17 Burst results for "Hollandia"

"hollandia" Discussed on GOOD PODS DON'T HAVE LONG NAMES

GOOD PODS DON'T HAVE LONG NAMES

03:55 min | 1 d ago

"hollandia" Discussed on GOOD PODS DON'T HAVE LONG NAMES

"You know what I would do for fifty five, million dollars five, million, fifty five seems like it'd be more than what is the The guy from the offspring? What is it? What does he lets his name? Lead, Singer nobody knows blond-haired bike era. Here's our Hollandia. Actor that in. starship troopers. Yeah. The Blond Guy. Yeah Yeah forty million shut the phone million. What's Guy owns a hot sauce company bro Oud. Songwriter and entrepreneur. Entrepreneurs. Or something. Oh we are entrepreneurs. Oh. County. Kings. The condiment kings. That's US Hey, for anybody that doesn't. Perfect anybody that doesn't know we're in the game now. Everyone I'm sauce. Boys? Yeah. Trust arse off. The themselves south. Find us on Instagram at the condom in kings. You can find us on twitter at T C K. Detroit. And were cooking up some sauce. Let me actually a little something on something. I, I gotta say Adam. This is fucking next level. I try. We Adam I made some sweet. He'd mustard needs idea I'm still sweating from it. I first bite I got a little guys. I was taught my throat my third me all the way to put it up. I remember sitting here and I was like Oh minimal stuffed up. Sunday's Lee that shit cleared me out. Why wasn't I feel like I'm on my game Every time before each pod I have to teaspoon. Oh We'd. Have Fun I wasn't stuffed up before and now I feel like my brain melted and his coming out of my nose. After I. See. What air coming. Through. there. I heard clear. A covert is transferred through the nose I heard. More so than the mouth. Give a couple more of those. Somebody. Come over and kiss my windscreen. ooh. I really hope we make a lot of sauces. Can that. So hundred percent fucking do? Get the cricket out make the label. Also about what? Happened Sweet. Front. Door covert killer that's going to be covert killer hot sauce. Mustard wait a second shit I fucked up covert killer mustard it would be in your nose, right like I just said. That clears out the now I was thinking I same thing. So that is actually unless freezing the chances of spreading covert. Yes. Yeah. Yeah. Inside yourself if you have covid and you eat this GonNa be all stuffed up anymore. So you need to eat by yourself that you can evacuate your all your asking, right. So you eat this and then quarantine weeks. To heat this every day you're in. Corner Yeah. Yeah, and then as soon after this will be hydrocare Accu- Barbecue all yeah varies. Over our fucking names have change the all I dead assets thinking about their yesterday. Fuck Dude as soon as. We just recap we just read the same labels often whenever the next one is we'll just name it that. is the cars three mustard right? We'll be ahead of the game by that. Either way grids to. Oh. Man Oh God Rock and roll I don't know but label on it. Yeah. We'll get jar jar shape. Dick's for the. Maybe, we'll make some Bayrou explosion hot sauce to. Talk about a segue let's yoga about one hundred, thousand people dying hundred, thirty, nine, hundred, thirty. One thirty five when I heard last was one hundred and then it was like four thousand injured when I heard last six. Hundred thirty seven people and injured five thousand. Five thousand. Are you re it's already. No..

Adam Lee Hollandia Detroit Dick
"hollandia" Discussed on The Jock and Nerd Podcast

The Jock and Nerd Podcast

07:01 min | 11 months ago

"hollandia" Discussed on The Jock and Nerd Podcast

"It's kind of Sassy Sassy thing so and then the other thing I thought was interesting in here is he says Spiderman was fine before the event movies did better with the event movies and now that we have our own universe. He will play off the other characters as well. I think we're pretty capable of doing what we do here. Does that mean he's going to be in envenom in Moebius in these. They said they're working on five or six. Live Action TV series is set in the Spiderman main world with Spiderman characters high-demand able love Tom Holland. They got him so that's a good thing. They have a good five to start it over without Tom Hollandia disaster. I think that it would be people would just automatically protest because they're such a stan ship for Tom. I'm hot. Where can I ask a question. Where does the word stand come from. I have no idea Anthony Dino withstand. All you don't even know the words Stan what's percents I think it's like a rabid fan. I think it's comes from the Song Stan. Oh okay so stan is an an over zealous or obsessive fan of particular celebrity or fantasy night. It's all over the Internet. Everyone is like stand. There's and stand up but I think you're right. It comes eminem instead of the obsessive fame. Look I taught a millennial something who he had the we're you can use that. All these Spiderman stands like I I consider stands like people that are like got like I am about Spiderman. You know I guess Anthony. Let me ask you this what this foundation that the MC has given given given Sony Tom Holland Spiderman. I would you be looking forward to him being in venom to with carnage no go now really. I mean I probably would still watch it. I I've growing on the opinion that Sam Ramey and whoever directed into the spine verse they've more or less just got lucky with the product yeah and I don't think Sony is all that good in producing spiderman content. I mean I'm kind of now. I'm excited to see what they're doing. It highlights they fuck it up or can they keep the momentum on a third spiderman movie with what they have set up. I think that Disney has designs on what spider and should be for their financial financial future of the of the franchise of Spiderman like so they do the TV shows that you the cartoons does all that yeah. Sony not so much concerned with that because you've seen them fuck up spider man you know a couple of times and he has merchandising rights. They have a lot of other revenues revenues spiderman so it kind of like is a huge thing and that they're allowed more cautious with it and they a lot safer with it in their loud more willing to like tone it down in make it nice in on forever. That's why I'm kind of excited. It's a little bit more edgy than willing to like. Do due weird shit now that play out in a way I might hate because they could go completely off the rails I don't know I mean it's kind of like a really is like I have no idea how to go play. I'm just I'm grateful that we did get what we get because remember in the deal broke like this is unprecedented thing no oh to studios have ever done anything like this before to rival studios fucking playing nice for like the last four five years on this is unbelievable unbelievable like usually they're cut throat and they WANNA fuck each other over. I've never seen something like this happened. Well Sony was making shit loads of money off of this house. Why wouldn't they take yeah and then Disney comes in and says no. You're not going to get that money by that money get some of that money and they're like oh no and I'm telling you rugs. I think your idea is still sound. Disney offer Sony ten billion dollars for all of it lock stock and barrel ended back over they should do. They have the money I think. Sony would good investment for them. Like Spiderman is never not going to be Spiderman Anthony. You think it's worth ten billion. Spiderman back the NBA. I don't know about ten billion the. I don't think it's worth ten I mean nine hundred characters and spiderman ten billion dollars. Just think about the money that they'll make okay okay so they make. Let's say they make another six movies. In each of the makes a billion dollars. That's a good point. There have their money back already like for an but they're. GonNa GonNa make shitloads more on all Tian's and all the other things that they're going to do with it so like theme park stuff. That's based on video games so so they'll get if they own the character lock stock and barrel. They'll make so much more than ten billion ten billion it marvel was I think they bought marvel for four billion. Yes all of marvel back in the day and even office. Star Wars was four billion when Disney bought it yeah but now oh you got a billion dollar movie making property yeah. In how many star wars movies did they make. What are they up to so now nine yeah well yeah one two three four five six year and we how many marble they make twenty three all right though and they both netted Disney like sixteen seventeen billion dollars each which is crazy so look. Sony Ball's in your court. Don't fuck fuck it up anyway immigrant. Rome seventy what happened can offer seven seven. They said ten they really all take nine Maybe we'll see him in venom to okay. Let's let's take a quick break here. Play some promos where come back with another patriots on movie review right after this Hey guys this is venise and I've got a message from a friend of mine about my favorite podcast. Did you boy flavor. Flav and full of fake. Check this out of embody. I watch all go check out. TJ Was Johnson here from Westwood Underground. I I am the most handsome big has spoken my cigar of course you know saying judge you hoover and the PT Cruiser. I'm calling lip because they'll be fighting. Power talking fell social issues politics. You know what I'm saying and we're not even that good right. We're terrible terrible tennis all over the place and and not only that but they be keeping a form of sports music comics and movies too. Am I allowed to talk. I think right now is the you know what.

