or you know. I think disney and apple or you could imagine getting into that business a really big way. I mean i think the future where movie theaters are incredible experiences as a pretty cool. And do you see any of the tech companies getting into creative roles at all or is it is. is the new creativity. This idea Tiktok and things like that I mean they have also far resisted. The impulse to buy movie studios which i think is something that was. They really thought about at various times. You know if. I think if jason's experiment fails and we'll know pretty soon. There that that studio will be on the market and maybe a tech company will be tempted to who like i mean. Apple does seem like the obvious one if they were to get serious about it and you think they would want to most of them. Tell me they don't want to deal with. The difficulties of chris seems seems. Seems like a terrible idea. Honestly and yeah. That's my guess is that they've really rightly scared of the culture wars because the culture wars are in fact terrifying in that regard. How do you think these techies have done. With media and general lorraine jobs has one mark. Benny us jeff bezos. I'm into the degree they've poured in money and kept their hands off. It's been great right. I mean i think basis has done a great job with the washington post. The atlantic is killing it right now. Time is better than it's been in years. I've been hard to complain. I think you've got to be worried about the most powerful people in the world personally owning the most powerful media outlets in the world and you'd be an idiot not to imagine that those things aren't gonna wind up sort of gradually becoming the voices of their worldview one of the biggest story this year going into the next year is i know we've had this. Everything's been skewed by the pandemic but what from your perspective in media what. What are you looking at yemen. I feel like there were these sort of three crises in the media world and i mean they weren't crises on the same scale. They'll that media's little corner of the universe and obviously the pandemic election its aftermath and trump's continued attempt to overturn at and then this racial reckoning around newsrooms and and it does seem to me that there's so much unfinished business with the third and the question of like okay. There was all this conversation about how the industry should change over the summer. And i think it's not clear how much it has. How much it will is. Media can get boring now. That trump's gone. I mean i saw that. Joe biden's a big reader of apple news and i think that's all you need to know he's not going to be that interesting on twitter. Trump was an interesting but he certainly was riveting all right. Who should you think i should have my show them in the media space or anywhere else span if you have interests other places. I don't know a real still on air. Yeah we're still on a different list if it's it's secret. I want the secret list. Tell the people you know. I i have found somewhat to my surprise that the people remain like very interested in the people who run big news organizations. I mean that's one of the big stories right. It's like turns out the new york times and cnn are still relevance. He should get our boston back. And jeff zucker before they ride into the sunset. Yeah sucker is a good point. The case harder. He's hardly smooth. He's a smooth guy diplomatic. He's very diplomatic becker. I think i can break so to speak. I mean it's dangerous to break your employer. He's up my employer. I don't work for right. You don't work for him see. I'm being much more diplomatic. You do i. I can break. I can't break them though. He's so smooth. he's here all right. Now let's say anything all right. Those jeff soccer. Anyone else i mean. I do think that you know the government is going to be runoff. Capitol hill mitch. Mcconnell is going to be a very important guy mitch. Mcconnell excellent ben. I really appreciate thank you so much for coming on. And everyone should read. Ben's columns are amazing. They are must reads for me and many many other people. Thank you care. I'm gonna put the my twitter rile. Don't police down.

netflix jason cuyler jason Hbo hollywood Ben smith The new york times chris nolan disney Manuel miranda warnermedia obama hbo cuyler Cuyler swain congress albanian army jeff bucs apple
Weakness of Wokeness with Adam Carolla

The Charlie Kirk Show

36:11 min | 9 months ago

Weakness of Wokeness with Adam Carolla

"Thank you for listening to this podcast one production. Now, available on Apple podcasts podcast one spotify and anywhere else you get your podcast. If you're a defender fighting to protect your organization from cyber attackers. You must be successful ending tax every single time they only need to be successful. Once cyber reason reverses the attackers advantage. Our Future Ready Attack Platform gives defenders the wisdom to uncover, understand, and piece together multiple threats and the precision focus to end cyber-attacks. Instantly together, we are the defenders cyber reason and cyber attacks from end points to everywhere learn more at cyber reason, dot com. That's. B. E. R. E. S., O. N., DOT COM. If you're a business owner, don't let quickbooks and spreadsheets slow you down anymore now is the time to upgrade to net suite by Oracle the world's number one cloud business system net sweet gives you visibility and control over your financials inventory and more schedule your free product tour right now at net sweet dot com slash podcast one. Hey, everybody today. Charlie Kirk show we have Adam Corolla the amazing Adam Corolla need I say anymore please consider supporting us at Charlie Kirk Dot com slash support. Charlie. Dot Com slash support is where you guys can get behind our work where we are doing three episodes day now to the election and we are hitting it harder than ever before email us freedom and Charlie Kirk Dot Com Freedom Charlie Kirk. Dot Com. WanNa get involve a turning point USA TO TEEPEE USA DOT COM Adam Corollas here everybody buckle up. Here we go. Charlie. What you've done is incredible here. Maybe Charlie Kirk is on the college campus won't you know we are lucky to have Charlie Charlie comes running the White House. I WANNA thank jellies an incredible guy, his spirit, his love of this country. He's done an amazing job building. One of the most powerful youth organisations ever created turning point USA. We will not embrace the ideas that have destroyed countries destroyed lives, and we are going to fight for freedom on campuses across the country. That's why we are here. This is the most important election of our lifetime values our security and our future or on the ballot. Every American. Deserves to have their voice her and their vote counted. So Visit Your Vote Twenty twenty or defined your polling location get to the polls, cast your ballot, visit your boat twenty twenty dot org because your voice, your values, your vote have been more important paid for by America first policies need. Everybody welcome to this episode of the Charlie Kirk show super thrilled to be joined by Adam Corolla, who is of course, a legend and author of I'm your emotional support animal. So Adam, I want to read one part of your book that just had me laughing you said, as you wrote this book Nancy Pelosi Adam Schiff could find or create something else to impeach him for anything else and Giuliani going through their trash looking for something embarrassing a tweet about my question is how did you know nine months ago? That's exactly where we'd be today. Well. You know. A first off disappointing there's never disappoint. So it's like the people you know who are always late or always slate and Nancy? Pelosi you can basically chart. Movement, sort of like a satellite like you know exactly you know the answer to everything she's going to give you know you know shift. Is there anything those guys have ever said that has ever surprised you have you ever want. Wait a minute. I can't agree with that or wow she's being honest or a rare moment of candor and you know what You Leon is going to do to and yeah announced the hence the Hunter Biden Laptop. Yeah you. You go through your chapter in your Donald Trump part of it where you say this is the obligates Tori trump chapter and I kinda like it you've predicted donald trump becoming president two, thousand eight and he said it again in two. Thousand Fourteen and I do want to walk through this. Adam. You're you're one of the last Comedians I think in America where we have someone that actually tells the truth and is unafraid to kind of challenge. Some of the kind of conventional Orthodoxy Adam is, do you think that Donald Trump? Because of Hollywood's reaction to him do you think that he has killed like comedy in America I find a lot of these late night hosts they are clapping. Audience they're clapping instead of laughing It seems as if you're not able to tell jokes anymore and I know you, you walk this, you walk through this in your book. So what is it about president trump that bothers the community of comedian so much well, I, have multiple thoughts about that one is the Hollywood community. He does not like trump for multitude of reasons. But one of one of the main reasons that no one ever really talks about out is style those people are attracted to an aesthetic. It's the Hollywood community the you know what I mean like that is their living the visual because you think about it think about how they would wax. On. About John Kennedy Jr. or the Kennedys or you know camelot, you know it was always a sort of Oh and they do this thing all they do things like look at Michelle Obama look at her arms look at grace. Look at the dignity. You know they love they love an aesthetic and they love a style and so trump reminds them of their husky uncle who's always talking about bowl line and arena football, and then like you get away from me, we want we want the want to beautiful people. So one is they don't like him. You know I obviously don't agree with many of his policies, but it's really a style thing like why elevate? Jacqueline Onassis. Jacqueline Kennedy or even like you take junior take the son who died in a car wreck all that guy was what was good looking and they loved it then loved it but I don't know what he did other than that. You know he published a sort of. You know magazine about nothing but he was he was royalty and the Kennedys were they. They love the aesthetic and they love that sort of grace and they hate trump on that level. The other thing that's going on with Comedians. In. This is interesting which is they look at it and have always traditionally looked at it as your job is to push back against society your job jobs to push back against the man. So you know Lenny, Bruce, Richard Pryor George Carlin, they were going to push back against the man, but here's what happened. You and they sorry not you but comedians handsomely attack Donald trump is if they're pushing back against the man Donald Trump is not the man. The man are people like Gavin, newsom who are shutting down their states and telling everyone to stay in their house and giving them protocols for Thanksgiving. That's the man and the the and the COMEDIANS are cowards because they won't push back against the real man trump is not the man trump's a big easy target. You'll get nothing but Kudos in Hollywood. If you slam trump trump and that's why they do it. Constantly, the man is really your governor who shut down the state your mayor who shut down the city you WanNa push back the man CNN is the man. Trump isn't a man Fox's in the man CNN is the man. You don't think they're the man what station is on in every single airport in the country. You don't think that's enough sets. This CNN is, as we speak is literally on five hundred monitors in any in any airport around the country right now times two thousand airports. You don't think they're the man. So Howard, Comedians, you've gotTa push back against the man trump. That's easy. You push back against gaps here. Let's talk about the lockdowns. Let's talk about Coa. The man is covert the man are lockdowns. Okay. Cowards push pushback against them never do no one will say a word about that. Well. And we've seen throughout the last couple years especially how the comedians of almost consider themselves to be part of the communication arm of the Democrat Party and Adam you're exactly right. If comedy is supposed to be contrarian, it's supposed to be provocative. It's supposed to call out truths that we all see but were afraid to say and it was really easy to be a comedian when George W Bush was president. That was when every single comic was pushing back against George Bush accent. or his his way of going about governance, and we of saw under Obama, there is still plenty of people that you know challenge Conservatives and Republicans, but it kind of made this transitional phase from comedy being a place where it was equal opportunity offender to that. Now comedy being almost agreeable with the culture you talk about this in your book and I WanNa make sure we continue to mention it on your emotional support animal I'm working my way through it Adam I was just Reading about an hour before this interview I couldn't stop laughing through parts of it. My favorite part is our now going to classify airplane crashes at how many support animals are on board and the as you put it the white chicks will be more upset with the dogs that are lost in the crash. Then the human beings that are lost and I love the pictures you included with the woman that had to emotional support animals and you ask the question is this she has. Doubled the anxiety and it's just again the reason I love this book is you're saying things are not allowed to say, which is exactly what comedy is supposed to be Let's just take a bigger picture question about your Book Adam did you write it and what what is the bigger point you're trying to make I? Would I derive from it? Is you think were too fragile to soften and comedies actually the way comedy has gone is actually partly to blame for that. Yes saying the book is the next time. There's a major commercial airline crash. We're going to get the number of passengers. You know it's GonNa make one hundred and seventy three passenger was eleven, crew members and twenty six stocks. That's that's. You you think I'm making a joke. Not There are going to have to add a category if eight dogs are on that plane. We're going to have to know about it. All right. You're right. That's why it's funny. I'm just repeating my own Jeff So. When I I I wrote the book because someone paid me to write the book I. Tell that to people all the time like someone comes up to me goes you want to write a book and I go yes and they pay me and I write the book but I never mail it in. I was want to write a killer book I go to Amazon I look at the reviews if it's not you know five star or eighty percent five-star I'm bummed out so. I I. I always have a lot ideas in my head. And when you do a podcast. or You you do stand up. It you don't fully sort those ideas many times. As you know, you know just kind of you're talking you're waxing poetic you're going off the it's things are on the tip of your tongue and they're not fully they're not necessarily fully realized the ideas when it comes to stand up the realize but there's a lot of jokes in there because there's an audience you're at a nightclub in can't just stand up there and pontificate for seven minutes without a Joe The book allows me to take the ideas. Really. Drill down on them and explore them and the book format is one. Because you're not in person you know what I mean like with when it's your physically your voice. Your impeded a little bit. You can't just say every single thing you're thinking of standing on stage and there's three hundred people in the room. You just don't. You just don't. It's like it's basically like when you go to a member when used to real to go indoors and eat at a diner. Everywhere it's it's like you and your friend and you're eating at a diner and you party pretty good the night before and all of a sudden some elderly couple pulls up in the booth right behind yours I'll send the conversation changes right? You're not quite as freewheeling with it because elderly couples within earshot. That's kind of what well a lot of standup is and a lot of other stuff is but the book that's you in a diner booth in the middle of the Mohave Desert with a bullhorn and that's the way I wrote it in my my My editors when raw. On numerous occasions like are. You sure you want to say this or they don't think you should say this or you should take it out and I've just tell them leave it in its end as a matter of fact, if you told me to take it out, it's really it's really and that's exactly what I think is so hilarious about it and I think that comedy really is saying things. That are deeply true that people know to be true that people are afraid to say it, and that's why it's the kind of S. Tucker endorsed your book as the Revolution Hits Its most humorless and radical phase. The people that are saying things that are true. All of a sudden considered to be more funny than it would have been even twenty or thirty years ago. Right Yeah well, look I talked to people about this all the time I did not get into comedy to Parse are mince words I want to say exactly I mean look I, don't work at UPS. And I don't I don't work at starbucks or the apple store I do comedy. Why should I be thinking about? What? I'm saying that that's up to the audience why would you possibly be attracted to this expression with this free expression of known as comedy and then start editing yourself to try to curry favor with this group or that group? Getting. In shape doesn't have to be about losing a specific amount of weight or a magic number on the scale. It's about building healthier habits and feeling better about yourself. So that's why I like Neum N. O.. M.. They do physical, psychological and social. Movements to make you a better person, a specific lessons you learned about psychology or habits. The ease of just ten minutes a day, the Tony Program or anything you love it is so easy to log your food and it's also very flexible. Newton. Is Not a diet. It's a healthy and easy to use way of life with neum. It doesn't tell you what to do, what not to do. It teaches you how to look inside your own mind and make better decisions for yourself. You don't have to change all one day small steps. Make big progress today. If you're neum dot com slash Charlie what you have to lose except that extra fifteen pounds visit neum, dot com slash Charlie neum dot com slash Charlie. And so one of the funniest things I've seen you do Adam when you were testifying in front of Congress, there's a whole part of your book about this. Mr. Corolla goes to Washington and you hold up the NOTEPAD and you say, can I keep this because if I can that's a pretty big deal and so you're talking about free speech and what's happening? On college campuses and I want to build this out with you. That's a lot of the outreach that we do on university campuses and I don't think that what we're saying is albeit that controversial but the goalpost have moved so much the overton window has changed that students feel the need to get to safe spaces and they need trigger warnings, gift trigger warnings throughout. This entire book by the way, which I think is is perfect. You did a whole documentary with Dennis prager on this no safe spaces and you talk about in the book here where your your opinion of the death of free speech, not just the speech but the need for people to have playrooms listening sessions really is a is a not just a troubling trend. For civilization, but it's also it's also just made us look likely to explore new ideas. Can you talk a little bit about the documentary and how he weaved into your this book of in the Chapter Academia? It's of where where you think the status of higher education is in our country and how it has changed so much and even the last couple of years. The joke lands better few say academia nuts all I. liked that's very funny. I totally missed that. That's all right. That's why I'm here. That's why I'm here. Well. What I said in front of Congress. was. He in in one's life, one needs resistance to push against and you know you think of ourselves as a biological creature your body gets stronger. Do a bench press with some weights on at not using a mop handle right so you want to build up your body you go. All right throat throw those thirty, five pound or forty five pound slabs on there and let's let's let's knock out a few reps, right so resistance like pushback it's good how you get strong you know it's y you know why young bucks wrestle and go at it. You know all this you. See at nature all the time and you're also I was Kinda thinking about this, your body needs it to like all the parral and all the sanitizer. This kids end up with all these allergies and skin conditions and stuff like that. Meanwhile, the Amish kids are fine because they're outside rolling around with animals and running around all day and they're they're Munin system there like flora and fauna has something to fight against. So your whole body. Need something to push against it needs something to fight against and in order to get stronger in needs resistance I say in the book the The reason you know they take a astronauts and they sent her to the space station space station for year get. They, lose muscle and bone density. Pudding. So, why do you WanNa create a zero gravity environment for your kids they hear ideas they don't like and instead of strengthening themselves emotionally pushing back they shout the guy off stage or they go into the room with their huggy Buki and listen to a nursery rhyme. How could you possibly why? What's so different about you emotionally than physically then you're floor and finding your gut why's that separate you need everyone needs something to push against the strengthen themselves. You put in the book here where campuses really get absurd is with safe spaces for those of you unfamiliar with this term congratulations a so-called safe spaces and area for students to escape with stuffed animals, counselors, coloring books and support animals for when Jordan Peterson or some other monster comes to campus and think romper room except instead of. Four year olds it's for nineteen year olds who think think like are four year olds and just for all the listeners and I have to continue to tell older audiences. This is not exaggerated. This is on campuses all across the country and you're exactly right I just wrote down zero gravity example I'm I'm going to use that and I'll reference you sometimes with that because it his phenomenal that when when I remember two because there is no muscle mass being built with young people. In higher education or in academia at all whatsoever, and when they go to these university campuses, college should be a place where they get tougher they get more they get stronger to be able to encounter difficult world when the exact opposite is happening, they're actually becoming weaker and less likely to be able to endure the inevitable suffering that is wife and so so Adam what do you attribute a lot of this to everyone has their own theory Jordan? Peterson has a highly intellectual theory. What warning signs do you think we ignored ten or twenty years ago that led us to the place where we send our kids to university campuses where they have to be around Plato dolls or you know the nursery rhymes what was it? That led us to this point? Is it was it really a sacrificing the terrain of higher education to radicals wasn't political correctness which you touch on this book which you're obviously, you know criticizing a lot of the political correct culture. How did we get here? Well, think about the evolution I would I would look at look at college is a business you know in you have to constantly cater to your clientele. And your clientele is more and more growing up in the self esteem movement. Right being told there number one the participation trophy, which it's everyone gets a trophy group and participation trophy I. Never liked that as an example because I played seven years of Pop. Warner. Football got participation trophy every time that wasn't the thing it didn't mean anything to me. It's like I wanted most valuable player best defensive lineman but. The clientele are the I. Mean think about think about what the politicians are doing. Now promising this promise, you know free free education, free healthcare free this you know rent control all they're doing is. Trying to tell their clients what they want, right. So if you have a whole bunch of pampered kids who grew up in the self esteem movement and they're coming onto your college campus will that's Your Business and it's look have you. Any I have been. To a very high end casino in. London a very private, very private High End Casino and the folks that come there and play these multimillion dollar hands of blackjack or Texas holdem or whatever they're all Chinese. So, guess what? The inside of that place it's all catered to Chinese like they face things this way because it's considered good luck. Are they don't do that? Well, that's their clientele. So. Why wouldn't that casino go who's coming through the door? And they go. Well, it's the high rollers. The big whales are coming in here Chinese and I go All right. We're still going to were so going to face the slot machines that way right now. They don't like that direction. You gotTA CHANGE IT and they're in the business of attracting clients. So why wouldn't the college campuses just go along with this sort of directive or the the way the prevailing winds were blowing yet? So your theory is that it's really a issue of what happened just before college, but also just look at it as a business and also I think it's pandering to the loudest voices in the most radical voices I. Think it's very weak college administrators just as if you mentioned the the very cowardly comedians that are afraid to you know push the boundaries of everybody's administrators. That basically, they're negotiating position is all give you everything you want to stop stopped yelling at me to the five percent of the college radicals that are at University campus where twenty or thirty years ago they would've said, no, you're you're nuts. We're not going to give you a trigger warrant. You'RE NOT GONNA get trigger wedding safe spaces, and you even mention the book at the University of Kansas. There is the angry white man studies and you recommend that this book should be the textbook I completely agree which I find to be hilarious and the things that are actually taught at the university campuses. Outside of just the culture and the curriculum is creating a country where young people have very little understanding of the world thereabouts enter into and also. The I think the depth and the complexity of our country and everything they learn is our country is awful. It must be torn down must be disintegrated all costs. So Adam, you also talk about in the book a little bit about your story and where you came from I think it's a it's a great story because it is a story where you just decided to apply yourself and you have achieved an enormous amount of success and I think we're losing that a lot in our country Can you talk about how you think that with all these different contributing cultural factors? Whether it be the political correctness movement or zero gravity movement. It almost has created young people to be more fragile, less likely to take risks and more likely to just try to look to other people and you have a whole chapter on this where you say I I I'm trying to pull it up, but it's victimhood where it seems as if there's a competition to try the highest level of become the hot, the become a victim at all costs him the oppression Olympics, can you talk about how dangerous you think this is for our country where everyone wants to be a victim all costs. Well, all you have to do if you want to sort of know what works like you go from the macro to the micro so if you're just talking about. Diet and exercise you know you go. Well, I have a IVA teenage son and you'd go. Okay. Well, let's see. Let's get on some low carbs and some high protein and get them working out Blah Blah Blah okay. Well, that would be universal. Then if everyone ate more vegetables and less fast food and exercise more, it's not like well, that would work for your boy or his boy or her boy, but it wouldn't work for the culture. Of course, it would work. So so diet and exercise let's say would would work work for the culture right okay universal. So anybody who has a child with a handicap like confined to a wheelchair or dwarfism are some. Handicap Spina Bifida are something right. Well, you would be the worst parents in the world if you were convincing that kid every day that they were handicapped in less than others in their class, you would be horrible. What would a good parent do good parent would be well, you're confined to a wheelchair, but that doesn't make you a victim and that doesn't make anyone any better than you and yeah, you're GonNa have to work some of these people but let's do it. So if you had some of the handicap a kid, the handicap then that's all you tell them and he'd be a good parent to tell them that. So then why is it? Why is it somehow noble when a politician explains to an entire group, the black community you have a target on your back, you're not wanted in this society. You you won't be able to get ahead as long as we have the the structures in place. I mean. Is that's gotta be the worst parenting ever. Right. In our fast paced world, it's to make reading a priority at least it used to be a new APP called thinker. You guys have heard me talk about it thinker dot Org Slash Charlie to H. I., N. K. R. Has solved that problem by summarizing the key ideas from new and noteworthy fiction giving you access to an entire library of great books in by size. Forum reader listen to hundreds of titles in a matter of minutes including old classics like Dale, Carnegie's how to win friends and influence people. Do you want to challenge your preconceptions expand your horizons what become a better thinker? Go to thinker dot Org Slash Charlie that's T. H. I n. k.. R. Dot Org Slash Charlie to start an extended free trial and put your mind. In. Motion. Completely agree and you can see that in how many people have not many people how population has refused to push back against a lot of these lockdowns and they have almost willingly ask their leaders to take care of them. Instead of saying wait why is it are we still lockdown after nine months and we're trying to slow the spread of the virus or stop the spread and it's just seems as if there is one failed. And almost like I want to be taken care of at all costs no matter like I want to be the victim and it's that as you said before and Greg, dot and Dave Rubin have said this it's almost like it is the oppression Olympics. The book is, I'm your emotional support animal You also have a chapter here on commercial grade. Can you build out this chapter a little bit atom I found very interesting kind of the examples that you use throughout the entire chapter says made with love makes me hate what exactly did you mean by that? Well obviously Madison Avenue Hasta stay on top of the shifting winds of society and think about the commercials you see now. So when I was growing up if there was a commercial for truck, they talked about Torque and towing capacity, and they would always talk about warranties and fuel mileage and you know best fuel mileage in its class best warranty you know hundred thousand miles on the power train you know one hundred, thousand Russ through on the body with Bonder ice steal you know now a Subaru is made with love. They watch a Subaru commercial. They don't even then even show. They don't even talk about the car at all. They just show the the nice couple dry the the the mixed race couple driving into the woods and in the Book I explained what Else Subaru makes suber Subaru Omega attack helicopters for the Japanese military. So do you think they make those with love is well, you think Subaru loves. You or super thinks you're soft and weak and dumb and they pander to you look at all the good vibe commercials that are out there when I was growing up, there were no good vibe commercials that the commercial was the product and you've seen almost this increasing demand through as you mentioned commercials in communication not to actually your cell. The best thing is you say, but instead Want to win over the audience and some emotive argument chapter seventy sick of Hashtag me too me too You really go after this year. Adamant. I'm glad you do because of the double standard and almost the creation of culture. We are telling young women to go out of their way to try to find ways that they have been offended or ways that they have been wronged by men. Can you walk us through this chapter? You use many different examples here. You talk about the purpose you talk about Harvey Weinstein Bill, Cosby and you have a lot of nuance by the way when you go through all of them about Louis C.. K.. What is the bigger point you're trying to make in a chapter with me to that you think our audience should be made aware of. Well, it's sort of dovetails into. Let's not. You know first off stop convincing everyone they were victims. There's plenty of women I know where somebody grabbed their. Cheek or something they just shoot the guy's hand away and they moved on with their life you know that's there's versions of that that happen happened to men as well. Let's. You know I probably said in there. since they started all of these seminars in the work place about sexual harassment. I will bet you that sexual harassment lawsuits have gone up two thousand fold. So how's that possible you bring in these experts? They tell you what to do and what not to do, and now sexual harassment lawsuits are an all time high. Well, all you're doing is sort of giving a roadmap to people who wanna be victimized to everyone has to think back or wait a minute was I victimized. Yes. I was we've all been victimized a one in one way shape or form or another by those standards. By those standards, we can't just say. You can't just say if somebody puts their hand on your, that's not sexual assault. You can't just you can't just you can't say you were assaulted by that. You're ruining the definition of the word and you create almost an entire population of people that they get the seminar on and say Oh wait maybe I was wrong. That's create almost a cottage industry of lawyers law firms that represent people exactly in that arena in sector the book is on your emotional support Animal Adam inclosing what is your message to young people you saw you talked about it in no safe spaces, but there's a lot of young people come this Charlie just can't succeed I, can't. Get ahead, matter heart a work I feel as if I'm just barely treading water this, this book is pretty blunt where it says apply yourself correctly stop stop blaming other people for your problems and try to have a little fun along the way because the world is not as serious as some people try to make it seem I, think your message is pretty inspiring to students sent to young people, which is you know stop being stopping victim stop pointing to the external world and again I, I I love your story where you decided to apply yourself and I don't know if you went to college or not doesn't matter to me I. Just. Miss. Remembering. I didn't, and so what is your message to students in young people out there with a lot of young people that listen to this podcast while the good news is your contemporaries are so weak and saw. There's so soft. They have no idea how to be employees. They have no idea what grit or hard work or intestinal fortitude is. That, all you have to do, you don't have to be the best. You don't have to be the brightest. You don't have to the top your class just show up hungry and have a kick ass attitude about work, and you'll stand out immediately amongst these super soft woke contemporaries and swell said. So the book is I'm your emotional support animal and also hosted the Adam Corolla show podcast Adam thanks so much for joining us and hope to see you soon. Appreciate it. Thanks Charlie. What a great conversation that was with Adam Corolla police consider emailing US freedom at Charlie Kirk Dot Com. Your questions. Support US at Charlie Kirk Dot com slash support, and if you want to win a signed copy of the magazine doctrine just say, Hey, I listened to the curl episode type and Charlie Kirk. Show it's subscribe give us a five star review screen shot at email us freedom at Charlie Kirk Dot Com. Thanks so much listen everybody. God bless talk assume. This is the most important election of our lifetime, our values, our security, and our future or on the ballot. Every American deserves to have their voice heard and their votes counted. So Visit Your Vote Twenty, twenty dot org defined you're pulling location, get to the polls, cast your ballot, visit your boat twenty, twenty org because Your Voice your values your folks have never been more important paid for by America first policies need. Gun owners across the country have become targets of frivolous lawsuits at exit insurance we provide custom firearm liability insurance to eliminate your exposure and to protect you from unscrupulous lawyers and if lawsuits arise, we aggressively fight them. We're the best at what we do and we've been doing it for more than forty years. The offers same day quotes in solutions. So call us today we're have your agent, call us, and let's get that target off your back for more information visit EX INSURANCE DOT com.

