19 Burst results for "Hofmann"

Olympics Live: US skaters lose appeal to get silver medals

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 3 months ago

Olympics Live: US skaters lose appeal to get silver medals

"U. S. bobsledder Elena Meyers Taylor extended her mental record at the Beijing games pilot Meyers Taylor in break woman Sylvia Hofmann took home the bronze in the two woman bobsled event Saturday competing in what could have been her last race Meyers Taylor secured her fifth Olympic medal after beginning the games and cope with quarantine starting out in US isolation I had no idea what was possible but fortunately I had a great team behind me who believed in me who believe that this is possible and I couldn't ask for a better outcome and arbitrators have rejected an appeal by U. S. figure skaters to have their silver medals awarded by the end of the Olympics the nine American skaters finished second in the team event that was marred by a doping positive by Russia's fifteen year old Camilla Valjevo I'm given Coolbaugh

Meyers Taylor U. S. Bobsledder Elena Meyers Sylvia Hofmann Beijing U. S. Olympic United States Olympics Camilla Valjevo Russia Coolbaugh
"hofmann" Discussed on Trina Talk

Trina Talk

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"hofmann" Discussed on Trina Talk

"The greater good the world that children especially as students in school that have to go out into that real world and they need to know something other than what's been told to them in their house right because you know we know they're being fed one thing in the house and like just like net ever being told no you get out in the real world is not. What's going on in your house. You know you got those four walls you out in the world. There's a broad spectrum of things. So yes i think it's really as really. I was really just so invigorated to just hear your story to know that this what you were doing because you just don't see enough of it you know you really don't in his only you know i can only stand on my soapbox so much i can only write so many articles But it takes all of us to collect a thing in. Maybe there's going to be something. I say to somebody i listened to. Maybe there's going to be something you say that someone listens to and then maybe you know we can get to a place where you know. Our kids won't have to worry about seeing somebody laying on the ground with their neck being. You know crushed making their live. Right now yeah. Is this amazing. I'm going to my questions. Are you ready ready okay. I usually don't tell people to study forum. So we're going to see a right. Who or what motivates. You my wife. She's a really hard worker and motivates media on my hustle park. What demotivates you negativities. That's been the hardest thing this last year is. Just been 'cause we. I'm a people person into cut off from that man that could cause you to spiral yet to the point. Where like. I don't want to get out at all. And so yeah just much has been so much about race. Last year is just a lot. Yeah it is. I don't know how you do it. 'cause with the diversity and inclusion because you do you ever have to just stop and come up for air just to be like. I don't want to talk about this again. Earful because part of inclusion means we we accept all ideas right in so of course. I want everyone to agree with my ideas. So if i blast you because you shared idea. That's a way for mine. I'm not being inclusive. So at the heart that's really afar and you see that a lot with a lot of the schools is you got this diversity groups that come together because they want things change and then if you get one person that assists something different than what they believe they want to them out and i'm like inclusion what you're not asking them not to do that too inclusive. When was the time the something was said or done to her too. But it worked for your good.

Last year last year one person one thing four walls many articles
"hofmann" Discussed on Trina Talk

Trina Talk

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"hofmann" Discussed on Trina Talk

"My. My biological mother's husband was not the kindest man so sedan she earlier question. I had met my mother's sister. Nancy in she was the one that told me the abortion story in that And so yeah. It was interesting story Unfortunately did not get to meet the biological mother and father but met other people in the biological fan. So how was that a meeting your aunt from your biological mother and siblings. How was that. How were you received. How are you perceived. Tell us about that. Yeah that was. It was a good thing in a not so good thing. It was great to connect with the fan. But because i'm because you know. I'm black and my mother's family is all white. Yeah i really had concerns with. How would they accept me And so that really. Every time i go see them i that would really kinda messed with me And so we kept in contact for a while And then a couple of years. After i got in touch with my sister. She'd invited me and my wife and two kids to go. Come up and see her. And i thought i was just. I was like the friday after thanksgiving one year. And i thought we were just going to go up to her apartment. Just forty five minutes away at dinner with her and her daughter and i walked into this very small in. There's gotta be at least twenty people in. They're all sitting in this the living room. And i remember it clearly and i'm thinking okay. How are these white people gonna perceive me. I walk into the room. And they're all sitting there watching the rodeo. And i just remember thinking that i feel too comfortable. It was quite honestly. It was like the longest three hours. I just wanted to go. And no one said it was just really comfortable. Underst- i think my sister is so excited to show me off to everybody. But i wish she would have prepared me for what i was about to walk into. It was little things like that because of that that i just chose to kind of break from the family because it became not as healthy for rain and and really i had gotten the answer. The questions answered that. I wanted right and i do much else. Yeah yeah you know it is. Yeah you get your answers and you know life is life you go on your way in So you were adopted by white family. So how was that. So you're this black kid biracial however you want to identify now you're in a family of white people. How how did that play.