Sony Spiderman Anthony Disney Tom Holland Stan Tom Hollandia Anthony Dino Sam Ramey Tom tennis NBA hoover Westwood Underground Tian Rome TJ Flav Johnson
"hollandia" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

06:25 min | 1 year ago

"hollandia" Discussed on KTOK

"Someone shouted. Attention on deck and everybody snapped to attention, and then they began to cheer and clap, and and tears came to his eyes. And he couldn't believe that they were receiving him so warmly and that continued through the entire reunion weekend. Sara talk a little bit about difficulty in getting materials. You talked about going through archives and finding records at share with me. Did you run into roadblocks that you could not get past? And and if so what were they actually one of the documents that really helped us pay the biggest picture was the court of inquiry documents. And you know, I had tried for years Lynn had come into the picture and join me in this effort to get a copy of this document. And the reason it was so important was that it was really the first recorded testimony of any of the survivor's right after the sinking. So just days after they're rescued. They're in the hospital in Guam and their testimonies are taken, and so we tried everything to get these documents. And this actually this specific report, and we would come back. You know? Oh, it's lost forever. Oh one. You know, we got one copy of it, and it was entirely redacted and. Freedom freedom of information act should have allowed us to have this. And then, you know, we contacted the the source again and our context. Well, we don't have an unredacted version doesn't exist. And so interestingly enough, you know, a friend or actually a young man who became a friend was the grandson of the rescue pilot who landed in the water and save fifty three men his. His grandson was actually. Inspector general sorry. I was trying to remember his title. He's inspector general works with the navy. And he was actually the person who got us this document. And this kind of showed us really testimonies of what happened not only when the ship was torpedoed in those final moments, but what was happening in the water because in the court martial they did not allow any of the testimonies about what took place in the actual water because they didn't you know, that would impact how McVeigh was viewed. And so it was kept strictly to what took place when the ship was torpedoed and the events leading up to that. So this new court of inquiry document was so important because guess seventy years later stories can change or stories can be impacted by other stories, but this was the purest form of what really took place not only when the ship sank. But in the water for those five nights and four days. Lynn, could you talk about the life of media. After they were rescued what it was like for the the survivors where they were taken. I would assume more of them died after because of their injuries and exposure. Well, a few did die. And if you can imagine how awful that was not only for the men themselves, but for their families to know that they had actually made it all the way to rescue only to die of their exposure and their injuries. So I think three hundred and twenty were actually rescued is that correct, Sara. Yes. Three hundred and twenty were rescued but only three hundred sixteen ultimately survive. So they were taken to base hospitals around the Philippine sea eventually converging on Guam where they had some time to recover before they had to give their testimony. And then they went aboard the USS Helen Hollandia, which was an escort carrier, and they actually landed in our home city of San Diego where they were actually participated in a parade. And then. Very quickly. They went home. Caught buses and trains back to their hometowns some of them immediately got out of the navy some of them had survivors leave and then got out some of them stayed and made careers of the navy. And you know, this was the greatest generation. So the vast majority of the men they just kind of put this behind them. They went on to have careers as engineers and fishermen and everything you can think of police officers, but there were those who could not hold a job. And there were those who became alcoholics and had many many struggles and almost to a man, none of them talked about it not even to their families. They held it in. And years and years some for sixty years, but mostly they didn't talk about it today. That would be a lot different. I think people would be out trying to get a book deal or a movie deal or something like that. But these men were different. I think about that Robert Shaw character in jaws, you know, he had kept that story bottled up he becomes a shark hunter. As a result of of being one of those guys, and that's very moving scene. And that was great. I was gonna use the clip. Anyway, I was really glad to see the coverage in in the book. Sarah. Did you always have in mind keeping that in there? Well, yeah, it's really, you know, when Lennon I've gone across the country talking to groups about the story in this book, you know, one of the things that really comes out every time is that most people learned about this story from job. So it's an essential part of the stories history. Is that you know, the public learned about it this way. Interestingly enough, some of the children of the survivors. Actually, I heard about it. And that their father was involved in it by watching jots, you know, they came home several accounts came home saw the movie we're really impacted by it, and especially the scene at only to find out their dad was on the ship. This scene is about. Yeah. It's pretty incredible. The men didn't talk about it that long, but then to find out this way. But that's you know, how your dad served in World War Two. Lynn, Vincent, Sarah Vladic. Indianapolis is the book when we come back. We'll open up the phone lines. And maybe maybe you've got some questions or comments our calls. We'll be right back..

Lynn Guam Sara Sarah Vladic Indianapolis McVeigh Helen Hollandia San Diego Robert Shaw jots Lennon Vincent seventy years sixty years four days
"hollandia" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

06:25 min | 1 year ago

"hollandia" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Someone shouted. Attention on deck and everybody snap to attention. And then they began to cheer and clap, and and tears came to his eyes. And he couldn't believe that they were receiving him so warmly and that continued through the entire reunion weekend. Sara talk a little bit about difficulty in getting materials talked about going through archives and finding records share with me did you run into roadblocks that you could not get past. And if so what were they actually one of the documents that really helped us pay the biggest picture was the court of inquiry documents, and I had tried for years Lynn had come into the picture and join me in this effort to get a copy of this document. And the reason it was so important was that it was really the first recorded testimony of any of the survivor's right after the sinking. So just days after they're rescued. They're in the hospital in Guam and their testimonies are taken, and so we tried everything to get these documents. And this actually this specific report, and we would come back. You know? Oh, it's lost forever. Oh one. You know, we got one copy of it, and it was entirely redacted and. You know, freedom freedom of information act should have allowed us to have this. And then, you know, we contacted the the source again and our context. Well, we don't have an unredacted version doesn't exist. And so interestingly enough, you know, a friend or actually a a young man who became a friend was the grandson of the rescue pilot who landed in the water and save fifty three men his. His grandson was actually. Inspector general sorry. I was trying to remember his title. He's inspector general works with the navy. And he was actually the person who got us this document. And this kind of showed us really testimonies of what happened not only when the ship was torpedoed and those final moments, but what was happening in the water because in the court martial they did not allow any of the testimonies about what took place in the actual water because they didn't you know, that would impact how McVeigh was viewed. And so it was kept strictly to what took place when the ship was torpedoed and the events leading up to that. So this new court of inquiry document was so important because you know, seventy years later stories can change or stories can be impacted by other stories, but this was the purest form of what really took place not only when the ship sank. But in the water for those five nights and four days. Lynn could you talk about the life immediate. After they were rescued what it was like for the the survivors where they were taken. I I would assume more of them died after because of their injuries and exposure. Well, a few did die. And if you can imagine how awful that was not only for the men themselves, but for their families to know that they had actually made it all the way to rescue only to die of their exposure and their injuries. So I think three hundred and twenty were actually rescued is that correct, Sara. Yes. Three hundred and twenty were rescued but only three hundred sixteen ultimately survive. So they were taken to base hospitals around the Philippine sea eventually converging on Guam where they had some time to recover before they had to give their testimony. And then they went aboard the USS Helen Hollandia, which was an escort carrier, and they actually landed in our home city of San Diego where they were actually participated in a parade. And then. Very quickly. They went home. Caught buses and trains back to their hometowns some of them immediately got out of the navy some of them had survivors leave and then got out some of them stayed and made careers of the navy. And you know, this was the greatest generation. So the majority of the men they just kind of put this behind them. They went on to have careers as engineers and fishermen and everything you can think of police officers, but there were those who could not hold a job. And there were those who became alcoholics and had many many struggles and almost to a man, none of them talked about it not even to their families. They held it in yours and years and years some for sixty years that mostly they didn't talk about it today. That would be a lot different. I think people would be out trying to get a book deal or a movie deal or something. But these men were different. I think about that Robert Shaw character in jaws, you know, he had kept that story bottled up he becomes a shark hunter. As a result of of being one of those guys and very moving scene. And I was great. I was gonna use the clip. Anyway, I was really glad to see the coverage in in the book. Sarah. Did you always have in mind keeping that in there? Well, yeah, it's really, you know, when I I've gone across the country talking to groups about the story in this book, you know, one of the things that really comes out every time is that most people learned about this story from Josh. So it's an essential part of the stories history. Is that you know, the public learned about it this way. Interestingly enough, some of the children of the survivors. Actually, I heard about it. And that their father was involved in it by watching jobs, you know, they came home several accounts came home saw the movie we're really impacted by it, and especially the scene and only to find out their dad was on the ship. This scene is about. You know, it's pretty incredible. The men didn't talk about it that long. But then to find out this way that that's you know, how your dad served in World War, Two Lynn, Vincent serve. Latic? Indianapolis is the book when we come back. We'll open up the phone lines. And maybe maybe you've got some questions or comments our calls. We'll be right.