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Defining Depravity Downward

In the News with Mike Dakkak

21:53 min | 11 months ago

Defining Depravity Downward

"Common Sense commentary on Politics Culture and current events. If it's on your mind, it's in the news and now in the news with your host Mike Dakkak. Now before we get started today I'd like to. Cover a brief housekeeping note here it's. It's. Probably not going to be too much longer before we begin to suffer. some repercussions from the work that we've been doing here last couple of months. I noticed something peculiar after last week's episode I got zero downloads from the platform stitcher. Now I'm sure there's A. Logical and reasonable explanation I've seen the same thing happened with youtube videos I've mentioned that to you in previous. Where when I first started posting regularly on Youtube I've been posting on Youtube for. G I guess a couple years now, but earlier this year. After. I was kind of red pilled guess you can say. I began posting in a little bit more earnest on Youtube. And when I first started I was promoting my videos just to kind of get the word out and just to kind of cover for the change in format. and. I noticed something peculiar which I've mentioned to you before is that on the Dashboard for the promotion page, I would see that my promotion got to three thousand views. Easily per video, and then you'd go to the video. The page that you and I would see the page that was public facing on Youtube and you'd only see two or three hundred views. And again I'm sure there are logical explanations to these things. But I'm also fairly certain that if I spent. Twenty minutes every week talking about Joe Biden. Or. Singing the praises of Antifa or the black lives matter movement. My downloads miraculously would fall in line with expectations. It was kind of like speaking of Biden bindings acceptance speech. couple of weeks ago after his his convention, the virtual conventions that we had both Democratic and Republican. Bite in the speech. His acceptance speech had like four or five thousand up votes and six thousand down votes and miraculously the following day he had four or five thousand up votes and only three thousand downloads. So, again, I'm sure of some for someone from Youtube reached out to me. They'd have a very logical and very reasonable sounding explanation why things like this happen but I say all this to say that If over the next couple of weeks or months you find I'm doing everything that I can the post regularly both articles on the site and with this with this show episodes of this show. and. So if there's ever a week where on the platform that you're listening to me on, it doesn't look like I've published a new episode. You can just hop on over to my website and you'll see for yourself whether or not. There is a a new episode there I don't think we're going to be exempt. From the censorship. that's been going around all the independent content producers both on Youtube and on other social media sites. This is the nature of corporate and globalist. Media. You can always double check with my actual website because that's where the media goes up. That's where the content goes up I. Again, the the site is www dot it and Dot Com. But again, this is this is the nature of corporate and globalist corporate and globalist medium. And speaking of corporate and Global Media Net flicks. CEO Reed Hastings. He was he was interviewed. By CNN last week. and. He was asked as kind of peculiar to me. He was asked not one question about the cuties controversy that is embroiling the company. The. Film cuties of course, is about an eleven year old girl who breaks free of her family's tradition. And joins a tweaking crew. In the hopes of finding stardom through a local dance contests working as a form of sexually. Suggestive dance. Now, the film's producers and makers say that it's a statement against the over sexualization of children. So. They made a movie warning against the over sexualization of children by overly sexual sexualizing children. And many believe the film sexualize children some scenes described by I, doesn't know this is imdb talking. This is a movie rating and review website says not Cunanan. This is not Mike Dag. This is not Donald Trump, but this is not any Maga- people as they're referred to this IMDB. They said in one of their reviews that scenes from the film. Are Lawfully the find as paedophilia. The HASHTAG and the CEO isn't it not questioned once about this issue, the Hashtag, cancel netflix's. was. The number one trending topic on twitter for much of the day. Last Thursday the same day. That hastings was interviewed by CNN Anchor Poppy Harlow. The movie had just premiered on the service the day before instead harlow asked hastings many hard hitting questions about working from home the challenges of working from home during the Kobe pandemic and about his new book. Now, the review that alluded to I'd like to, I'd like to read it to you because I think it's it's important I'm quoting here. Parental warning. During one of the many highly sexual these are eleven year old girls I would remind you in the movie, their eleven year old girls, and their played by eleven year old girls and real life. During. One of the many highly sexualize D- And erotic dance. Scenes. That purposefully again, this IMDB's language not mine that purposefully exploit and objectify numerous scantily clad underage girls. One of the female child dancers lifts up her cropped top to fully display her bare breast. This is lawfully defined as pedophilia. And can be extremely distressing to many viewers. Now, that review by itself would be bad enough right but halfway through the day. Very mysteriously. This is all on the same day. This is all last Thursday IMDB seemed to water down its review. Instead of statements like the one I just read to you. They have statements up now that say the movie consists of eleven year old dancing very suggestively. and. They leave it at that. These people have declared war I. Mean they've they've declared war our kids decades ago. But now it's right in our faces they're asking us in. So many words will what are you going to do about it? Yes. There's a war going on. Yes we admit to it. Yes. That's right. In your face. What are you gonNA do about it. I don't think anything. A pit amazes the disconnect between what are institutions trying to shove down our throats convince us as reality. And what we're trying to resist. Then, the the the reviews if you go on rotten tomatoes and you look up this movie. Critics have given this movie ninety percent ninety percent out of one hundred. The audience has given this movie five percent out of one hundred. His that that's that's the perfect microcosm of what's happening in society today with institutions trying to shove things down our throats and we are trying as hard as we can to resist them. Speaking of institutions trying to shove things down are throwing us. Resisting the movie also appears to have communist symbolism embedded into the film the communist hammer and sickle symbol of communism is painted prominently. On a wall in the background of one of the film's dance scenes. But none of that matters they would have you believe because this is an award winning film. This film won an award. So that should I mean gone with the wind won awards. That didn't stop. Netflix's from taking that movie off the platform Gone With the wind one of the most decorated pictures of all time one nine Oscars including the first one to an African American actress and this was back in nineteen forty when Oscars actually meant something. But apparently. The only awards that matter of the awards that Netflix's tell you matter cuties. If you go investigate the film a little further this this seeming pattern with net flicks Judy's is actually not the first film to cause an uproar when Netflix's audiences in two, thousand, eighteen him. The Parents Television Council which is a media. Watch. Dog Group. wrote to Netflix's set Yo Reed Hastings and demanded the removal of a film called desire. And they wanted it removed for child porn content. Netflix apparently never responded to the demand and we have not been able to find evidence that it was removed at the time. But desires Argentinian fell minute depicted a nine year old girl masturbating and experiencing an orgasm while watching a movie with another girl the film's director. A fellow by the name of Diego. CAPLAN. Defended the scene at the time by saying it was just acting and he blamed you for being offended he blamed the audience in essence he told India wire at the time. When we see a shark eating a woman on film no one thinks the woman really died or that the shark was real. We work in a world of fiction. Of course, this scene was filmed using a trick. The girls never understood what they were doing. They were just copying what they were seeing on the screen. Everything works inside the spectators heads and how you think this scene was filmed. Will depending on your level of depravity. He says. So. If you have a problem with child porn your depraved, there's something wrong with you. Know California Democratic governor. Gavin NEWSOM. He signed a controversial one, forty, five, the Bill S. P. One, forty, five into law this week and now that bill now law. Allows for adults who are less than ten years older than a minor who were convicted of having sex with that minor. To not be added to the sex offender registry at least not automatically. Old Law held that adults must register a sex offenders if they are convicted of having sex with a minor. Although judge had the discretion to not place an adult male less than ten years older than the minor on the registry. If the minor is a female and they did that because if the if the male and the and the female got married if the mail was on the registry that it would be hard for him to find a job and make a living and provide for his new family. Judges didn't have the same discretion when both the adult and a minor were males. and. So California State Senator Scott Wieners a Democrat and who introduced sp one forty-five last month call that discrepancy horrific homophobia. Democrats vehemently opposed this bill. There's a democratic, California State Rep by the name of Lorena Gonzalez who said I cannot in my mind as a mother understand how between twenty, four year old and a fourteen year old could ever be consensual. How could it ever not be a registrable offense? We should never give up on this idea. She said that children should be no way subject to a Predator. But see if you agree with that, then you horrific. You're practicing horrific home for your depraved. This version of reality is all part of of the playbook revolver revolver. News As published a report. That explores a lot of these similarities between cover color revolutions brought about. It says by the US government in other countries. and. The current unrest happening today within the US norm is in the former ethics czar President Obama wrote a book titled, the Democracy Playbook Preventing and reversing democratic backsliding. They try to put it in your mind that a few advocate for such things like you know keeping child pornography at bay and off your screen while you're trying to watch television with your kids. If you do that, you're a fascist if you support that you're a fascist. This book revolver says is serving as the playbook to undermining and eventually overthrowing the trump administration. Revolver also explores Michael mcfaul is book which which lays out similar instructions mcfaul. Also, served in the Obama Administration maybe there's a pattern there he served as US ambassador to Russia from two, thousand, twelve to two, thousand fourteen. And mcfaul lists factors, he says are needed for a successful Revolution Ryan. Order. A successful revolutions happen successful color revolution. You've got to set the stage kind of. And there are several factors that go into setting the stage for a successful color revolution. One of them is a semi autocratic regime rather than fully autocratic. Trump administration checks that box right? And unpopular incumbent note, the blanket negative coverage of trump and all the fake polls revolver news points out eight united and organized opposition. See the media Hollywood community groups. And ability to quickly drive home the point that voting results were falsified they're gonna be there. They've already told us that they're going to be massive protests contesting the election if trump wins. Enough independent media to inform citizens of falsified votes. There's a full court press in the media pushing contested election narratives, and of course, they're all the social media censorship that we just talked about. And a political opposition capable of mobilising tens of thousands or more demonstrators to protest electoral flawed fraud. Now? What have we seen in the country over the last couple of months? If not. Tens of thousands of protesters and demonstrators being mobilized see black lives, matter and ANTIFA. Last week, we reported Han how the transition integrity project. Is Planning to use doubt about the integrity the integrity of the election and a massive civil protests undermined constitutional norms in this in this country. They're going to strengthen their hand. In order to negotiate a package of structural reforms, they're not going to concede the election and they're going to ask for their going to extort basically from the American people a degradation of constitutional norms in order for the massive street protests to go away. They WanNa make DC and Puerto Rico states they wanNA abolish the Electoral College they want to require Supreme Court justices to retire at seventy. This is all being telegraphed. President trump for for his part. has vowed to bring any writing or civil unrest during November's election to a quick end and he needed to invoking the insurrection act. The Insurrection Act of eighteen o seven says a US president has the right? To use the nation's military forces to quell any insurrection violence or conspiracy. That obstructs the execution of the laws of the United States on what we've seen over the last couple of months if it's not insurrection violence and conspiracy to obstruct the execution of laws of the United, states. Now the assistant secretary for Public Affairs. At the Department of Health and human, services a fellow by the name of Michael Caputo. gave a chilling account of things to come in this country after the election on Sunday, you went onto his facebook page. And he went live on his facebook page. And he said that there hit squads being trained in the US right now he said they're being there hit squads be hit squads being trained all over this country. To Mount Opposition to a second term for president trump. He also predict that trump is going to win reelection on election night but vice president Joe Biden is not going to concede Hillary Clinton already told us last week that Joe Biden is not going to concede under any circumstances. And when trump refuses to stand down. That's when the violence is going to begin in earnest. He said the drills that you've seen are nothing caputo says. He also in a rather stunning development, but we've all kinds of suspected this over the last couple of months. Be accused scientists working for the CDC of forming a resistance unit. An actively working against improving America's plight in the fight against Kobe nineteen because they believe it's going to hurt trump politically. He said, there are CDC scientists. Who Haven't gotten out of their sweatpants except for meetings on coffee shops, and they're plotting how they're going to attack Donald Trump next. There are scientists who worked for the government. He said, who do not want America to get well, not until after Joe Biden his present. Now, his video was broadcast on facebook live. He has since closed his account. He's actually taking a leave of absence from his job. But we've been talking about this for weeks. There's a war going on only one side knows it. It's time for the other side to know it as well. You got to get the word out share these links kept people it soon doesn't have to be my links to some not accused of being self serving but the first step to resistance is waking you're not depraved. For wanting to see for not wanting to see nine year olds nine year old girls masturbating even if it is a simulation like that somehow makes it better. You're not crazy for not wanting to see Molotov cocktails thrown at police officers who are just doing their jobs. You're not crazy for not wanting to see those things, but they want you to believe that you are. You Know Sam Sam Fattest is a retired CIA operations officer. He spent decades undercover in the Middle East and South Asia. And he wrote in an op Ed recently he spelled out in no uncertain terms, the danger the country is currently in. And he he raises a lot of interesting points which I want to relate to you. Here he says, we are not experiencing a wave of social unrest. Generated by injustice or police brutality. Says we are watching an insurrection in progress. One, which uses police violence as a pretext. But which has as its goal, the destruction of the existing social economic and political order in the United States. The group sponsoring the twenty twenty rioters are hostile to the United States of America as it currently exists. They have long since made common cause with some of our most dangerous enemies. Now what they want is not reform phrases like black lives matter allred deliberate obfuscation. A time honored tactic of radical left groups used to make themselves and their goals seem less threatening. He goes on to to lay out the many connections far left Marxist groups and the men who control them. Have with the funding of the current protests place around the country. He says these powers behind the scenes. Have even many of the protesters fooled themselves. They think they are marching for more humane police forces or reduced incarceration or a few new social programs. He says, they believe that when the protests and riots are over, they will still live in the United States that they knew before, but it will just be a slightly better nation. Of course, people harboured the same delusions in nineteen, fifty-nine Cuba and thousand, nine, hundred, seventeen Russia he says. Even, the foot soldiers of those revolutions likely believed they would still have the countries they grew up in just with a brighter more democratic future. They discovered far too late that at the heart of the movement in which they were caught up were hard men with very different ideas about the future. This is what's at stake here folks he says, this is not about reform. It's about revolution and revolutions don't care about elections a Mensa that. This is what's at stake. Make sure everyone knows aware of it. because. That's how we render these people and these tactics that they used to inverse reality. That's how you rent to them. Powerless. That's chauffeured today. Hope you enjoyed it. You have any comments on any of the issues we discussed, drop me a line. You can reach me comments at ITN show DOT com. That's comments at it show DOT com. Thanks again for listening everyone until next time, carry yourselves and each other. If it's on your mind it's in the news subscribed to end the news on both I tunes and on Stitcher Radio. This has been in the news.

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Ep18 Politics, Religion and the Slogan Black Lives Matter

Wrestling with God Show

19:36 min | 1 year ago

Ep18 Politics, Religion and the Slogan Black Lives Matter

"Welcome to wrestling with God. Show the podcast were we grapple with the big questions about faith, religion and life I'm Irish. McMahon and I'm here with my friend and Irish Catholic priest father lend McMillan. Irish if other land. So I know you've been wrestling with something here. The last little while you've had lots of requests to. Make statements. Do things whatever. Tell us. What's on your mind here? Fatherland so? I've had these interactions where people want me to make some statement on black lives matter. And I'm reticent about doing so not because I'm reticent about making a statement, just the baggage that comes with it, and so my own mind I'm kind of wrestling well. This. Idea does religion and politics mix and in one sense? It's a yes, no answer. An example so. Putin in Russia. He supported by the Patriarchs, but years later will. People Admire the Patriarchs for condoning everything. Putin does or will they be seen as cowards or Look at. Nazism and the German bishops were very brave in standing up against Nazism at one point. The German bishops are against Nazism before. It's full blown and I love the story war. This one bishop demands that on every statue of Mary Jesus in. In in his diocese that they put the. Yellow, Jewish, Star on them so Catholics would realize you're Percy shooting the family of God. Now that I have seen. Incredibly, brave. Versus offensive talion bishops that during the rise of Nazism the. Italian. Bishops they gathered together, and they made a very strong statement that there's too much cussing at the beach. And women should stop wearing short sleeved shirts. So like you missed the whole. Battle of your own time period Germans didn't that talion bishops. They came out with no events. Photo moral position that didn't matter to anybody and I'm glad they came down hard on something that didn't matter so part of me thinks it's cowardice for religious leaders not to lead. They are anointed. There prayed over so that they have something to say now, so I guess. My first position is so religion and politics. They do mix my other position. Is that now? They they don't mix. It's very dangerous for religion to get in bed with politics. My position is. Religious leaders should speak out about a spiritual moral issue, and if that has political implications, so be it, but will be judged on it. But. Part of me is like our. When people are you going to say something or not say something? I don't want to get into politics I. WanNa get into spirituality, and the other issue is also I. Think people have to come to the truth themselves. Religious leaders are to lead them there. Blaise Pascal who is in the Middle Ages. He was This great, mystic and mathematical genius and Einstein of his time. He said that. If you just tell people the truth, the fight it. You have to lead people to discover the truth and I have to say I. Found that really true in my. True, my own priesthood. That if you just tell people the truth, they will not accept it. You kind of lead people the truth. And make them my do the dishes themselves they figure out one plus one equals two, but it takes a lot of effort to for them to be that position so like I had this Nick one morning. God, bless. He's a good person, but. I'm going to mass and. Outside of the church. He kinda confronts me because we asked people to wear masks while the Bishop has asked work people to wear masks to mass and he gets upset news. You know this is interfering with my freedom. I have a math, but I. don't think I should have to wear it. It's my freedom and I said yeah but. I try to be joking and say yeah, but if you wear masks, then you're free to attend mass. Assis, gives you greater freedom. And like he didn't like that, and then he points his finger at me, and he says I better. Not Hear you say black lives matter. So that point, I said Oh let me put it this way. Black lives do matter. All Life is sacred to me in I've always preached out, always preach a pro life position that absolutely every life I don't care if it's a black or white or Chinese or Lebanese or Minnesota, or whatever it is every le every human life is sacred to me now I probably won't say. Preach. On black lives, matter because also has this hinge of politics where like one? person's that about the black lives matter that it means that we should polish the police. So I'd be very cautious about a political slogan that has other implications. But. To me, it's not a political position. My position spiritual. Position that every human life is incredibly sacred. And listening to this interview or this Hollywood singer who lives in wealth. He coupled black lives matter with burning down. The entire House says the whole structure has got to be burned down. All police have gotta be abolished well, that's really fine. If you're living in a gated Hollywood community, but I find that more of a political position. And I've had other people. Emailed me saying you know how long complaints how come not saying something, but I've always said something and what I've said is every life matters and the problem. Is You get these polarized positions which you're seeking a fight and By polarize positions I mean that's like. When I was growing up on the dinner table, but we have these great debates, great arguments and debates about what was going on I love that, but my dad who developed a drinking problem when my dad was starting to drink. And then be getting bad mood. It is a strange thing that. You can just use the back of your hair just goes up and you know he doesn't want a debate. He is looking for a fight he's looking to. Really not discover any truce or discussion. He has anger that he wants to let out and he's just looking for something to argue about. That's what I have with this kind of polarize rigidity. A- polarized rigidity. It just makes you. Jeff Tone deaf to morality. You can't hear any subtlety. Both extremes to me. have kind of this polarization. Jen of it's not really a search for truth. It feels like. No Offence Drunken father who has just wants to pick a fight. Chart. The, hard thing I think is separating. Illegitimate statement on its face and that is that black lives matter. and. All lives matter life matters and separating that from this political movement which. Is a controversial one in many ways. You brought up some of it. They seem to want to abolish the police. All kinds of different things and so separating those two seems very difficult in today's world. You know because the minute you say black lives, matter and you mean it in a spiritual way. Somebody who is just absolutely against this black lives matter political movement immediately is all over you. You know what's wrong with you. Father Land. How could you say that? They can't separate. The the people are so emotional there so kind of hardened in their positions, and if you see the politics, if you see it for through the political lands, and you don't agree with the political movement, you have a whole different perspective than if you see it through the Spiritual Lens, and you're just talking about lives, no matter what color they are, and they matter and right now we're having a conversation about. You know why so many black people are dying one of the things that isn't talked about a lot. and. You bring this up and all of a sudden. You know you're supposedly dumping on black people, but our black communities in this country are in real trouble. You know. Like in Chicago a couple of weeks ago, they were eighty people shot and twenty five people killed, but you don't hear much about that. We're hearing about George Floyd. We're hearing about this guy that got killed in Atlanta. But are we talking about the real problems in the black community? And what? What can we do to help that going on there? That kind of gets lost in all this it does get lost, but here's like pardon. Me Is kind of excited about this. This throughout the world. Everybody is tired. The vast majority is tired of all forms of racism Ed protests, Australia and London, and Or was it. Japan. That's actually pretty amazing that. Everyone is tired of bigotry. That part I think is absolutely beautiful and amazing. I just don't want to see it. Being Co opted by anger. But even their fatherland. Here's what's I. Mean what I see happening. Is Politics Anders into this again? It's like. All of a sudden you know we have this horrible. And everybody agreed it was evil. The George Floyd killing, and whatever, but all of a sudden now. It becomes politicized and. All police are. Painted as brutal as racist. We don't even know for sure. What the guys the COP who committed the horror believable. We don't know what his motive was. We have no idea if it was racist or not. He's he's and and the victim. Poor George Floyd is black, but is that why that happened? We don't know but all of a sudden you know. Every police department gets paid in with this brutal racist. Whatever kind of thing in fact, the attorney for George Floyd said that this is another example of genocide for Gosh Sakes. Talk about polarizing. You know this is an example of the genocide that's happening with black people in our country. It's crazy I mean. How do you separate all this? It does remind me of that great line. You know I think we all have to start by admitting that the line between good and evil cuts through every human heart. It's not a political position anymore than it's a color one skin. Good needle cut through every human heart, so there's good cops. Bad cops. Good precent add priests. I JUST WANNA end all bigotry and hatred and racism. And this polarized position I. Think allows for any oxygen of real life to come. I. Hope it does not just a different issue. If you ever talked to anybody who's religious, who is so stream Lee religious so? unbendingly Orthodox. There's this anger there and you can't negotiate with that person. The moment you disagree with anything. They say they feel they have the right to reject you, so you don't really get any spirituality. You just stay at this level of. Hana rigidity so should I say something should I not. You know the problem is Zach. Anything it's not a conversation. So in my position is all life matters. That's what I wanNA preach or like. John One where it says. How can you say that you love God, but you don't love the person in front of you. You know you must love all you must see. Everyone's life is sacred. So to me, I want to emphasize the spiritual dimension of this and like Martin Luther, King. Martin Luther King. When the civil rights movement started, they did this training session with prayer. They pray, and they would train themselves not to react and hatred, so they'd have these. Training sessions where? Prey, but then they yell horrible things at you gyms to train you not to react in hatred. That's a spiritual movement were spiritually. Goodwill Overcome Gandhi the same thing trained with meditation. He refused to react in anger Those Saints Holy Figures? That's kind of spirituality I want they weren't. Martin Luther King and Gandhi. Tapped into a spiritual power. And so for me like the spiritual power I want is. I pray the. Attitudes every day, so when it says a blessed are those who mourn I. WanNa feel the pain of what a slight! To be a minority. To live in discrimination and fear that brings Enlightenment's personally like I'm reading black like me that a classical book to make me more compassionate that compassion brings understanding, but that's a spirituality that I'm praying. To feel the pain, and suffering or blessed are the Peacemakers. By, even prefer that blessed are those who hunger and thirst for justice. There are good cops. We've seen that and good protesters a day. Hunger and thirst for Justice, Yup Hunger and thirst for their political position. That's a spiritual movement. I want to succeed, so I pray for that every day I. Pray for everyone to have his hunger and thirst for justice, not for their particular position. Or blessed are the Peacemakers. That's a commitment. Peacemaker means a bridge builder. So, a bridge builder that everyone is united together. So piece in the sense, the Hebrew idea Shalom which really means unity. Where you and our united everybody human to human soul to soul. In Hebrew it's fetched. neff edge sold soul we are united. That's a bridge builder. That's a commitment. That's what I want were truly united soul to soul. No injustice can come into our country. Some for me. It's not a political position. That is my point. My point is shallow, I want unity. I want all human beings to see each other's brothers and sisters. That's a whole spiritual movement that has been preached for thousands of years to me. That's the real battle. Not Particular policies. Will you know? The hardest thing in the world I think is to take off whatever colored glasses you have on, you know we all see things from our own experiences, and we all have some kind of prejudice and stuff. And, you know what I hear you saying is. Let's see if we can listen to each other. Let's see if we can understand what we don't know. Let's see if we can put ourselves in other people's shoes and be compassionate Try Try to listen more than we talk that kind of thing. That's what I kind of hear you saying Fatherland. and. I really want all people to live together and love and unity now we're not there. I admit that is not part of the United. States. We are not united. But that's Michael's. When people say you've gotta come out with a political position, or don't you dare? Come out with a political position. My political position is that I. Want Everyone's life to be regarded as sacred. That's awesome. Well Fatherland I think that's a good place for us to. Start a conversation with listeners. To kind of set their mind in a place where you know. How should they approach this as people of faith? And hopefully if if you have some reaction to this. If you'd like to continue this conversation, just head over to our website. It's www show dot com. That's W. W. G.. Show DOT com. Click on the questions button. You can send us an email, a text or voicemail. And hopefully you'll join us next time as we continue our journey climbing the mountain of life, searching for truth, meaning and purpose in our lives. Thanks for listening.

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Danny Trejo on his life and times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

22:31 min | 3 weeks ago

Danny Trejo on his life and times

"Hey what's up every friday. We're turning over the mike to one of our awesome. La times colleagues and today we welcomed in hernandez daniels. Writing is always surprising and lively whether he's writing about low riders or music or even food. It's always the bidding me of this monitor jolly good time so daniel to my chet. The himself danny three hole. Well that's that's my that appeared as mother enjoy. I'm daniel hernandez you're listening to the times. Daily news from the l. a. times today is july. Ninth twenty twenty one. I've spent the past few months reporting about latino representation or rather lack of in hollywood for the la times along the way the books editor at the paper. Boris casca asked me as he occasionally does. If i wanted to take a look at a new book by an actor turned out. It's by one of the most fascinating and honestly bad ass figures in hollywood today. Danny trae ho. What i had was this look of a criminal. I had the look of a bad guy. You know guys that bad guys. Tell me well. You really look like a pack. We spoke over. Zoom treacle wore a cap and he and of seventy seven. He's one of the most beloved genre actors around even over the pandemic distance trae who's fierceness onscreen as the perpetual prisoner or inmate is evident in conversation. He spoke with emotion and sometimes snorted a rubbed his face with both hands. It was as if he was bracing himself against the pain of experience in the state penitentiary system. That took up half his life. I was doing a film. With mickey rourke and we were doing in new mexico and i played this insane killer and and it was strange. The direct route say okay. Let's do that we do it. And he's a danny hon. You do it. It's like you go to this maniac and then all of us. I watch you and you go what i say. Cut you immediately. Go over and play with your kids. And he says most accurate they get into that zone and they want to stay there. When i'm playing that insane crazy person. It's like i been there. I've seen that. I've lived that you know i don't i don't want to be there. There's times that. I've been acting. And then i stop and i'm gonna throw up because that place that you can go to is is very very real. It's like i love working with like all the wanna be tough guys and convy killer in hollywood because you look at a menu. No as tough as you are you would be paying protection to some little five foot six mexican. That's how tall danny trae. Ho really is by the way. But it's his face that captures people's attention. It's famously mangled. By the years. He spent in prison offering an ideal expressive palette for the actor he became he can convey rage and humor like few other villains on screen. Some of these stories have been told. The many have informed his wildly prolific word and the most important are collected in his new memoir. Trae ho my life of crime. Redemption and hollywood he co authored with his longtime friend and fellow. Actor donal lobe. You know if there was a group of us standing on a corner. When i was young the cops into lovey with a you compare always just i just had the phaser the body that stuck out but as far as hollywood. I don't think i ever been discriminated against. I work all the time. And i was a inmate number one bad guy and i didn't know that i was being stereotype. I just do. I was working in fact the young lady probably fresh out an interview school. You know she asked me a danny. Don't you think you're being typecast. And i didn't know what that was about. What what do you mean. Well you're always playing the mean. Chicano dude with tattoos and thought about as i am the means chicano due to adapt dues trae who got his break in the business after visiting a film shoot in one thousand nine hundred eighty five. He was there to help someone onset. Who's battling through addiction addiction recovery. Then his career took off at first quietly with a string of tiny rolls as prisoner inmate or tuck inmate run but by nineteen ninety-five pray ho shared a riveting death scene with robert deniro in michael mann's movie heat one of my all time favorites and one of many displaying trae skill at portraying someone on the brink of death he says even deniro wasn't crises death of the century so funny when i was doing that to get a compliment from robert deniro and he helped me up off the ground. There's a lot of talk in the hollywood community about the constant use of the gangster. Trowell kind of bob ewell stories but at the same time some actors will say well. That's giving us work. We're training in our craft were reflecting the streets. Where do you lie on that argument. And how do you some of these films. You know that you were under leader career in today's mindset days as long as the bad guy dies or goes to prison. I don't care okay. You know what i mean. It's like i won't do a movie or the best guy lives in. I got ninety six deaths. Now i think and i got the record for death in film you know just. I worked a lot for me. Is i like yeah. Let's tell those stories. Yeah let's let's get them right you. Let's get right. it's you know what. Why do you. Why or why are prisons full of african american and mexican. Because you know jobs aren't available. There's a lot of things going on that. They're putting us in prison right now. I honestly believed that. Probably fifteen percent of the people that are in prison belong in prison. You know what i mean. We could do other things with with with the other. Fifteen percent you said percentage fifteen hundred eighty five percent of people in prison. Don't don't need to be there. Yeah i honestly believe that we could do something else. Non-violent drug addicts do not belong in prison most of the dealers they got in prison. Were dealing to support their habits. You don't mean it was like you got a i got a quarter. I'm going to cut it up. And i'm going to sell this. I'm going to use this. You know don you know it's like i. I know some of the big dealers that were in prison. Why do you think people still want to see these kinds of films and love. Even american people still watch it. People watch blending dow On your in withdraw. Their people want identify with violence. First of all secondly they wanna see heroic characters and like. I said as long as the bad guy loses. I'll do it in one thousand nine hundred five legendary filmmaker robert rodriguez gave trae a ho a signature role in desperado. He played a colombian assassin. Contract to kill antonio banderas is character and in two thousand one. Rodriguez specifically created four trae. Ho the role of marceca in spy kids a role that eventually became a franchise on its own that established perhaps the only character in film history to straddle the genres of children's adventure and grind house horror trickles role as much as iconic but his tough guy movie roles seemed to be just a fraction of an actual life filled with drugs gangs and terror. Stay with us for more. Get it for hugs. Get it for date nights for live. Music home games and haircuts. Get it for eating at your favorite restaurant for grandma's birthday for graduations. Get it for your loved. Ones and the essential workers. Get it for all of us when it's available to you. Blue shield of california encourages you to get the cove in nineteen vaccination. Get it for california. The world is built on relationships from building wealth to building a business. It takes a dedicated team working together. And the only difference between success and failure is who you have in your corner when the going gets tough at city national bank. We aim to be the people you rely on when it really counts. That's why your relationship manager will take the time to get to know you after all it's only by knowing your goals that we can help you achieve them see what personal can do for you at c. n. b. dot com city national bank member. Fdic staying up to date on. The latest news can work up an appetite. Well grubs got you covered. grub hub. Works hard to serve restaurants so they can work hard to serve you today. Grab hubs doing a little extra to serve pinera. Get a free delivery perk on your first order from pinera of fifteen dollars. Or more order through the grub hub app or online grub hub. We serve restaurants. Excuse me is this seat open. There are no assigned seats on a southwest airlines flight. And that means your net seat mate could be chest about anyone. Hi i'm quentin jenkins. I league community outreach. At southwest airlines and welcome to is this seat open on this podcast. We'll hear twenty stories from south west history from people like chief marketing officer ryan green. Leave it to southwest airlines to save the company by offered a bunch of free booze. Managing director of culture and engagement whitney ike inger. All of it coming together was probably the greatest piece of humor. I've ever seen at southwest and retired vice president of cargo and charter matt. Luckily i look back on it. I get goosebumps. So sit back. Relax and enjoy stories of south west fifty years of flying. Because you never know who. You'll meet the next time you hear. Is this seat open trae. Who grew up in the bario culture of the san fernando valley in the nineteen fifties and nineteen sixty s from an early age. He understood the true distance between the glitter of nearby hollywood and his world of drug dealing and bare knuckle. Violence grabbed you by the throat and threaten threatening to break every bone in. Your body was abused. I didn't know giving marijuana when you were eight. Was sharing it stuff like this. Trae hall writes that eventually got him hauled into a police station for the first time at the age of ten from that point on. He spent years engaging in criminal mayhem in the san fernando valley and up and down the state cycling through juvenile and state prisons and never expecting to come out alive but over the course of trails life. His experience with criminality would collide with hollywood one. Crystallizing episode came when trump. Who was wayne offers to appear in two films in the early nineteen ninety s one was american me to be directed by edward james olmos. The other was blood in out by taylor. Halford both sought to tell the story of the founding of the mexican mafia trae ho with his chest of tattoos and years of time served would have been a great fit in eater film. There was a problem though. The mexican mafia or ma is highly secretive and torius for its ruthless. Executions word was already getting around the penitentiary system. That the american meese script took some offensive narrative liberties related to prison rate into the ms fraternal codes. In order that we're upsetting real world. Gang leaders the proposed film would also explicitly use the term. Na which is another big no-no you ever. Jeans is great actors. Unbelievable actor but you gotta. We walked into into jerry's deli in encino okay. He walks in worrying county jail shirt but to the opening and do look like like an easterly. Chiloe and so. I'm trying to figure out dow's doing this to be my friend or i didn't. I didn't understand that kind of getting into character. The first question we asked was. Hey did you get permission from joe to do. The job organ was the leader of the mexican mafia and the mexican mafia l- was was not like the john gotti who wanted to be in the papers. Okay just before a second meeting with almost tranquil. Got a message. Joe morgan the guy trae who warned about wanted to talk to him the infamous joe quote unquote. Peg-leg morgan incarcerated at the time at county jail was then the living dawn of the according to traco. Joe morgan doesn't call people unless he saying you're dead. Who took the call the home phone of his friend eddie. Bunker an old industry insider who he met in prison. Joe morgan got right down to business on. Never forget it. He had to be the age old. What's up and he goes down. You know what medicine serious owns understand. Europe for that movie of american me and yeah. I'm up for both of them up for a month for blood in blood out do. He's which are you gonna do. I says you gonna do blood in blood out on. Never forget joe morgan's oh yeah oh. That's a cute one this movie about about mexican killers and said quinton. That's the cute one so we talked needs to even to daddy you. Don't you could do the other one. you could do. American me of you want nothing would happen. But i know i wouldn't israel. I wouldn't disrespect the people that i know almost not respond to a request for comment about the passage in the book or about trucco statements for this story in the book trek. Oh emphasizes again. His admiration for almost and his advocacy for latinos and people of color in hollywood almost made american me as a morality. Play to warn you about the dangers of prison life. Yet the stories ripple effects in the real world were unmistakable to consultants. Who worked on the film were killed including a beloved gang intervention worker named anna lisa. I think four people got killed out here directly because that movie and about eight or nine killed in prison directly behind that move. We'll have more after this break. Frank carson was a criminal defense attorney who spent years accusing police and prosecutors of corruption. Then they charged him with murder. I'm christopher gothard writer and host of the l. a. times podcasts. Dirty john and detective trap. I'm inviting you to follow and listen to my new podcast. That trials of frank carson. This eight episodes series is a story of power politics and the law. In california's central valley new episodes of the trials of frank carson are available to find them search for the trials of frank carson. Wherever you get your podcasts. Thank you trey who took a smallest role in blood in blood out an experienced that allowed him to return to san quentin for the first time since he was an inmate. There this time as an actor during filming he was able to roam almost freely inside a facility that for him was the site of so many horrors early passages in the book describe mortal dangers lurking around every corner at san quentin and in a state of full circle. He even got to shoot a few scenes inside c. five five zero his actual former cell in the prisons south block. I consider my life a complete gift from god. cut remember nineteen sixty eight. I made a deal. I said you know what if you let me die with dignity. I'll say your name every day. And i'll do whatever i can for my fellow inmate. I said inmate. Because i never thought i was getting out of jail a year later. He left prison for good. And despite many bumps along the road tranquil transformed into a dedicated recovery counselor and sponsor recovery ultimately is the driving force of the memoir. Trae who has more than four hundred credits to his name. Now a remarkable achievement for someone who could hardly have imagined a film career as he prayed at soledad prison and nineteen sixty eight today he recognizes how far hollywood has to go to expand opportunities and roles beyond tough prisoner number one on the topic of latino representation the subject of a recent series of stories in the times trae who says he welcomes the growing advocacy. But what's needed to move the needle. He argued is more direct investment from high powered producers of latin american descent specifically. Everybody we were were not represented were not represented not represent you know. I have to say the reason. We're not represented. Is that people on top not caucasian. Latin american people do not want to produce phil but your point about the the representations issue that we just don't have enough latino financiers of films producers is what you're saying exactly you know and it's stop clients don't put up some money. It may sound like tough love but after reading the book and talking to the man you come away with the sense that trae hose indomitable hardness serves a kinder philosophy. Everything good that has happened to me as as a direct result of someone else. And that's it for this episode of the times daily news from the la times coming up next week. The continued evolution of nicaragua. President daniel vega our show is produced by shannon lynn. Steven cuevas denise garra. Our executive producer is abby venture swanson. Our editors johnny hilton our internists ashley brown special. Thanks to juliet. Turner hector peseta shelby. Grad and boris. Catch cut our engineer. Engineers mario de is in our theme. Music is by andrea man. I'm we'll be back monday. With all the news and monitoring grassi's frank carson was a criminal defense attorney who spent years accusing police and prosecutors of corruption. Then they charged him with murder. I'm christopher gothard writer and host of the l. a. times podcasts. Dirty john and detective trap. I'm inviting you to follow and listen to my new podcast. That trials of frank carson. This eight episodes series is a story of power politics and the law. In california's central valley new episodes of the trials of frank carson are available to find them search for the trials of frank carson. Wherever you get your podcasts thank you.