Nancy two kids friday forty five minutes three hours thanksgiving rodeo least twenty people one year years
"hofmann" Discussed on Veteran On the Move

Veteran On the Move

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"hofmann" Discussed on Veteran On the Move

"Is 250s life of a book so long. It's an optional jokes 250 bucks for the life of a book right now. We're at about a hundred fifty about a month and half in and that's fine. It was never meant to be a Thursday. It's a profit-making peace more important is to get the message out there about the bigger piece of grit grit embracing grit and putting yourself on the journey writing a book can be challenging. There's plenty of information out there, but it does require it does require a bit of grip to take it over the finish line and then make sure you're publicizing it in terms of getting folks engaged. I won't know unless you tell them and there's a variety of ways to do that and I'm still learning that process. Yeah, you know, the thing about writing writing books is for the most part unless you're planning on being Stephen King or something like that. You're not going to write the book cuz you want to make money at it and like you said, no one's going to know how many books you've sold unless you tell them so if you have a several books written off a certain Niche what it does is it gives you credibility in that Niche which allows you to do other things in that Niche. So whether you're angling to be a motivational speaker some day off or becoming a non-profit Wizard or becoming a ultramarathon expert bloggers whenever it may be whatever that Niche you're writing these books in you really have to look at Birth. As a I'm just building credibility and experience to you know have have a better resume to present to the public by writing these books. It happened once a while you might get lucky and hit a home run with something but usually it's never going to happen. So I've had a number of book authors on the show veteran book authors and a lot of them do it for different reasons, but it's usually usually helps them establish themselves in ditch and provide credibility for that. Yeah, Joe, I would add to with all the things that your show does. It also is again got a day job the career. It's a great career but it gives a kind of what I call a side hustle on something that maybe adds something that may be missing package that you want to augment. I have fun with this. I have fun with running been doing it for him over my fourth decade of marathons. So it's I would recommend that to those folks that are in transition. To as they find that next career to seek something else on the side that gives them joy and gives them other things besides your career and family. That's great. I mean career and family family, especially very key but it gives them something else to Aspire to that keeps them in the game on things in this case for me. It's running an am applying that and and and saving lives saving veteran lives through running to me. It's it's one of the things I love to do. But but and even better to help veterans and First Responders overcome pts, so creating a side hustle in addition to family and career. I think keeps people going gives them a motivational Factor as well. So to me Tony we're about out of time. Normally I ask folks wage, if if you were to give some advice to those folks about really get out and wanting to get in entrepreneurship. I was going to ask you why why would you recommend somebody getting out if they get a day job? Why should they have a side Hustle? You just answered that so I do want to ask you tell us the name of your book and where the best place to find. It is true Joe really appreciate it. It's called embracing grid flatland veteran conquered the Leadville 100 Marathon can find it at Amazon.com or my website. Tony Hoffman. Grid one word. Tony Hoffman one F two n's grit off. I'm also on Facebook also Instagram and Linkedin jokes, so appreciate the opportunity to to promote that but more importantly to maybe it's just transitioning Veterans as they seek seek life outside the military. That's absolutely appreciate you sharing your wisdom and experience and the phenomenal success you've had in some of the not just marathons, but these Ultra what do they call that the code an ultra-marathon or is it going over? 26.2 Jill? It's called an ultra so okay, I would rather do the 26.3, but yep. Sided fifty or a hundred miles while I can still do so. Yeah, it's crazy. All right. Well, thanks appreciate you sharing your wisdom experience. We look forward to your future success and raising money for a good cause thanks again for all you do Joe. I appreciate it. You bet. All right these two veterans or ask you might. Thank you for listening to veteran on the move your Pathfinder to Freedom. If you like to show leave us a review in iTunes reviews are always greatly appreciated. So until next time this veteran is Oscar Mike..