Lynn Guam Sara Indianapolis McVeigh Helen Hollandia San Diego Robert Shaw Sarah Josh Vincent seventy years sixty years four days
"hollandia" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

06:25 min | 1 year ago

"hollandia" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Someone shouted. Attention on deck and everybody snap to attention. And then they began to cheer and clap, and and tears came to his eyes. And he couldn't believe that. They were receding him so warmly and that continued through the entire reunion weekend. Sara talk a little bit about difficulty in getting materials. You talked about going through archives and finding records share with me did you run into roadblocks that you could not get past. And and if so what were they actually one of the documents that really helped us pay? It's the biggest picture was the court of inquiry documents. And you know, I had tried for years Lynn had come into the picture and join me in this effort to get a copy of this document. And the reason it was so important was that it was really the first recorded testimony of any of the survivor's right after the sinking. So just days after they're rescued. They're in the hospital in Guam and their testimonies are taken, and so we tried everything to get these documents. And this actually this specific report, and we would come back. You know? Oh, it's lost forever. Oh one. You know, we got one copy of it, and it was entirely redacted and. You know, freedom freedom of information act should have allowed us to have this. And then, you know, we contacted the the source again and our context. Well, we don't have an unredacted version doesn't exist. And so interestingly enough, you know, a friend or actually a young man who became a friend was the grandson of the rescue pilot who landed in the water and saved fifty three men. His his grandson was actually. Inspector general sorry. I was trying to remember his title. He's inspector general works with the navy. And he was actually the person who got us this document. And this kind of showed us really testimonies of what happened not only when the ship was torpedoed in those final moments, but what was happening in the water because in the court martial they did not allow any of the testimonies about what took place in the actual water because they didn't you know, that would impact how McVeigh was viewed. And so it was kept strictly to what took place when the ship was torpedoed and the events leading up to that. So this new court of inquiry document was so important because seventy years later stories can change or stories can be impacted by other stories, but this was the purest form of what really took place not only when the ship sank. But in the water for those five nights and four days. Lynn could you talk about. The life immediately after they were rescued what it was like for the survivors where they were taken. I I would assume more of them died after because of their injuries and exposure. Well, a few did die. And if you can imagine how awful that was not only for the men themselves for their families to know that they had actually made it all the way to rescue only to die of their exposure and their injuries. So I think three hundred and twenty were actually rescued is that correct, Sara. Yes. Three hundred and twenty rescued but only three hundred sixteen ultimately survived. So they were taken to base hospitals around the Philippine sea eventually converging on Guam where they had some time to recover before they had to give their testimony. And then they went aboard the USS Helen Hollandia, which was an escort carrier, and they actually landed in our home city of San Diego where they were actually participated in a parade. And then. Very quickly. They went home. Caught buses and trains back to their hometowns some of them immediately got out of the navy some of them had survivors leave and then got out some of them stayed and made careers of the navy. And you know, this was the greatest generation. So the vast majority of the men they just kind of put this behind them. They went on to have careers as engineers and fishermen and everything you can think of police officers, but there were those who could not hold a job. And there were those who became alcoholics and had many many struggles and almost to a man, none of them talked about it not even to their families. They held it in years and years and years some for sixty years, but mostly they didn't talk about it today. That would be a lot different. I think people would be out trying to get a book deal or a movie deal or something like that. But these men were different. I think about that Robert Shaw character and jaws, you know, I get he had kept that story bottled up he becomes a shark hunter. As a result of of being one of those guys, and as a very moving scene, and I was great. I was gonna use the clip. Anyway, I was really glad to see the coverage in in the book. Sarah. Did you always have in mind keeping that in there? Well, yeah, it's really, you know, when Lennon I've gone across the country talking to groups about the story in this book, you know, one of the things that really comes out every time is that most people learned about this story from Josh. So it's an essential part of the stories history. Is that you know, the public learned about it this way. Interestingly enough, some of the children of the survivors. Actually, I heard about it. And that their father was involved in it by watching jobs, you know, they came home several accounts came home saw the movie we're really impacted by and especially the scene only to find out their dad was on the ship. This scene is about. You know, it's pretty incredible. The men didn't talk about it that long. But then to find out this way that that's you know, how your dad served in World War Two. Lynn, Vincent, Sarah Vladic. Indianapolis is the book when we come back. We'll open up the phone lines. And maybe a maybe you've got some questions or comments or calls. We'll be right back..

Lynn Guam Sara Sarah Vladic Indianapolis McVeigh Helen Hollandia San Diego Robert Shaw Lennon Josh Vincent seventy years sixty years four days
"hollandia" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

06:25 min | 1 year ago

"hollandia" Discussed on WTVN

"Someone shouted. Attention on deck and everybody's snapped to attention, and then they began to cheer and clap, and and tears came to his eyes. And he couldn't believe that they were receiving him so warmly and that continued through the entire reunion weekend. Sara talk a little bit about difficulty in getting materials. You talked about going through archives and finding records share with me did you run into roadblocks that you could not get past. And if so what were they actually one of the documents that really helped us pay the biggest picture was the court of inquiry documents. And you know, I had tried for years Lynn had come into the picture and join me in this effort to get a copy of this document. And the reason it was so important was that it was really the first recorded testimony of any of the survivor's right after the sinking. So just days after they're rescued. They're in the hospital in Guam and their testimonies are taken, and so we tried everything to get these documents. And this actually this specific report, and we would come back. You know? Oh, it's lost forever. Oh one. You know, we got one copy of it, and it was entirely redacted and. You know, freedom freedom of information act should have allowed us to have this. And then you know, we contacted the the source again. And our context said, well, we don't have an unredacted version doesn't exist. And so interestingly enough. Yeah. A friend or actually a a young man who became a friend was the grandson of the rescue pilot who landed in the water and saved fifty three men. His his grandson was actually. Inspector general sorry. I was trying to remember his title. He's inspector general works with the navy. And he was actually the person who got us this document. And this kind of showed us really testimonies of what happened not only when the ship was torpedoed and those final moments, but what was happening in the water because in the court martial they did not allow any of the testimonies about what took place in the actual water because they didn't you know, that would impact how McVeigh was viewed. And so it was kept strictly to what took place when the ship was torpedoed and the events leading up to that. So this new court of inquiry document was so important because you know, seventy years later stories can change or stories can be impacted by other stories, but this was the purest form of what really took place not only when the ship sank. But in the water for those five nights and four days. Lynn could you talk about. The life immediately after they were rescued what it was like for the survivors where they were taken. I I would assume more of them died after because of their injuries and exposure. Well, a few did die. And if you can imagine how awful that was not only for the men themselves, but for their families to know that they had actually made it all the way to rescue only to die of their exposure and their injuries. So I think three hundred and twenty were actually rescued is that correct, Sara. Yes. Three hundred and twenty rescued but only three hundred sixteen ultimately survived. So they were taken to base hospitals around the Philippine sea eventually converging on Guam where they had some time to recover before they had to give their testimony. And then they went aboard the USS Helen Hollandia, which was an escort carrier, and they actually landed in our home city of San Diego where they were actually participated in a parade. And then. Very quickly. They went home. Caught buses and trains back to their hometowns some of them immediately got out of the navy some of them had survivors leave and then got out some of them stayed and made careers of the navy. And you know, this was the greatest generation. So the vast majority of the men they just kind of put this behind them. They went on to have careers as engineers and fishermen and everything you can think of police officers, but there were those who could not hold a job. And there were those who became alcoholics and had many many struggles and almost to a man, none of them talked about it not even to their families. They held it in RIC years and years and years some for sixty years, but mostly they didn't talk about it today. That would be a lot different. I think people would be out trying to get a book deal or a movie deal or something like that. That. But these men were different. I think about that Robert Shaw character in jaws, you know, he'd kept that story bottled up he becomes a shark hunter as a result of of being one of those guys and as a very moving scene, and I was great. I was going to use the clip. Anyway, I was really glad to see the coverage in the book. Sarah. Did you always have in mind keeping that in there? Well, yeah, it's really, you know, when Lennon I've gone across the country talking to groups about the story in this book, you know, one of the things that really comes out every time is that most people learned about this story from Josh. So it's an essential part of the stories history. Is that you know, the public learned about it this way. Interestingly enough, some of the children of the survivors. Actually, I heard about it. And that their father was involved in it by watching jots, you know, they came home several accounts came home saw the movie we're really impacted by it, and especially the scene at only to find out their dad was on the ship. This is about. Yeah. It's pretty incredible. The men didn't talk about it that long, but then to find out this way. But that's you know, how your dad served in World War, Two Lynn, Vincent serve. Indianapolis is the book when we come back. We'll open up the phone lines. And maybe maybe you've got some questions or comments our calls. We'll be right back..