trae hollywood robert deniro pinera la times hernandez daniels daniel hernandez Boris casca Danny trae frank carson danny trae donal lobe Trowell bob ewell marceca Joe morgan Trae national bank
Chapter Four: A Global Pin-Up

The Killing of Marilyn Monroe

24:08 min | 2 years ago

Chapter Four: A Global Pin-Up

"She was friends with anybody. She didn't realize who she was. Never Abbott did Marilyn Monroe really had no confidence in herself psychologically just as a personality she really had no confidence game abused child. She really felt very vulnerable and she was always looking for protection. That could easily be alone doesn't bother me <music> some people. I know they want to be long. I don't mind it. I think this thing and human being gave F. I think is is a myself definitely wanted you longer again. The guy have all agape insight hello and welcome to part four of the killing of Marilyn Monroe. I'm your host Jackie Moran in this episode episode. We're going to see how after dragging herself out of an abusive childhood and suffering the infamous Hollywood casting couch. Maryland finally made it big on a level. Nobody nobody even she could have predicted and we'll also discover how her extraordinary onscreen sex appeal crossed over into increasingly scandalous private life. I will be very jealous very jealous. I think you just Delic Maryland had broken through in nineteen eighteen fifty thanks to two movies all about eve and the asphalt jungle in which she had small but memorable parts the buzz she created from her performances in in them led to her being cast in no fewer than ten movies over the following two years and kept her profile. High Maryland was relentless in Haram Bishen then she took acting lessons with all the great teachers in Hollywood and she was formed friendships with the piglets agents and the best interview that anyone had ever given should tell us that were quite extraordinary and sometimes unusual in one thousand nine hundred fifty to daily variety columnist Flora Bell Muir name Maryland the it girl of the year and former silent movie legend turn Gossip Queen Hedda Hopper described described her as the cheesecake queen-turned box office smash in February of that year she was also named the best young box office personality by the Farm Press Association in Hollywood and Maryland's reputation as the sexiest up and coming actress in Hollywood wasn't exactly harmed by the emergence of the nude photos she had post for as a penniless model back in one thousand nine hundred forty nine as Greg Schreiner president of the Marilyn Monroe Fan Club explains Maryland was also smart enough to turn what could have been a career ending scandal into another facet of growing legend. She did a new calendar for Tom. Kelly which incredibly famous eventually Louis and when they ask her what she was wearing during that session she said Chanel number five and of course they said no no. What did you have on the radio to me. I don't know there's something wonderfully clever and naive about all of that which I think shows that side of Maryland very much. Marilyn made further headlines that year when she began a high profile romance with New York Yankees Legend and America's most famous sport star Joe Dimaggio the Dimaggio biographer Jerem Sharon author of Joe Dimaggio the long vigil details how the ball player and the showgirl came to meet Nineteen fifty-two who was it starlet cheat appeared and all about eve but suddenly these new pictures should take an a few years before surface and not only that she declared herself often suddenly her mother arrives at an insane asylum and says that Maryland take care of her Sydney's Cold Key West Coast Columned Airy Station of Schwab Obstructs Unstuck Boulevard said hey we got to do something so what they did to date for her to go out with Joe Dimaggio he the proletarian prints of America. It's nine hundred fifty two just tired and fifty one the whole world loved him at that point Maryland thought choose splashy sports figure you know with the slicked hair and a flashy sports jacket and when he showed up at dinner she found that he was quiet and sensitive and that would always be current so the moment she went out with Jodi marriage. Oh they were the royal royal couple of America and she was in all the newspapers and her career was they really hit it off. I think that one of the things things that really attracted to aside from the fact that she was very physically attracted to him and he was physically attracted are which always helps but also that father father thing. He was very protective of her as we shall see. Joe Dimaggio was to be the first of several significant men in Maryland's life and death yeah but he was not to be the most significant here's Danforth Prince celebrity publisher and Monroe expert the module was not part of the Hollywood community energy. He was an athlete. He was a sports star. He didn't go for any of the FROU FROU and silly Hollywood stupidity that seemed to make the Hollywood industry run that was considered chic and fun and interesting desirable. She was devoted to her way and never used her never use her fame. Never used the talent what interested in any loved desperately the end of the Joe probably would have been rather conservative. Italian husband probably would've demanded that she take fewer pills. They might have done her good but he might have killed that magical spirit of charisma with her profile rising and public interest in her next move high in one thousand nine hundred fifty three. Marilyn starred in three movies that remain classics today and that finally lifted her above all the other pretty blonde wannabees in Hollywood. My name is Charles. Castillo an entertainment journalist. I think the first role role that really solidified that she was a legend and a true star was a movie called Niagara but she was playing fem tall and seductress and she won't leave her husband she he's having fair so she wanted to kill him but the reason that I think more so than the plot that solidified her star status as it was in color and everything about Maryland that we remember today was on display in that movie the creamy white skin the Ruby Red Glossy lips the tussled blonde hair the beauty mark the cleavage edge all in breathtaking color people were dumbfounded by her. They had never seen anything like her before because she was just so cornel so sexual people had never seen anything like it. Hot on the heels of Niagara Came Gentlemen Prefer Blondes released just six months after Niagara era. It's so Maryland turn in a show stopping performance opposite Jane Russell many moments from the movie including Marilyn's dazzling performance of diamonds are a girl's best spread remain iconic today but squeak or pay shape these rocks shape eh Spanish tiffany's eighty. It was amazing. It was kind of like Vivian Lee with gone with the wind or Marlon Brando Streetcar named desire like you can't imagine anyone else playing those roles. I think that it was a time in in Marilyn Monroe's history where the perfect actress for the perfect role and the perfect year just came together serendipitous Lii in a rare recently unearth interview Maryland's some like it hot co star Jack Lemmon describe just what she brought to the screen I why is she had a very good sense of of comedy. There's no question she also created this character herself of and the voice all of that that was was her she was not at them. I think what she knows. It was maybe US look at the center of our talents in heartache or in a good indicator. I think Marilyn King closely listen using one hundred percent on the takes it reprinted. She had a town of the powerful glad she seemed a little. She could dance a little patchy bristle little she could whatever ah but she could lose what she would have more fully than everybody. I've ever worked with for her advantage when people ask me. I don't know anything thing about Marilyn Monroe movies. What should I say. I always say this one. I gentlemen prefer blondes because everything about her that made her star is there. It's a dumb blonde role but she's kind of like underneath it all. She's got some savvy and brains but she's very delicious. She's at the peak of her beauty. She sings she dances. She's got in the perfect cohort. She's got Jane Russell. WHO's the opposite of her dark and sultry and Marilyn's light and funny. It's very fresh. It's very delicious and it's it's just as entertaining today as it was. In nineteen fifty to nineteen fifty three by the third of Maryland's trio of Nineteen fifty-three smashes how to marry a millionaire in which she received top billing over Betty grable alarm a call of all people the formerly stuttering foster girl had become the most famous woman in the world. She always wanted to be famous but she was experiencing the kind of fame that even she couldn't have expected. I mean I don't think anyone at this point in time had ever been as famous as Marilyn Monroe was really the most famous woman in the world not only Andy moral drawing her. She's Great Wait Comic Actor Twentieth Century. She's the female counterpart to Marlon Brando. She was just everywhere you know and she became came. Catchphrase like if a woman walking down the street and she was haughty or something the guys would yell out. Who Do you think you are Marilyn Monroe. I mean that's how famous she was. She it was the standard to be judged by almost a magic kind of charisma that she had nobody can figure it out their stories about how she'd walked on his avenue feeling depressed looking being dumpy and looking allow makeup she would say. Do you want me to become the legend that is Maryland Marilyn. Let's see if you can do it and she pulled off her scarf and she'd put on some smear lipstick and she trust her chest and she razzle-dazzle her way. In suddenly the low with this magic charisma suddenly people would notice that's Maryland uncrowded for him and if she was the most famous woman in the world she was also the most desired here's Danforth Prince again his arm candy with Marilyn. Monroe's one of the highest status symbols man could possibly have Maryland was thrilling. She he was charismatic. People would meet her once when she was being extroverted on the glamorous beautiful platinum blonde that she was and never ever forget it. She was fabulous status symbol to be seen a great conversation piece. Perhaps one of the most unique things about Marilyn sexuality was how up front she was about she may have been dating Joe Dimaggio at the time but the rumors of her other love affairs kept gossip columnists working overtime just about every handsome famous eligible men in Hollywood and several who were not eligible were shall we say romantically linked with the star and Marilyn it seems not only did nothing in to quell the gossip but seem to actually thrive on it celebrity biographer Mark Bego. She was Marilyn Monroe. She knew she has a certain power our cachet in Hollywood and do what she wanted. She was her own woman and I think that that's one of the things that makes appealing to you. Women as well as a character is that she was basically in control of her own destiny. She slept with who she wanted to. She had affairs with she wanted to. She was really kind of ahead of her time. This kind of behavior would have been with scandalous back then but it would have been even more scandalous in early Hollywood but she's really carried. He's that sex symbol roll into her personal life and she knew she goes through a certain power. Some believe however that Marilyn's intense sexuality had its roots. It's in a far darker place. Her abused Childhood Bill Burns is an author and Hollywood historian. She was turned into a sexual creature before she was a teenager. That meant psychologically that the only response she had any stimulation from men was sexual. Actual couldn't be friendly could be business. That was her response. She was trained that way when she was a child who was molested. Why was she it that way. Because before she even reached puberty she was being sexually abused. That was her only response and that was the response she had for the restaurants. If we look at Maryland's relationship with men again we have to go back to the studio system in the nineteen in forty nine hundred fifty where you had to sleep with a producer. You wanted to get a role so women were constantly taken advantage of constantly hunt abused so her relationship with men was based on what these things were. I mean she was kind of toy curve of placing among the men who fell into her orbit was British actor Peter Lawford who in Nineteen Fifty Four married Patricia Kennedy the sister of ambitious Senator John F. Kennedy and through Lawford. She met his RATPAC Buddy Frank Sinatra. It's nice to be seen with the rat pack. It's nice to be their friend. You get included in better parties. They all knew one another. They were all striving for booking engagements because Maryland didn't have a father figure growing up. She tended to like men who were older than she was who she could look up to. Maryland was involved with Sinatra for many years and he gave her dog walk with she called after Mafias Club. Marilyn had enjoyed relationships with powerful and influential men before and perhaps perhaps uniquely call the shots with them but Sinatra was to introduce her to a whole new world and a whole new class of powerful and influential men who would prove far or harder to control Frank Sinatra had a very very complicated hugely talented man but always accusations of being associated associated with the mob cal Neva Lodge the Las Vegas singing engagements a murky careers early that casinos were we're always accused of being associated with the mob. Sinatra definitely had mob contacts. That's been very well documented and that's easy to prove and then he was involved with the Kennedy's as well. I remember that he was going to have John Kennedy. Come onto his place in Palm Springs so this whole association with these people of Peter Lawford of course being done f Kennedy's brother-in-law and and being a movie actor who was under contract the movie studios all throughout from the late forties fifties and sixties and so on she was part of this whole mix <music> as the decade progressed so did Maryland's run of box office hits the seven year itch in Nineteen fifty-five gave us one of cinema's most famous scenes as Maryland's white dress was blown upwards by a passing train the Prince and the showgirl in nineteen fifty fifty seven saw her give a critically acclaimed performance opposite Sir Laurence Olivier and nineteen fifty nine some like it hot was later voted the funniest movie in American in Cinema History. There are people who claim that Marilyn was just a dumb blonde to use that phrase that she just had had her sexy image to rely on and there are others who argue that she was absolutely brilliant in knowing how to market mark this image that it really was just facade for the person who lived inside herself you Chris Welch. Well what you wear Pajama top to bottom of the Jones or the night town. Look kind of so now number two truth and yet I wanNA see <music> a true among the light however there was shade and the pressure to be Marilyn. Caroline Munro could sometimes feel overpowering. Here's first husband James Daugherty on the side of Maryland. The public didn't say that she was a good gal. She knew how to be tough. She didn't have that stuff but our Jeanne was heard. Often always for how she feared him to go out of the House for a while. She was always frayed. She timid person to a real sweet. Person should never been in that gets. I should've been fireworks. Somebody could be your husband. Take care of fleet to everybody his she never it's perhaps inevitably. Maryland sought comfort end escape wherever she she could here's Hollywood historian and biographer mark be go. She's someone who did you know have fears insecurities like we all do but she she was so in the spotlight that she wanted to be the best she could be at all times she kind of had that Judy Garland Syndrome where they would would judy. You're getting a little sad. We'll give you died. Tells Okay you're too high. You can't sleep will put you down or you know in that ruins. Judy Garland's life and I think that there was the potential for a ruining Maryland's lies and she seems to thinks that she had control over what she was taking doctors would would give her you pick me ups and also to sleeps and she was on that cycle and it can be a deadly cycle and it still is today. Sometimes for movie stars Alvis Presley had this problem too is that while I'm not a drug addict. He's a prescription drugs. I don't have a drug problem doctor gave his Jimmy. Well drugs are drugs. Even alcohol's a drug if you use it that way it was something that relaxed her seems to send her but you start taking him with champagne so poor Marilyn in monroe. She's addicted to methamphetamine. She's also an alcoholic. She's also heavily on barbiturates which is a deadly combination. When you're teaching metamphetamines the nineteen fifties belong to Marilyn Monroe in a manner and on a scale almost unprecedented in Hollywood history but as she achieved uncharted uncharted levels of worldwide fame in her private life things were beginning to unravel by one thousand nine hundred sixty Marilyn less than two years left to live and had developed serious addictions to alcohol and prescription drugs the childhood traumas that she had fought so hard to escape from where resurfacing and her chaotic love life was about to to put her at the center of a deadly power struggle between forces she had no hope of controlling entity was very sexually active active so she was having an affair with him with Frank Sinatra with people in the rat pack and me became a fixture in Hollywood an-and in American politics. She is an enduring part of the American legend story that only America and maybe Hollywood could have reduced. What was the American Arkansas's identity be without her. There are still bars in Pago PAGO. You go someplace really obscure in the world and has a poster of Marilyn Monroe or some bars in retrospect. Her fate has a terrible tragic inevitability about it but as Mark Bego speculates. It could have all been so different. It's really interesting to speculate what would happen to a lot of our idols. What would Maryland be like these days if she was still alive would you be as big big as we view her which she icon as review her which she be making appearance is on the tonight show which she show. Oh up on game shows which should be someone who lost her beauty and became a has been but you look at someone like Jane Russell who was Maryland Coast are gentlemen prefer blondes and Jane a long life she would show up on television Turner Classic Movies Different shows and she was still a beautiful woman but definitely older. It was an older version of Jane Russell Maryland fit into that category. <hes> Mamie van Doren another bombshell L. from fifty. She's around. She shows up every once in a while. She still looks pretty. She's still somewhat a legend not as big as Maryland of course would Maryland d like fat hat or would she developed a another character of for herself which she either wise cracking older woman. I guess we'll never know exactly what she could have become as she survived in the next episode of the killing of Marilyn Monroe all the men that she found the tractive because they were powerful. We're also the enemies of a lot of dark forces on the periphery of that for example. She got involved with the Kennedy's who hated the Kennedys in Kinda hated the Kennedys so by getting to Maryland it was an open door to anyone who wanted to punish the Kennedys or make they just use like a rag doll. I mean bars and clubs and plays with but you could see you mean she'd be totally out of it and they'd walk away for wild come back then somebody else who grabbed him and walk away and come back like St Okay Oh it was terrible but I was in a position saying to these guys young a young kid. The killing of Marilyn Monroe is hosted by me. Jackie Moran executive produced used by Dylan Howard and is a production of broad and water studios and endeavor audio executive producers also include. Tom freestone James Robertson and anti tillet the series is produced by carry budge and written by Dominic Hutton reporting by Doug Montero. The series is mixed and engineered by Sean crabby and Sam Ada scoring by Benz town. There is so much more to this story and you don't want to miss anything. I can assure you make sure you subscribe to the killing of Marilyn Monroe wherever you get podcasts.

Maryland Marilyn Monroe Marilyn Hollywood Maryland Marilyn Monroe Fan Club Jane Russell Joe Dimaggio Jane Russell Maryland Marilyn King High Maryland Jackie Moran Frank Sinatra Senator John F. Kennedy America Judy Garland Mark Bego Tom freestone John Kennedy Danforth Prince
Wednesday 7/22/20 - Avicii's Eerie Music Video Part II

Chicago Dog Walk

22:46 min | 1 year ago

Wednesday 7/22/20 - Avicii's Eerie Music Video Part II

"Alright make today is Wednesday July twenty second welcome. The dog walk presented by Barstool Sports. Have you can listen yesterday? Stop Right now. Listen apart one because this is part to achieve and Dante again talk about a whole crazy scary underbelly of the world, so go listen to that comeback here for part two all right? Let's hop right into it. So what's over this film? Now like is this. Is there any word on this win? Come Out, Wednesday, so there's actually trailer out for and it's kind of one of those. Things that got started and never completed I watched the trailer this morning to refresh my memory and I wish I. didn't it's really really? Sad okay. I'll post that the blocked is called the silent children, so this guy. The produce city kind of seems like A. He ought not that normal by I, mean he? He travels all over the world all the places you would. Basically assume are hot spots for this shit like you know. Thailand Philippines and then places organs. Yeah, like no, but like Third World Places That have suffered like. Natural, disasters, early famine, or just war-torn, where these kill with these kids are super vulnerable. Insurance up. He's I. Mean Sh- documenting the suffering like hidden camera, and like hand held camera like dishes going on like these heads are being rounded up. There were being reported missing. No one's looking into it. I mean it's eight hundred thousand kids just in the United States. Yes, I can imagine countries worldwide. Yeah, now. was there any inkling on that trailer or That these people are involved that Cornell Bennington. Like had A. Film Razor I honestly nothing like they honestly don't know yes, or no, there might be, but Because where does board ain't come into play? Is he alleged to be involved in this either the the fortune and read it. People say that there's both sides of it. People say he was part of it. And that's you know what led him to kill himself because he had all this guilt on, his girlfriend was definitely kind of a dirtbag As became news, but then there's other side that says he was privy to a lot of fucked up shit and was going to start voicing it because of the whole Weinstein thing. You know when you're Geno came out and said she was raped by Harvey. Weinstein Boarding Kinda like went off the rails, and he I like tweeting stuff that wind seen you know like here's your menu coming up. tweet him like the prison. Menu and stuff, so I think people up top kind of became nervous like this guy's a loose cannon. This where things kinda get slim, yeah. You'll get to those message boards. It's almost like they'll find any death and they'll try to connect the dots anywhere. They can are sure and it is the biggest fucking reach ever it is, and then the other thing that kind of for me the gives makes me a little bit nervous about this whole topic and category, as it relates to these These people is that. That a lot of like you know people blowing You know you bone errand to the fire fan. The flames is anonymous so anonymous. The online hacker group is like claiming to have documents that show you know references to the pedophile ring, and like they list Chris Cornell of each acre, spending Kurt Cobain Lady Di and even Paul Walker as people who knew. What was going on then all had like mysterious deaths. But now if I'm not mistaken, though doesn't anonymous usually generally try to good. I mean I would say that. This is good. Yeah Okay Okay so you. Sound like you're on the other side like. This is this is a fine line is starting to show saying like Oh. They were involved with it when I basically misspoke saying you're there. There's something to do here with the so it's almost like they knew too much. Like the people who have had the mysterious death anonymous is claiming that they knew about Epstein and some of these larger pedophile rings, and we're GONNA. Do things to quote unquote expose it, and then all those people listed by anonymous and again like synonymous. It's a hacker group. They've gotten a lot of things right They're like a group people that I will just never wanNA fought. Yeah I don't even know what they are. Who they are where they are what they are, but this shabby, but they're. They're the ones kind of fan. The flames on this was that. was from June of this year. Oh Shit, yeah, is it the real anonymous? Because there's a lot of fake ones right now I believe it's the real anonymous. Is. Says one by this from Disappear remember and they came back after the floor. which is right when this thing got released. Okay saw I think I. Think I as far as I know. It's the real anonymous, and they're the ones out there kind of pushing that that narrative, okay or fanning the flames of that narrative so now is there. Evidence most of them so obviously we have cornell there. You know he's. He's linked to his wife, saying things like hey. He didn't kill himself. You did not want to die. Is What's the? What's the Real Bennington proof? Improve you said he was involved in that documentary right? Maybe this is a chance to hand. This is really crazy, but when you actually look at the pictures, it's kind of like Whoa. There's this whole theory now. Going not now, but after like the jump at the emails got There's this theory in also. Have you seen John? Podesta's art gallery him and his brother. It's really fucked up. I mean something like like. How do you not lock that guy up just for owning that? It's like if it's. I I did not see it so people who do it falls under that whole. You know in school. It falls into the whole. Like what is pornography? Yeah, law. Case and it's like. Because it's art, I feel like he got away with. It is twisted fucked. Yeah, just like has no place like. Have you seen some of the weird shit that were recovered from team. Yeah, yeah. Their, cousins of those okay, okay last. They'd fall into the same problem. You look it up, but it's going to give you nightmares. Yeah, it's really fucked up. You're listening. So. They're these Podesta. Emails came out and people started realizing like. Wow, this guy is he's an associate. Yeah, twisted, obviously magnifying glass stargate getting shown on him then. I think this is after Bennington died. Yeah those email leaks. Yes twice! Is Ahead of the Orion so then after Bennington died, and people are starting to try to uncover everything I'm in the whole sex trafficking thing. People. KINDA started looking at. Bennington and realizing while this guy looks just like a young John Podesta. I could see that so now. There's this whole theory that he was possessed his son. And I mean dude. If you look at I, know it sounds nuts. If you look at the pictures, it's like not even like a on. It's like spitting image really Dan. There's this whole thing that possesses and actually Podesta that he's a rockefeller. No, Dante I'm not tell. People, that way more. Than I do Ned, if told me this stuff, this is me reading it on like. Read it. I mean a a side by side of. Bennington impetus like they do look eerily similar. DO WE WANNA? Talk about that music video with each of. The last person that we've mentioned here that we haven't really got to and VP. That music videos something. So. We'll just teed off. It's called for better day for a better day, and though the video essentially starts with these two young children, running through like a field of sunflowers, but it's like this weird kind of grainy, black and white From somebody trying to catch them, yeah. And the man a man. Like thirty five forty year, old, paramilitary guy, yeah, and they running through this field, and then it clips. You know now you have. These two people kinda wearing masks that look like the anonymous mask. Like what was that movie character from Ethan Data? From the VENETA, and they're wearing these masks to run around. They're like assassinating these people branding them I landing in assassinating, and and you know the it's almost like the movie Munich. Have you seen the Movie Ganic? Were there like they have like this? Hitless at their run around, it's all high profile. Like well to do people right, and they're knocking them off one by one and then crossing their picture out. Yeah, and then you shows, and then you keep going. It's like a four minute video. They showed the two children and they basically they're. They're in the back of this van, which is in the middle of some nondescript feel. It's army truck army truck. Yeah, that's a better way to say. And they opened up the back the truck. There's you know eight ten kids in there. And this guy goes. We'll take those two, and they get out of the out of the back of the army truck through the back of the trunk and the show. They don't show the guy the actual buyer. He has like a representative, but he's in the back of this black Mercedes with you know a watch, and whatever he's clearly like a well to guy, and then they drive off, and then it's like essentially. It's like the two people in present daytimes. Doing all these assassinations, where the two kids plucked out of the back of that van, and now they're kind of going around getting their vengeance, but it's like this like. You know I'm not like a giant fan or anything, but it doesn't seem like that is typically his content. EXA- you. You just nailed it like that's the whole thing, right? It's like. Like open your eyes whereas this coming. Exactly and that was that came out in twenty fifteen. Right so if it's for a better day, it's on Youtube. You could watch it. Yeah, do that. Yeah, and it's like a disturbing video and if you think of if you think of like typical of each song track all. Let's fucking go like he's like a hype man. He had like great. You know great great time great summer, Guy. Yeah, this is not that this is darkest fuck so it was like this is like I said it's just not his. Not, his contact, but On the other side, there's a lot of fucking fucked videos that have been released before. You know it just like. Oh, now people are you know connected any dot? They want and here's where he falls in all. Yeah, because he did this like he wants that like you. You can't wash that music video and be like. Oh, he doesn't want a late on like the the whole video. is about that, so it's like what what? Why is he doing this? Why is it a major statement? Yeah, why is he your statement and sure where he was involved in the film to? This was his own music city. The film though we don't know that I don't know that. There is a link, but they do. Those three guys know each other I. Know Bennington and Cornell did. I. Honestly I don't know I mean. There's such an age gap obviously a continent gap, but Yeah! I mean that each video is just so like damning. I, think, too. It's bizarre. Yeah, media draw attention I mean you're talking about somebody that I mean he's huge here, but in Europe to think about how big he is like. World Wyoming like EDM is like soccer. Soccer soccer here. Union is whatever here just got popular. You know ten years ago, but over there. It's like the number one. Yes so I mean. He is so big globally, internationally Put that out. A quick break suck about JP Graziano boys back to back here. JP's and obviously you talked yesterday. Dante about your experience. We've been getting out of Wednesday's now chief. It's been good. That's our new deal, so shout out Hockberg Shadow. GP, Graziano, there's nothing better than when you're like. Oh, like. He got a GP Sandwich for you. Yeah, so it's good to JP Grozny dot. com get some you got to. My buddy really likes the chips I. Don't you can't find those everywhere I'm. I I can't remember what they're called ongoing. Their website is that no, it's not Miss Vicki's solid that go on their website and find out what they're called so. Dot Com and go see what those chips are called. Because like I said you can't find him everywhere do that. Go Online. Go to tastes. Dot Com after you visit ibkr dot com, get some muscle letter. Get some Eric at mild, good hot. However, you like it. It doesn't matter civil summer left. A lot of summer left, so go on. Go Get your papers. Make sure you're enhancing your barbecue. Little talion sausage, you know. Whip it up like that. You'll be good to go so Jay Grozny, on on ninety one west, Randolph. All right. Let's hop back into the shell. Feel like it didn't make waves like you would think of video like that. Like did I was trying to look up that he ever make a statement about? I didn't really find anything and it's just seems like a bizarre like of all the topics. To put on on a song called for a better day to be A. Revenge killing all. It's Outta files. Is it's the thing is? It's like it's Kinda like one of those things that it's scary to think, but are we gonNA look back in like twenty thirty years and be like. All the shit was going on under our noses the whole time. How did nobody make a big deal? It House Ashton Kutcher, the only guy the face of this like. Devoted his basely retired from acting is devoting his life to. Everyone thinks he's like a quack. I, it's just again like I'm not an expert, but there's definitely. A, point where it's like the numbers don't lie. Yeah, exactly so everything's nothing until it's something. Yeah, and that you know, and it is such a thing like you know like you said like people think asking coutries quack. But it's like it's such an explosive topic in such an explosive accusation. That if you in, it's dangerous because it's like the worst thing in the world that you can be. So if you're GONNA accuse somebody. You better have him dead to rights, and it's like I tweeted this last week, because it just like popped into my head, but I mean remember Corey Feldman like no five six years ago, got dragged some hard and for being this. You know job. And, he's been screaming this forever. He's been streaming like Yo Hollywood. Takes advantage of young kids, and that's why these child stars are so fucked up like that's why my friend. Cory overdose. That's why you know I'm. Messed up and everyone's just like. Okay. He's he's the joke. And now I mean well. There was also proms seldom because he tried to raise I think it was a million or five million dollars to put this film in the motion and people were like. Hey, if you really have shit the tell. That's not how it works. You know you're not. Money Project. Dude like you're supposed to like you. Get the names out there. who was doing this fucked up things and let's lock them the fuck up. You know so a lot of people kind of. Daughter was a money. Grab which I'm not saying. It was, but I'm just saying that's where a lot of people ignored him from that aspect because he had something so serious. You know, don't do it that way through point you know, and obviously like these you know corey he's. He's had spats with. You know being kind of a radic and shit like that so but. But. I get what you're saying for. Sure I mean I'm not. That doesn't mean that terrible shit didn't happen to him at all. Definitely at all right? Yeah, but that's just just like we we're to do would just speak on both sides here, so yeah. I'm kind of torn on that, too. Because people definitely profited from exploiting him now, he can't use that talk. To like I'm back at like who do you might as well try to make money off? It somehow but yeah, IT'S A. It's it's something that these are like those things. It's like man I. Really Hope is not true because it's so fucked up so I. Don't know these three guys I don't know The problem is though. Is that obviously when you say the fourteen Radicek. That's a lot of people. Just tune it the fuck out, yeah! We've seen this happen and people who don't even go into that world by all this Epstein and kill himself Shit, you know so if you believe in that and you believe that there's really this underbelly like. There were no I do think that that the Epstein thing and like his murder death. Whatever you WANNA call it. is where I think a lot of this stuff. Jump from the mainstream because I. if it's you know, it's pizza gate, it's this. It's that it's you know you just hear all these things like what like? There's no way that can be true and then. Then, you read about the Epstein thing. It's like wow. He got an unbelievable sweetheart. Deal has really willing to talk about it. They can't pin them down than they think they finally do. Have in pinned down and whoops. He's dead. Yeah, like every anybody with a brain. The more skeptical people in the world can't look at the FCC thing and be like Oh. Yeah, this is on the up and up. I mean what happens here. If something happens in Maxwell, I mean the the weirdest thing is not the weirdest thing, but. Another thing that you just have to shake your head at of this whole thing is okay, so Epstein kills himself. You don't really hear much from. I'd say like that Hollywood community about it. Here's accusers, you know. Cry Rightfully so like we're not GonNa get our. Day In court with our. You know. Alleged Acute, you know who they accused of these awful things. Okay, so now they somehow find Maxwell, which is awesome. And again it's like y like. Why isn't Hollywood celebrating this? If they're innocent of this and there's all these like. There's a few bad apples wire. Aren't they coming out saying like? Yeah get her the Fuck Outta. Here put her in jail. The rest of her life in anyone else affiliated with her like like. Why is there silence about this? If there's nothing wrong with it, it does feel like their silence won't like that. INSTAGRAM account goes viral, and it's like all the people are pictured with her. It's not like it's an like taking a picture with somebody doesn't make guilty. If you're just at the same parties or whatever, but it's like she. It just seems like those two people, and it's weird that you have like the left and the right being like. Oh! fucking trump here. He is Epstein Big scumbags. Take him down. Then the right just turned around and chosen picture of him with Clinton, and it's like wait a second, if both of these guys that two those powerful people ask, thirty years are both like deeply connected to or connected at least to have seen like that's probably a good indication that the whole system's fucked. They're all the same. Yeah, it's part of the whatever but it it's. It's really it's. It's quite troubling, and it's just like I'm so tired of doing this topic about like the pedophile rings, but because it does seem like all the way fair thing. The thing like there's just like pizza gate like whatever like everything kind of leads back to the same thing and I can't tell if it's like. Garbage or if it's like it's smoke. There's fire type of thing and I think it's when you're that elite in your on that kind of like spectrum. like depravity. Thing just comes like I've I've seen a small like inkling of it like some of these. Ridiculous Events I've. BEEN HIRED TO DJ or I'm just like Whoa I do not belong around these at all like they're in some weird shit. I can only fucking imagined should've EG saw like. Oh, yeah, like these like I, said the level. He was on Europe like I don't think you can comprehend the money that got thrown at the sky like if you watch documentary, he's literally flying. Three times in a day to do. Three different shows like two different festivals, and then like a private house party for like some. Salt. In! The basement. It's the scene from taken his managers. Just whoring him out whoring him out, but he's such a money machine that they were like we were off. This guy's GonNa retire again. We got to strike while the iron hot, so he's killing himself working himself to death. And at the same time he's being exposed to. The people that run the world, and it's like he seeing behind the curtain like you seeing them in their own element in their house like they obviously don't show this on the documentary, but you can put two and two together I mean this guy is doing. Private Events House parties I mean he's seeing all the shit. Go down. Yeah, the only thing that's. Always weird to me and then maybe it's just a function of. Like why is it always famous people like why? Aren't there. And maybe that's the reason why we know the names that they're allegedly connected this one way or another, but it's like a beach of all the people in the world. Who could take this down there murdering of EJ Chris Cornell and Chester Bennington over it. I'll have sure there's so many. Other name. You just don't know about the maybe. I Dunno disturbing. Down I, don't know. I think I else here to wrap up. Yeah, like again. I'm not an expert I. Don't know anything I was just repeating other people's words, so if you're listening in, you WANNA cover shoot up. Don't come after me. Yeah, no I mean, but it's worth look. You know like everything else. It's worth looking into the Internet and like like we said the music video for a better day as fucked up, and just you know, it's not exactly levels at all. It's a much different VIBE shutout. Recall so much different. There's an instagram account. It's called celebs with gasoline. If you guys want to see that, there's a ton of pictures of people on there, so but yeah, I think that's it I don't know quite. The quite fucked up situation here but yeah, we will We'll stop here and we'll. We'll see everybody tomorrow.