Joe Tony Hoffman Oscar Mike Stephen King Facebook Jill Linkedin Instagram
"hofmann" Discussed on Veteran On the Move

Veteran On the Move

06:29 min | 1 year ago

"hofmann" Discussed on Veteran On the Move

"Will always do is Team level is to ensure that a high percentage of them of the donations go directly to program. There's got to be some overlap. Associated with Sade executive director positions and full-time positions. That's a critical aspect I think is to maybe vet the organization for not legitimacy, but is the money going going to what it says? It's supposed to be going towards that is the case with Warrior sent. The other thing you'd asked asked me to kind of elaborate on is how do you get involved think starting as a board member as a veteran for maybe a veteran non-profit or just any non-profit that you are passionate about would be a very important start before even starting a nonprofit may be good to see how a non-profit is Run Through The Eyes of those that are doing it on a day-to-day basis and then there might be opportunity to establish a non-profit you hit the nail on the head. It's unfortunate Choice. I've never been in the quote unquote profit-making business, but you have to you have to raise money for the cause in order to support whatever non-profit is in their, Michigan. Um, and that's a different skill-set. That's a different skill-set asking, you know corporations or companies for to support your costs financially. I think a lot of folks believe it's a pretty easy sell when we started team leads will I thought wow it's going to be pretty easy to get get donations because it's a great cost. Well, no, it requires some marketing. It requires trust. I mean, the biggest piece in raising funds is trust as people support our Runners that they do support the nonprofit and our mission for warriors to send however, they're really supporting the wrong. They're trusting the runner that I trust, you know, Joe Crain or Tony Hoffman that the money that I provide that that he has he or she has better that organization and I'm going to donate because I'm Joe or because the tone that is what I have found the other piece that's been amazing to me is most of our 216000 that we've that we've raised to our donors efforts has come from Individual donors off. Not big companies. Um, I think you know always wait for that Silver Bullet someday, we're going to get that x amount from a large company and it's common however, our individual donors have done a tremendous job. So so really in summary Joe, I think sitting on a non-profit as a veteran really would give them an opportunity to see how a non-profit is run before maybe just dive again to start a non-profit of their own if they want to know kind of the ins and outs of what goes on in a day-to-day world of non-profit. Now your book embracing group is all about team Leadville and running this Hundred Mile event above 10,000 feet. So You know like say every veterans get a book inside of them but most of us don't write that book. So talk about what it took to actually write the book and the purpose behind the whole book and some of the lessons learned because oftentimes ready to book promoting the book marketing. The book is a very entrepreneurial Pursuit interest Joe and I'm learning that out kind of building the airplane as long as line here. So again, it's based on my efforts 2013-2014. Achieving the hundred Miler getting pulled off at 60 and 20-13 thousand applying Lessons Learned and finishing the race in 2014. I really wrote the book for a few reasons one really a first and foremost Inspire others not so much to run a marathon month or a hundred miles of in fact, I'd probably recommend not doing that but but really to inspire others to maybe put themselves on a journey a personal journey of their own in something they didn't think they could log And creating a plan to to achieve it but yet you don't really know what that result. Maybe that to me is the essence. What I call grit is putting yourself on a journey or something that you maybe didn't think you could do and it's a leap of faith but you're putting the effort into it and you don't know if you're going to be able to achieve it or not. But putting yourself on that personal Journey. That's really the key is instead of my book about the my Leadville experienced. The other piece is Joe. I thought it was good twenty20 with what's going on with pandemic. There's a lot of negative news out there. That's a positive thoughts about really a common person myself doing an uncommon thing. Usually think of elite ultramarathoners completing event like the Leadville 100. So it's really a month. Um, some of us that are a little more aged can still achieve big results on a big stage while working full-time raising a family and trying to support, you know, veteran activities Etc wage. You know the thing is is it creates a bit of a legacy for our kids got three kids. They'll look back and say hey that was a book that my father did its volume one of the endurance and grits series home volume to I'm working on now just started. It's in the early stages that will be about team Leadville and our mission stop veteran suicide. So they'll be volume to the endurance and gripsters wage back to writing a book show for me. It was fairly easy to write the book. I actually wrote it in 2014 a month after the race captured it and you say well, why did take your six years? Um, I had a friend West Point classmate that really pushed me here in the last few months to say look you can do this. I thought the concept of self publishing a book would be way too hard. It's really not that difficult. The writing itself was pretty easy because it's something I know about something I experienced and I actually enjoyed it then getting into the print was a little bit different different process off. Hiring somebody for the cover Etc. So the writing piece for me wasn't necessarily the hardest part getting it edited getting a professional design cover wage cetera. You talk about the entrepreneurial piece of promoting it that's another challenge, you know being on your podcast. I can't help not self-serving but gives me the opportunity to your viewers to hear about the book but it's a constant battle most Hindi independent authors. I looked it up the average amount of books that they sell.