Lynn Guam Sara Indianapolis McVeigh Helen Hollandia San Diego Robert Shaw jots Sarah Lennon Josh Vincent seventy years sixty years four days
"hollandia" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"hollandia" Discussed on KGO 810

"Inspector general I was trying to remember his title. He's inspector general works with the navy. And he was actually the person who got us this document. And this kind of showed us really testimonies of what happened not only when the ship was torpedoed in those final moments, but what was happening in the water because in the court martial they did not allow any of the testimonies about what took place in the actual water because they didn't you know, that would impact how McVeigh was viewed. And so it was kept strictly to what took place when the ship was torpedoed and the events leading up to that. So this new court of inquiry document was so important because seventy years later stories can change or stories can be impacted by other stories, but this is the purest form of what really took place not only when the ship sank. But in the water for those five nights and four days. Lynn could you talk about. The life immediately after they were rescued what it was like for the survivors where they were taken. I I would assume more of them died after because of their injuries and exposure. Well, a few did die. And if you can imagine how awful that was not only for the men themselves, but for their families to know that they had actually made it all the way to rescue only to die as their exposure and their injuries. So I think three hundred and twenty were actually rescued is that correct, Sara. Yes. Three hundred and twenty rescued but only three hundred sixteen ultimately survive. So they were taken to base hospitals around the Philippine sea eventually converging on Guam where they had some time to recover before they had to give their testimony. And then they went aboard the USS Helen Hollandia, which was an escort carrier, and they actually landed in our home city of San Diego where they were actually participated in a parade. And then. Very quickly. They went home. Caught buses and trains back to their hometowns some of them immediately got out of the navy some of them had survivors leave and then got out some of them stayed and made careers of the navy. And you know, this was the greatest generation so that that's majority of the men they just kind of put this behind them. They went on to have careers as engineers and fishermen and everything you can think of police officers, but there were those who could not hold a job. And there were those who became alcoholics and had many many struggles and almost to a man, none of them talked about it not even to their families. They held it in RIC years and years and years some for sixty years, but mostly they didn't talk about it today. That would be a lot different. I think people would be out trying to get a book deal or a movie deal or something like. But these men were different. I think about that Robert Shaw character and jaws, you know, he had kept that story bottled up he becomes a shark hunter. As a result of being one of those guys, and that's a very moving scene. And I was great. I was gonna use their clip. Anyway, I was really glad to see the coverage in the book. Sarah. Did you always have in mind keeping that in there? Well, yeah, it's really, you know, when Lyndon I've gone across the country talking to groups about the story in this book, you know, one of the things that really comes out every time is that most people learned about this story from Josh. So it's an essential part of the stories history. Is that you know, the public learned about it this way. Interestingly enough, some of the children of the survivors. Actually, I heard about it. And that their father was involved in it by watching jobs. You know, they came home several accounts came home saw the movie we're really impacted by and especially the scene at only to find out their dad was on the ship. This is about you know, it's pretty incredible. The men didn't talk about it that long. But then to find out this way that that's you know, how your dad served in World War Two Lynn Vincent Lasik. Indianapolis is the book when we come back. We'll open up the phone lines. And maybe maybe you've got some questions or comments our calls. We'll be right back..

Indianapolis McVeigh Lynn Vincent Lasik Lynn Helen Hollandia Guam Sara San Diego Robert Shaw Sarah Lyndon Josh seventy years sixty years four days
"hollandia" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

06:25 min | 1 year ago

"hollandia" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Someone shouted. Attention on deck and everybody snap to attention. And then they began to cheer and clap, and and tears came to his eyes. And he couldn't believe that they were receiving him so warmly and that continued through the entire reunion weekend. Sara talk a little bit about difficulty in getting materials. You talked about going through archives and finding records share with me did you run into roadblocks that you could not get past. And if so what were they actually one of the documents that really helped us pay the biggest picture was the court of inquiry documents, and I had tried for years Lynn had come into the picture and join me in this effort to get a copy of this document. And the reason it was so important was that it was really the first recorded testimony of any of the survivor's right after the sinking. So just days after they're rescued. They're in the hospital in Guam and their testimonies are taken, and so we tried everything to get these documents. And this actually this specific report, and we would come back. You know? Oh, it's lost forever. Oh one. You know, we got one copy of it, and it was entirely redacted, and you know. Oh freedom. Freedom of information act should have allowed us to have this. And then, you know, we contacted the the source again and our context. Well, we don't have an unredacted version doesn't exist. And so interestingly enough, you know, a friend or actually a young man who became a friend was the grandson of the rescue pilot who landed in the water and saved fifty three men. His his grandson was actually. Inspector general trying to remember his title. He's inspector general works with the navy. And he was actually the person who got us this document. And this kind of showed us really testimonies of what happened not only when the ship was torpedoed in those final moments, but what was happening in the water because in the court martial they did not allow any of the testimonies about what took place in the actual water because they didn't you know, that would impact how McVeigh was viewed. And so it was kept strictly to what took place when the ship was torpedoed and the events leading up to that. So this new court of inquiry document was so important because you know, seventy years later stories can change or stories can be impacted by other stories, but this was the purest form of what really took place not only when the ship sank. But in the water for those five nights and four days. Lynn could you talk about. The life immediately after they were rescued what it was like for the survivors where they were taken. I I would assume more of them died after because of their injuries and exposure. Well, a few did die. And if you can imagine how awful that was not only for the men themselves, but for their families to know that they had actually made it all the way to rescue only to die of their exposure and their injuries. So I think three hundred and twenty were actually rescued is that correct, Sara. Yes. Three hundred twenty rescued but only three hundred sixteen ultimately survived. So they were taken to base hospitals around the Philippine sea eventually converging on Guam where they had some time to recover before they had to give their testimony. And then they went aboard the USS Helen Hollandia, which was an escort carrier, and they actually landed in our home city of San Diego where they were actually participated in a parade. And then. Very quickly. They went home. Caught buses and trains back to their hometowns some of them immediately got out of the navy some of them had survivors leaves. And then got out some of them stayed and made careers of the navy. And you know, this was the greatest generation so that that's majority of the men they just kind of put this behind them. They went on to have careers as engineers and fishermen and everything you can think of police officers, but there were those who could not hold a job. And there were those who became alcoholics and had many many struggles and almost to a man, none of them talked about it not even to their families. They held it in. Rick years and years and years some for sixty years that mostly they didn't talk about it today. That would be a lot different. I think people would be out trying to get a book deal or movie deal or something like that. But these men were different. I think about that Robert Shaw character in jaws, you know, he had kept that story bottled up he becomes a shark hunter. As a result of of being one of those guys. That's a very moving scene. And I was great. I was gonna use the clip. Anyway, I was really glad to see the coverage in in the book. Sarah. Did you always have in mind keeping that in there? Well, yeah, it's really, you know, when Lennon have gone across the country talking to groups about the story in this book, you know, one of the things that really comes out every time is that most people learned about this story from jobs. So it's an essential part of the stories history. Is that you know, the public learned about it this way. Interestingly enough, some of the children of the survivors. Actually, I heard about it. And that their father was involved in it by watching jobs, you know, they came home several accounts came home saw the movie we're really impacted by it, and especially the scene at only to find out their dad was on the ship. This scene is about. Yeah. It's pretty incredible. The men didn't talk about that long. But then to find out this way. But that's you know, how your dad served in World War, Two Lynn, Vincent serve Lasik. Indianapolis is the book when we come back. We'll open up the phone lines. And maybe a maybe you've got some questions or comments or calls. We'll be right back..