Epstein Chester Bennington Dante John Podesta Europe Chris Cornell cornell Hollywood INSTAGRAM Cornell Bennington Corey Feldman Weinstein soccer United States Barstool Sports Thailand Philippines Geno Youtube Harvey
Ep. 97: Stay On Your Path

Happier in Hollywood

28:47 min | 2 years ago

Ep. 97: Stay On Your Path

"So let's you know, I'm all about living bigger life. I am one of the important components of that is to keep on learning, but it can be really hard to find time to sit down and learn more and people may think they don't have time to read a book or develop themselves. So there's an app I highly recommend it's called blinking blinking is the only app that takes the best key takeaways. The needs though information from thousands of nonfiction books and condenses them down into just fifteen minutes. So you could read or listen to them. You know, there's always like fifteen minutes of waiting before you have an appointment when I was just waiting for my last doctor's appointment. I was checking out a book called more of less by Joshua Becker. It's all about minimalism one of the components of my bigger life is to have less. So that was really edifying for me right now. For a limited time Lincoln has a special offer just for our audience. Go to blink dot com slash Hollywood. To start your. Free seven day trial. That's blinking. I spelled B L I N K. I S T blinking dot com slash Hollywood. To start your free seven-day trial, Lincoln dot com slash Hollywood. Okay. I'm gonna read the words ready. Rise. Builds. Trusts. Hashian? To nationless. Wraps. I liked that one somebody wants reps. Nice. At least that's how I interpreted. Hi and welcome to happier. In Hollywood, the podcast about how to be happier. Healthier. Saner? More creative. More successful and more productive in a backbiting superficial chaotic unpredictable fundamentally insane world, I'm Liz craft TV writer and producer living in LA. And with me is my high school friend and writing partner of nineteen years. Sarah, that's me, Sarah Fain on this podcast. We talk about being writers in Hollywood, how we balance a career and friendship and how to survive the war of attrition that is life in Los Angeles. This week's episode Seren, I discussed staying on your path, then we answer listener question about ratings, and in our take a hike segment, we'll discuss digital decluttering, then we're going to call the brilliant Jane Espen, sin to share a Hollywood hack can finally we have a two for one hiking celebrity citing the first, Sarah. We have an update. Yes. We had our meet up. It was on March. Third at the federal in north Hollywood. And oh my God. It was packed. It was packed. And I mean in a way thank God we had to move from idle hour because the federal space was bigger. It was so crowded and hot I was like were apologizing. Everyone thought it was. But it really was a reminder of how great or happier Hollywood community is so supportive. Everyone was talking to each other and making connections sharing their words. We all shared our words only wrote them down on pieces of paper put them in a bowl. And then went around talking to each other about our words, and what we're doing to encompass our words of the year. And we have to tell everyone we then took the words and had Mary because for those who don't know Mary is a witch Goodrich. We had her do a spell for the words to bless everyone. So you can see that in our Facebook group. Yeah, I was videotaping it, and I have to say I've found it kind of oddly move. Moving and how full we liked watching. Mary meditate at the end. I know we didn't videotape that that was mostly entertainment for us. Let Sarah I have to say I was so gratified at the meet up because one young woman probably early twenties came up to me and said that she felt like our episode on what to wear to a meeting had actually helped her get a job at a major studio. Yes, she said she'd been planning to wear sort of corporate suit. That's what she thought you ought to job interview. And then she was sent to our the way make sense. So of from somewhere else, that's what you think you wear by the way when I interviewed at magazines New York after college that's what I wore. And of course, it was completely wrong might get a job. Right. She heard what we said. Which was you know, where something a little more hep a little more not now as usual, but not corpora. And anyway, she said, she wore black jeans and a blue shirt with flowers on it that she felt was very chic and she got the job. And the reason that's especially notable. Oil is they told her when she started working like, oh, we just you just looked like you fit right in here. And she was recently promoted, so congratulations to her that what she told me the same thing. And it was so exciting. Yeah. It's very it is gratifying to be like, okay. These little things we say they make a difference. I was this pumping. I was so happy. Now, it was really really fun to meet everyone. So thanks everyone for coming. We'll have more meet ups and next time. Hopefully, it won't be so hot. Okay. Sarah. It's time for from the treadmill? Desks of in which we discuss what's most pressing in our work psyches in this week. It's stay on your path. Yes, we were hiking Freimann canyon, as we do many mornings these days, it's like our pre work work -times. And we were talking about all of these things that are kind of circling us right now an impending stressful things stressful of airy stressful things that we really can't do anything about. Yes. And you said we just need to stay on our path which was perfect timing because we were actually walking on a path at the time and literally regimen, and we were like, yes, we have to stay on our path because these things like we should talk about the things that are settling. Yeah. So we've got the reviews of the fix coming out which were recording this like a couple of days before they. Come out. So we don't know if they're going to be great or horrible or a mix or what? And there's nothing we can do about them. There are people out there right now writing reviews of our show. We can't control the words coming out of their computers and fingers, and you know, it's like, and then we've got of course, impending ratings. Yes. I mean, the ratings are we live or die basically on ratings? So it's not that our career is over if this show doesn't do. Well. But it's the stakes are very very high. If the show does do, well, it will be tremendously. Good for our career. Yeah. Obvious. And if it does, okay, it'll probably be okay. Yeah. Also, it's just you know, everyone knows our word for the years explode. Yes. We want the show to do well enough that we can pursue our exploding road are exploding path. And I think the show when this airs will have premiered. Ready? So those numbers will be out my, and we are just sitting here like oh boy. Yes, we are in the dark. Yeah. At this very moment. Yes. And that makes it really hard to stay focused. Yeah. And stay at all. Then you're not that I'm ever zinn. But I'm lesson. Now, there's something else. That's very stressful. That's going on for writers in Los Angeles and agents. So right now, there's a conflict between the writers guild and the ata which stands for the association of talent agents. And it's too inside baseball to go into the details of this. But the upshot is that writers in their agents could end up parting ways, at least until this is sorted out. Which means the people that we rely and trust like Matt solo. We could have to you know, temporarily say could find yes that would be very very sent. Yes. And we don't want that to happen. But there's all these negotiations going on again too much to get into the details. But we're hoping it all works out. But it's this massive sort of stressful abyss now I'm out there and again over which we have no control yet. What can we do this? I think hiking, oh, stay on her pack. Stay on our best on our path. And that involves exercise, which is one reason we're making a real point to hike as much as we can. It means staying focused on our creative projects. Yes. Both thinking of season two for the fix because at some point. Hopefully, we'll be pitching that. Right. And also working on our other projects developing new shows, you know, working on our coming writer's retreat. Yes. You know, the the path to to exploding is a long path. Yeah. And that's our focus with all of these things going on that we can't control. We just have to put our heads down and focus on the things we can control which is sort of our mental and physical health and the work just focus on the work. Yeah. And I mean, this obviously applies to us. But I think an applies to anyone. I mean, really everybody has got stuff going on around them that they can't control. That can sort of try to pull you off your path right at ten be life stuff works stuff. We all have you could your company could be undergoing restructuring like many things could be happening in the best thing to do is just put your head to how to move forward. The other thing we realized the other day because we're forcing our we had to keep reminding ourselves doesn't just happen. You didn't just say that. And I said good idea. And we never worried about these things again, it's a constant thing of we get sidetracked. And then we're like, wait, wait, we've got to stay hundred path. And we'll stop talking about these stressful things the other day, we had sort of real insight revelation about some strategy in our career, and we realize okay, we never would have had this had we not forced ourselves to stay moving forward on our path. Right because we would have been going down a rabbit hole about ratings. Yeah. Instead of talking about our career our path our path or create a path. Yeah. So in these times. We just remind ourselves to put on our sturdiest, hiking, shoes metaphorically, and literally and stay on the path. Whatever your personal path is just stay right on it a focus on what you can control everybody. We would love to hear. How you stay on your path. So please Email us at happier in Hollywood g meal dot com. Yes. And speaking of ratings coming up, we will answer a mail room question about just that. But first break. Sarah, we have discussed on the show how you are determined to stay zen in hideous LA traffic where you might be sitting on the freeway for an hour and one of the ways I know that you are coping with the traffic is audible, yes, I have been listening to becoming by Michelle Obama on audible, and oh it makes my drive just so delightful audible has the largest selection of audio books on the planet, and now with audible originals, the selection has gotten even more custom with content made for members. Honorable members can choose three titles every month one audiobook and to audible originals you can't hear anywhere else. Audible members also get access to exclusive audio fitness programs to start the new year off on the right foot. Go to audible dot com slash Liz, Sarah or texts Liz Sarah to five. Zero zero five zero zero and listen for a change. That's audible dot com slash Liz, Sarah with an h or text Liz, Sarah two five zero zero five zero zero and listen for a change. Okay. Liz now, it's time for our segment the mail room in which we answer a listener question about the entertainment industry, and we've gotten a couple of questions about ratings recently, which we appreciate Lauren wrote in and asked, hey, y'all love the show, I'm super excited for the fix. So are we However, I literally never watch live TV? Does it still count for ratings? If I watch it within twenty four hours on Hulu. And then we also got an anonymous question question is I have set up my DVR for the fixed? But then was thinking that might be better for the show's ratings to watch it live doesn't matter when we watch for our view to count in the ratings. I am not in Nielsen family, but wanna help as much as I can. Well, first of all, thank you. Thank you. Yes. We appreciate that. And we honestly weren't really sure ourselves how ratings works. So we've put in a call to the network and found an answer. Which is basically that ratings that come out the next day only include live, well, come out the next day and the live plus three in live, plus seven numbers that are all important now, they only include live viewing DVR viewing and video on demand. Playback from your cable provider. Right Hulu, and streaming those reported separately through something called multi-platform ratings and those come out like a week later, and they also don't really count. It. Sounds like right. They're not really taken into consideration. Yeah. As for whether it's better to watch live or on DVR. I think if you're not a Nielsen family, it's probably better to watch on DVR because all the DVR numbers count count. Yes. Right. Yeah. Now, if you're approaching the strategically, I think the best thing to do would be to watch it on DVR. But like that night or the next morning, right? So that it counts as same day viewing. Oh, that's because I believe all the DVR's counted. Whereas if you're watching live only Nielsen families or counted, oh, that makes sense not that we want to discourage you from watching it live because it's so fun to watch live. But I think that would be best also feel free to watch live. And then why it's really good you'll in at least twice so the shows already aired. So we have the overnight ratings already, but in terms of live plus three live plus seven. If you have a DVR, go ahead and watch it those numbers will count and watch it a lot. Thank you, all for caring. Yes. Do we really do? Okay. Sarah. It's time for take a hike in which we talk about mental physical or spiritual health and today, it's mental health. It'll decluttering you have been doing this. I have I did Gretchen HS twenty one day. Outer order challenge, which she did right before her book. Outer order in our calm came out. Yes. Which we recommend to everybody scoring right book. It is really good. And basically, it's about unsubscribe ING from emails like I would wake up in the morning and get like a hundred or more emails that are just like crap. I don't want, and you know, delete, delete, delete, delete, delete, delete delete. And it takes time and it takes energy. And then over the course of the day, you get more. So as part of the outer order challenge, I unsubscribe from all of these emails, and it really like is kind of like. Life-changing? Well, here's what I don't get. Because I went through this at one point. I said lemme unsubscribe from all these emails, I unsubscribe to probably twenty different companies, and yet I still continued to get emails from them. And so I just gave up and said, okay, forget it. I became convinced. I was actually making it worse by trying to unsubscribe. Okay. Well, here's what I would say. I think many companies first of all it takes time to get off the list, it could take a day or a week or whatever, but many companies have multiple lists. So I don't know if this is the case with J crew, but I'm going to use them as an example, they have their sale list. They have their other list. They have their new items have their kids list. They have it. Right. Exactly. So you have to be kind of tenacious about it and stick with it over several days, maybe even a week or two weeks to kind of really get off of all of the lists. Okay. It really does make a difference. It's so. Nice now, just like only have the emails that I want to get back into it. And I'll let you know if I have more success this time, you can do it. No way. Are you also like deleting apps or you decluttering your phone? Yes. I have been decluttering. My phone deleting apps that Idaho us or don't want and sort of trying to organize them more in folders because I have a ton of apps. I don't know why. But I just that's I accumulate urine over buyer which goes to a wrapping exactly not by. I'm definitely overact. So I'm working on it. Okay. Sarah. You're inspiring me. I'm gonna try to declutter my phone. I like the idea of making folders for apps like I could have a folder with all of Jack's apps. Those drive me nuts. I've got like fifteen of his games on my phone. Right. So I'll report back to you. How I do. Coming up. We'll call one of the best and most prolific TV writers we've ever known to discuss her intense Hollywood hack, but I the spray. Liz, you have shared with our listeners that you're kind of word of the year is the number six because you want to be a size six this year. That is right, Sarah. And I am getting there. I mean, I'm not there. But I'm on the way and new is really helping me I have lost over ten pounds with the help of NUM NUM is weight loss in the palm of your hand. Literally, it's on your phone whenever and wherever you need it because we're all strapped for time. But Neum just asks you to commit to ten minutes a day to you with Neum, you'll have personalized training and your own support team for less than the price of a single appointment with a nutritionist or personal trainer. And I will say the food tracking is the easiest one. I have ever used Neum is designed for results it's out with the old habits in with the new sign up for your trial today at noon and O M dot com slash Hollywood. What do you have to lose? Visit Neum dot com slash Hollywood. To start your trial today. Again, that's Neum dot com slash Hollywood. Start losing weight for good. And now it's time for this week's Hollywood hack. We're phoning a friend for this one Jane Espen soon, we met Jane when we worked on angel and she was a writer on Buffy. Her credits include once upon a time and battle star galactica among many, many, many others. Jane has written on everything she also wrote the famous golden crown seen season one of game of thrones. And if you don't know what that is. And you're not a game of thrones fan. Exactly. She is a genius. She really is one of the best writers, we know or know of. Yeah. And she has genius hack. Mary. Will you try Jane? Yep. One second. Hello. Hi, jay. Hi, good to speak to you guys. Thank you so much for coming on happier. In Hollywood, the talk about your incredible hack, which we've known about for years and used for our own purposes, which is your Twitter writing sprint. Will you? Explain what that is yet. It's a little motivational tool that I came up with for myself and realized like, oh, this can be like dispersed. So I just when I know I need to work, particularly if I've been putting off writing as you know, that's easy to do. Yes. And I know I could get a lot done if I just had one focused our where I didn't do anything else and it occurred to me if I go on Twitter and say, I'm gonna do this. That'll hold me to it. Then I can't tweet for that our right because people with see me breaking the rules. And I thought even better. Why don't I stay everybody else jump in? If you want to and people love it. You never have an hour anymore. You're only doing one thing. Yes. And I love that. You always say I'll just read one of your tweets, I'm doing a writing sprint one hour of totally focused work on one task jump in with your own task. If you had like doesn't have to be writing are you in? And so I loved that. It doesn't have to be right. Yeah. Yeah. That I sort of figured out early on. Because a lot of people were asking. What can I edit can I knit can I clean my apartment and as the? Yeah, these are all awesome things to do those things. Right. It's a sprint of whatever you want to sprint it. I love the idea of a of a knitting sprint. Yeah. A lot of people make their own Christmas gifts and stuff. And it's it's in it anything you do for fun can be turned into a chore when you've got to get it done in a time period. And so it I think I'm amazed at what people come up with to sprint, and I should mention sometimes you go in for another. You'll be like, okay. I'm doing another hour who's with me. Yeah. Because that's actually how the sprint is supposed to work is that you promise yourself. Okay. I can do this for an hour because it's only an hour and at the end I can stop. But ideally after you've been working for an hour writing for an hour. You wanna keep going because now you're in the task. So it it I dearly that is just the first hour of several nice. And Jane, how many people do this with you? Do you do you get a sense of it from Twitter early on? I did because I would get a couple dozen people going. I'm in I'm in I'm in and now people have realized like, well, they can just jump in without saying. You're not gonna check. Right. I'm not gonna check. There's no way to know. But I I assume I'm still getting the same number of people. Maybe not maybe maybe it's fallen to the three or four who. Now, stay. No, I'm I think you have dozens. To do it. We don't say I'm in. We just do it. Yeah. I see that you have a writing sprint. I feel pressure. I'm like, oh my God Jane's writing I should be writing or doing something for -ducted at actually makes me want to do something. I'm going to ask a question that's gonna make me feel like a bad writer. But when you do these sprints because you're fast like how much can you in a sprint? Oh, it entirely depends. If there's scene that's just fighting back. I'll I may do is get a structure for the shape this scene should have. But if I've got you know, how we do in TV, you tend to go in with a really detailed outline, you know, you can do an act. It's amazing. What you can do in an hour. You can do it. I don't know if I can do an act but other day not realize that pain s Benson is like fingers. Fly frames speeding along. When it comes to dialogue AM when it comes to structure, I second guess everything. I have no confidence in myself with structure. So that's what I'm saying. If I'm structuring thing. I don't get much done. But if I'm writing, and the fact that, you know, it's only for an hour for some reason that's jet fuel like you can just go so much faster. If you know, I gotta get a bunch done in one hour. That's have Ma everybody needs to follow Jane on Twitter at Jane Espersen and take part in these sprints. So Jane, hopefully, our listeners will now sprint with you. Oh, that's awesome. Yeah. And don't feel like you have to say I'm in on in. Jane? Thank you so much for calling in. Thanks to talk to you. Yeah. You too. Thank you so much. And now it's time for this week celebrity citing this was a fun one. Yes, we saw Jennifer aka Pam from the office who we spoke to about her book the actors life survival guide at episode twenty-seven. We were hiking as we mentioned we've been hiding alive, and we were on the trail. And I I never see people you always see them. But I said there's Jenna Fisher. And she was wearing a birthday crown. So she stood out. She was behind us by the time. It was her. And we were like, oh, and we didn't say hi because we didn't want to bother her. Then the funny thing was we went to the office, and you looked on Instagram, and she had posted a picture of herself with her hiking friend who happened to be Angela Kinsey from the office. Yes. Who played Angela and their best friends. In real life. So it was just funny. We saw it was like this real time thing where we saw them. And then we saw them on Instagram and I saw the birthday crowns. So I knew that it was just taken. So that was super fun. Yeah. She's awesome. And of course, everyone must read the actors life. If you're free to field if you're moving to LA, it's so damn good. It is. And that's it for this episode of happier in Hollywood Email us or send us a voice memo through happier in Hollywood at g mail dot com. Thanks for listening, and please subscribe. If you haven't already very special, thanks to Jane Espen, Susan for talking to us today. You can follow her on Twitter at Jane Espersen to join in on the writings sprints things to our executive producer, the amazing Chuck Reed and to Jose out Kantar. Did I say that right? Yeah. For filling in for Chuck today and to everyone at Saint cola sound you can follow them on Instagram at central. Sound thanks to everyone at cadence. Thirteen. Thank you to our assistant, the good witch, Mary merkin. And as always thank you to Gretchen Rubin, happier in Hollywood is part of the onward project. Get in touch I'm on Instagram at loose craft and Sarah is at s Fain. The also have a Facebook group. Search for happier in Hollywood on Facebook to join the conversation until next week. I'm Sarah Fain, and I'm Liz crafts, thanks for joining us. It's a fun job. And we enjoy it. So Jane, I have to note when you did that the golden crown melting head seen on game of thrones was that during a sprint. I had I invented the sprints yet. I'm not sure I adds someone who knows the timelines should be able to. But it might have been, but that you know, that was in the novel. So that was much more transcription creation. Well, I'll say is that I think is one of the best scenes of television ever. Oh my God. I couldn't believe that they assigned me the chunk of that book that had a collie seat and the horse heart, and oh my good. Golden crown like, I get you to a freelancer. Well, not just any freelance the best. Are you guys are the best? Awesome. Okay. Jay. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you guys talk too soon. Bye. From the onward project.