Joe Crain Sade Michigan executive director Miler West Point Tony Hoffman
"hofmann" Discussed on Veteran On the Move

Veteran On the Move

08:16 min | 1 year ago

"hofmann" Discussed on Veteran On the Move

"And that's what my book embracing grits about Joe is is about that Journey off of tackling something that you probably didn't think you could do. All of that said the lessons learned from going to that race and and succeeding if you want to call that success. I think there's ways to define success led me to say hey, this would be a great venue to have a team element A Team Marathon. That a team that has to start and finish as a team and also support a veteran cause doing it which was the creation of Team Leadville with our inaugural run in 2015 at the Leadville Trail Marathon. So each year since then we've got mail six straight years running 63 Runners. And again, it just goes up to 13185 feet. It's a full marathon. And the thing that Team level does is we start and finish as a team. However, the other pages each of the runners is expected to raise money for a selected veteran non-profit that will assist veterans and we have done that our selected nonprofit and really our mission is to start Veteran's suicide. We we decided that back in 2016 with our second run or second Marathon as team Leadville and we chose a Kansas city-based nonprofit home. Warriors sent to support for a variety of reasons one. They are tackling the veteran suicide issue through their Academy of Healing and the dollars go directly to program not to over. So that was the really impetus hundred mile run and the location of Leadville was exactly what I was looking for a for an endurance teamwork and grit wage went and we've been able to do that through Team level and we've raised over six years now $216,000 Joe and that has saved 108 lives cost about $2,000 to put somebody through that program from the entrepreneurial peace could almost look at that as a small business starting up from scratch and I've got the numbers here, but the the amount of donations we've raised in that six years went from 7000 to 17000 to 35000 to 70,000 and then 49,000 and during birth. Endemic 38 games. So if you were to say hey, if I'm going to increase 50% each year for in this case donations or profits. That's not the best we do. I think that'd be a month early successful small business jobs. So that's that's the impetus for Team level and what we do right now. Yeah, that's awesome talking about grit. I can't imagine being 60 miles into a thousand mile race and getting pulled off cuz you weren't quite fast enough. Holy cow had to my friend. You kind of know the timelines and not knowing those time lines in those cuts. It really adds a lot of pressure when you know, hey, I'm On The Fringe of not making it but that gets back into the grid piece of challenge yourself to do something you weren't sure you should do and then training for and being probably mentally and physically tough, but just not having enough enough energy on a particular date to complete the event log. That's why I don't Define that as not successful. I mean you gave it your best. You didn't quit and fortunately just didn't meet the time cut. But yeah, it's it's quite a unceremonious and to a 60-mile efforts. Yeah, no kidding. Now. Typically how many Runners for team Leadville participate in the event each year. You don't have all 63 Dodge Jeep running at the same time. Do you know what we've said we've gone up to 16 before and I think that's our Max. We we want to keep it to a manageable amount. We've got Runners of all abilities, by the way, and I'm very proud of this that 11 of those 63 that have run with Team Leadville were first-time marriages. So it never run a marathon. It's crazy. It's not a requirement. I'm kind of the person who vets it as kind of the founder codes administrative person from the dead. The great part about it is got folks that one got repeat performers that have wanted to come back but it also had a West Point classmates two of them had one had never run a marathon be said, hey, look I want to donate to that cause but I want in next to the only thing I ask of the runners Joe is to make sure they understand our purpose. It's not a race that you know, there are some that are much more physically able and could finish faster than our group. We have eight and a half hours to finish that race by by the timeline that's been designated by the race. But the only thing I asked them to do is come ready because we have Runners from all four time zones, and we never really trained again. So we come together as a group and we're going to altitude where most of our Runners are from your life nine hundred feet your Overland Park, Kansas. And what's been amazing to me is one they all come ready and they know what the mission their mission is to get ready and more importantly. It's for a bigger cause in this game. Is to start Veteran's suicide and make a positive difference for veterans and First Responders that are suffering from post-traumatic stress to me that's been the most rewarding piece for for me Joe is being young folks that are all in on a mission that they believe in and a very tough physical event to achieve. Yeah, you know, we've had a number of folks on the show that started and run nonprofits many of them veteran nonprofits and a lot of a lot of veterans they get out and they want to start a veteran non-profit. I would like to change to say that the world probably doesn't need any more veteran non-profits. But what we need is veteran non-profits that are run better and run any more professional way off an interesting way. There's been a lot of abuse in that space. We are not typically veterans that abuse it but you know, a lot of guys rent a vet, you know, and and put them as a figurehead and then do something dog. And behind the scenes but my point is a lot of times you don't realize what you're getting into when it comes to running a nonprofit it really it really is a business office. And unfortunately you get into the business of wanting to help people but you end up spending most of your time trying to raise money. So you're really getting into the business of raising money in running a business. You're not if you're going to run the nonprofit you're not going to have if you're if you're the figurehead of the organization, you're not going to have all that one on one time or as much of it as you might think. So sad you chose to do something different in that is designated non-profit. You're going to raise money for and then turn the money over to them, which is a great weight a great thing to do because so many nonprofits need people in organizations long you that will go out and raise the money for them. And can you talk a little bit about the legalities of what you do? Like, how do you make sure it's legit? I mean, they just rent a check to Warriors are saying you're going to go a little bit about and and warriors asset has to has to trust you to you cuz you're using the name under the guise of raising money for them. So tell you about the legalities and the mechanics of actually if you don't want to start a non-profit, but maybe you want to help one that's already out there. How do you go about doing a show? I think all great points. There are I think first first and foremost think it's important to vet the the nonprofit vet meaning a little bit deeper dive into there five. Oh one c three numbers. Are they reporting to the IRS? Also if your local with a non-profit is to talk to some folks in that nonprofit to make sure it's all run one of the aspects that.