Lynn Guam Sara Indianapolis McVeigh Helen Hollandia San Diego Robert Shaw Rick Lasik Lennon Sarah Vincent seventy years sixty years four days
"hollandia" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

06:25 min | 1 year ago

"hollandia" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Someone shouted. Attention on deck and everybody's snap to attention. And then they began to cheer and clap, and and tears came to his eyes. And he couldn't believe that they were receiving him so warmly and that continued through the entire reunion weekend. Sara talk a little bit about difficulty in getting materials. You talked about going through archives and finding records. Share with me did you run into roadblocks that you could not get past? And and if so what were they? Actually, one of the documents that really helped us pay the biggest picture was the court of inquiry documents. And you know, I had tried for years. Lynn had come into the picture and join me in this effort to get a copy of this document. And the reason it was so important was that it was really the first recorded testimony of any of the survivor's right after the sinking. So. Yeah. Just days after they're rescued. They're in the hospital in Guam and their testimonies are taken, and so we tried everything to get these documents. And this actually this specific report, and we would come back. You know? Oh, it's lost forever. Oh one. You know, we got one copy of it, and it was entirely redacted, and you know, freedom freedom of information act should have allowed us to have this. And then, you know, we contacted the the source again and our context. Well, we don't have an unredacted version doesn't exist. And so interestingly. Enough, you know, a friend or actually a young man who became a friend was the grandson of the rescue pilot who landed in the water and saved fifty three men. His his grandson was actually. Inspector general trying to remember his title. He's inspector general works with the navy. And he was actually the person who got us this document. And this kind of showed us really testimonies of what happened not only when the ship was torpedoed and those final moments, but what was happening in the water because in the court martial they did not allow any of the testimonies about what took place in the actual water because they didn't you know, that would impact how McVeigh was viewed. And so it was kept strictly to what took place when the ship was torpedoed and the events leading up to that. So this new court of inquiry document was so important because you know, seventy years later stories can change or stories can be impacted by other stories, but this was the purest form of what really took place not only when the ship sank. But in the water for those five nights and four days. Lynn, can you talk about. The life immediately after they were rescued what it was like for the the survivors where they were taken. I I would assume more of them died after because of their injuries and exposure. Well, a few did die. And and if you can imagine how awful that was not only for the men themselves for their families to know that they had actually made it all the way to rescue only to die of their exposure and their injuries. So I think three hundred and twenty were actually rescued is that correct, Sara. Yes. Three hundred and twenty rescued but only three hundred sixteen ultimately survived. So they were taken to base hospitals around the Philippine sea eventually converging on Guam where they had some time to recover before they had to give their testimony. And then they went aboard the USS Helen Hollandia, which was an escort carrier, and they actually landed in our home city of San Diego where they were actually participated in a parade. And then. Very quickly. They went home. Cut buses and trains back to their hometowns some of them immediately got out of the navy some of them had survivors leaves. And then got out some of them stayed and made careers of the navy. And you know, this was the greatest generation so that that's majority of the men they just kind of put this behind them. They went on to have careers as engineers and fishermen and everything you can think of police officers, but there were those who could not hold a job. And there were those who became alcoholics and had many many struggles and almost to a man, none of them talked about it not even to their families. They held it in years and years and years some for sixty years, but mostly they didn't talk about it today. That would be a lot different. I think people would be out trying to get a book dealer movie deal or something like that. That. But these men were different. I think about that Robert Shaw character in jaws, you know, I get he'd kept that story bottled up he becomes a shark hunter. As a result of of being one of those guys, and that's a very moving scene. And I was great. I was gonna use their clip. Anyway, I was really glad to see the coverage in in the book. Sarah. Did you always have in mind keeping that in there? Well, yeah, it's really, you know, when I was gone across the country talking to groups about how the story book, you know, one of the things that really comes out every time is that most people learned about this story from Josh. So it's an essential part of the stories history. Is that you know, the public learned about it this way. Interestingly enough, some of the children of the survivors. Actually, I heard about it. And that their father was involved in it by watching jobs. You know, they came home several accounts came home saw the movie we're really impacted by it, and especially the scene only to find out their dad was on the ship. This scene is about. So, you know, it's pretty incredible men didn't talk about it that long. But then to find out this way that that's you know, how your dad served in World War Two. Lynn, Vincent, Sarah. Indianapolis is the book when we come back. We'll open up the phone lines. And maybe a maybe you've got some questions or comments our calls. We'll be right back..

Lynn Guam Sara Sarah Indianapolis McVeigh Helen Hollandia San Diego Robert Shaw Josh Vincent seventy years sixty years four days
"hollandia" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

06:25 min | 1 year ago

"hollandia" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Someone shouted. Attention on deck and everybody snap to attention. And then they begin to cheer and clap, and and tears came to his eyes. And he couldn't believe that they were receiving him so warmly and that continued through the entire reunion weekend. Sara talk a little bit about difficulty in getting materials. You talked about going through archives and finding records share with me did you run into roadblocks that you could not get past. And and if so what were they actually one of the documents that really helped us pay the biggest picture was the court of inquiry documents, and I had tried for years Lynn had come into the picture and join me in this effort to get a copy of this document. And the reason it was so important that it was really the first recorded testimony of any of the survivor's right after the sinking. So just days after they're rescued. They're in the hospital in Guam and their testimonies are taken, and so we tried everything to get these documents. And this actually this specific report, and we would come back. You know? Oh, it's lost forever. Oh one. You know, we got one copy of it, and it was entirely redacted and. You know, freedom of freedom of information act should have allowed us to have this. And then you know, we contacted the the source again. And our context said, well, we don't have an unredacted version doesn't exist. And so interestingly enough, you know, a friend or actually a young man who became a friend was the grandson of the rescue pilot who landed in the water and saved fifty three men. His his grandson was actually. Inspector general sorry. I was trying to remember his title. He's inspector general works with the navy. And he was actually the person who got us this document. And this kind of showed us really testimonies of what happened not only when the ship was torpedoed in those final moments, but what was happening in the water because in the court martial they did not allow any of the testimonies about what took place in the actual water because they didn't you know, that would impact how McVeigh was viewed. And so it was kept strictly to what took place when the ship was torpedoed and the events leading up to that. So this new court of inquiry document was so important because you know, seventy years later stories can change or stories can be impacted by other stories, but this was the purest form of what really took place not only when the ship sank. But in the water for those five nights and four days. Lynn could you talk about. The life immediately after they were rescued what it was like for the survivors where they were taken. I I would assume more of them died after because of their injuries and exposure. Well, a few did die. And and if you can imagine how awful that was not only for the men themselves, but for their families to know that they had actually made it all the way to rescue only to die of their exposure and their injuries. So I think three hundred twenty we're actually rescued is that correct, Sarah. Yes. Three hundred twenty were rescued but only three hundred sixteen ultimately survived. So they were taken to hospitals around the Philippine sea eventually converging on Guam where they had some time to recover before they had to give their testimony. And then they went aboard the USS Helen Hollandia, which was an escort carrier, and they actually landed in our home city of San Diego where they were actually participated in a parade. And then. Very quickly. They went home. Caught buses and trains back to their hometowns some of them immediately got out of the navy some of them had survivors leave and then got out of them stayed and made careers of the navy. And you know, this was the greatest generation. So that majority of the men they just kind of put this behind them. They went on to have careers as engineers and fishermen and everything you can think of police officers, but there were those who could not hold a job. And there were those who became alcoholics and had many many struggles and almost to a man, none of them talked about it not even to their families. They held it in RIC years and years and years some for sixty years, but mostly they didn't talk about it today. That would be a lot different. I think people would be out trying to get a book deal or a movie deal or something. Like that. But these men were different. I think about that Robert Shaw character in jaws, you know, he'd kept that story bottled up he becomes a shark hunter as a result of of being one of those guys and as a very moving scene, and I was great. I was gonna use clip. Anyway, I was really glad to see the coverage in the book. Sarah. Did you always have in mind keeping that in there? Well, yeah, it's really, you know, when I have gone across the country talking to groups about the story in this book, you know, one of the things that really comes out every time is that most people learned about this story from Josh. So it's an essential part of the stories history. Is that you know, the public learned about it this way. Interestingly enough, some of the children of the survivors. Actually, I heard about it. And that their father was involved in it by watching jobs, you know, they came home several accounts came home saw the movie we're really impacted by and especially the scene and only to find out their dad was on the ship. This scene is about. Yeah. It's pretty incredible. The men didn't talk about it that long. But then to find out this way that that's you know, how your dad served in World War Two. Lynn, Vincent, Sarah Vladic. Indianapolis is the book when we come back. We'll open up the phone lines. And maybe a maybe you've got some questions or comments our calls. We'll be right back..