Hollywood Liz Sarah Sarah Fain writer Jane Twitter Jane Espen Los Angeles Instagram Facebook Mary merkin Liz Jane Espersen jay Joshua Becker Lincoln baseball partner Hulu New York
A Star is Born (1954) Ep. 30

Classic Movie Musts

28:07 min | 2 years ago

A Star is Born (1954) Ep. 30

"I'm max Baril. And this is classic movie musts where every week we breakdown a classic movie while looking to provide artistic insight and historical context at the very least. We'll talk about what makes these movies classics. Classic movie Musk's releases every Friday ready to complement your weekend movie, viewing plans classic movie musts is supported by listeners like you. If you want to help support the show, I thank you so much and second head on over to patriots dot com slash classic movie. Musts every patriot subscriber earns cool perks and ways to engage with the show, including the opportunity to vote every month on a movie they like to hear discussed on the show. All it takes is one dollars per month. A huge thank you to our current patriot subscribers you make this show possible. You can read about all our support tears and the rewards over at patriot. Dot com slash classic movie. Musts thank you for joining me this week as we discuss the nineteen fifty four musical drama. A star is born in this episode will do a deep dive on the power of Judy Garland's, performance and persona in our feature. Presentation will hear about the tension between Warner Brothers, and George q core that ultimately changed the final cut of the film in our buzz from the back lot segment, but first let's get into this week's opening credits. Our film. This week is a star is born a star is born was directed by George q core and was released in nineteen fifty four stars born stars, Judy Garland and James Mason for your streaming ease. A star is born is available for streaming rental on items Amazon YouTube and Google play Esther Blodget played by Judy Garland is a talented aspiring singer with a band and Norman main played by James Mason is a former matinee idol with a career in the early stages of decline when he arrives intoxicated at a function at the Shrine Auditorium. The studio publicist Matt Libby attempts to keep him away from reporters after an angry exchange. Norman Russia's away and bursts on stage where an orchestra is performing Blodget takes him by the hand and pretends he is part of her act thereby turning potentially embarrassing and disruptive moment into an upper. Unity for the audience to greet Norman with applause, realizing that Esther has saved him from public humiliation. Norman, thanks her. And then later watches her perform in an after hours club while recognizing her impressive singing talent, he urges her to follow her dream and convinces her she can break into the movies Esther surprised that someone of Norman's stature see something special in her, and he offers her screen test Esther decides to quit the band and pursue acting studio. Head Oliver Niles believes Esther is just a passing fancy for the actor, but casts her in a small film role the studio arbitrarily changes her name to Vicki LeicesteR, which she finds out when she tries to pick up her paycheck. When Norman finally gets Niles to hear Vicki Singh. He is impressed, and she is cast in an important musical film, making her a huge success her relationship. With Norman flourishes, and they soon get married as Vicki's career continues to skyrocket. Norman studio contract. It's cancelled. And he finds himself emotionally going downhill fast with his alcoholism beginning to rage. Norman arrives late and drunk in the middle of Vicki's. Oscar acceptance speech, he interrupts her speech rambling and begging for work from the assembled an embarrassed. Hollywood community Vicky continues her meteoric rise at the studio and tells all of that Norman has entered a sanitarium after supporting him for so long. She worries about the effect of Norman's alcoholism on her while also acknowledging that he's trying very hard to overcome his addiction Niles amenable to offering Norman work adjuster for which Vicki is truly grateful thinking this may be just the boost. Her husband needs wants out of the sanitarium. Norman runs into the studio publicist. Matt Libby who? Him and accuses him of living Vicki's earnings, the resulting fight prompts the actor to go on a drinking binge. He's eventually arrested for being drunk and disorderly Vicki bails him out and brings him home where they are joined by Niles Norman goes to bed but over here's Vicky telling Niles she will give up her career to take care of him. He also here's Nile say that Norman ruined his own career with his drinking finally realizing what he's done to himself. Vicki his career and the people around him. Norman leaves his bed tells Vicki cheerfully that he is going to go for a swim and walks into the ocean, drowning himself despondent Vicky becomes a recluse and refuses to see anyone finally her old bandmate, Danny convinces her. She needs to attend a charity function because she constitutes the only good work Norman ever did. And which he died trying to save back at the Shrine Auditorium. When vicky. Arrives on stage. The MC tells hurt the event is being broadcast worldwide and asked her to say a few words to our fans. She says Hello everybody. This is MRs Norman Maine, which prompts the crowd into a standing ovation. The budget for a star is born was five million dollars. And it brought in six point one million at the box office adjusted for inflation budget of almost forty seven million dollars and a box office hall of just over fifty seven million. Now, I just wanna look at you again because it's time for our feature presentation. A star is born is a film about the cyclical nature of Hollywood and stardom. It's all the more appropriate that this story has been made and remade. I as what price Hollywood in nineteen thirty two. And then as a star is born in nineteen thirty seven nineteen fifty four nineteen seventy six and now two thousand eighteen so what makes the nineteen fifty four version of a star is born a classic movie must it's a film that embraces the two key themes of the story down to its very core. Both cyclic structures and start him. And then exudes these qualities through every cinematic technique at George to Gore's disposal. Let's I examine the cyclical structure of the film, which manifests as a poetic recall system. And then we'll discuss stardom and how it pertains to Vicki, Lester and Judy Garland. Because there's no way around the fact that garland is the heart and soul of the Phil. It's immediately apparent when watching a star is born that this film deals with the harsh reality of Hollywood this film paints. Very clearly a picture whereby death breeds new life. And so on one star fades, another brightens and the dream factory. That is Hollywood keeps on churning George q core masterfully weaves this cyclical structure throughout the film. And it's what gives the film such poetic. Cadence take the beginning and the end both at the Shrine Auditorium at first with Esther Blodget on stage and Norman main terrorizing backstage and then at the end with MRs Norman Maine on stage and the memory of Norman haunting her soon after the opening performance Norman awakens in his bed possessed with the drive to find Esther. Similarly, he'll wakened from his drunken stupor at the end. With enu clarity that he must end his own life in order to save hers. His drunken interruption of her opening number is frustratingly reprised during her. Oscar acceptance speech Esther confesses, her desire to shampoo, her hair when confronted with a stressful situation and Norman reveals that he hits golf balls when he stressed no words required. When she finds his putter golf balls in the living room later in the film. The recall of his early words by his present actions is far more powerful. Then of course, there's beautiful romance. In Norman saying I just wanted to look at you again to Esther, and then there's tragic heartbreak of him saying it again when he knows it'll be for the last time, and then when Esther decides to take Norman up on his offer to do a screen test. She declares her purpose at sunrise the sunsets. As Norman enters the ocean to drown himself. These cyclical structures are at. Visual peak when Esther goes to the publicity office to find herself bounced from person to person office to office only to find herself right where she began and then locked in a turnstile the cycle cannot be broken. Equally affecting is the ironic insight of director, George q-car who in two decades, N G M never directed a musical cue core like all directory all masters is a master of frames. Those frames present a visual counterpoint between the central subject and the world surrounding her Q. Core keeps human personality at the center of his frame, but builds historical psychological or economic commentary around it with revealing decor, his shots of single faces are usually two shots of visual conversations between the figure and the visual world, his two shots of literal conversations are metaphor three shots of two. People within one world the coming of the wide screen in the case of a star is born through vista. Vision was a boon for q core providing even larger frames for visual counterpoint s-. While cuchara always preferred lengthy takes to sustain performance why'd screen formats allowed him to sustain them even longer shooting whole scenes an entire musical numbers without a cut the lengths of the frame allow our observation of framed ironies about which the characters are themselves ignorant. A star is born is as much about the wide screen as it is in the wide screen. It is also about the small screen though, yet another commentary on the rise and fall of everything Hollywood television is both seen and heard in a star is born in careful juxtaposition to the wide screen of the film itself. One example is the key scene went studio. Head Oliver Niles. Informs Norman that the studio will not renew his contract the conversation takes place at night during a party enormous house where guests have a symbol to watch Norman's latest. And as it turns out last film directly behind the conversing figures is Norman's extensive gun collection. This conversation with all of her. We'll be fatal for Norman. Although his suicide will not use one of these guns cuchara is to settle for that they suggest both danger and fatality. The key Lester will play the film's climactic scene when she decides to appear in public again after Norman's death in front of these same guns ending the burial that began with this conversation between Oliver and Norman and the guns, but there is more in this conversational image than the guns behind them at the far left of q. Cores wide frame is a flickering black and white television screen both tiny compared to the film's wide-screen and monochromatic. Compared to the film's color, but that drab little frame has great power all of her himself has left the party to watch the fights on TV though, he produces movies. He can't escape TV at the far. Right. Of course frame is another flickering black and white image Norman's movie projected for his guests the conversation between Norman and Oliver takes place at the visual intersection of television and the movies. It's subject is their economic and historical intersection in nineteen fifty four Hollywood where Norman will lose his job, and ultimately his life Q core carefully construction image of reading from left to right, television, guns and movies. But does nothing so over with his camera as to tip his hand, the revealing objects are just there for the audience to read as they please other cure images of literal, and metaphor conversations stand out all over. A star is born several scenes occur outdoors on the terrace of Norman's beach house backed by its plate glass windows, as characters speak the windows, speak behind them reflecting the role of the surf there are a number of reasons for these pervasive reflections, the most obvious is that the rolling surf as motion to still pictures of conversations. The surf also turns out to be the extension and ally of Norman's gun collection for it is in the sea that Norman will end his life, but equally important the restless motion of surf reflects the restlessness of the characters in these scenes such consistent and the Matic motifs contribute. To making star is born the most dramatically powerful film musical of the decade cures framing. Also brings the musical numbers to life using the wide frames and long takes as performance spaces for garland to fill with her hypnotic vocal power. The man that got away amongst the most memorable of all garland songs is shot in a single take unedited and uninterrupted of garland surrounded by musicians. Strolling through their space filling it with her vocal trumpet in answer to their brass trumpets. Judy is the star dominating the frame her sight and song only occasionally punctuated by an instrument that pokes into her space. The scene is dominated by the sharp contrast of light for Judy and darkness for the musicians. Inky blue black and crisp white make for a dynamic image the scene conveys what Norman knows while watching her. Ester is already star. She's merely in need of public recognition, which brings us to a series of questions are stars born or made what does birth mean for a star aren't stars born with the artificial pack. Aging that gives them public life is the star of the film Esther Blodget or Vicki Lester was Francis. Gum a star. When Arthur freed I her or did she only become a star when MGM dubbed her Judy Garland and was Judy still star after Arthur freed fired her from MGM. Although a star is born with talent only packaging creates the public figure called star. The talent is born and the recognition is manufactured thus. Every star is born twice talent is born as Esther or Francis. And then package, Vicki Lester or Judy Garland, and sadly, the life of stardom also means to endure personal anguish, whether as MRs Norman, Maine or MRs Vincent Minnelli now that we're more deeply in the subject of stardom and Judy Garland. Let's examine the power Judy Garland brings to the film both in terms of her performance and her persona. A star is born a retro. Spectacle history of Judy Garland, a raw singer with a big heart and a big voice named Esther Blodget who could just as easily have been named Francis. Gum Garland's real birth. Name Esther becomes a star of film musicals named Vicky Lester or just as easily Judy Garland. Judy Garland's life was the basis for every performance. She ever gave good and bad. But it was Hollywood that provided her with her archetypal images. Dorothy, of course as well. As the tramp character created for Easter parade and the Sheik androgynous vamp of her get happy routine to understand Judy Garland will must try to understand Hollywood. After all the star is not only an actress the character. She plays are not only characters the characters of her films infect the star reciprocally the star herself infects these characters a star is born uses as source material. Not only. Garlands and GM career, but also events transpiring off the screen in the years since that career ended in about nineteen fifty events surrounding Judy Garland's break with MGM, including a suicide attempt gave away the lie to Garland's wholesome childlike persona for the first time the real facts of her life became known to the audience in the early nineteen fifties. Judy Garland's MGM image was demystified than mystified again through the agency of her comeback performance at the palace theatre in nineteen fifty one both these events the suicide attempt and the comeback formed the backdrop against which it's original audience perceived. A star is born within the film, broadly, speaking, Judy Garland's, real life exposure to the public is represented by Norman Maine, but her palace comeback is represented by Vicki Lester stars rise and stars fall. Judy Garland had already done. Both more than once the life of one-star praise. Parasitic on the decay of another Vicki, Lester can only devour Norman Maine, but stardom itself can only devour Vicki Lester, just as it did Judy Garland this sense of decay in counterpoint to Garland's soaring performance rooted in personal pain is one reason a star is born is so heart wrenching conveying. This point the strongest is Vicki's instantaneous switch from dressing room sorrow to on camera joy at the end of the lose that long face number which mirrors the shift garland made so often in her deepest periods of MGM misery this opposition between the death of the musical. And it's resurrection. Permeates the film at other levels as well. For example, the movement from Garland's first number gotta have me go with you to her second. The man that got away contrasts her old. Old MGM image with her new tragic image the opening number serves the function of exposing Norman's deterioration, but also provides continuity between Judy Garland's last MGM number get happy from summer stock in nineteen fifty and her first appearance on screen in a star is born the movement from the opening number two garland second the more conic number the man that got away parallels. The movement from Garland's MGM persona to exposure to the public singing becomes a means of expressing tragedy. Heartbreak and alienating the number incorporates Garland's new singing style with its history. Onic excess awkward gestures which would not have been tolerated at engine the motivation for the man that got away is almost entirely extra filming that is influenced by circumstances outside the movie itself. If one reads the film contextual. Alie the number appears out of place, a tragic ballad of enormous intensity coming before anything has happened in the Phil. If one reads, the number, however as an acknowledgement of Garland's MGM demystification its intensity seems far more understandable the same pattern of alternation between past and present occurs. In the to set pieces of a star is born both of which are parodies as well. As reminders of MGM musicals in their heyday, someone at last affectionately mocks MGM and the naive Aotea associated with garlands early career image. Then the born in a trunk musical sequence the long number within the film, we see Vicki Lester, making perpetuates gardens peak career MGM image yet undercuts the sentimentality by situating, the number within a mock MGM musical within the film itself. Born in a trunk also reprises. Garlands own career with references to her roots in vaudeville and to the palace theater act. Ultimately, the number doesn't perte Garland's persona as much as it sentimentalize is her the lengthy born in a trunk number turns these paradoxes of stars being into the big number about stardom in a film about stardom, a film within a film and impersonation within an impersonation the big number of the second act, which extends the performance power of the man that got away and answers the cinematic extravaganza of born in a trunk is somewhere. There's a someone the oddity of this number is that it could have been the big number of the fill in the vein of born in a trunk. It's the kind of big number that musicals typically turn into lush Ballet's. But it is merely a solo for garland or Vicky or Esther in her living room while describing the number. She is about to shoot at the studio. Vicki Lester, performs at for Norman at home and without cinematic adornment it does visualize the action. But in a totally different way than is typical. Judy Garland, transforms a single domestic room into an exotic everywhere all over the globe by playing imaginatively with the ordinary objects in this confined space. The number raises two questions why wasn't somewhere. There's a someone the traditional big number. And why is it in the film? If it's not this type of big number, the answers or garland, movies and performance, though, movies can take you all over the world. They can also transport you on the power of performing imagination. Judy Garland is a world in herself. And her performance creates a somewhere as rich as any art directors somewhere. There's a someone enacts the ideal movie for the ideal audience in the ideal theater, a total performance world of. Pure imagination for a single beloved audience. It's what makes this cynical film so filled with humanity. The film's final shot or a heavenly choir companies of the camera as it cranes further and further out from MRs Norman, Maine is perhaps the most mystifying shot of the musical genres. Most mystified star a star is born was nominated for six Academy Awards. Judy Garland was nominated for best. Actress James Mason was nominated for best actor the film was nominated for best art direction best costume design and best original song for the man that got away. And the film was also now a for best scoring of a musical picture. Now, it's time for our buzz from the back lot segment and this week. We have tension between studio and director the film was re edited several times premiering at one hundred eighty one minutes the studio Warner Brothers cut the film by thirty minutes despite the objections of director, George q and producer Sidney luffed. Judy Garland's husband at the time in nineteen eighty three all but five minutes of the cut footage was found and reinstated. But some footage had to be constructed using production stills in October nineteen fifty four after the film had opened and been reviewed. Harry Warner head of the studio's business side in New York decided the picture was too long. He ordered another half hour of cuts. So that exhibitors could get in one more showing per day by this time. George q court was in India, filming Bhawani junction. So he was unable to influence the reediting of the Phil. The cuts included an entire sequence in which Norman Esther lose touch with each other. While Norman is on location a comic scene of her getting sick on the way to her. First preview was also deleted along with to complete numbers. Here's what I'm here for the song Esther is recording. When Norman proposes to her and lose that long face the number. She does before and after she breaks down in her dressing room, the cuts represented most of the scenes that developed Norman and Esther's relationship to make matters worse. The studio melted the negative from the cut scenes to retrieve the film's, silver content. Word of the cuts hit the film press generated such a strong backlash against the film that attendance dropped precipitously as a result. Despite the film's promising opening it ended up as a financial disappointment. George q core offered Marlon Brando the role of Norman Maine on the set of Julius Caesar in nineteen Fifty-three. Why would you come to me? As Brando I'm in the prime of my life. If you're looking around for some actor to play an alcoholic has been he's sitting right over there. And he pointed at his co star, James Mason, who of course, got the part Groucho Marx called, Judy Garland. Not winning an Oscar for a star is born the biggest robbery since Brink's had a hopper later reported that her loss to Grace Kelly for the country. Girl was the result of the closest Oscar vote up until that time that didn't end in ties with just six votes, separating the two in any event. It was a heartbreak from which you never really recovered, and which has remained a matter of some controversy ever since however, Judy Garland did not attend the nineteen fifty five Academy Awards because she was in the hospital after giving birth to her third child and only son Joey left. That concludes our episode on a star is born I would love to hear what you think of this. Classic movie. Must feel free to tweet at movie must pod or E mail. Classic movie. Musts edgy mail dot com. You can listen to all our episodes on our website classic movie must dot com. Support the show and received cool perks like being able to vote on upcoming movies. At patriot dot com slash classic movie. Musts on the next episode. We're watching the doors day rock Hudson, romantic comedy, pillow talk pillow talk is available for streaming rental on itunes, Amazon YouTube and Google play for all the usual prices. Remember episodes release every Friday on all podcast services. They you so much for listening until the next episode keep up with your classics.

Niles Norman Judy Garland Norman Esther MRs Norman Maine Vicki Lester Hollywood Esther Blodget Vicky Lester MGM Vicki Norman Norman Russia Shrine Auditorium James Mason Norman George Matt Libby Warner Brothers Vicki LeicesteR Oliver Niles
Welcome to Hollywood Scandals

Political Scandals

38:51 min | 3 months ago

Welcome to Hollywood Scandals

"Hi listeners here's something released special and timely. It's the first episode of the podcast limited series. Hollywood scandals if you enjoy it tune in every monday for another infamous event in showbiz history. Just follow hollywood scandals. Free and only on spotify. Hi everyone here. On april twenty fifth. We're in for hollywood's biggest night of the year the ninety third annual academy awards steeped in tinseltown tradition. The oscars are a night of classic glamour. Stars walked the red carpet in their finest gowns and suits beneath all that sparkle. Hollywood has always had a seedy underbelly. In honor of the oscars par cast is put together. A special collection of ten episodes about the biggest scandals. In hollywood history will cover the hollywood madam who ran a celebrity sex ring the blacklisting of the hollywood ten and the mysterious death of natalie wood but before we dive into those infamous stories. We're going back to the original scandal. How hollywood got its start in this episode of the dark side of will explore. How hollywood was founded as a christian utopia and how the movie business came in to crush those dreams. Due to the graphic nature of this podcast listener discretion is advised this episode features discussions of drug use sexuality death and other adult content. We advise extreme caution for listeners. Under thirteen eighteen. Los angeles was a modest town of eleven thousand. People newly reachable by rail eight miles to the north northwest was largely undeveloped ranching area full of fruit trees and wild coyotes surrounded by stunning canyon views but the budding film industry had other plans and enterprising couple moved in setting up. Beautiful gritted streets and planting gardens. That would soon rival eden itself. They shared a dream of building a christian utopia for wealthy midwesterners away from the bustle of city life. There were to be stunning. Homes plentiful churches and absolutely no alcohol or debauchery of any kind but the budding film industry had other plans in just five years. That small plot of rural paradise was transformed from an upscale elite society to the hotbed of the working class. Film industry and with that change came sex scandals. Elaborate drug rings predatory cults and cold blooded murders but if you were to look upon the land that was to be hollywood that idea would have been impossible to see in fact. The founders of the small plot of land in southern california had a much different premise about. It's ideal us. Harvey wilcox was in his early fifties and looking for new beginnings with his twenty one year. Old wife. Diana harjo the recently wed pair was an excellent match in part due to their shared christian faith in staunch opposition to alcohol. Both were early and ardent adopters of prohibitionist ideals. Harvey was a real estate man and recognized his young wife talents embracing her as a partner in his career as well as in his home beyond that they shared a vision a vision of a utopia and like so many others in the nineteenth century. The couple looked west in one thousand. Nine hundred eighty. Three southern california had a unique combination of rugged nature and toon ity los angeles had a meagre population of eleven thousand and the santa fe railway would not reach the city for another two years meaning wealthy landowners and aspiring farmers could tap into the untapped potential of the vast undeveloped fertile land. For the wilcox's this could be the home of their perfect society. A place to build their dream when they first moved out west. The wilcox's purchased a home in the desirable figueroa district of los angeles. They had a son about a year later and all seemed to be bliss but then tragedy struck and perhaps changed the course of cultural history in eighteen. Eighty six the wilcox's eighteen month. Old son harry died. It was a devastating. Turn for the couple who thought they had a bright future. To look forward to grief-stricken harvey and data began to take long carriage. Rides in the wild canyons number of downtown los angeles led by harvey's stunning white racehorses duke and royal on their way to the canyons the couple pass through barely developed farmland dotted with patches of fig and apricot trees. The landscape was beautiful and the wilcox's were infatuated. It was a paradise but an untamed one ripe for cultivation and development so like so many others that would come to this land in the future. They began to dream harvey and diet a new it in their hearts. This was to be the home of their utopia. But their vision of an ideal society had a rigid and sinister undertone. Harvey data were staunchly religious. And as such they envisioned a community that banned both alcohol and non white non christian residence. This was actually part of a late. Nineteenth century trend many fundamentalist christians were breaking off from society to build commune's their own particular brand of beliefs. These could be relatively mundane or more dramatic and cult-like in their origins. No place had the combination of natural aesthetic beauty and open space to attract these commune's as california so on february first eighteen eighty seven she and harvey purchased roughly one hundred twenty acres approximately eight miles north of downtown los angeles virtually the middle of nowhere. Their goal was to turn the parcel into a retirement destination for wealthy christian midwesterners wanting to try their hand at hobby farming and land speculation harvey a wealthy upper class elitist plan to personally screen prospective buyers to keep out heathens non whites and those not polished enough for their dream society because the wilcox is owned the land they owned a city completely separate from los angeles that they could control however they saw fit but like any up and coming community. Their land needed a name in august. It came to data by chance train ride. She was returning from seeing relatives in ohio. When a wealthy passengers spoke of her own estate in illinois named hollywood data loved holly trees and further loved that a member of societies upper crust had already given the name to her estate to data it evoked. The dreamy exclusive luxury. They're utopia was meant to embody data suggested to harvey and they officially submitted the name to the county recorder in august of eighteen eighty seven harvey drew up a map of their new community along with perfect gritted street delineations and individual lamp plots. Hollywood was officially born. He indata pass the time by coming up with street. Names hoping this would also attract customers. Meanwhile they employed cheap laborers to help clear the dirt roads and plant hand some pepper trees on the edge of properties. These laborers were primarily chinese and mexican immigrants. The wilcox's only wanted white families to own their property but they had no problem employing the cheapest labor they could get in order to build their dream but just when things were going their way the economy took a steep downturn los angeles suffered a real estate crash in the late eighteen eighty s the bubble that had brought thousands out to california with dreams of real estate eventually left more realtors than land buyers the bubble burst and buyers grew scarce. This was a terrible loss for the wilcox's in eighteen eighty seven. They were forced to sell their own downtown home and refund money to buyers who were forced to pull out at the last second to their greater horror. The need to stay afloat financially forced them to lower their strict requirements on new residence. Even admitting a few people who openly drank they promised themselves would only be temporary. But this officially marked the beginning of hollywood's downward spiral into a town of excess. The couple tried to offset their bad luck by encouraging residents to hire top notch architects and plant beautiful eden gardens around their future homes they also accorded commercial developers hoping that upscale businesses would make hollywood more desirable slowly. They began to recover but disaster. Hit before they could truly get back on their feet. Harvey's health took a turn for the worse during these stressful times and on march nineteenth ninety one. At about sixty years old. He passed away data. Just twenty nine was now a widow with a house on the edge of an increasingly undesirable neighborhood and little financial means to speak of on top of that mounting water problems threatened hollywood's continued development with the city alternating between terrible floods and stark shortages. That summer a particularly awful drought dry. Data's well completely leaving her without safe drinking water. These conditions once again forced data to sell to undesirables leaving the young widow rather despondent that is until eighteen ninety four when data thought. Her luck was turning around at last that year. She married her second husband. Filo judson beverage. Filo was a good-looking wealthy son of a former governor. His family connections provided financial stability and aida and follows partnership as beverage and beverage real estate finally to return to building her utopia. It also helped that shortly after their marriage files father. The esteemed former governor john beverage of illinois moved to hollywood giving it the prestige necessary to attract wealthier more established clients. This continued in one thousand nine hundred when she successfully sold property to the communities. I true celebrity. Resident paul delong. Pray the so-called king of flowers delong. Pray was a famous french painter. Who is a smash hit with the more conservative residents. He was cultured. Foreign and painted tasteful florals as opposed to more popular nude paintings that were the talk of the art world delong praise presence alone sent property values skyrocketing data had struck gold development began to snowball and in nineteen o to the hollywood hotel opened. It was an instant success but also ultimately brought undue attention to the budding city. It began to be harder to control. Who was in. And out of hollywood with all the workers and tourists and the prohibitionist rules of the city. Were being broken more and more often much. Today does dismay. Her own husband was caught breaking the law when he tried to serve white wine. At an event hollywood hotel this began to sow a seed of discord between his rigid morals and follows more progressive outlook. This was exacerbated by the other headaches created from trying to run a city in the wet winter months the city was consistently flooding. Meanwhile wealthiest state owners refuse to put unsightly septic tanks and other sewage processing facilities on their land leading to a lack of adequate equipment and constant sewage. Backups all over town. Hollywood literally stunk and the only way to fix these problems was utilizing the resources and labor force of los angeles but that would mean being incorporated by the city and losing the autonomy that allowed hollywood to ban liquor and control who is allowed to live their votes began around nineteen o five on whether or not to join los angeles data who had literally created. Hollywood wasn't allowed to participate since women's suffrage would not pass for fifteen years then in nineteen zero seven. A new obstacle appeared that no one could have predicted. The movies arrived in los angeles next. Hollywood takes on a life of its own now back to the story in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight at the same time. That hollywood was falling victim to a real estate bubble bursting. Thomas edison patented an invention. That would change hollywood forever. Edison was a shrewd businessman who held or jointly held a record of one thousand ninety three patents across his lifetime. Edison didn't actually invent the motion picture camera himself however always looking to strengthen his prophets he commissioned a lab. Assistant named william kennedy. Laurie dickson to do it and dixon delivered in eighteen eighty eight. The camera was revolutionary and within ten years a burgeoning film industry had emerged in new jersey. The new industry was exciting but not without its challenges. Early film relied entirely on natural light meaning companies had to us open spaces and sunshine to get their shots even built elaborate moving platforms to track the sunlight as it moved throughout the day whenever there was poor weather or the sun went down. Production had to stop while this obstacle was utterly frustrating to filmmakers the medium was still wildly lucrative and there were always people willing to brave the elements to make a picture. Edison saw the rapidly growing industry as a way to make a fortune and as usual. He wanted to keep everything under his control. He went after anyone who tried to make. Additional cameras are equipment ensuring his products. Were the only ones on the market but his cameras were expensive. Only a few of the original film companies could afford them which suited these companies just fine. It meant a monopoly on the market thus in nineteen nine eight. These companies banded together to form the motion picture patents company or edison. Trust all of this culminated in a rash of illegal filmmaking around new york a creative industry that from its outset was lawless and extremely competitive as a result film companies and independent projects began outright sabotaging each other's productions fires on sets damaged cameras broken equipment actors getting roughed up by hired thugs were extremely common occurrences in the early movie scene. One of the most popular forms of this pointed subversion was for higher double agents to bring a loaded to set and shoot out the camera lens during filming. It was a ruthless kind of film on film crime producing stories wild enough to fuel writers imaginations and capture the attention of movie goers gangster stories quickly became popular and directors would cast gangsters to play fake gangsters on screen. This made the performances convincing if unconventional but with such a potent integration with the criminal underworld police intervention was inevitable and they would regularly arrest filmmakers and shutdown productions. This was the anarchy of the early film industry threats sabotage and violence gangsters and thugs all in the name of the newest form of art. It was chaos what was worse. The motion picture patents company discouraged feature length products outside financing and other natural growths in the film industry upsetting even the filmmakers who bought into the system. Those who really wanted to make their mark in movies realized they were going to have to get out of new york and new jersey to do so in those days. The post was slow and travel was difficult. The best way to run from the law was to head as far away from it as possible for that reason. Many illegal filmmakers started migrating west to southern california besides being far from the law and the reign of the mpp see southern california received three hundred to three hundred and fifty days of sunshine a year new york city by contrast got a maximum of about two hundred severely limiting film production coming from the loud dirty populated streets of new york. Southern california felt like paradise. There was almost no change. Between summer and winter the landscape offered ocean beaches deserts rocky canyons snowy mountaintops and grassy plains all within a day's drive. The filmmaker soon realized they were home. Much like data wilcox. They had found their eden but just as had happened in new york and new jersey. Legal authorities soon came collecting remember just because they had left the east coast didn't mean they were free from edison's patents and private. Detectives were more than thrill to chase the movies. West director allan dwan was not entirely shocked when a well dressed. Private detective showed up on set in the early. Nineteen hundreds hoping to shut down allen's production and collect reward money back east allen. New thugs like this meant business. But he wasn't going to give up his life's work. He led the detective up to an arroyo or small creek bed which was full of used tin cans from set. The detective pulled out a firearm and warned allen menacingly. We want you to get out of town immediately. Quit making pictures. Just forget about it to prove his point. The detective fired into the arroyo. Missed every canny shot at but the can still dance dramatically. But doin was prepared calmly. He pulled out his own firearm. Alan fired three cans from fifty feet away and hit each straight through the middle. He looked the detective in the eye and asked. Do you want to try that again. Thoroughly spooked the detective ran off straight into the three mounted morrison brothers and their winchester. Rifles these real-life cowboys were extras on the film and hired security. The morrison brothers roughed up the detective enough that he left town and alan here from the agency again. Of course this story was too good to pass up. Within a year allen's company made a film based on the experience with embellishments of course anything for entertainment. This situation was typical at the time. Filmmaking was not for the faint of heart bodily harm was almost a given and between the hired gangsters. an unsafe. Stunts movie says were downright dangerous. Anyone interested in making movies had to be ready to literally cracks goals but despite the danger more and more people move to california in the early nineteen hundreds smaller film companies set up in remote areas giving them plenty of room to build sets and film the landscape the more legitimate companies settled in the cities where equipment and cheap labor were more readily available hopeful actors and extras began coming to the city for work given a quarter to a third of all filmmaking in the early nineteen hundreds was independent and therefore illegal there was a large market interested in operating far far away from edison and his patents. What was more the ninth circuit court of appeals which oversees california to this day was not particularly interested in enforcing patent laws adding a layer of protection to filmmakers and in the unlikely event. A case was upheld in a court of law. It was only a few hundred miles to the mexican border so long as your equipment passed over with you. It couldn't be seized. So southern california became the mecca for movies in nineteen zero seven. The first film studio opened in downtown los angeles while filmmakers were initially content to shoot their pictures on studio stages filmmakers soon wanted a variety of backgrounds and less crowded areas to film mainly hollywood unfortunately for data wilcox. There was easy public transportation between los angeles and hollywood which allowed filmmakers and their crews to easily commute to hollywood during the day. Hollywood was after all only eight miles from downtown. The stunning garden of eden effect the data and the hollywood community had so carefully cultivated now attracted the very scoundrels vagrants. They wanted to keep out. It was no secret that hollywood residents immediately hated film people even calling their growing presence. An invasion their productions filled the peaceful streets with clanging yelling and general chaos to mention the presence of working class and minority people who these utopians detested several residents reported shock and dismay at opening their door to see to mounted cowboys galloping across their properties with a camera crew shouting running after them. These incidents became increasingly common. And there wasn't much the town could legally do about it. Shooting permits were unheard of at this time and the town could only govern what businesses were built inside city lines because the film crews showed up during the day but packed up and left at night. Hollywood's laws didn't apply to them as they were written. Well plenty of. The hollywood elite wanted to enact stricter laws and fight back against the influx of film professionals. They had more immediate problems there. Infrastructure hadn't been fixed and property values plummeting voting residents faced the difficult decision of keeping their independence while singing into further economic failure or joining los angeles to survive. They held on as long as they could. But in the fall of nineteen o nine finally voted to merge with the city. The vote passed and hollywood officially became los angeles's newest neighborhood and the vagabonds welcomed with open arms. Next hollywood becomes tinseltown and now back to the dark side of hollywood in one thousand nine hundred. Nine of haute passed to give up hollywood's legal autonomy in exchange for help with failing infrastructure financial woes an ever-worsening sewage problem. Now that hollywood was part of the city of los angeles. The alcohol ban was lifted as was the ban on movie studios. There was nothing data could do about it. She was forced to watch three decades of work crumble around her almost immediately future film tycoon. Cecil b demille purchased a nearly inaccessible shack in hollywood used expressly for filming within the year. He opened los. Angeles's second film studio. Demille would soon become deeply enamoured with hollywood. He constantly filmed they're bringing increasing numbers of film. Crew into the area actors flocked from all over the country to try their hand at these new motion pictures flooding the streets of hollywood and storming the gates of studios every morning in hopes of finding work with this abundance of new labour and new films came a rise in alcohol. Consumption drug use child labor and sex scandals all smack in the middle of hollywood and with the emergence of the movie industry in hollywood and los angeles so to came the things that always marked the silver screen dreams and broken dreams fame and idolization risks and rewards beyond the early twentieth centuries imagination. The dream that became tinseltown had captured. The country's imagination and the fundamentalist christians scattered around hollywood would soon be vastly. Outnumbered data live just long enough to see her city lost to darkness. She contracted cancer and died in nineteen fourteen less than a year later in nineteen fifteen. Hollywood release. the world's first feature length film the three hour epic birth of a nation. D w griffith had filmed parts of it in his hollywood studio. The film began with a disclaimer on screen quote. This is a historical presentation of the civil war and reconstruction period and is not meant to reflect on any race or people of today. The movies content was the exact opposite of this claim it unabashedly portrayed black people as the main reason for the problems in the south specifically during the antebellum and civil war periods in case the racism wasn't clear enough. The end of the movie showed the ku klux klan writing into heroically restore the south to it's perceived pre-civil war glory. The movie was a resounding success. Which meant it's racist and hateful. Rhetoric was seen all over the country and even abroad this empowered many racists across the country to begin speaking more boldly about their twisted beliefs. In fact birth of a nation is consistently credited with revitalizing the k. k. k. So much so that the k. k. k. literally used the film to train new recruits well into the nineteen seventies if not longer birth of a nation wasn't wildly out of place at the time though most viewers read it as historically accurate and the film skewed but emotional perspective made audiences feel justified in their beliefs. Plus the film was an incredible technological feat. No-one had seen a production. This expensive or long before and the sets and stunts were stunning. But the film did have critics. There were people outraged by its big stances and false understanding of the past. Unfortunately these voices were too small and too young to make an organized effort against the film for example the n. Double acp had just been formed a few years earlier in nineteen o nine and it was in no position to take on a cultural juggernaut. Historian david layer compares it to being the star wars of its time besides with no national laws film distribution. It was hard to go after more than a single theater or state at once and the studio was eager to show the film in as many places as possible feature films provided newer and bigger success opportunities for directors and performers alike and actors. Were often willing to do anything to keep their careers often. This meant sustaining onset injuries. These could be broken. Bones burns breathing. Problems from special effects or severe skin lacerations despite the medical industry knowing the dangers of opiates. Morphine and heroin. Were still the preferred painkillers of choice in the nineteen and even early nineteen twenty s. As a result injured actors would often become addicted to these hard drugs. Some fell into a cycle of addiction later. Becoming targets of newly formed drug rings others attempted to get off drugs by switching to alcohol which wasn't necessarily any better to famous cases of early drug scandals. Were wallace reid. And fatty arbuckle. Both were beloved. American performers read acted birth of a nation and had contracts extending well into the nineteen twenties for more work are buckle was the highest paid performer in hollywood surpassing. Even charlie chaplin read was given morphine to handle terrible injuries after a train crash because the morphine allowed him to keep working the studio look the other way as his addiction began to grow read shocked the nation when he overdosed on set in early. Nineteen twenty two. He died a year later from complications. He was the first of many drug related. Hollywood deaths are buckle also suffered an injury in the mid nineteen. Ten's his doctors put him on. Heroin are buckle successfully switched to alcohol but as a result became a well-known drunk the arbuckle scandal surpassed the read scandal in seriousness when our buckle was accused of drunkenly raping and murdering another famous actress. Virginia repay in one thousand nine hundred ninety one while he was ultimately acquitted public opinion toward the movies took an enormous hit which may have exacerbated an already growing problem as stories of scandal leaked out of los angeles. Many of the country's derelict began to see tinseltown. As a place where anything goes this was the exploitative environment that hollywood was founded on built upon an industry that was literally running from the law. The leaders of the film world were ruthless and tenacious in their methods which gave it a dangerous mystique that only helped the film industry grow at an explosive rate movie studios with huge stages popped up more and more frequently these stages left productions to the mercy of the weather sometimes equipment caught fire or crews had to rush to cover the cameras and props when a rare rain came in. There were no unions regulations. Yet and hopeful crew and actors had to show up at the studio gates in the mornings to try to get work but this rigid atmosphere contrasted the glitz and glamour. That was creeping. its way into the city. Hollywood had transformed into a premier destination for the rich and famous in addition to becoming the location of homes to stars such as buster keaton. Douglas maclean mary pickford. It became a major tourist attraction the hollywood hotel once an alcohol. Free local establishment was constantly full with guests and actors. Even visiting dignitaries wanted to see hollywood. As hollywood welcomed the roaring twenties the movie industry had completely taken over los angeles. But not everyone found hollywood as welcoming as they'd hoped with a growing population of movie. Hopefuls came a growing population of out of work actors. Many who had moved west to make it in film had their dreams dashed and felt increasingly isolated in a town void of family and friends looking for a surrogate family and a place to call home. Many became susceptible to the burgeoning number of colts popping up around the area. These were so prevalent that there were an estimated four hundred colts in los angeles in the nineteen twenties alone. Hollywood had become synonymous with fame and power drawing ambitious crooks from around the country who were only too happy to get a fresh start out with just. This was in part because a. was growing so rapidly. Eleven thousand people in eighteen eighty became one hundred thousand people in one thousand nine hundred. That number rose to five hundred. Seventy five thousand people in nineteen twenty and a whopping one point. Two million people in nineteen thirty. This man los angeles went from the thirty sixth populous city in the united states in nineteen hundred to the fifth in nineteen thirty. Not all of that growth was good. The rise of show business led to the systemic exploitation of women children and minorities meanwhile countless budding actors threw away their life. Savings to make it in showbiz only to end up destitute. The great depression hit at the end of the twenties. Sending even more hopefuls spiraling out of work former actresses often sought burlesque and sex work to pay the bills. Meanwhile newly enacted federal codes clamp down on the moral purity of onscreen stories while the scandals murders and drug deaths kept piling up in the tabloids. It's hard to believe that in nineteen thirty hollywood was completely unrecognisable from either the open canyon pastures of the eighteen eighties or the wilcox's conservative. Al hawl free. Utopia of nineteen hundred hollywood's bright lights and allure of a better life would continue attracting dreamers for the next one hundred years and beyond and the hollywood machine would keep crushing then may blackburn was not the last mother to try to use her daughter to gain a fortune. And fatty are buckle and wallace reid. We're not the only drug alcohol or murder cases to come out of hollywood. There were scandals to come. That hadn't even been dreamt of from drug rings to terrifying stage mothers to cults with all that light and glamour. The shadows just kept getting darker. Thanks for listening. If you enjoyed this episode follow the dark side of for free on spotify to hear more and be sure to check out the next episode in our collection the story of the downfall of fatty arbuckle which became known as hollywood's first scandal. Hollywood scandals is a spotify original from par cast. It is executive produced by max cutler. This collection was written and developed by chelsea would and writing assistance from kate. Gallagher production assistants by aaron larson and ron shapiro. Fact checking by haley milliken and hosted by carter roy. This episode of hollywood scandals comes from the dark side of hosted by kate. Leonard and richard. Rosner and written by taylor cleland sound designed by ron shapiro with production assistance by carleen madden and nagy admire. Remember to check out the new spotify original from podcast hollywood's scandals every monday discover the real life dramas of some of entertainment's biggest names. Listen to hollywood scandals free and only on spotify.