Joe Leadville Trail Marathon Warriors Kansas Overland Park Jeep founder IRS West Point
"hofmann" Discussed on Veteran On the Move

Veteran On the Move

07:28 min | 1 year ago

"hofmann" Discussed on Veteran On the Move

"Transition mistakes that most veterans make great topic Joe the top three for me. I think our first for the military ID number in transition is to own the process. I cannot emphasize that enough. That's probably my number one transition assistance piece of advice to folks that are departing the boundaries on the process what I mean by that it's really taking on the process owning it and not expecting somebody else to do it for you that said it comes on into my cell and major takeaways Reach Out For assistance from those that you know both in not so much that are in uniform because they haven't made that transition yet, but those mentors teachers that you know that have been in uniform have made the transition to collect as much information and lessons learned from them, which is you know, reaching out for assistance is kind of job. 2080 from what you're taught in the military. Keep it at the lowest level figure out problems at or figure out problems at your lowest level. Going to your leaders. I would say don't do that go reach out for help because there's a plenty of folks that will want to help the transitioning veteran the third piece that say and I see this mainly with senior non-commissioned officers and officers in twenty years or or more is not starting early enough in the process not leaving themselves enough time. I certainly respect running to the finish line and jobs Etc. I did that myself, but in retrospect one-sided made the decision to transition I should have put more time and effort into preparing for that transition not only for myself but for our family as well, so those would be my big three takeaways Joe on the process Reach Out For assistance and then yep. Early as early as you can for the transition. All right, great advice great breaking it down to three points like that if we're going to take a quick break and be right back Dave membership is open to all veterans and their family members too. I was in the Marine Corps for twenty four years and I've been a Navy Federal Credit Union member for thirty years and all my family members Navy Federal Credit members if you served in the Army Marine Corps Navy Air Force Space Force Coast Guard or National Guard, you can join serving over one point five million veterans Navy Federal understands the unique lives of Veterans office products and services to meet your life goals as a member-owned not-for-profit credit union Navy Federal has a mission to put you in all their Members 1st by making your success there priority off each member's earned and saved $361 more per year just by bank with Navy Federal if you're in the market for a new car Navy Federal Credit Union mix buying a car easy with their auto loan process their application process. Easy, you can do it on your mobile app online or by phone. It's so fast. You can get a decision in seconds insured by ncua credit and collateral subject to approval rates subject to change and are based on credit were this message and data rates may apply visit navyfederal.org. For more information. The first time I use Fiber was back in the summer 2014 is I Was preparing to start this podcast from the new logo. So I went to fiber submitted some basic info and within 24 hours. I had a great logo, ironically the guy who created the logo was an Army veteran. So he totally got the whole message of Pathfinder freedom and the veteran message and everything else fibers Online Marketplace connects businesses with Freelancers offering hundreds of digital services, including graphic design copywriting web programming film editing and more find what you're looking for instantly. It's easy customize your search by service deadline price cell reviews and more no more guessing games, you know exactly what you're paying for it off. No, negotiating needed pricing is always project-based not hourly this time is difficult for all of us. So having a network of quality Talent you can count on his crucial find Freelancers at our age you are fibers platform is flexible enough to accommodate and manage the ebb and flow of business check out fiber.com and receive 10% off your first order by using my code veteran find all the digits. Just you need one place at f i v e r r code veteran again. That's fiber.com code veteran. All right back talking with army veteran Tony Hoffman founder team Leadville in your recent book embracing grit. So Tony when you did finally retire from the Army, you took a civilian job a public works. Nothing to do with the military no defense contract or anything like that. So you've become civilianized but yet you've you've deliberately stayed engaged in May and maintain Connection to the military tell us about what you've been doing their job very fortunate to again first year out of the military work for architectural engineering firm that was going after Federal program type contracts, which was great. But then this job this job was available and I thought it was a better skill set for what I had done in the military as a Nation Army Corps of engineer District Commander with construction et cetera some of the Public Works Director City of Overland Park, Kansas second largest city in the Casey region two hundred thousand folks and a lead a team of about 140 Personnel in a day-to-day basis. So obviously fortunate enough to be in a leadership position where the leadership from the military those types of values Etc. Do you do cross over into this particular career? I found it's been very rewarding work with some great folks. It's a public sector jobs, you're giving back to the community wage. Live in actually live in we live in Overland Park. So it's need to be a part of the city team that has a key role in our community. I try to but there was kind of a link and I think some of the veterans that make that transition may find that as well as how do you still maintain kind of a toe in the water? So to speak with the military and the culture that you left especially like you and I joke both retired After Twenty Four and Twenty six years respectively. It's part of kind of who you are may not be who you are today. It's not who I am today. I still want to maintain an affiliation with the military. One of the aspects I did is through our running in 2013 had been doing marathons since 1990 as we we talked about decided to up the ante and challenged myself to to take tackle. One of the hardest Ultra marathons in the world called the Leadville 100 called the Raging. Scott Mendelson said ten thousand one hundred ten thousand two hundred feet highest incorporated city in the u.s. And they have a hundred mile event that you have to complete within thirty-six hours attempted in 2013 got pulled off the course due to time and there are certain time hacks that you have to hit. I did not meet the time requirements that Miles 60 so I got pulled off at 60 and decided in 2014 to give it another shot. And.