Lynn Sarah Vladic Guam Sara Indianapolis McVeigh Helen Hollandia San Diego Robert Shaw Josh Vincent seventy years sixty years four days
"hollandia" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

06:25 min | 1 year ago

"hollandia" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"Someone shouted attention on deck and everybody snap to attention. And then they began to cheer and clap, and and tears came to his eyes. And he couldn't believe that they were receiving him so warmly and that continued through the entire reunion weekend. Sara talk a little bit about difficulty in getting materials. You talked about going through archives and finding records share with me did you run into roadblocks that you could not get past. And if so what were they actually one of the documents that really helped us pay the biggest picture was the court of inquiry documents. And you know, I had tried for years Lynn had come into the picture and join me in this effort to get a copy of this document. And the reason it was so important was that it was really the first recorded testimony of any of the survivor's right after the sinking. So, you know, just days after they're rescued they're in the hospital in Guam and their testimonies are taken, and so we tried everything to get these documents. And this actually this specific report, and we would come back. You know? Oh, it's lost forever. Oh one. You know, we got one copy of it, and it was entirely redacted and. You know, freedom of freedom of information act should have allowed us to have this. And then you know, we contacted the the source again. And our context said, well, we don't have an unredacted version doesn't exist. And so interestingly enough, you know, a friend or actually a young man who became a friend was the grandson of the rescue pilot who landed in the water and save fifty three men his. His grandson was actually. I'm inspector general sorry. I was trying to remember his title. He's inspector general works with the navy. And he was actually the person who got us this document. And this kind of showed us really testimonies of what happened not only when the ship was torpedoed in those final moments, but what was happening in the water because in the court martial they did not allow any of the testimonies about what took place in the actual water because they didn't you know, that would impact how McVeigh was viewed. And so it was kept strictly to what took place when the ship was torpedoed and the events leading up to that. So this new court of inquiry document was so important because you know, seventy years later stories can change or stories can be impacted by other stories, but this is the purest form of what really took place not only when the ship sank. But in the water for those five nights and four days. Lynn could you talk about the life immediate. After they were rescued what it was like for the the survivors where they were taken. I would assume more of them died after because of their injuries and exposure. Well, a few did die. And if you can imagine how awful that was not only for the men themselves, but for their families to know that they had actually made it all the way to rescue only to die as their exposure and their injuries. So I think three hundred twenty were actually rescued is that correct, Sara. Yes. Three hundred and twenty were rescued but only three hundred sixteen ultimately survived. So they were taken to base hospitals around the Philippine sea eventually converging on Guam where they had some time to recover before they had to give their testimony. And then they went aboard the USS Helen Hollandia, which was an escort carrier, and they actually landed in our home city of San Diego where they were actually participated in a parade. And then. Very quickly. They went home. Caught buses and trains back to their hometowns some of them immediately got out of the navy some of them had survivors leave and then got out some of them stayed and made careers of the navy. And you know, this was the greatest generation. So the vast majority of the men they just kind of put this behind them. They went on to have careers as engineers and fishermen and everything you can think of police officers, but there were those who could not hold a job. And there were those who became alcoholics and had many many struggles and almost to a man, none of them talked about it not even to their families. They held it in break years and years and years some for sixty years, but mostly they didn't talk about it today. That would be a lot different. I think people would be out trying to get a book deal or a movie deal or something like that. But these men were different. I think about that Robert Shaw character in jaws, you know, he'd kept that story bottled up he becomes a shark hunter. As a result of of being one of those guys. As moving scene, and that was great. I was gonna use the clip. Anyway, I was really glad to see the coverage in the in the book. Sarah. Did you always have in mind keeping that in there? Well, yeah, it's really, you know, when Lyndon I've gone across the country talking to groups about the story in this book, you know, one of the things that really comes out every time is that most people learned about this story from Josh. So it's an essential part of the stories history. Is that you know, the public learned about it this way. Interestingly enough, some of the children of the survivors. Actually, I heard about it. And that their father was involved in it by watching jots, you know, they came home. Several counts came home saw the movie we're really impacted by and especially the scene at only to find out their dad was on the ship. This scene is about. Yeah. It's pretty incredible. The men didn't talk about it that long, but then to find out this way. But that's you know, how your dad served in World War Two. Lynn, Vincent, Sarah Vladic. Indianapolis is the book when we come back. We'll open up the phone lines. And maybe maybe you've got some questions or comments our calls. We'll be right back..

Lynn Guam Sara Sarah Vladic Indianapolis McVeigh Helen Hollandia San Diego Robert Shaw jots Lyndon Josh Vincent seventy years sixty years four days
"hollandia" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