hollywood wilcox los angeles Hollywood harvey california Harvey north northwest oscars Harvey wilcox Diana harjo wild canyons holly trees harvey drew Filo judson allen john beverage paul delong
BONUS Episode: To Celebrate Our Fifth Anniversary, A Blast from the Past! Listen to Our Very First Episode.

Happier with Gretchen Rubin

27:15 min | 1 year ago

BONUS Episode: To Celebrate Our Fifth Anniversary, A Blast from the Past! Listen to Our Very First Episode.

"Elizabeth you may remember that for Christmas. I gave Jamie a Thera Gun. Yes yes so. Thera gun is a handheld per cussing therapy device that releases your deepest muscle tension using scientifically calibrated combination of depth speed and power. I gave this to Jamie because he and then also me. It's one of these. I could use it to yes. We get things back things. Lower back things with our muscles and I just wanted to Thera- gun because I thought this is going to be the thing that will just let us get to those muscles. Loosen up those muscles so much more easily. Feel better naturally. Treat your pain and get back to your life. Try Thera Gun. Risk free for thirty days or your money back by going to Thera gun dot com slash happier for a limited time our listeners get a free charging stand with purchase a seventy nine dollars value. That's there a gun dot com slash. Happier thera- gun dot com slash happier okay listeners. We've promised you eight zone episode of our very first episode from five years ago Elizabeth. Are you ready? We're going to replay that first episode. It's hard to believe that it's been five years like a whole half day. That'd been doing happier and when I just listened to it. It sounds like I have a gun semi I literally check the speed of my player to see if I had accidentally switched to house seen because I thought we both ends like we were speaking so slowly. What was going I know and Gretchen? Doing the show would take so much out of we'd record than we talk on the phone about it and then we'd be like white out for the rest of the day just rained every ounce of strength and I mean it took us a to build up more stamina. Yes it absolutely did and then one fun thing Gretchen. Is that the first time we recorded this? We each did a gold star and we each did a demerit. Yeah and we decided okay. That's just too long. So are so one of them got cut from both of us for this first episode and. I remember that my merit was going to be watching three hours of the bachelor. And can I tell you last night? There were three hours of the bachelor and I watched so. I have not come very far on my bachelor viewing in five years. Well that's the thing is you go back to the first episode and you see that so many things that we talk about the very first episode like the one minute will end up being major themes in the podcast for years to come also in my work. I talked about order intercom in that. Very first episode. I had no idea I would go under a book about Order Intercom. It's funny to see how many things kind of were at their most nascent stages in first episode coming up after this break we will play the first episode of happier with Gretchen. Rubin Grove collaborative is the online marketplace and delivers all natural home. Beauty and personal care products directly to you grove takes the guesswork out of going green every grove dot. Co Product is guaranteed to be good for you your family your home and the planet. So you can save time reading confusing labels grudge. I love it because it comes to your door every month. And so just makes it easy And you know I like anything. That's easy and they usually smell good. Which is a bonus for a limited time when our listeners go to grove dot co slash happier. You'll get a free five piece cleaning. Set FROM MRS Myers and Grove. A THIRTY DOLLAR VALUE GO TO GROVE DOT CO slash happier to get this exclusive cleaning offer. G. R. O. V. E. DOT CO slash happier. Hello and welcome to happier. A podcast that gives you strategies and tips for how to build happier habits into your daily life. We discussed cutting edge science wisdom of the ages lessons from pop culture and our own experiences. I'm Kristen Ruben. A writer who studied happiness and good habit. I'm in New York City and with me is my sister of the Sage Elizabeth Craft who's my happiness Guinea pig and question her. That's me Elizabeth Craft TV writer and producer living in. La and Gretchen. Makes me happier even if it's against my will this week? We'll talk about the one minute rule as a habit that helps to keep clutter under control whether you're a satisfied or maximize her when making decisions and how to avoid a common happiness stumbling block. We'll also answer a listener question and reveal our happiness fails and gold stars for the week. We're going to start with the suggestion. You can try at home something small and manageable. They'll actually make a difference about how you feel each day and our first try. This at home tip is the one minute rule. One minute role is exactly what it sounds like. If you have a task that can be done in less than one minute. Do it without delay and this has been so helpful for me because I realized that if I just hang up my coat instead of dumping it on a chair if I rip open a letter and read it and throw away if I answer an email that you know is a one word answer without postponing it. Then there's little things don't become the scum on the surface of life. I mean a friend of mine told me that her apartment went from being a total wreck to being quite tidy without much effort and another friend said his productivity shut up because when he got rid of all those little things that he felt like he can do the bigger things. Yeah I mean for me. I have to say your one minute. Role has actually improved my mayor. Aw because as you know. I'm extremely messy. If left to my own voice I will say in your defense. You're not dirty. You're just messy. Well thank you whereas Adam. My husband is very neat. If you go into his closet all the shirts are together. You know all the pants. Everything's perfectly arranged and one of the things that we used to fight a battle lot was me being messy and so once. I instituted this one minute rule. I started putting dishes in the dishwasher. Putting in laundry changing the laundry scooping up that huge pile of clothes. That accumulates next to my bed every week And so it. Has You know relieve some that tension. Although if you asked him he would probably could do much much better. But it's something is the thing that's nice about it is that it's it's small and it's like you don't have to you know spend the entire weekend cleaning out your closet. You don't have to take like a week of your vacation time to deal with the garage. Is this something that you fit into like the little bits of your day like you know you've got one minute before you have to head out the door and you know you've got your keys in your hand and you're just like okay. I can just do one thing and so that stuff gets done without a lot of effort it just it. It's it's not hard to work it into your daily routine. Yeah and I think each of these things as an accomplishment of the day sort of builds up the the number of accomplishments per day. Well it's funny because so many people like whenever I talked to them about happiness. Something that's really surprising is how often people say that outer order contributes to inner calm really more than it should be like why does having like a messy kitchen counter or messy desk make you feel weighed down or like you have no creativity or no energy but over and over people say when you clear the services and get rid of stuff and put stuff away so you can find it. You get this weird surge of energy and tear like a sprinter. I cleaned up my fridge and now I know I can switch careers. I knew exactly what she meant. And if that's an illusion it's a helpful illusion. There's just something about doing that Taking that time that does make people feel like they're more in control. I definitely feel more in control. When you come to my house and clean out my closets for me I will give you that. That is my favorite thing to do Which is a nice quality in an older sister? Well let let us know if you do. Try this at home. And how the one-minute rule works for you. Crutches on Twitter Gretchen Rubin in I'm at Elizabeth Craft Connect on the Gretchen Rubin facebook page or drop us an email. Our email address is podcast at Gretchen. Rubin Dot Com elicit. Here's a question to help you know yourself better when it comes to making decisions or you a maximize her or a satisfied. Sir. What you? Maybe you should start by defining those words. I'm thinking a normal person probably has no idea what you're talking about hasn't been indoctrinated the way you have exactly so yes. These are real words and it has to do with how you make decisions. Maximize IRS WANNA make the maximum decision. They WANNA make the optimal decision if they're choosing a tent or an apartment or a pasta sauce. They want to make the best possible choice. Satisfies irs not a word. That's a combination of satisfying suffice or people who who they have. Certain criteria not criteria could be very high but once it's net. Then they move on. They don't have to feel like they have the best pasta sauce at the best price. They just have to feel like they have what they wanted. And what's interesting is that maximize irs are a lot less happy with their decisions. They have my regrets. They don't feel as good about their choices. They're anxious about it. So what do you think you are you more of a maximize or satisfied sir? I call myself a recovering maximize Zor. Oh yeah a lot of people are about. Yeah so you're recovering maximize. Yeah because I think I used to think I should be a maximize or partly because you know our mother who I call. The Martha Stewart of Kennedy is the ultimate maximize. She'll spend months looking. At fabric paint choices coffee table Christmas ornaments et Cetera et Cetera. Sheila and she's and she's got wonderful. Taste I. For instance years ago I moved into an apartment and I you used a cardboard box coffee table which is by the way. I just couldn't handle picking a coffee table. There were so many out there and of course everyone would make fun of me for this so I finally said to my writing partner. Sarah I just wish someone would buy me a coffee table. I wouldn't care what it was once I have it. I know that I won't ever think about it again but I can't commit right if it if you just had a coffee table that worked as a competent. That would be enough your criteria would be met. Yeah yes It was just the existential dilemma. Choosing it so Sarah being the good writing partner that she is for my birthday went to a thrift store and buy me and extremely ugly coffee table which I used for five years probably until I got married I will say in my defense that people will come to my apartment and sort of feel nostalgic for cardboard box. I think it made them feel good about themselves. But anyway to this point I mean I've had blank walls my whole life. Nothing on the walls again unless mom visited a put something on the wall. This is frustrating for my husband and I am trying an have. I think in recent years become more of a satisfied sir where I realize. It doesn't have to be the perfect art. It would just need something on the wall right. There's this great line from Voltaire where he says. Don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good and it's like don't let the desire for the perfect coffee table or the perfect painting mean that you get nothing because if you just satisfies You have the satisfaction of of of moving on research suggests that satisfies are happier. They're they're more contented with their decisions. They don't use so much time and energy They don't burn it up coming to this decision. They have less regret about the decisions. They've made and so really. It seems like for happiness. Satisfying is Is a better choice. Well I have to disagree on one point. Which is that our mom for example who I said is the ultimate maximize our. I think she really enjoys the process of making those decisions. She enjoys those our she spends so I think if you are a person who loves the journey of Choices. It's good to be maximized but for most of us who are just interested in the destination. It's better to be a satisfy Sir Right. I think that's a very good point for you and me. It's hard to imagine enjoying the journey but clearly others do all right in our next segment. We're going to talk about stumbling blocks. That's our name for the small seemingly innocuous things that get in our way when we're trying to make our lives happier healthier and more productive. Today's stumbling block is a loophole now. A loophole is when you're trying to keep some kind of good habit. But you've come up with a justification. Why just this once? You're off the hook that for some reason. Something doesn't count. And this loophole. I called the one coin loophole and it gets. Its name from a classical teaching story which is called the argument of the growing heap. And this this teaching story goes like this. Are you rich if you have ten coins? You'd say no if ten coins aren't enough what if you add one coin what if you add another point finally have to say that you can't be rich and less one coin can make you rich now. This has huge implications for habits because just as in the story one coin by one coin a person becomes rich. It's only by the addition of the one coin that eventually you get to the growing heap with a habit. It's only by one trip to the gym and one trip to the gym and one trip to the gym that you form the habit of going to the gym in that you get all the benefits of the riches that are going to come from going to the so. The one coin loophole is when you say well. What's one coin? One coin doesn't make a difference. So have you ever caught yourself? Invoking this loophole which is very true. I mean that's what's dangerous but it's very true. I I invoke it all over the place You know it is a great loophole. It works works every absolutely every single. Day You know the one. That's really really having trouble with it at the time at right now is You know I'm trying I. I won't say I'm trying. I'm writing a novel On the side and and that is something where you know. It's so easy to say. Well if I don't write a paragraph right now what does it matter? I have to write three hundred more pages of this thing. I'm on page four hour or it's GonNa take a year. What is what does it matter if I skipped day in a year exactly Whereas you know but I know that if I keep writing those paragraphs or if I write get up and write two pages at six. Am It's GONNA add up? And I'M GONNA get to page three hundred Now I will tell you that knowing that we were going to be discussing the coin. Loophole actually got me to work on my novel. Gal So because I didn't want you to bust me on it and so this week you are yes the ultimate happiness bully so it it worked But it's hard. It's it's easy to fall into that but it's just it's like you. You realize like the only way that you're actually doing something is doing any particular situation and I think this is. This is a problem because people will often shift. You know they they will decide well Today like yes. It's true that I wanNA spend all this time with my family and it's a really high priority for me but not today Because what's today? What differences today make? But it's only doing it today today today today that you build up. That's how you become rich. That's how you get something accomplished. It's also how you build stamina it out because I think a lot of the reason people don't do things at least for me is fear you know. I'm afraid my book is going to be terrible. That's why I don't want all right it right if I actually just do it it. It builds a muscle. And then you keep doing it and so like that's definitely true for the gym. It's such a good point too because it's like if you if you do something only rarely and it's a big production every time you do you want it to be good. You want it like well. I have today's writing has to go well today at the gym. I really push myself like everything has to be really quality but if you do it all the time it's like any particular one you're like well today was sort of lame but I'll keep doing it tomorrow. It takes the pressure off of it. But it's funny like sometimes people use this like as a weapon I. A friend of mine Lost like seventy pounds and And so she said Oh somebody in her office like us. The one coin loophole to undermine her she would say oh. You've been so good. What's One cupcake okay right? It's like well one cupcake cupcake by cupcake. I gained seventy pounds. Right and cupcake by cupcake. Lost it and so. It's so true that it's easy to invoke but it can quickly spiral out of control. Another way to reach us is to leave a voicemail question for me analyst at seven seven four two seven seven nine three three six or easier to remember seven seven happy three three six an upcoming shows. We'll be answering some of your questions but since this is episode one. We don't have any calls yet so instead we're answering a question. Posted to us from Gretchen. Facebook page. The question is does checking facebook. Make people feel happier and connected or more lonely and sad Could question good question. The funny thing for me is I'm not even on facebook and why not. Why if I deserve to answer this. But why have you made that choice? At the beginning it was because there were just hurting people in my past. I did not want to reach me or you know where I was. nothing dangerous just people. I didn't care to speak for that. There's no secret rhymes But you know over time I. It just seems so overwhelming. I see now why. Facebook is valuable because for instance. My husband is on it and he'll tell me something that a good friend of mine is doing such as moving to Italy that I have no idea about and you know. He'll know what her kids look like. I don't know because I haven't seen them for a year so I'm realizing that it's making me feel like I'm out of the loop and that I am not connected to people so I would like to join but I feel overwhelmed by jumping in now seems so late in the game. Well I think and that's why it makes people happier as I you know. Ancient Philosophers and contemporary scientists. Agree that if you had to say what is the secret to happiness. Probably the best answer is relationships so anything that helps people stay in touch to maintain. Relationships is something. That's probably going to make you happier but the thing about facebook. Is that like many things in life. It's an amplifier of human nature. It makes good things better and bad things worse. And so if you're the kind of person who really gets upset if you compare yourself to others or if you have relationships in the path you know a tendency to be kind of a slight stocker on you know there's things about it that can can amplify the negative as well as the positive and and it's interesting. There's a lot of research right now. Scientists are really interested in. What is it's affecting us. How is it making us happy or not? But I but I think just for most people in Everyday Life. I think your experience the one that really makes it a lot easier to stay in touch with people like everybody's so busy it's hard to like. Pick up the phone or make and anything that makes it easier. I think he just needs to remember. I know I will. Should I embark upon the facebook journey? Is that people present. I think a lot of people their fantasy selves and so that's next to all of these fantasy selves. You you can feel like your life is not measuring up right so I will definitely have to guard myself against that because I could spend a lotta time beating myself up over. You know the fact that I don't have a garden. You know growing my own vegetables that right right. The your kids aren't trilingual and all that different. Now that's a very good point. It's like you have to use it. It's like everything it's a it's a good servant and a bad master. Well if you'd like Gretchen and me to answer your question on a future show. Here's a number to call seven seven four two seven seven nine three three six. That's seven seven happy. Three three six to wrap up the show. Listen I are going to get even more personal I one of us is going to give ourselves happiness demerit from a steak. We made this week affected our happiness. Then we don't leave you on a down. No one of us will award a gold star to something or someone we think deserves to be recognized. You know you'd think that just like the average person would not have to make a big effort not to email While talking on the phone to the love of her life And this is something that I really have to make a special effort like do not email while I'm talking on the phone to Jamie and the you know the other day I was just I i. I'm sure you know when there's that pause because you know that they're trying to like slightly rewriting it and brain. And then he started answering his email I can hear him clattering away so there. We were both totally ignoring each other clattering keyboards and it wasn't like a companionable Nice. Like let's sit here together and answering the other. Is this like your sneaky. It's just so rude. I like okay but okay so we'll do better next time and I have to ask you though I can't help myself email. Are You emailing people? When I'm talking to you on the phone now with you never I would never ever never ask you to repeat what you just said. It's because I really WANNA over not because I wasn't listening right. It's instantaneous On a happier note. Let's let's let's go to the gold star together My Goldstar this week goes to my treadmill desk I don't know if everyone knows. What a treadmill desk is. It's what it sounds like it on which you put your computer and your phone and your your pens and it's underneath as a treadmill And you walk while you write or talk on the phone or in my case break story for television shows right so I have to give you credit Gretchen. This was your gift to me a few years ago recently few years ago. Whenever for my fortieth birthday and I've been off of it for a few weeks because I've just hadn't been in the office and so I got back on it this week and I had to five point five Mile Day. Oh my gosh just like in the middle of Your Work Day. You're walking five miles without yes without trying and I have to tell you especially as you as you know. I'm a type one diabetic. So Mu- keeping emotion really helps make my blood sugar under control and even aside from that. It just makes me happier and even got My writing partner even got one because she didn't want to sit around. I said like a slug while I was walking away during a meeting. So I recommend the treadmill desks to anyone Who has the space for it? And this is the thing we're like you live in. La So you have space. I live in New York. I tried so hard to figure out a way to get a treadmill dust but if I put it in my office I would not be able to open the door so it is And I'm so sad I really envy your it is. It's A. It's a great sadness in your life but enjoy mine curly. And that's it for the first episode of happier remember. Tried this at home. The one minute rule and let us know if it's helpful our producer is Henry Morowski. Thanks to Laura Mayor Andy bowers panoply. Please let us know what you think of the show. Grudge on twitter at Gretchen Rubin. And I'M AT CRAFT. Our email address is podcast at Gretchen. Rubin Dot Com. And if you like the show please be sure to tell Brennan and subscribe to us in Itunes until next week. I'm Elizabeth Craft and I'm Gretchen Rubin. Thanks for joining us. Onward and upward while Gretchen. It seems like so recently and so far we recorded that and after the break. We're GONNA talk a bit about what struck us in the episode. But I this break. Wow that I mean that brings back so many memories like so. Many things are the same and so many things are different. It's weird listened to thank. You weren't even on facebook then I can't I know I can you believe no. I CAN'T REMEMBER. There was ever time before you are on facebook and now. Gresh Sarah and I have this thriving facebook group for the happier and Hollywood community. So it's funny now and use your burying gates on facebook. I was flabbergasted to realize that at that point you weren't and you know Gretchen. I recorded that first at an NPR Office in Santa Monica. And I remember driving. They're just like shaking in my boots. No Gosh we get so nervous beforehand. You know what I was also remembering when we started. We didn't have the happiness hack segments which I think now most popular segments. But we didn't have that for the first years and that was your idea by the way gold star. Thank you and the button. We didn't have a button for a long time. Which the button is the is the little kind of out takes that we always do at the very very end of the show after the credits listed. I bet some people don't even know we have the button there I know but but you and Sarah had been happier in Hollywood and I loved it so much that I called you up I was like. Can we copy that for happier because I love the button? Which also funny. Gretchen is listening to my voice because it has been psych thing from the beginning. Is that some people you know. Think I'm too monotone and almost always when I meet someone. They'll say well. I like your voice. I appreciate well. I like your voice to thank you. Grad. Here's to the next five years. We'll be doing this again. Five years yes. Wording and up onward and upward from the Onward Project.

Gretchen Rubin facebook Sarah partner Jamie New York City twitter muscle tension Elizabeth Rubin Grove producer irs NPR Kristen Ruben writer Co Product Sage Elizabeth Craft G. R. O.
How to challenge conventional wisdom -- and change any industry | How to Be a Better Human

TED Talks Daily

28:47 min | 5 months ago

How to challenge conventional wisdom -- and change any industry | How to Be a Better Human