Navy Federal Navy Federal Credit Union Army Army Marine Corps Navy Air For Overland Park Joe Tony Hoffman Scott Mendelson Nation Army Corps Marine Corps u.s Dave fibers Online Marketplace Miles Kansas Public Works Director City founder engineer
"hofmann" Discussed on Veteran On the Move

Veteran On the Move

07:59 min | 1 year ago

"hofmann" Discussed on Veteran On the Move

"If you're really into running marathons, we're going to talk about and some of the things you've done since retiring from the The Army also part of where you book comes from which is embracing grit. So before we get to talking about all that it takes us back and tell us what you did when you're in the Army true show them what you do for veterans. It's absolutely critical. So thank you and your team for what you do for veterans Joe go back to nineteen eighty-three my junior year in high school. I actually in listed under what was called the delayed entry program. Yep, and they still have to put myself through school. Ya college entry program. I'm sorry. Do they still have the delayed entry program? I don't know. I really don't know when I was in high school. Yeah, you know basically making a commitment to when you graduate from high school that you'll be in the military mine was a two-year wage started active duty as an enlisted Soldier Army. So I'd Nineteen Eighty-Four sought some opportunities after discussion with actually one of my dead. Um my counterparts in in the military and apply to the US Military Academy Preparatory School on my own and was accepted there when they're from 1985 to 86 and was fortunate enough to earn an appointment to US Military Academy at West Point through was from Minnesota through a congressman in Minnesota Orleans stangland wage generated from there in nineteen eighty-six to Nineteen Ninety Four great years at a very good institution, as you know, as all of the academies and all of the ROTC programs are branched Engineers, um Wanted the kind of excitement of Frontline type stuff like an infantryman infantry person. Um, but one of the skill set of an engineer to maybe fall back on whenever I would get out and who do o long that would be went to Ranger school. Nineteen. Ninety one. One of that challenge to was fortunate enough to get through that course, and then really 4 a.m. My most of my first half on my career as an officer was on the Tactical engineering side of the house helping maneuver forces Etc with with a few deployments Palm Desert Shield Desert Storm, 14 months to her as Iraq kicked off Etc later selected for command and and kind of veered off through the selection process to the arm u.s. Army Corps of Engineers side of the house really kind of a different part of the military joining the largest public engineering at T in the world commanded at the lieutenant colonel level in the Walla Walla District of the Army Corps of Engineers, and then was fortunate enough to be selected for the for district command as a colonel here in the Kansas City region as the district near for the u.s. Army Corps of Engineers, Kansas City District from 2010 to 2013 and during that time led to log Very major natural disasters that simultaneously we had the Joplin tornado recovery Mission under sixty two people perished in that horrible event in May of 2011 and then right behind it and during that cleanup process was at the time record, Missouri River flooding in 2011. So really got a taste of Emergency Management page Disaster Recovery during that time frame it was decision time 2013, whether you continue on or not we decided to make this region in the Kansas City region home and overall Park and then transitioned out, uh to the private side. First know to the public side joke now this little time you did all these things in the Army you were an avid Runner right off. I want joke started marathoning thirty years ago be 30 30 years ago in nineteen. Ninety, I believe it's November the Marine Corps Marathon first marathon, so that's continued age. It kind of parallels you all the military things and non-military being being out of the military now of had about forty. I'd have to look 42 marathons. I think completed including the 13 Boston marathons and then branched off into the ultra marathons at the mileage of fifty to a hundred miles after 2013 after getting out. So that's always a staple for me for a variety of reasons. But thanks for asking about that. Yeah, it took a little bit about after twenty-six years in the Army and retiring tell you a little bit about what you're what you were transitioned out of the army was like God. I was probably fortunate Joe in some aspects having had the opportunity to command lead to u.s. Army Corps of engineer districts. There's 40, I think forty six districts in the choice of Engineers 9 or commanded by Lieutenant Colonels. The others are commanded by kernels. The fortunate part is your leading as a uniformed officer, but it's primarily civilians dead. So in the case of Kansas City District about 900 non-military and probably just a handful 4 to 6, depending on how many slots you get the point being I had the luxury I guess that would put it of having been around non-military although in uniform and that transition pretty well engineer by degree and I decided to stay in the Kansas City area, which is I believe the fourth largest conglomeration of engineering firms from their transition to the private sector with the architectural engineering firm called stantec great company and then unbeknownst to me was contacted by by the city of Overland Park to to consider putting in fact Works director job and a job which I ultimately competed for and have been in now six years next month. So but the transmission itself, although had the loan Of those aspects in military was still a challenge and I've had the fortunate um, fortunate time to work with transitioning veterans since 2014. There's a nonprofit called The Society of American military engineers. And we establish what's called Warrior transition panels Joe. We're home. We've actually been in touch with over a thousand soldiers Sailors Airmen and Marines since 2014, we're will get a panel of professionals that has made the military transition down and talk to groups of soldiers Sailors Airmen and Marines. We've done it at Fort Leavenworth a few times for Riley, Kansas Joint Base Lewis-McChord Whiteman Air Force Base wage, of course in Colorado. The intent of those is as you and your listeners know there are some pretty formal processes which with the soldier for Life transition assistance. Program and other programs with the Marine Corps Coast Guard Air Force and Cetera our panels were not meant to take over that process, but they were off to augment it by getting in front of folks that are making the transition to really let them know what it's going to really look like when you get out not that we have not that the transitioning veterans had all the answers, but maybe to fill in some gaps and as the military member made the transition and are in the process of going through those Department of Defense sponsored transition programs to maintain a supply even more and know what to look for in those programs to augment and make their transition a smoother process to so in the subject to transition. What are the some of the things that that really jumps out at you as far as Transition roadblocks or obstacles or big.