06:25 min | 1 year ago

"hollandia" Discussed on KNSS

"Someone shouted. Attention on deck and everybody's snapped to attention, and then they began to cheer into clap, and and tears came to his eyes. And he couldn't believe that. They were receding him so warmly and that continued through the entire reunion weekend. Sara talk a little bit about difficulty in getting materials. You talked about going through archives and finding records at share with me. Did you run into roadblocks that you could not get past? And if so what were they actually one of the documents that really helped us pay the biggest picture was the court of inquiry documents, and I had tried for years Lynn had come into the picture and join me in this effort to get the copy of this document. And the reason it was so important was that it was really the first recorded testimony of any of the survivor's right after the sinking. So just days after they're rescued. They're in the hospital in Guam and their testimonies are taken, and so we tried everything to get these documents. And this actually this specific report, and we would come back. You know? Oh, it's lost forever. Oh one. You know, we got one copy of it, and it was entirely redacted and. You know, freedom freedom of information act should have allowed us to have this. And then, you know, we contacted the the source again and our context. Well, we don't have an unredacted version doesn't exist. And so interestingly enough. Yeah. A friend or actually a young man who became a friend was the grandson of the rescue pilot who landed in the water and saved fifty three men his. His grandson was actually. Inspector general sorry. I was trying to remember his title. He's inspector general works with the navy. And he was actually the person who got us this document. And this kind of showed us really testimonies of what happened not only when the ship was torpedoed in those final moments, but what was happening in the water because in the court martial they did not allow any of the testimonies about what took place in the actual water because they didn't you know, that would impact how McVeigh was viewed. And so it was kept strictly to what took place when the ship was torpedoed and the events leading up to that. So this new court of inquiry document was so important because you know, seventy years later stories can change or stories can be impacted by other stories, but this was the purest form of what really took place not only when the ship sank. But in the water for those five nights and four days. Lynn, could you talk about the life of media. After they were rescued what it was like for the the survivors where they were taken. I I would assume more of them died after because of their injuries and exposure. Well, a few did die. And if you can imagine how awful that was not only for the men themselves, but for their families to know that they had actually made it all the way to rescue only to die of their exposure and their injuries. So I think three hundred and twenty were actually rescued is that correct, Sara. Yes. Three hundred and twenty were rescued but only three hundred sixteen ultimately survive. So they were taken to base hospitals around the Philippine sea eventually converging on Guam where they had some time to recover before they had to give their testimony. And then they went aboard the USS Helen Hollandia, which was an escort carrier, and they actually landed in our home city of San Diego where they were actually participated in a parade. And then. Very quickly. They went home. Caught buses and trains back to their hometowns some of them immediately got out of the navy some of them had survivors leave and then got out some of them stayed and made careers of the navy. And you know, this was the greatest generation. So the vast majority of the men they just kind of put this behind them. They went on to have careers as engineers and fishermen and everything you can think of police officers, but there were those who could not hold a job. And there were those who became alcoholics and had many many struggles and almost to a man, none of them talked about it not even to their families. They held it in for years and years and years some for sixty years, but mostly they didn't talk about it today. That would be a lot different. I think people would be out trying to get a book deal or a movie deal or something like. But these men were different. I think about that Robert Shaw. Character jaws, you know, I get he had kept that story bottled up he becomes a shark hunter. As a result of of being one of those guys and very moving scene. And I was great. I was gonna use the clip. Anyway, I was really glad to see the coverage in the in the book. Sarah. Did you always have in mind keeping that in there? Well, yeah, it's really, you know, when Lyndon I've gone across the country talking to groups about the story in this book, you know, one of the things that really comes out every time is that most people learned about this story from Josh. So it's an essential part of this stories history is that, you know, the public learned about it this way. Interestingly enough, some of the children of the survivors. Actually, I heard about it. And that their father was involved in it by watching, you know, they came home several accounts came home saw the movie we're really impacted by it, and especially the scene and only to find out their dad was on the ship. This is about. Yeah. It's pretty incredible. The men didn't talk about it that long. But then to find out this way that that's you know, how your dad served in World War Two. Lynn, Vincent, Sarah Vladic. Indianapolis is the book when we come back. We'll open up the phone lines. And maybe maybe you've got some questions or comments our calls. We'll be right back..

Lynn Guam Sara Sarah Vladic Indianapolis McVeigh Helen Hollandia San Diego Robert Shaw Lyndon Josh Vincent seventy years sixty years four days
"hollandia" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

06:25 min | 1 year ago

"hollandia" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Someone shouted. Attention on deck and everybody snap to attention. And then they began to cheer and clap, and and tears came to his eyes. And he couldn't believe that they were receiving him so warmly and that continued through the entire reunion weekend. Sara talk a little bit about difficulty in getting materials. You talked about going through archives and finding records share with me did you run into roadblocks that you could not get past. And if so what were they actually one of the documents that really helped us pay the biggest picture was the court of inquiry documents. And you know, I had tried for years Lynn had come into the picture and join me in this effort to get a copy of this document. And the reason it was so important was that it was really the first recorded testimony of any of the survivor's right after the sinking. So just days after they're rescued. They're in the hospital in Guam and their testimonies are taken, and so we tried everything to get these documents. And this actually this specific report, and we would come back. You know? Oh, it's lost forever. Oh one. You know, we got one copy of it, and it was entirely redacted and. You know, freedom freedom of information act should have allowed us to have this. And then, you know, we contacted the the source again and our context. Well, we don't have an unredacted version doesn't exist. And so interestingly enough, you know, a friend or actually a young man who became a friend was the grandson of the rescue pilot who landed in the water and save fifty three men. His his grandson was actually. Inspector general sorry. I was trying to remember his title. He's inspector general works with the navy. And he was actually the person who got us this document. And this kind of showed us really testimonies of what happened not only when the ship was torpedoed and those final moments, but what was happening in the water because in the court martial they did not allow any of the testimonies about what took place in the actual water because they didn't you know, that would impact how McVeigh was viewed. And so it was kept strictly to what took place when the ship was torpedoed and the events leading up to that. So this new court of inquiry document was so important because you know, seventy years later stories can change or stories can be impacted by other stories, but this is the purest form of what really took place not only when the ship sank. But in the water for those five nights and four days. Lynn could you talk about. The life immediately after they were rescued what it was like for the the survivors where they were taken. I I would assume more of them died after because of their injuries and exposure. Well, a few did die. And if you can imagine how awful that was not only for the men themselves, but for their families to know that they had actually made it all the way to rescue only to die of their exposure and their injuries. So I think three hundred twenty we're actually rescued is that correct, Sara. Yes. Three hundred and twenty rescued but only three hundred sixteen ultimately survived. So they were taken to base hospitals around the Philippine sea eventually converging on Guam where they had some time to recover before they had to give their testimony. And then they went aboard the USS Helen Hollandia, which was an escort carrier, and they actually landed in our home city of San Diego where they were actually participated in a parade. And then. Very quickly. They went home. Caught buses and trains back to their hometowns some of them immediately got out of the navy some of them had survivors leave and then got out of them stayed and made careers of the navy. And you know, this was the greatest generation. So the majority of the men they just kind of put this behind them. They went on to have careers as engineers and fishermen and everything you can think of police officers, but there were those who could not hold a job. And there were those who became alcoholics and had many many struggles and almost to a man, none of them talked about it not even to their families. They held it in RIC years and years and years some for sixty years, but mostly they didn't talk about it today. That would be a lot different. I think people would be out trying to get a book deal or a movie deal or something. But these men were different. I think about that Robert Shaw character in jaws, you know, he had kept that story bottled up he becomes a shark hunter as a result of of being one of those guys and as a very moving scene, and I was great. I was gonna use the clip. Anyway, I was really glad to see the coverage in the in the book. Sarah. Did you always have in mind keeping that in there? Well, yeah, it's really, you know, when Lyndon I've gone across the country talking to groups about the story in this book, you know, one of the things that really comes out every time is that most people learned about this story from Josh. So it's an essential part of the stories history. Is that you know, the public learned about it this way. Interestingly enough, some of the children of the survivors. Actually, I heard about it. And that their father was involved in it by watching jots, you know, they came home several accounts came home saw the movie we're really impacted by and especially the scene and only to find out their dad was on the ship. This is about. You know, it's pretty incredible. The men didn't talk about it that long. But then to find out this way that that's you know, how your dad served in World War Two. Lynn, Vincent, Sarah Vladic. Indianapolis is the book when we come back. We'll open up the phone lines. And maybe a maybe you've got some questions or comments our calls. We'll be right back..