"Hey everyone z. Lease continuing our ted audio collective friday series. Something a little different today. An episode from our podcast. How to be a better human featuring film producer franklin leonard he helps us unpack this provocative question. What if conventional wisdom is so wrong that it's costing us lots of better more meaningful opportunities if you enjoy it find how to be a better human wherever you're listening to this ted talks daily is brought to you by monday. Dot com if you work with a team you know how complicated staying organized can be but our sponsor monday dot com believes that working effectively with your team can actually be really fun. Monday dot com work. Os gives your team the tools they need and want to work collaboratively and be successful monday dot com work. Oh s makes it super simple to run work update status and give feedback all in one place. Teams are more productive when they work together to experience. Monday dot com work. Oh s in sign up for your free two week. Trial visit monday. dot com. that's m. o. N. d. a. y. dot com. Have you ever in your life. Someone who felt like everything other job and in their industry just worked perfectly no room for improvement. I definitely have not in fact if i was talking to someone and they started to express anything even remotely similar to that view. I would be like okay. Take up the disguise. You're my boss undercover. I caught my point. Is whatever you do for work. There is clearly room for whether it's making hiring practices practices poor inclusive or limiting the plastic waste and packaging materials were stopping the spread of misinformation. We all have a role to play in. Today's episode is about how to catalyze change. How do you get people to try something new when they're already very familiar and very comfortable with these well-worn pats we'll franklin leonard managed to do just that in hollywood. He created the blacklist. It's a list of the unprovoked. Screenplays that hollywood insiders love the most and in doing so. He changed the way. The hollywood worked once a script made that list. It made the blacklist and then powerful people started to see that there was consensus that the script was actually amazing. Well then these previously unsellable projects they started getting sold and getting made and winning awards. And here's how franklin described the importance of that in his talk at tech's venice beach simply put the conventional wisdom about screenwriting merit where it was where it can be found was wrong and this is notable because as i mentioned before in the triage finding movies to make and making them. There's a lot of relying on conventional wisdom that conventional wisdom maybe just maybe be wrong to even greater consequence films about black people. Don't sell overseas motive action movies. Don't work because women will see themselves in men but men won't see themselves in women and no one wants to see movies about women over forty better onscreen heroes. After conform to a very narrow idea about duty that we consider conventional. What does that mean when those images are projected thirty feet high and the lights. Go down for a kid. That looks like me in columbus georgia or muslim girl in cardiff wales or a gay kid. Tonigh- what does it mean for how we see ourselves and how we see the world and for how the world sees us. We live in very strange times. I think for the most part. We all live in a state of constant triage. There's just too much information too much to contend with and so as a rule we tend to fall to conventional wisdom. I think it's important that we ask ourselves constantly. How much of that. Conventional wisdom is all convention and no wisdom and that will cost as a writer myself. I think that there is something really amazing here. Normally what makes a script. Hot is a huge celebrity attached. Or if it's a remake of something beloved or if your last movie won six academy awards in gross a billion dollars you know and not that those will stop getting scripts attention. I'm sure those aggressive aggressively. Keep getting sold. But what's really amazing about. Franklin did is he meant to find another way to get scripts attention if enough for the people who read scripts all day. Say that this this one deserves attention will now. All of a sudden people would actually read it and people would take it seriously and whatever industry you work in whatever you do the question. That franklin's experience with the blacklist raises. Is i think central to all progress. How can you challenge conventional wisdom today on how to be a better human. We've got franklin here to answer that question and so many more. This is franklin leonard. Founder of the blacklist. The blacklist has gone from being just a list of the most beloved scripts to so much more than that. So i'm wondering in your own words. How do you now think of and describe. What the blacklist is. I mean i think of our north star is being identified celebrating great screenwriting and the people who do it And that can take many forms. It's everything from giving folks who are trying to become better screenwriters Reasonably priced feedback but From reputable sources it is when that feedback returns. Good telling people in the industry that can help their careers and help their movies get made. Hey this is a really good script. It's providing workshops for the best among those writers oftentimes in collaboration with other organizations. It's the annual survey of the industry's most liked screenplays. It's Partnered lists that we do with glad Impact and other sort of affinity groups. you know for the muslim community. Asian pacific islander community et cetera. All the way up to and including making some of those scripts into movies. So we're we're producing a lot of these things now. it's more about. How can we be supportive of the hollywood community at large and especially screenwriters within it. And i think that that as a general guide Sort of be the guiding principle for for everything we do. What's so cool about the blacklist. Is you basically found a way to give people an excuse to trust their actual taste to say like this thing that we really love. we actually can make And i think that's a really powerful thing across industries not even just in holly. I think that's right. Look and i i. I don't think that it's hollywood. Lacks imagination. i mean. I can see concretely. Having worked in the business now for coming up on eighteen years the people that work in hollywood or wildly imaginative and allow the talented and it is a joy to be able to work with them. I think that the the the difficulty in the frustration is that the industry you know people are running scare at all times and the decisions that are made about. The economics of the business are made based on a set of conventional wisdom that is all convention and no wisdom that has been passed down through generations and implicit in that sort of past now. Conventional wisdom is a ton of bias Some of which is you know sort of innocuous and a lot of it is is terribly dangerous right so it can be something as simple as you know. Certain kinds of action sequences. Don't work right now. It doesn't really matter About like you know. Certain kind of car chases work or don't work in movies. Probably not really doesn't matter when we decide as the industry had for years that female driven action movies don't work commercially and the consequences of that we see in our gender relationships in our daily lives when people assume. Oh well you can't sell black actors abroad outside of the. Us the consequences of that are apocalyptic in terms of the actual valuing of black lives in america and around the world because make fewer black movies. We don't market there's movies abroad and it is just fundamentally not true. Stacey smith a professor at usc ran the numbers and found that. Basically when you support with diversity in at the same level that you support movies that don't have that diversity. Guess what they make the same amount of money. People don't have a problem. Seem diverse actors on screen or seeing diverse stories. What they want more than anything is for those movies too. Good and what's the blacklist. I hope has done is created more of a true meritocracy where the focus is not. Who's in the movie. What's the movie about it simply. Is this a good script and probably one of the most gratifying things about the sort of fifteen year history of the blacklists coming up on sixteen years is that last year. The harvard business school did a study on the economics of the blacklist and found that movies on the blacklist when controlling for every other factor movies made from scripts on the blacklist made ninety percent more in revenue than movies made from scripts. Not on the blacklist. And i wanted to say it again because i think that it can't be emphasized enough that movies on the planet that were made from scripts on the blacklist made ninety percent more than movies that were made from scripts not on the blacklist. And there's one reason why which is if you start with a screenplay you have a better chance of making a great movie. And if you make a great movie you have a better chance of making a profitable. What and so. I think that that's a lesson that everybody instinctively knows but it's not one that has been the guiding principle of the film industry for a very long time if ever so they worked both artistically and profitably. What lessons do you think you've learned that apply to people who don't work in entertainment or maybe even integrate fill that all because it seems like so much of what you've learned here. Is that challenging. The conventional wisdom is not just good for diversity and equity and inclusion. It's also good for the bottom line. That's exactly right. And i think that's probably a number one Increasing diversity is good for the bottom line like it's good morally and ethically but it's also good capitalistically if we can use that probably The No look i think the other. The other thing that i've learned is that conventional wisdom is more often than not convention and not wisdom. You know. I think that in a world especially over the last. Let's say twenty twenty five years or the amount of information that we are expected to sort of keep in our brain and the analytics that we have to do on a daily basis to do our job and to process the world and to interact with other people. We are inclined to create these eurosctics. That we just take for granted and a lot of this. Heuristic are deeply deeply deeply flawed and we as individuals and organizations have to do a better job of aggressively interrogating them. Both for the good of the world. But also for our own individual self-interest that means that. I have to do that as well right like this is not just me giving advice to other people in saying. Why aren't you doing better. It's me looking in the mirror every day and saying you doing better when you look at your business. Are you just saying well. I'm a black eye from the so. I'm sure i'm doing fine or am i saying you know. Are we on gender. Are we making sure that everybody has a seat at the table. Are we making sure that we're deconstructing. The table and deconstructing the house and allowing everybody to rebuild it. And if we're not then. I have to make changes and i think that's probably the biggest thing is Trying to build a mirror for myself that actually presents an image of me as i am and not as i want to imagine myself with that. Make sense that totally makes sense so for everyone listening who may not know last year the academy issued some new rules for films to be considered for an oscar. The rules had minimum requirements for diversity and inclusion and there's been a mixed response as to what the effects of those rules might be Some people think it's gonna make a huge difference. Some people think it doesn't go far enough and some people are angry about it. Franklin you have really publicly said that you think that the new rules are good. Start and you're optimistic. I'm curious though if you think they're gonna make a real tangible difference in the kinds of movies that are getting produced but again because of the way in which the the thresholds are structured if you just hire one like a woman of color senior role at your at your distribution company and like have an internship program with two insurance. You're fine and so the way i read. The academy's sort of announcement is a public statement that in order to be a responsible corporate citizen of the film industry. You have to be trying to expand the pipeline. Ever so slightly. And if you're not doing that then no we're not going to give you the chance of winning an oscar but they did not prevent anyone who's made a movie from getting you know the sort of laurels that their artistic accomplishment may have earned them and that's the thing like look for me personally. I don't need for any individual movie to include black people right or any other group. If you wanna make a movie with all like by about all straight white cysts men over the age of fifty who grew up upper middle class like more power to you. I just wanna make sure that if somebody wants to make a movie about trans women who are black and poor that they have just as much likelihood of getting that movie made as the white dude in and then you know. Best movie wins. The problem is not that we need all these movies to be super diverse in for all of these groups to be diverse when they make them though. That would be nice. The problem is is that for the entire history of hollywood we've had massive amounts of affirmative action for one group white upper middle class. Straight says men and everybody else has to not only make something good but also do it and overcome all these obstacles to just getting their movie made or even being in a position where they can make a movie so i would like to focus on the the access to resources and the access to distribution problem far more than i would. Hey who's eligible for an oscar. But i do think that because the academy awards. Are you know the time every year when most people are thinking about the the ecosystem of the film industry. It's critical that we have that conversation about the oscars as part of a broader conversation that be tackling year round. I also have to say shout april rain. Who came up with the hashtag oscarssowhite. There's very little chance that we'd be having this conversation right now. If it wasn't for her. And i think it's really important that we remember that oscarssowhite not just about black actors. It is about all non white men and making sure that everyone is represented in the culture Because we have a better culture when that is true and we all make more money. When that's true. And i think that you know. I'm really just an all of what she built with that with something very very simple That have the power to change the world. Yeah and the fact that she did make such a huge impact with that and she's not at the very top of the power structure in the money. She's not the person green. The films i think does speak to the fact that Anyone can actually have a real impact on the films that are getting made in the culture that is being Spread around the world. That is the power that all of having a world where social media exists again. That is a sword that cuts both ways as well but it is something that that power exists for all of us. If we want to become advocates on behalf of any ideas you know diversifying hollywood diversifying congress or making sure that people have enough food to eat and a roof over their heads. We'll be right back with more from franklin leonard after this break. Here we are. We're back do you think people who maybe don't see themselves as having that kind of power. How can they think about the the creative force that they can. They can create change in. I think it's really about just modeling values in your day to day actions right. You don't have to be an advocate to to change the way a person sees the world or somebody else. But i think that if you are in a position where you see somebody mistreating somebody else or you see somebody being disrespectful to somebody else or you. You hear somebody say something. That's maybe not even disrespectful to anybody. Who's in the room. But maybe telling them. Hey not cool. Have you considered this. Do you realize that when you say this you also mean this. That's one way but also then just modeling kindness right again. It's super simple. It's a super. It's very cliche idea but a fundamental basis. You don't know the effect that your actions will have on someone else who may be watching you and you never know who maybe watching you. We all failed to live up to our highest ideals. We all do. I know i knew but aspiring towards them has effects that we can never anticipate and so you may never even know what the consequence is. But you can't really go wrong by trying that saccharin true you know it's weird. So what can audiences both in the us and abroad. What can audiences due to kind of help support systemic change or or broader representation. Ironically because i think a lot of people in the film and television industry are very trouble with these review. Aggregations but rotten tomatoes. Metacritic are a great place to start. You know look. We are all in a time of sort of superabundance of content right. There's more tv shows to watch them. Any human being could ever watched. There's more movies to watch than any human being could ever watched. And we all wanna watch the good stuff right and by good. I want to be clear. I don't mean pretentious. I don't mean oscar winning. I just mean best in class right like if you want to watch a comedy you wanna watch the best comedy you wanna watch the bad one. Ripe film critics television critics. There are deep problems with those communities. They tend to be over represented by by white older men. But seek out critics who ha- who consistently have opinions that mirror your own right. If you love a movie go find critic who felt similarly to you that wrote about the movie in a way that you found compelling and go see what else they liked right because odds are you will find other movies that you will be intrigued by you can be the critic that shares information about those movies with other people in your community and i know that sounds like a very elaborate thing to do in order to find good movie or television show but i promise you two things one you will enjoy the process of looking because you will learn about things that you would not otherwise learn about and if people are reviewing things in a way that is compelling that process alone will be entertaining and to. You will find better things to watch. You will have fewer nights where you made the decision to watch something for hours into the end of the two hours or like. That's two hours of my life. I'm never getting back. So there's there's obviously a huge portion of the movie going audience that mainly watches things like superhero movies are big franchise films. Do you not believe that. That's the problem. I think people should watch what they like. And if the superhero movies. It's all good. There are a lot of really good superhero movies out there. Black panther excellent film. Thor ragnarok excellent film right. Thor ragnarok is a meditation on refugees and the displacement of peoples right black panther. Like there's a reason why immigrant song is the song they play over the climactic battle scene. Black panther is about many things but it is fundamentally about this tension between the black community wanting to sort of shut itself off and sort of integrate into world Despite the that the rest of the world has put us through Right is martin versus malcolm and literally the fight scene happens on a literal underground railroad. There's a tendency for live people to sort of tut tut about You know these big studio action movies and act like they're somehow like Diminution of the art form. And i just have never believe that's true. Some of them are not good. But they're they're mini. Indy pretentious movies. That are not good either. So what i would say is look for things that you love and if you loved that thing right if you love black panther maybe checkout creed by the same director ryan kugler and if you love creed maybe out fruitvale station also by that director if you loved four ragnarok. There's a reason why t- right and indigenous new zealander got the job for four. Why don't you go watch the stuff that he made the got him that job as a good chance. You're going to like that too and the thing about it is is. You're the only person losing by not checking those things out right like they got your money. They've got your money for black panther. The industry is going to be fine. You have an opportunity in the world is going to open up to you. And you're gonna have these moments of joy and these moments of sadness and these moments of exhilaration that you haven't gotten to have yet And that is fundamentally for me at least the film when the beauty of art and the beauty of a cultural world in which we live. You know we've been talking about movies and cinema but obviously the experience of watching a film has changed dramatically with theaters being closed our guest. Even if they're open people being scared to go. I think that a little bit personally because there's a movie theater right down the block from where i live here in los angeles and on their big marquee rather than new movie title. It says to be continued. But it said that for months now and the doors still haven't reopened. So what if. I was kind of charming and even funny sign is now a real open question right like will that feeder ever actually reopen. And i hope they do. I hope they do. Because i think that there's something really powerful about seeing movies in person that classic experience which you described so beautifully in your talk from a few years ago. Here's a clip of that this weekend. Tens of millions of people in the united states and tens of millions more around the world in columbus georgia in cardiff wales and chongqing. China and india will leave their homes. They'll get in their cars or they'll take public transportation or they will carry themselves by foot and they'll step into a room and sit down next to someone they don't know or maybe someone they do and the lights will go down and they'll watch a movie they're watch movies about aliens or robots or a robot aliens or regular people but they will all be movies about what it means to be human millions will feel all or fear millions will laugh and millions will cry and then the lights will come back on and they'll reemerge into the world. They knew several hours. Prior and millions of people will look at the world a little bit differently than they did when they went in going to temple or mosque for a church or any other religious institution movie going is in many ways. A sacred ritual repeated week after week. After week i'll be there this weekend. Just like i was on most weekends between the years of nineteen ninety six and nineteen ninety at the multiplex. No this shopping mall about five miles from my childhood home in columbus georgia. The funny thing is that somewhere between then and now. I accidentally changed part of the conversation about which of those movies get made. You obviously gave that talk well before the pandemic or any of the current concerns about movie theaters in public health existed. But i imagine you must be thinking about that a lot during this time right now. So do you have any new perspective on. Why movies matter. And why this experience matters. I think the absence of these communal environments wherein we learn about what it means to be human and right and that was sort of a link that i was making between religion and movies is that you know but i think what's interesting to me about movies and i i would include television. Really any storytelling in this regard. Art more generally but as popular medium is that you know. Unfortunately we have these virtual spaces where we can sort of commune around them And it's not quite the same but it's still ends up being a common language and a common touch point for humankind right. you know. I think netflix just put out today. Had seventy eight million. People watch gena prints by movie the old guard and when i meet somebody and they've washed it also. We will have a really positive conversation about gina prints brilliant work and we will feel closer as a consequence matters. Nothing to do with us being both black or both men or whatever it is. It's just that like we saw this thing about these people and we bonded over it. I don't know i'm really appreciative. That exists now. That's the positive side. There is also a negative side. Which is and i think that this sort of moment of racial reckoning that we were seeing around the globe is in large part connected to the movie industry because when we go into a room and we sit with a lot of people don't know and we learn about the world and what we learn about. The world is ally in terms of race in terms of gender in terms of sexuality in terms of religion those lies being projected forty feet high in front of tens of millions of not hundreds of millions of people have real human substantive consequences particularly for black lives. You know. I'm i'm i've increasingly over. The last few months been struck by the notion that the first ever. Hollywood blockbuster was birth of nation and You know we're we're consequences of it now. So i i think it cuts both ways I i'm an part of the reason. Why i'm so attracted to film as an art form because it does cut both ways incredibly sharply with an incredibly large sword. What is one movie or book or cultural artifacts idea. That's made you a better human. I mean i'm very lucky. In that i have two parents who very clearly communicated to me and my two younger siblings that we could do anything and as black kids in the deep south in the eighties. That probably wasn't true. But they convinced us of that anyway. And i think between that. And they're very clear expectation that the obligation that we had was not just to do whatever we want to do. An aspire to whatever we wanted to aspire towards it was to make sure that we made it more likely that anybody had more of a chance of doing it like somehow they managed to convince us that like we could do anything and also explained to us that the world was organized so that not everybody could and then we. It was our responsibility to make sure that everybody could. And that's not a cultural artifact but it's the thing that for me. I'm most thankful for and the thing that i hope. I'm able to incorporate from a values perspective and all of my work and the arts that i contribute to I don't know if that answers your question. But it's something that's been greatly on my mind of late and a related question right now in this point in your life. What is something that you're trying to be a better human out I'm trying to have more patients with people. I'm trying to be better at recognizing that the world is on fire figuratively and literally and that everybody's going through a lot and that moments when i feel need to judge or the feel the need to cast disapproval on. I need to take a moment and realize that. There may be other explanations than that which i would assume Well franklin ladder. Thank you so much for talking with us. It's been an absolute honor and a pleasure. Pleasure thank you for having me. Thanks so much for listening to this episode of how to be a better human. That's our show for today to our guest franklin leonard. You can find the blacklist at be l. c. k. l. s. t. dot com. I'm your host chris. Duffy this show is produced by avi dos yellow rezzo frederica elizabeth iosifovna and karen newman at ted and jocelyn gonzales pedro. Rafael rosado and sandra lopez monsalve from x productions. For more on how to be a better human visit ideas. Dot ted dot com. We'll see you next week.

franklin leonard hollywood franklin oscar Stacey smith Franklin venice beach columbus cardiff oscarssowhite georgia wales harvard business school usc united states ryan kugler fruitvale station academy awards
Welcome to Hollywood Scandals

Kingpins

38:51 min | 3 months ago

Welcome to Hollywood Scandals

"Hi listeners here's something released special and timely. It's the first episode of the podcast limited series hollywood scandals. If you enjoy it tune in every monday for another infamous event in showbiz history just follow hollywood scandals free and only on spotify high. Everyone carter here on april twenty fifth. We're in for hollywood's biggest night of the year the ninety third annual academy awards steeped in tinseltown tradition. The oscars are a night of classic glamour. Stars walked the red carpet in their finest gowns and suits beneath all that sparkle. Hollywood has always had a seedy underbelly. In honor of the oscars par cast is put together. A special collection of ten episodes about the biggest scandals. In hollywood history will cover the hollywood madam who ran a celebrity sex ring the blacklisting of the hollywood ten and the mysterious death of natalie wood but before we dive into those infamous stories. We're going back to the original scandal. How hollywood got its start in this episode of the dark side of will explore. How hollywood was founded as a christian utopia and how the movie business came in to crush those dreams. Due to the graphic nature of this podcast listener discretion is advised this episode features discussions of drug use sexuality death and other adult content. We advise extreme caution for listeners. Under thirteen eighteen. Los angeles was a modest town of eleven thousand. People newly reachable by rail eight miles to the north northwest was largely undeveloped ranching area full of fruit trees and wild coyotes surrounded by stunning canyon views but the budding film industry had other plans and enterprising couple moved in setting up. Beautiful gritted streets and planting gardens. That would soon rival eden itself. They shared a dream of building a christian utopia for wealthy midwesterners away from the bustle of city life. There were to be stunning. Homes plentiful churches and absolutely no alcohol or debauchery of any kind but the budding film industry had other plans in just five years. That small plot of rural paradise was transformed from an upscale elite society to the hotbed of the working class. Film industry and with that change came sex scandals. Elaborate drug rings predatory cults and cold blooded murders but if you were to look upon the land that was to be hollywood that idea would have been impossible to see in fact. The founders of the small plot of land in southern california had a much different premise about. It's ideal us. Harvey wilcox was in his early fifties and looking for new beginnings with his twenty one year. Old wife. Diana harjo the recently wed pair was an excellent match in part due to their shared christian faith in staunch opposition to alcohol. Both were early and ardent adopters of prohibitionist ideals. Harvey was a real estate man and recognized his young wife talents embracing her as a partner in his career as well as in his home beyond that they shared a vision a vision of a utopia and like so many others in the nineteenth century. The couple looked west in one thousand. Nine hundred eighty. Three southern california had a unique combination of rugged nature and toon ity los angeles had a meagre population of eleven thousand and the santa fe railway would not reach the city for another two years meaning wealthy landowners and aspiring farmers could tap into the untapped potential of the vast undeveloped fertile land. For the wilcox's this could be the home of their perfect society. A place to build their dream when they first moved out west. The wilcox's purchased a home in the desirable figueroa district of los angeles. They had a son about a year later and all seemed to be bliss but then tragedy struck and perhaps changed the course of cultural history in eighteen. Eighty six the wilcox's eighteen month. Old son harry died. It was a devastating. Turn for the couple who thought they had a bright future. To look forward to grief-stricken harvey and data began to take long carriage. Rides in the wild canyons near downtown. Los angeles led by harvey's stunning white racehorses duke and royal on their way to the canyons the couple pass through barely developed farmland dotted with patches of fig and apricot trees. The landscape was beautiful. And the wilcox's were infatuated. It was a paradise but an untamed one ripe for cultivation and development so like so many others that would come to this land in the future. They began to dream harvey and diet a new it in their hearts. This was to be the home of their utopia. But their vision of an ideal society had a rigid and sinister undertone. Harvey indeed were staunchly religious and as such they envisioned a community that banned both alcohol and non white non christian residence. This was actually part of a late. Nineteenth century trend many fundamentalist christians were breaking off from society to build commune's under their own particular brand of beliefs. These could be relatively mundane or more dramatic and cult-like in their origins. No place had the combination of natural aesthetic beauty and open space to attract these commune's as california so on february first eighteen eighty seven she and harvey purchased roughly one hundred twenty acres approximately eight miles north of downtown los angeles virtually the middle of nowhere. Their goal was to turn the parcel into a retirement destination for wealthy christian midwesterners wanting to try their hand at hobby farming and land speculation harvey a wealthy upper class elitist plan to personally screen prospective buyers to keep out heathens non whites and those not polished enough for their dream society because the wilcox is owned the land they owned a city completely separate from los angeles that they could control however they saw fit but like any up and coming community. Their land needed a name in august. It came to data by chance train ride. She was returning from seeing relatives in ohio. When a wealthy passengers spoke of her own estate in illinois named hollywood data loved holly trees and further loved that a member of societies upper crust had already given the name to her estate to data it evoked. The dreamy exclusive luxury. They're utopia was meant to embody data suggested to harvey and they officially submitted the name to the county recorder in august of eighteen eighty seven harvey drew up a map of their new community along with perfect gritted street delineations and individual lamp plots. Hollywood was officially born. He indata pass the time by coming up with street. Names hoping this would also attract customers. Meanwhile they employed cheap laborers to help clear the dirt roads and plant hand some pepper trees on the edge of properties. These laborers were primarily chinese and mexican immigrants. The wilcox's only wanted white families to own their property but they had no problem employing the cheapest labor they could get in order to build their dream but just when things were going their way the economy took a steep downturn los angeles suffered a real estate crash in the late eighteen eighty s the bubble that had brought thousands out to california with dreams of real estate eventually left more realtors than land buyers the bubble burst and buyers grew scarce. This was a terrible loss for the wilcox's in eighteen eighty seven. They were forced to sell their own downtown home and refund money to buyers who were forced to pull out at the last second to their greater horror. The need to stay afloat financially forced them to lower their strict requirements on new residence. Even admitting a few people who openly drank they promised themselves would only be temporary. But this officially marked the beginning of hollywood's downward spiral into a town of excess. The couple tried to offset their bad luck by encouraging residents to hire top notch architects and plant beautiful eden gardens around their future homes they also accorded commercial developers hoping that upscale businesses would make hollywood more desirable slowly. They began to recover but disaster. Hit before they could truly get back on their feet. Harvey's health took a turn for the worse during these stressful times and on march nineteenth ninety one. At about sixty years old. He passed away data. Just twenty nine was now a widow with a house on the edge of increasingly undesirable neighborhood and little financial means to speak of on top of that mounting water problems threatened hollywood's continued development with the city alternating between terrible floods and stark shortages. That summer a particularly awful drought dry. Data's well completely leaving her without safe drinking water. These conditions once again forced data to sell to undesirables leaving the young widow rather despondent that is until eighteen ninety four when data thought. Her luck was turning around at last that year. She married her second husband. Filo judson beverage. Filo was a good-looking wealthy son of a former governor. His family connections provided financial stability and aida and follows partnership as beverage and beverage real estate finally to return to building her utopia. It also helped that shortly after their marriage files father. The esteemed former governor john beverage of illinois moved to hollywood giving it the prestige necessary to attract wealthier more established clients. This continued in one thousand nine hundred when she successfully sold property to the communities. I true celebrity. Resident paul delong. Pray the so-called king of flowers delong. Pray was a famous french painter. Who is a smash hit with the more conservative residents. He was cultured. Foreign and painted tasteful florals as opposed to more popular nude paintings that were the talk of the art world delong praise presence alone sent property values skyrocketing data had struck gold development began to snowball and in nineteen o to the hollywood hotel opened. It was an instant success but also ultimately brought undue attention to the budding city. It began to be harder to control. Who was in. And out of hollywood with all the workers and tourists and the prohibitionist rules of the city were being broken. More and more often much today is dismay. Her own husband was caught breaking the law when he tried to serve white wine. At an event hollywood hotel this began to sow a seed of discord between his rigid morals and follows more progressive outlook. This was exacerbated by the other headaches created from trying to run a city in the wet winter months the city was consistently flooding. Meanwhile wealthiest state owners refuse to put unsightly septic tanks and other sewage processing facilities on their land leading to a lack of adequate equipment and constant sewage. Backups all over town. Hollywood literally stunk and the only way to fix these problems was utilizing the resources and labor force of los angeles but that would mean being incorporated by the city and losing the autonomy that allowed hollywood to ban liquor and control who is allowed to live their votes began around nineteen o five on whether or not to join los angeles data who had literally created. Hollywood wasn't allowed to participate since women's suffrage would not pass for fifteen years then in nineteen zero seven. A new obstacle appeared that no one could have predicted. The movies arrived in los angeles next. Hollywood takes on a life of its own now back to the story in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight at the same time. That hollywood was falling victim to a real estate bubble bursting. Thomas edison patented an invention. That would change hollywood forever. Edison was a shrewd businessman who held or jointly held a record of one thousand ninety three patents across his lifetime. Edison didn't actually invent the motion picture camera himself however always looking to strengthen his prophets he commissioned a lab. Assistant named william kennedy. Laurie dickson to do it and dixon delivered in eighteen eighty eight. The camera was revolutionary and within ten years a burgeoning film industry had emerged in new jersey. The new industry was exciting but not without its challenges. Early film relied entirely on natural light meaning companies had to us open spaces and sunshine to get their shots even built elaborate moving platforms to track the sunlight as it moved throughout the day whenever there was poor weather or the sun went down. Production had to stop while this obstacle was utterly frustrating to filmmakers the medium was still wildly lucrative and there were always people willing to brave the elements to make a picture. Edison saw the rapidly growing industry as a way to make a fortune and as usual. He wanted to keep everything under his control. He went after anyone who tried to make. Additional cameras are equipment ensuring his products. Were the only ones on the market but his cameras were expensive. Only a few of the original film companies could afford them which suited these companies just fine. It meant a monopoly on the market thus in nineteen nine eight. These companies banded together to form the motion picture patents company or edison. Trust all of this culminated in a rash of illegal filmmaking around new york a creative industry that from its outset was lawless and extremely competitive as a result film companies and independent projects began outright sabotaging each other's productions fires on sets damaged cameras broken equipment actors getting roughed up by hired thugs these were extremely common occurrences in the early movie scene. One of the most popular forms of this pointed subversion was for higher double agents to bring a loaded to set and shoot out the camera lens during filming. It was a ruthless kind of film on film crime producing stories wild enough to fuel writers imaginations and capture the attention of movie goers gangster stories quickly became popular and directors would cast gangsters to play fake gangsters on screen. This made the performances convincing if unconventional but with such a potent integration with the criminal underworld police intervention was inevitable and they would regularly arrest filmmakers and shutdown productions. This was the anarchy of the early film industry threats sabotage and violence gangsters and thugs all in the name of the newest form of art. It was chaos what was worse the motion picture patents company discouraged feature length products outside financing and other natural outgrowths in the film industry upsetting even the filmmakers who bought into the system. Those who really wanted to make their mark in movies realized they were going to have to get out of new york and new jersey to do so in those days. The post was slow and travel was difficult. The best way to run from the law was to head as far away from it as possible for that reason. Many illegal filmmakers started migrating west to southern california besides being far from the law and the reign of the mpp see southern california received three hundred to three hundred and fifty days of sunshine a year new york city by contrast got a maximum of about two hundred severely limiting film production coming from the loud dirty populated streets of new york. Southern california felt like paradise. There was almost no change. Between summer and winter the landscape offered ocean beaches deserts rocky canyons snowy mountaintops and grassy plains all within a day's drive. The filmmaker soon realized they were home. Much like data wilcox. They had found their eden but just as had happened in new york and new jersey. Legal authorities soon came collecting remember just because they had left the east coast didn't mean they were free from edison's patents and private. Detectives were more than thrill to chase the movies. West director allan dwan was not entirely shocked when a well dressed. Private detective showed up on set in the early. Nineteen hundreds hoping to shut down allen's production and collect reward money back east allen. New thugs like this meant business. But he wasn't going to give up his life's work. He led the detective up to an arroyo or small creek bed which was full of used tin cans from set. The detective pulled out a firearm and warned allen menacingly. We want you to get out of town immediately. Quit making pictures. Just forget about it to prove his point. The detective fired into the arroyo. He missed every canny shot at but the can still dance dramatically. But doin was prepared calmly. He pulled out his own firearm allen. Fired three cans from fifty feet away and hit each straight through the middle. He looked the detective in the eye and asked. Do you want to try that again. Thoroughly spooked the detective ran off straight into the three mounted morrison brothers and their winchester. Rifles these real-life cowboys were extras on the film and hired security. The morrison brothers roughed up the detective enough that he left town and alan here from the agency again. Of course this story was too good to pass up. Within a year allen's company made a film based on the experience with embellishments of course anything for entertainment. This situation was typical at the time. Filmmaking was not for the faint of heart bodily harm was almost a given and between the hired gangsters. an unsafe. Stunts movie says were downright dangerous. Anyone interested in making movies had to be ready to literally cracks goals but despite the danger more and more people move to california in the early nineteen hundreds smaller film companies set up in remote areas giving them plenty of room to build sets and film the landscape the more legitimate companies settled in the cities where equipment and cheap labor were more readily available hopeful actors and extras began coming to the city for work given a quarter to a third of all filmmaking in the early nineteen hundreds was independent and therefore illegal there was a large market interested in operating far far away from edison and his patents. What was more the ninth circuit court of appeals which oversees california to this day was not particularly interested in enforcing patent laws adding a layer of protection to filmmakers and in the unlikely event. A case was upheld in a court of law. It was only a few hundred miles to the mexican border so long as your equipment passed over with you. It couldn't be seized. So southern california became the mecca for movies in nineteen zero seven. The first film studio opened in downtown los angeles while filmmakers were initially content to shoot their pictures on studio stages filmmakers soon wanted a variety of backgrounds and less crowded areas to film mainly hollywood unfortunately for data wilcox. There was easy public transportation between los angeles and hollywood which allowed filmmakers and their crews to easily commute to hollywood during the day. Hollywood was after all only eight miles from downtown. The stunning garden of eden effect the data and the hollywood community had so carefully cultivated now attracted the very scoundrels and vagrants. They wanted to keep out. It was no secret that hollywood residents immediately hated film people even calling their growing presents. An invasion productions filled the peaceful streets with clanging yelling and general chaos not to mention the presence of working class and minority people who these utopians detested several residents reported shock and dismay at their door to see to mounted cowboys galloping across their properties with a camera crew shouting running after them. These incidents became increasingly common. And there wasn't much the town could legally do about it. Shooting permits were unheard of at this time and the town could only govern what businesses were built inside city lines because the film crews showed up during the day but packed up and left at night. Hollywood's laws didn't apply to them as they were written. Well plenty of. The hollywood elite wanted to enact stricter laws and fight back against the influx of film professionals. They had more immediate problems there. Infrastructure hadn't been fixed and property values plummeting voting residents faced the difficult decision of keeping their independence while singing into further economic failure or joining los angeles to survive. They held on as long as they could. But in the fall of nineteen o nine finally voted to merge with the city. The vote passed and hollywood officially became los angeles's newest neighborhood and the vagabonds welcomed with open arms. Next hollywood becomes tinseltown and now back to the dark side of hollywood in one thousand nine hundred. Nine of haute passed to give up hollywood's legal autonomy in exchange for help with failing infrastructure financial woes an ever-worsening sewage problem. Now that hollywood was part of the city of los angeles. The alcohol ban was lifted as was the ban on movie studios. There was nothing data could do about it. She was forced to watch three decades of work crumble around her almost immediately future film tycoon. Cecil b demille purchased a nearly inaccessible shack in hollywood used expressly for filming within the year. He opened los. Angeles's second film studio. Demille would soon become deeply enamoured with hollywood. He constantly filmed they're bringing increasing numbers of film. Crew into the area actors flocked from all over the country to try their hand at these new motion pictures flooding the streets of hollywood and storming the gates of studios every morning in hopes of finding work with this abundance of new labour and new films came a rise in alcohol. Consumption drug use child labor and sex scandals all smack in the middle of hollywood and with the emergence of the movie industry in hollywood and los angeles so to came the things that always marked the silver screen dreams and broken dreams fame and idolization risks and rewards beyond the early twentieth centuries imagination. The dream that became tinseltown had captured. The country's imagination and the fundamentalist christians scattered around hollywood would soon be vastly. Outnumbered data live just long enough to see her city lost to darkness. She contracted cancer and died in nineteen fourteen less than a year later in nineteen fifteen. Hollywood release. the world's first feature length film the three hour epic birth of a nation. D w griffith had filmed parts of it in his hollywood studio. The film began with a disclaimer on screen quote. This is a historical presentation of the civil war and reconstruction period and is not meant to reflect on any race or people of today. The movies content was the exact opposite of this claim it unabashedly portrayed black people as the main reason for the problems in the south specifically during the antebellum and civil war periods in case the racism wasn't clear enough. The end of the movie showed the ku klux klan writing into heroically restore the south to it's perceived pre-civil war glory. The movie was a resounding success. Which meant it's racist and hateful. Rhetoric was seen all over the country and even abroad this empowered many racists across the country to begin speaking more boldly about their twisted beliefs. In fact birth of a nation is consistently credited with revitalizing the k. k. k. So much so that the k. k. k. literally used the film to train new recruits well into the nineteen seventies if not longer birth of a nation wasn't wildly out of place at the time though most viewers read it as historically accurate and the film skewed but emotional perspective made audiences feel justified in their beliefs. Plus the film was an incredible technological feat. No-one had seen a production. This expensive or long before and the sets and stunts were stunning. But the film did have critics. There were people outraged by its big stances and false understanding of the past. Unfortunately these voices were too small and too young to make an organized effort against the film for example the nwa c. p. had just been formed a few years earlier in nineteen o nine and it was in no position to take on a cultural juggernaut. Historian david layer compares it to being the star wars of its time besides with no national laws film distribution. It was hard to go after more than a single theater or state at once and the studio was eager to show the film in as many places as possible feature films provided newer and bigger success opportunities for directors and performers alike and actors. Were often willing to do anything to keep their careers often. This meant sustaining onset injuries. These could be broken. Bones burns breathing. Problems from special effects or severe skin lacerations despite the medical industry knowing the dangers of opiates. Morphine and heroin. Were still the preferred painkillers of choice in the nineteen and even early nineteen twenty s. As a result injured actors would often become addicted to these hard drugs. Some fell into a cycle of addiction later. Becoming targets of newly formed drug rings others attempted to get off drugs by switching to alcohol which wasn't necessarily any better to famous cases of early drug scandals. Were wallace reid. And fatty arbuckle. Both were beloved. American performers read acted birth of a nation and had contracts extending well into the nineteen twenties for more work are buckle was the highest paid performer in hollywood surpassing. Even charlie chaplin read was given morphine to handle terrible injuries after a train crash because the morphine allowed him to keep working the studio look the other way as his addiction began to grow read shocked the nation when he overdosed on set in early. Nineteen twenty two. He died a year later from complications. He was the first of many drug related. Hollywood deaths are buckle also suffered an injury in the mid nineteen. Ten's his doctors put him on. Heroin are buckle successfully switched to alcohol but as a result became a well-known drunk the arbuckle scandal surpassed the read scandal in seriousness when our buckle was accused of drunkenly raping and murdering another famous actress. Virginia repay in one thousand nine hundred ninety one while he was ultimately acquitted public opinion toward the movies took an enormous hit which may have exacerbated an already growing problem as stories of scandal leaked out of los angeles. Many of the country's derelict began to see tinseltown. As a place where anything goes this was the exploitative environment that hollywood was founded on built upon an industry that was literally running from the law. The leaders of the film world were ruthless and tenacious in their methods which gave it a dangerous mystique that only helped the film industry grow at an explosive rate movie studios with huge open stages popped up more and more frequently. These stages left productions to the mercy of the weather sometimes equipment caught fire or crews had to rush to cover the cameras and props when a rare rain came in. There were no unions regulations. Yet and hopeful crew and actors had to show up at the studio gates in the mornings to try to get work but this rigid fear contrasted the glitz and glamour that was creeping its way into the city. Hollywood had transformed into a premier destination for the rich and famous in addition to becoming the location of homes to stars such as buster keaton. Douglas maclean mary pickford. It became a major tourist attraction the hollywood hotel once an alcohol. Free local establishment was constantly full with guests and actors. Even visiting dignitaries wanted to see hollywood. As hollywood welcomed the roaring twenties the movie industry had completely taken over los angeles. But not everyone found hollywood as welcoming as they'd hoped with a growing population of movie. Hopefuls came a growing population of out of work actors. Many who had moved west to make it in film had their dreams dashed and felt increasingly isolated in a town void of family and friends looking for a surrogate family and a place to call home. Many became susceptible to the burgeoning number of colts popping up around the area. These were so prevalent that there were an estimated four hundred colts in los angeles in the nineteen twenties alone. Hollywood had become synonymous with fame and power drawing ambitious crooks from around the country who were only too happy to get a fresh start out with just. This was in part because a. was growing so rapidly. Eleven thousand people in eighteen eighty became one hundred thousand people in one thousand nine hundred. That number rose to five hundred. Seventy five thousand people in nineteen twenty and a whopping one point. Two million people in nineteen thirty. This man los angeles went from the thirty sixth month. Populous city in the united states in nineteen hundred to the fifth in one thousand nine thirty. Not all of that growth was good. The rise of show business led to the systemic exploitation of women children and minorities meanwhile countless budding actors threw away their life. Savings to make it in showbiz only to end up destitute. The great depression hit at the end of the twenties. Sending even more hopefuls spiraling out of work former actresses often sought burlesque and sex work to pay the bills. Meanwhile newly enacted federal codes clamp down on the moral purity of onscreen stories while the scandals murders and drug deaths kept piling up in the tabloids. It's hard to believe that in nineteen thirty hollywood was completely unrecognisable. From either the open canyon pastures of the eighteen eighties or the wilcox's conservative gulf free. Utopia of nineteen hundred hollywood's bright lights and allure of a better life would continue attracting dreamers for the next one hundred years and beyond and the hollywood machine would keep crushing then may blackburn was not the last mother to try to use her daughter to gain a fortune. And fatty are buckle and wallace reid. We're not the only drug alcohol or murder cases to come out of hollywood. There were scandals to come. That hadn't even been dreamt of from drug rings to terrifying stage mothers to cults with all that light and glamour. The shadows just kept getting darker. Thanks for listening. If you enjoyed this episode follow the dark side of for free on spotify to hear more and be sure to check out the next episode in our collection the story of the downfall of fatty arbuckle which became known as hollywood's first scandal. Hollywood scandals is a spotify original from par cast. It is executive produced by max cutler. This collection was written and developed by chelsea would and writing assistance from kate. Gallagher production assistants by aaron larson and ron shapiro. Fact checking by haley milliken and hosted by carter roy. This episode of hollywood scandals comes from the dark side of hosted by kate. Leonard and richard. Rosner and written by taylor cleland sound designed by ron shapiro with production assistance by carleen madden and nagy admire. Remember to check out the new spotify original from podcast hollywood's scandals every monday discover the real life dramas of some of entertainment's biggest names. Listen to hollywood scandals free and only on spotify.