Army Corps of Engineers The Army Kansas City Joe Army Corps of engineer US Military Academy Preparator u.s engineer Soldier Army US Military Academy Marine Corps Marathon officer Marine Corps Coast Guard Air F soldiers Sailors Airmen Society of American military Walla Walla District Kansas Joint Base Fort Leavenworth Lieutenant Colonels Ranger school
Reid Hoffman and Fei-Fei Li on Human-Centered AI

WSJ Tech News Briefing

03:03 min | 1 year ago

Reid Hoffman and Fei-Fei Li on Human-Centered AI

"I'm Llewellyn for the Wall Street Journal and I have a guest co host today are artificial intelligence report jared council hey jared. Thanks for having me. Okay. So last week, Lincoln founder Reid Hoffman and the computer scientists faith Lee or part of a session at our Tech Live Conference, and we sat down with them for a conversation as a special episode of Tech News Briefing we'll get to their conversation but I want to tell you a little more about what you're about to hear dared verse things first who are Reid Hoffman and fairly so reid. Hoffman was one of the CO founders of Lincoln which he sold to Microsoft in two thousand sixteen. And he's now a partner at the venture capital firm gray lock. He's been involved with a number of Tech Company boards, including Microsoft, and AIRBNB. Our other guests doctor Faye Faye Lee is a professor of computer science at Stanford University. She's widely considered one of the leading experts in a I. Computer. Vision. She used to be the chief scientist of machine learning in. Google and the to work together at Stanford's Institute for Human Centered Artificial Intelligence. Dr Lee is one of the CO directors air and Mr, Hoffman is a member of its advisory council. Okay. Got It. So Hofmann and Lee were at tech live to talk about human centered ai you guys will get into what that means in the interview but I wonder if you could just give a little background information as our artificial intelligence reporter, why is it such a hot topic of conversation right now? Yeah. Hey, I is a is a hot topic because it's becoming ingrained in a just so many aspects of our lives from predicting next next word or phrase in an email to recommending products on Amazon or songs on spotify. Those kind of innocuous aspects but also more high stakes decisions like what kinds of sentences. A person may serve or what kinds of jobs opportunities they may have access to so. Has Benefit Society but there's also a lot of a lot of risk know one of the biggest ones has to do with bias. There's been studies out there that that show that facial recognition systems for instance are better at detecting white male faces than they are at detecting women and people of Color, and so you know when you have a technology that is really infiltrating our world, there's going to be a lot of attention paid to it. Especially, some of the the issues that come with it and for read and Faye. Faye, with they're trying to do is really elevate somebody ethical issues and concerns and try to get as many stakeholders as possible whether it's businesses or governments to think hard about an of course developers to think hard about what they're creating in in how they're designing.