Lynn Guam Sara Sarah Vladic Indianapolis McVeigh Helen Hollandia San Diego Robert Shaw jots Lyndon Josh Vincent seventy years sixty years four days
"hollandia" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

06:54 min | 1 year ago

"hollandia" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Someone shouted. Attention on deck and everybody snap to attention. And then they began to cheer into clap, and and tears came to his eyes. And he couldn't believe that they were receiving him so warmly and that continued through the entire reunion weekend. Sara talk a little bit about difficulty in getting materials. You talked about going through archives and finding records share with me did you run into roadblocks that you could not get past. And if so what were they actually one of the documents that really helped us pay the biggest picture was the court of inquiry documents. And you know, I had tried for years Lynn had come into the picture and join me in this effort to get a copy of this document. And the reason it was so important was that it was really the first recorded testimony of any of the survivor's right after the sinking. So just days after they're rescued. They're in the hospital in Guam and their testimonies are taken, and so we tried everything to get these documents. And this actually this specific report, and we would come back. You know? Oh, it's lost forever. Oh one. You know, we got one copy of it, and it was entirely redacted, and you know. No freedom freedom of information act should have allowed us to have this. And then, you know, we contacted the the source again and our context. Well, we don't have an unredacted version doesn't exist. And so interestingly enough. Yeah. A friend or actually a young man who became a friend was the grandson of the rescue pilot who landed in the water and save fifty three men his. His grandson was actually. Inspector general sorry. I was trying to remember his title. He's inspector general works with the navy. And he was actually the person who got us this document. And this kind of showed us really testimonies of what happened not only when the ship was torpedoed and those final moments, but what was happening in the water because in the court martial they did not allow any of the testimonies about what took place in the actual water because they didn't you know, that would impact how McVeigh was viewed. And so it was kept strictly to what took place when the ship was torpedoed and the events leading up to that. So this new court of inquiry document was so important because guess seventy years later stories can change or stories can be impacted by other stories, but this was the purest form of what really took place not only when the ship sank. But in the water for those five nights and four days. Lynn could you talk about the life immediate. After they were rescued what it was like for the the survivors where they were taken. I I would assume more of them died after because of their injuries and exposure. Well, a few did die. And if you can imagine how awful that was not only for the men themselves for their families to know that they had actually made it all the way to rescue only to die of their exposure and their injuries. So I think three hundred twenty we're actually rescued is that correct, Sara. Yes. Three hundred and twenty were rescued but only three hundred sixteen ultimately survive. So they were taken to base hospitals around the Philippine sea eventually converging on Guam where they had some time to recover before they had to give their testimony. And then they went aboard the USS Helen Hollandia, which was an escort carrier, and they actually landed in our home city of San Diego where they were I actually participated in a parade and then. Very quickly. They went home. Caught buses and trains back to their hometowns some of them immediately got out of the navy some of them had survivors leave and then got out some of them stayed and made careers of the navy. And you know, this was the greatest generation. So if that's majority of the men, they just kind of put this behind them, they went on to have careers as engineers and fishermen and everything you can think of police officers, but there were those who could not hold a job. And there were those who became alcoholics and had many many struggles and almost to a man, none of them talked about it not even to their families. They held it in. Ric years and years and years some for sixty years, but mostly they didn't talk about it today. That would be a lot different. I think people would be out trying to get a book deal or a movie deal or something like that. But these men were different. I think about that Robert Shaw character and jaws, you know, he'd kept that story bottled up he becomes a shark hunter. As a result of of being one of those guys. That's a very moving scene. And I was great. I was gonna use the clip. Anyway, I was really glad to see the coverage in in the book. Sarah. Did you always have in mind keeping that in there? Well, yeah, it's really, you know, when Lyndon I've gone across the country talking to groups about the story in this book, you know, one of the things that really comes out every time is that most people learned about this story from jobs. So it's an essential part of the stories history. Is that you know, the public learned about it this way. Interestingly enough, some of the children of the survivors. Actually, I heard about it. And that their father was involved in it by watching jobs, you know, they came home several accounts came home saw the movie we're really impacted by and especially the scene at only to find out their dad was on the ship. This scene is about. You. It's pretty incredible. The men didn't talk about it that long. But then to find out this way that that's you know, how your dad served in World War Two. Lynn, Vincent, Sarah Vladic. Indianapolis is the book when we come back. We'll open up the phone lines. And maybe maybe you've got some questions or comments our calls. We'll be right back. The most powerful names and talk or heard right.

Lynn Guam Sara Sarah Vladic Indianapolis McVeigh Helen Hollandia San Diego Ric Robert Shaw Lyndon Vincent seventy years sixty years four days
"hollandia" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"hollandia" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"Joining us. I'm Roberta just say now on Tom Jordan. These are the top stories at seven fifty one brand new this morning on W w j Jeep is recalling eighteen thousand of the Wrangler j als from the two thousand eighteen and twenty nine thousand nine model years Fiat Chrysler says there's a well d- fact that could lead to a crash without prior warning. So far, no reports of any accidents or injuries. We've got a warning for the national weather service to those in the grand haven or a Hollandia officials say six to ten foot high waves. Wash over peers today, they say, quote, if you venture out onto the peers, you are putting your life at risk secretary estate. Mike Pompeo is in Saudi Arabia. He met with top officials about the disappearance of Saudi journalists James kashogi, Jamal kashogi and CBS news has learned that the Saudi government is preparing to say that the Washington Post contributor was accidentally killed when an interrogation went wrong inside of the Saudi consulate in Instanbul have to take a stand, and we have to be clear or else absence, some reaction from the United States, and others, frankly, it becomes open season on dissidents and journalists around the world, that's former homeland security adviser and CBS news senior national security analyst Fran Townsend Lincoln park of woman has died after a shooting at a home last night. Neighbors report hearing and nearly a dozen shots. No word yet of a motive or of any suspects. Those drug ads on telev-. Vision. They tout all the good stuff. The drugs do and then may rattle off the possible dangerous side effects. And now the government is proposing that those drugmakers maybe you should tell the price to racing thoughts. Keep you awake. If the Trump.

Saudi government Mike Pompeo Saudi Arabia Saudi consulate CBS Tom Jordan Fiat Chrysler Roberta Hollandia Fran Townsend Trump Lincoln park Washington Post secretary Jamal kashogi Instanbul James kashogi United States analyst ten foot
"hollandia" Discussed on Rosewood Church Sermons

Rosewood Church Sermons

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"hollandia" Discussed on Rosewood Church Sermons

"Hollandia hallelujah let it be so let it'd be so praise god let me also say the holy spirit's power enables us point de point de to be generous unselfish and not self centered now yes i love this to be generous unselfish and not selfcentered axe to verse forty four and five is where where we discover this look at to begin in verse forty four it says and all the believers met together in one place and shared everything they had they sold their property and possessions and shared the money with those in need they worshiped together at the temple a man and look at look at acts for x floor few pages over thirty four x four thirty four says there were no needy people among the because those who owned land or houses would sell them and bring the money to the apostles to give to those in in need the shared what do we see we see that they were generous as the spirit of god came upon them as it were filled with the holy spirit that became generous unselfish and not self centered while this truth applies to to to all of us in so many ways doesn't it doesn't it in this day and age in our society there is a tendency for selfishness there's a tendency for selfcenteredness there's a tendency for me me me but the good news is the good news is the holy spirit of god wants to do in us and through us and create an us this spirit of generosity unselfish.

Hollandia
"hollandia" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"hollandia" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"Quarters in that area i never saw the general up there in that area but i understood that a headquarters unit was established at hollandia in hollandia we were adler we were loaded on a an australian cruise ship and put our boats on the deck of the ship and troops in the bowels of the ship and we took off for our first landing and the philippine islands and that landing was at a place called tacloban on the island of late and we landed there the japanese didn't put up as much of a fight as we had had anticipated i think a lot of the fight was taken out of them by that time and a lot more of it was taken out of them by the time the battle of lady go over well yes oh yes the chocolate bond was there was a japanese airstrip there that became a landing point at a rendezvous point for american pilots who were either in trouble or had to refuel or in one case when the escort carrier was sunk all of her pilots landed i know i going where you where you are i was transferred out of the boat unit and was made initially was the deputy beach commander of white beach on luzon eventually i took command of that beach and that is located north of manila and what was interesting about that and and we the japanese had been pretty much pushed away from from the beach areas and we're up in the mountains so our field artillery was used to bomb barred them at up in the mountains and we unloaded all sorts of things in anticipation of our return to manila now that was that was the big show and i was then transferred at that point from the beam being the beach commander where we unloaded all sorts of things i should mention such as a railroad engine and a railroad track and a couple of cars and the reason for that was we were to repair the real line from all around that whole area there the real line had existed but had been blown up by the japanese and so we had to rebuild it so that general macarthur could make his return on the railroad into the city of manila let's talk a little bit about his return because you played a role in that i think anybody's familiar whatsoever.

hollandia adler tacloban commander manila macarthur