hollywood wilcox los angeles harvey Hollywood california Harvey north northwest oscars Harvey wilcox Diana harjo allen holly trees harvey drew Filo judson john beverage paul delong edison
Welcome to Hollywood Scandals

Hostage

38:51 min | 3 months ago

Welcome to Hollywood Scandals

"Hi listeners here's something released special and timely. It's the first episode of the podcast limited series. Hollywood scandals if you enjoy it tune in every monday for another infamous event in showbiz history. Just follow hollywood scandals. Free and only on spotify. Hi everyone carter here. On april twenty fifth. We're in for hollywood's biggest night of the year the ninety third annual academy awards steeped in tinseltown tradition. The oscars are a night of classic glamour. Stars walked the red carpet in their finest gowns and suits beneath all that sparkle. Hollywood has always had a seedy underbelly. In honor of the oscars par cast is put together. A special collection of ten episodes about the biggest scandals. In hollywood history will cover the hollywood madam who ran a celebrity sex ring the blacklisting of the hollywood ten and the mysterious death of natalie wood but before we dive into those infamous stories. We're going back to the original scandal. How hollywood got its start in this episode of the dark side of will explore. How hollywood was founded as a christian utopia and how the movie business came in to crush those dreams. Due to the graphic nature of this podcast listener discretion is advised this episode features discussions of drug use sexuality death and other adult content. We advise extreme caution for listeners. Under thirteen eighteen. Los angeles was a modest town of eleven thousand. People newly reachable by rail eight miles to the north northwest was largely undeveloped ranching area full of fruit trees and wild coyotes surrounded by stunning canyon views but the budding film industry had other plans and enterprising couple moved in setting up. Beautiful gritted streets and planting gardens. That would soon rival eden itself. They shared a dream of building a christian utopia for wealthy midwesterners away from the bustle of city life. There were to be stunning. Homes plentiful churches and absolutely no alcohol or debauchery of any kind but the budding film industry had plans in just five years. That small plot of rural paradise was transformed from an upscale elite society to the hotbed of the working class. Film industry and with that change came sex scandals. Elaborate drug rings predatory cults and cold blooded murders but if you were to look upon the land that was to be hollywood that idea would have been impossible to see in fact. The founders of the small plot of land in southern california had a much different premise about. It's ideal us. Harvey wilcox was in his early fifties and looking for new beginnings with his twenty one year. Old wife. Diana harjo the recently wed pair was an excellent match in part due to their shared christian faith in staunch opposition to alcohol. Both were early and ardent adopters of prohibitionist ideals. Harvey was a real estate man and recognized his young wife talents embracing her as a partner in his career as well as in his home beyond that they shared a vision a vision of a utopia and like so many others in the nineteenth century. The couple looked west in one thousand. Nine hundred eighty. Three southern california had a unique combination of rugged nature and toon ity los angeles had a meagre population of eleven thousand and the santa fe railway would not reach the city for another two years meaning wealthy landowners and aspiring farmers could tap into the untapped potential of the vast undeveloped fertile land. For the wilcox's this could be the home of their perfect society. A place to build their dream when they first moved out west. The wilcox's purchased a home in the desirable figueroa district of los angeles. They had a son about a year later and all seemed to be bliss but then tragedy struck and perhaps changed the course of cultural history in eighteen. Eighty six the wilcox's eighteen month. Old son harry died. It was a devastating. Turn for the couple who thought they had a bright future. To look forward to grief-stricken harvey and data began to take long carriage. Rides in the wild canyons near downtown. Los angeles led by harvey's stunning white racehorses duke and royal on their way to the canyons the couple pass through barely developed farmland dotted with patches of fig and apricot trees. The landscape was beautiful. And the wilcox's were infatuated. It was a paradise but an untamed one ripe for cultivation and development so like so many others that would come to this land in the future. They began to dream harvey and diet a new it in their hearts. This was to be the home of their utopia. But their vision of an ideal society had a rigid and sinister undertone. Harvey indeed were staunchly religious and as such they envisioned a community that banned both alcohol and non white non christian residence. This was actually part of a late. Nineteenth century trend many fundamentalist christians were breaking off from society to build commune's their own particular brand of beliefs. These could be relatively mundane or more dramatic and cult-like in their origins. No place had the combination of natural aesthetic beauty and open space to attract these commune's as california so on february first eighteen eighty seven and harvey purchased roughly one hundred twenty acres approximately eight miles north of downtown los angeles. Virtually the middle of nowhere. Their goal was to turn the parcel into a retirement destination for wealthy christian midwesterners wanting to try their hand at hobby farming and land speculation harvey a wealthy upper class elitist plan to personally screen prospective buyers to keep out heathens non whites and those not polished enough for their dream society because the wilcox is owned the land they owned a city completely separate from los angeles that they could control however they saw fit but like any up and coming community. Their land needed a name in august. It came to data by chance train ride. She was returning from seeing relatives in ohio. When a wealthy passengers spoke of her own estate in illinois named hollywood data loved holly trees and further loved that a member of societies upper crust had already given the name to her estate to data it evoked. The dreamy exclusive luxury. They're utopia was meant to embody data suggested to harvey and they officially submitted the name to the county recorder in august of eighteen eighty seven harvey drew up a map of their new community along with perfect gritted street delineations and individual lamp plots. Hollywood was officially born. He indata pass the time by coming up with street. Names hoping this would also attract customers. Meanwhile they employed laborers to help clear the dirt roads and plant hand some pepper trees on the edge of properties. These laborers were primarily chinese and mexican immigrants. The wilcox's only wanted white families to own their property but they had no problem employing the cheapest labor they could get in order to build their dream but just when things were going their way the economy took a steep downturn los angeles suffered a real estate crash in the late eighteen eighty s the bubble that had brought thousands out to california with dreams of going into real estate eventually left more realtors than land buyers the bubble burst and buyers grew scarce. This was a terrible loss for the wilcox's in eighteen eighty seven. They were forced to sell their own downtown home and refund money to buyers who were forced to pull out at the last second to their greater horror. The need to stay afloat financially forced them to lower their strict requirements on new residents even admitting a few people who openly drank they promised themselves would only be temporary. But this officially marked the beginning of hollywood's downward spiral into a town of excess. The couple tried to offset their bad luck by encouraging residents to hire top notch architects and plant beautiful eden like gardens around their future homes they also accorded commercial developers hoping that upscale businesses would make hollywood more desirable slowly. They began to recover but disaster. Hit before they could truly get back on their feet. Harvey's health took a turn for the worse during these stressful times and on march nineteenth ninety one. At about sixty years old. He passed away data. Just twenty nine was now a widow with a house on the edge of an increasingly undesirable neighborhood and little financial means to speak of on top of that mounting water problems threatened hollywood's continued development with the city alternating between terrible floods and stark shortages. That summer a particularly awful drought dry. Data's well completely leaving her without safe drinking water. These conditions once again forced data to sell to undesirables leaving the young widow rather despondent that is until eighteen ninety four when data thought. Her luck was turning around at last that year. She married her second husband. Filo judson beverage. Filo was a good-looking wealthy son of a former governor. His family connections provided financial stability and aida and follows partnership as beverage and beverage real estate finally to return to building her utopia. It also helped that shortly after their marriage files father. The esteemed former governor john beverage of illinois moved to hollywood giving it the prestige necessary to attract wealthier more established clients. This continued in one thousand nine hundred when she successfully sold property to the communities. I true celebrity. Resident paul delong. Pray the so-called king of flowers delong. Pray was a famous french painter. Who is a smash hit with the more conservative residents. He was cultured. Foreign and painted tasteful florals as opposed to more popular nude paintings that were the talk of the art world delong praise presence alone sent property values skyrocketing data had struck gold development began to snowball and in nineteen o to the hollywood hotel opened. It was an instant success but also ultimately brought undue attention to the budding city. It began to be harder to control. Who was in. And out of hollywood with all the workers and tourists and the prohibitionist rules of the city. Were being broken more and more often much. Today does dismay. Her own husband was caught breaking the law when he tried to serve white wine. At an event hollywood hotel this began to sow a seed of discord between his rigid morals and follows more progressive outlook. This was exacerbated by the other headaches created from trying to run a city in the wet winter months the city was consistently flooding. Meanwhile wealthiest state owners refuse to put unsightly septic tanks and other sewage processing facilities on their land leading to a lack of adequate equipment and constant sewage. Backups all over town. Hollywood literally stunk and the only way to fix these problems was utilizing the resources and labor force of los angeles but that would mean being incorporated by the city and losing the autonomy that allowed hollywood to ban liquor and control who is allowed to live their votes began around nineteen o five on whether or not to join los angeles data who had literally created. Hollywood wasn't allowed to participate since women's suffrage would not pass for fifteen years then in nineteen zero seven. A new obstacle appeared that no one could have predicted. The movies arrived in los angeles next. Hollywood takes on a life of its own now back to the story in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight at the same time. That hollywood was falling victim to a real estate bubble bursting. Thomas edison patented an invention. That would change hollywood forever. Edison was a shrewd businessman who held or jointly held a record of one thousand ninety three patents across his lifetime. Edison didn't actually invent the motion picture camera himself however always looking to strengthen his prophets he commissioned a lab. Assistant named william kennedy. Laurie dickson to do it and dixon delivered in eighteen eighty eight. The camera was revolutionary and within ten years a burgeoning film industry had emerged in new jersey. The new industry was exciting but not without its challenges. Early film relied entirely on natural light meaning companies had to us open spaces and sunshine to get their shots even built elaborate moving platforms to track the sunlight as it moved throughout the day whenever there was poor weather or the sun went down. Production had to stop while this obstacle was utterly frustrating to filmmakers the medium was still wildly lucrative and there were always people willing to brave the elements to make a picture. Edison saw the rapidly growing industry as a way to make a fortune and as usual. He wanted to keep everything under his control. He went after anyone who tried to make. Additional cameras are equipment ensuring his products. Were the only ones on the market but his cameras were expensive. Only a few of the original film companies could afford them which suited these companies just fine. It meant a monopoly on the market thus in nineteen nine eight. These companies banded together to form the motion picture patents company or edison. Trust all of this culminated in a rash of illegal filmmaking around new york a creative industry that from its outset was lawless and extremely competitive as a result film companies and independent projects began outright sabotaging each other's productions fires on sets damaged cameras broken equipment actors getting roughed up by hired thugs these were extremely common occurrences in the early movie scene. One of the most popular forms of this pointed subversion was for higher double agents to bring a loaded to set and shoot out the camera lens during filming. It was a ruthless kind of film on film crime producing stories wild enough to fuel writers imaginations and capture the attention of movie goers gangster stories quickly became popular and directors would cast gangsters to play fake gangsters on screen. This made the performances convincing if unconventional but with such a potent integration with the criminal underworld police intervention was inevitable and they would regularly arrest filmmakers and shutdown productions. This was the anarchy of the early film industry threats sabotage and violence gangsters and thugs all in the name of the newest form of art. It was chaos what was worse. The motion picture patents company discouraged feature length products outside financing and other natural growths in the film industry upsetting even the filmmakers who bought into the system. Those who really wanted to make their mark in movies realized they were going to have to get out of new york and new jersey to do so in those days. The post was slow and travel was difficult. The best way to run from the law was to head as far away from it as possible for that reason. Many illegal filmmakers started migrating west to southern california besides being far from the law and the reign of the mpp see southern california received three hundred to three hundred and fifty days of sunshine a year new york city by contrast got a maximum of about two hundred severely limiting film production coming from the loud dirty populated streets of new york. Southern california felt like paradise. There was almost no change. Between summer and winter the landscape offered ocean beaches deserts rocky canyons snowy mountaintops and grassy plains all within a day's drive. The filmmaker soon realized they were home. Much like data wilcox. They had found their eden but just as had happened in new york and new jersey. Legal authorities soon came collecting remember just because they had left the east coast didn't mean they were free from edison's patents and private. Detectives were more than thrill to chase the movies. West director allan dwan was not in tirelessly shocked when a well dressed. Private detective showed up on set in the early. Nineteen hundreds hoping to shut down allen's production and collect reward money back east allen. New thugs like this meant business. But he wasn't going to give up his life's work. He led the detective up to an arroyo or small creek bed which was full of used tin cans from set. The detective pulled out a firearm and warned allen menacingly. We want you to get out of town immediately. Quit making pictures. Just forget about it to prove his point. The detective fired into the arroyo. He missed every canny shot at but the can still dance dramatically. But doin was prepared calmly. He pulled out his own firearm allen. Fired three cans from fifty feet away and hit each straight through the middle. He looked the detective in the eye and asked. Do you want to try that again. Thoroughly spooked the detective ran off straight into the three mounted morrison brothers and their winchester. Rifles these real-life cowboys were extras on the film and hired security. The morrison brothers roughed up the detective enough that he left town and alan didn't hear from the agency again. Of course this story was too good to pass up. Within a year allen's company made a film based on the experience with embellishments of course anything for entertainment. This situation was typical at the time. Filmmaking was not for the faint of heart bodily harm was almost a given and between the hired gangsters. an unsafe. Stunts movie says were downright dangerous. Anyone interested in making movies had to be ready to literally cracks goals but despite the danger more and more people move to california in the early nineteen hundreds smaller film companies set up in remote areas giving them plenty of room to build sets and film the landscape the more legitimate companies settled in the cities where equipment and cheap labor were more readily available hopeful actors and extras began coming to the city for work given a quarter to a third of all filmmaking in the early nineteen hundreds was independent and therefore illegal there was a large market interested in operating far far away from edison and his patents. What was more the ninth circuit court of appeals which oversees california to this day was not particularly interested in enforcing patent laws adding a layer of protection to filmmakers and in the unlikely event. A case was upheld in a court of law. It was only a few hundred miles to the mexican border so long as your equipment passed over with you. It couldn't be seized. So southern california became the mecca for movies in nineteen zero seven. The first film studio opened in downtown los angeles while filmmakers were initially content to shoot their pictures on studio stages filmmakers soon wanted a variety of backgrounds and less crowded areas to film mainly hollywood unfortunately for data wilcox. There was easy public transportation between los angeles and hollywood which allowed filmmakers and their crews to easily commute to hollywood during the day. Hollywood was after all only eight miles from downtown. The stunning garden of eden effect the data and the hollywood community had so carefully cultivated now attracted the very scoundrels and vagrants. They wanted to keep out. It was no secret that hollywood residents immediately hated film people even calling their growing presence. Unin vision their productions filled the peaceful streets with clanging yelling and general chaos not to mention the presence of working class and minority people who these utopians detested several residents reported shock and dismay at their door to see to mounted cowboys galloping across their properties with a camera crew shouting running after them. These incidents became increasingly common. And there wasn't much the town could legally do about it. Shooting permits were unheard of at this time and the town could only govern what businesses were built inside city lines because the film crews showed up during the day but packed up and left at night. Hollywood's laws didn't apply to them as they were written. Well plenty of. The hollywood elite wanted to enact stricter laws and fight back against the influx of film professionals. They had more immediate problems there. Infrastructure hadn't been fixed and property values plummeting voting residents faced the difficult decision of keeping their independence while singing into further economic failure or joining los angeles to survive. They held on as long as they could. But in the fall of nineteen o nine finally voted to merge with the city. The vote passed and hollywood officially became los angeles's newest neighborhood and the vagabonds welcomed with open arms. Next hollywood becomes tinseltown and now back to the dark side of hollywood in one thousand nine hundred. Nine of haute passed to give up hollywood's legal autonomy in exchange for help with failing infrastructure financial woes an ever-worsening sewage problem. Now that hollywood was part of the city of los angeles. The alcohol ban was lifted as was the ban on movie studios. There was nothing data could do about it. She was forced to watch three decades of work crumble around her almost immediately future film tycoon. Cecil b demille purchased a nearly inaccessible shack in hollywood used expressly for filming within the year. He opened los. Angeles's second film studio. Demille would soon become deeply enamoured with hollywood. He constantly filmed they're bringing increasing numbers of film. Crew into the area actors flocked from all over the country to try their hand at these new motion pictures flooding the streets of hollywood and storming the gates of studios every morning in hopes of finding work with this abundance of new labour and new films came a rise in alcohol. Consumption drug use child labor and sex scandals all smack in the middle of hollywood and with the emergence of the movie industry in hollywood and los angeles so to came the things that always marked the silver screen dreams and broken dreams fame and idolization risks and rewards beyond the early twentieth centuries imagination. The dream that became tinseltown had captured. The country's imagination and the fundamentalist christians scattered around hollywood would soon be vastly. Outnumbered data live just long enough to see her city lost to darkness. She contracted cancer and died in nineteen fourteen less than a year later in nineteen fifteen. Hollywood release. the world's first feature length film the three hour epic birth of a nation. D w griffith had filmed parts of it in his hollywood studio. The film began with a disclaimer on screen quote. This is a historical presentation of the civil war and reconstruction period and is not meant to reflect on any race or people of today. The movies content was the exact opposite of this claim it unabashedly portrayed black people as the main reason for the problems in the south specifically during the antebellum and civil war periods in case the racism wasn't clear enough. The end of the movie showed the ku klux klan writing into heroically restore the south to it's perceived pre-civil war glory. The movie was a resounding success. Which meant it's racist and hateful. Rhetoric was seen all over the country and even abroad this empowered many racists across the country to begin speaking more boldly about their twisted beliefs. In fact birth of a nation is consistently credited with revitalizing the k. k. k. So much so that the k. k. k. literally used the film to train new recruits well into the nineteen seventies if not longer birth of a nation wasn't wildly out of place at the time though most viewers read it as historically accurate and the film skewed perspective made audiences feel justified in their beliefs. Plus the film was an incredible technological feat. No-one had seen a production. This expensive or long before and the sets and stunts were stunning. But the film did have critics. There were people outraged by its big stances and false understanding of the past. Unfortunately these voices were too small and too young to make an organized effort against the film for example the nwa c. p. had just been formed a few years earlier in nineteen o nine and it was in no position to take on a cultural juggernaut. Historian david layer compares it to being the star wars of its time besides with no national laws film distribution. It was hard to go after more than a single theater or state at once and the studio was eager to show the film in as many places as possible feature films provided newer and bigger success opportunities for directors and performers alike and actors. Were often willing to do anything to keep their careers often. This meant sustaining onset injuries. These could be broken. Bones burns breathing. Problems from special effects or severe skin lacerations despite the medical industry knowing the dangers of opiates. Morphine and heroin. Were still the preferred painkillers of choice in the nineteen and even early nineteen twenty s. As a result injured actors would often become addicted to these hard drugs. Some fell into a cycle of addiction later. Becoming targets of newly formed drug rings others attempted to get off drugs by switching to alcohol which wasn't necessarily any better to famous cases of early drug scandals. Were wallace reid. And fatty arbuckle. Both were beloved. American performers read acted birth of a nation and had contracts extending well into the nineteen twenties for more work are buckle was the highest paid performer in hollywood surpassing. Even charlie chaplin read was given morphine to handle terrible injuries after a train crash because the morphine allowed him to keep working the studio look the other way as his addiction began to grow read shocked the nation when he overdosed on set in early. Nineteen twenty two. He died a year later from complications. He was the first of many drug related. Hollywood deaths are buckle also suffered an injury in the mid nineteen. Ten's his doctors put him on. Heroin are buckle successfully switched to alcohol but as a result became a well-known drunk the arbuckle scandal surpassed the read scandal in seriousness when our buckle was accused of drunkenly raping and murdering another famous actress. Virginia repay in one thousand nine hundred ninety one while he was ultimately acquitted public opinion toward the movies took an enormous hit which may have exacerbated an already growing problem as stories of scandal leaked out of los angeles. Many of the country's derelict began to see tinseltown. As a place. Where anything goes this was the exploitative and that hollywood was founded on built upon an industry that was literally running from the law. The leaders of the film world were ruthless and tenacious in their methods which gave it a dangerous mystique that only helped the film industry grow at an explosive rate movie studios with huge stages popped up more and more frequently these stages left productions to the mercy of the weather sometimes equipment caught fire or crews had to rush to cover the cameras and props when a rare rain came in. There were no unions regulations. Yet and hopeful crew and actors had to show up at the studio gates in the mornings to try to get work but this rigid atmosphere contrasted the glitz and glamour. That was creeping. its way into the city. Hollywood had transformed into a premier destination for the rich and famous in addition to becoming the location of homes to stars such as buster keaton. Douglas maclean mary pickford. It became a major tourist attraction the hollywood hotel once an alcohol. Free local establishment was constantly full with guests and actors. Even visiting dignitaries wanted to see hollywood. As hollywood welcomed the roaring twenties the movie industry had completely taken over los angeles. But not everyone found hollywood as welcoming as they'd hoped with a growing population of movie. Hopefuls came a growing population of out of work actors. Many who had moved west to make it in film had their dreams dashed and felt increasingly isolated in a town void of family and friends looking for a surrogate family and a place to call home. Many became susceptible to the burgeoning number of colts popping up around the area. These were so prevalent that there were an estimated four hundred colts in los angeles in the nineteen twenties alone. Hollywood had become synonymous with fame and power drawing ambitious crooks from around the country who were only too happy to get a fresh start out west. This was in part because a. was growing so rapidly. Eleven thousand people in eighteen eighty became one hundred thousand people in one thousand nine hundred. That number rose to five hundred. Seventy five thousand people in nineteen twenty and a whopping one point. Two million people in nineteen thirty. This man los angeles went from the thirty sixth most populous city in the united states in nineteen hundred to the fifth in one thousand nine thirty. Not all of that growth was good. The rise of show business led to the systemic exploitation of women children and minorities meanwhile countless budding actors threw away their life. Savings to make it in showbiz only to end up destitute. The great depression hit at the end of the twenties. Sending even more hopefuls spiraling out of work former actresses often sought burlesque and sex work to pay the bills. Meanwhile newly enacted federal codes clamp down on the moral purity of onscreen stories while the scandals murders and drug deaths kept piling up in the tabloids. It's hard to believe that in nineteen thirty hollywood was completely unrecognisable from either the open canyon pastures of the eighteen eighties or the wilcox's conservative alcohol free. Utopia of nineteen hundred hollywood's bright lights and allure of a better life would continue attracting dreamers for the next one hundred years and beyond and the hollywood machine would keep crushing then may blackburn was not the last mother to try to use her daughter to gain a fortune. And fatty are buckle and wallace reid. We're not the only drug alcohol or murder cases to come out of hollywood. There were scandals to come. That hadn't even been dreamt of from drug rings to terrifying stage mothers to cults with all that light and glamour. The shadows just kept getting darker. Thanks for listening. If you enjoyed this episode follow the dark side of for free on spotify to hear more and be sure to check out the next episode in our collection the story of the downfall of fatty arbuckle which became known as hollywood's first scandal. Hollywood scandals is a spotify original from par cast. It is executive produced by max cutler. This collection was written and developed by chelsea would and writing assistance from kate. Gallagher production assistants by aaron larson and ron shapiro. Fact checking by haley milliken and hosted by carter roy. This episode of hollywood scandals comes from the dark side of hosted by kate. Leonard and richard. Rosner and written by taylor cleland sound designed by ron shapiro with production assistance by carleen madden and nagy admire. Remember to check out the new spotify original from podcast hollywood's scandals every monday discover the real life dramas of some of entertainment's biggest names. Listen to hollywood scandals free and only on spotify.

hollywood wilcox los angeles Hollywood harvey california Harvey Edison north northwest oscars Harvey wilcox Diana harjo allen holly trees harvey drew Filo judson john beverage paul delong