Faye Faye Lee Reid Hoffman Institute For Human Centered A Microsoft Wall Street Journal Llewellyn Jared Professor Of Computer Science Benefit Society Stanford University Lincoln Google Stanford Advisory Council Founder Airbnb
"hofmann" Discussed on The Dave Pamah Show

The Dave Pamah Show

06:04 min | 1 year ago

"hofmann" Discussed on The Dave Pamah Show

"Kevin Huffman, welcome to the De Palma show. Hey, thanks for having me on now. It's really really good. Good to have you. I've been sort of threw my trade in a mostly when I worked as a firefighter been in involved with anti-racism stuff in the UK and obviously internationally and before I joined the fire service, you know as a teenager and lots of stuff off of America came through obviously from the Civil Rights Movement on words, but today's stuff is very interesting, isn't it? Really? I think it's a new civil rights movement and Global even more Global. Yeah. Yeah. I think I'm just telling someone the other day. I think it this is you know our generation Civil Rights Movement. Yeah. Yeah, but your story started in nineteen sixty-seven, he was born in and when some riots happened around that time and it's a very unique story. I've only had one guests on before I said to be in the preacher preach at you just now that he was a comedian he's dead. Right in life, but he had a similar thing. I think he found his adopted parents. But before we keep our audience in suspense, you've written a book you've written a book about growing up black on black in white. We've talked about your journey. So tell the tell us about your life before this book and then tell us about a journey. Yeah. So I was I'm the result of an affair between my wife mother and black father. Yeah, they were together in a suburb of Detroit in the late sixties and what big Auto plants they worked in a cafeteria together. He was a cook. She was a cafeteria worker. Yeah. They were happily married. Not just the two different people. Yeah, and so my mother shows and I give her a lot of credit for this chose to go back to her white husband and admit that she had an affair with a dog. Man in the late sixties. Yeah, and right and I was born two weeks after the 67 riots in Detroit. Yeah, and it was a lot of what's going on in the late sixties is a is almost mirrors, but we're going through. Yes, right. Yeah. Well even today by some huge you stuff going to move with a collection of all the cases you'll see is not really settling down. Right? Probably right person next year after elections really even longer than that. But yeah, sixty-seven and riots and everything else that's going on or something new as well because really, you know, there was law separating, you know, now there's not laws, but it's kind of like the system still there, you know, which is why it's called systemic racism and then it was like a legal racism. It was like, oh, yeah, you'd not allowed by law to sit next door could be next to it. You know like South Africa was ripped apart. I wasn't it. Yeah. Yeah, so And that's how it was. Yeah, and the largest cities with larger, you know populations of people color. Yeah and the sixties and now it's still yeah, man, we're still kind of fighting that fight which is so frustrating if you 53 years from the 67 riots and we're still struggling with pretty much the same issues. So did you grow grew up in Detroit or yeah, so when I was born in Detroit, like I said my biological mother went to her white husband said I had an affair with a black man. Yeah, so she's only Kind of condition to her having me was that she had to immediately put me up for adoption which she did and I was adopted I went into foster care. Yeah hospital and then adopted three months old by a white Minister his wife and I have three adoptive siblings and their the other siblings were adopted as well. No, no. No, they're all biological to my mother and father. So I'm the only adopted child in our family and yeah, yeah of the adopted mother and father that you grew up with. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah that was life like growing up her or I mean, I don't know how you wrote your book, but we'll take you through the Journey of what your book spoke about. So it was interesting to be born into you know, this city that was literally off still burning when I my first breath in a city that still has this interesting racial history where yeah all the time growing up in Detroit. Detroit really doesn't didn't have an in some places still doesn't have diverse neighborhoods. So you have white neighborhoods and you have black neighbor. Sometimes they'll put up against each other but rarely do they have like mixed neighborhoods. So that was a struggle for us growing up was yeah. So where do we fit in as this Multicultural family? And you know, how may we when I was three years old my parents we lived in a suburb of Detroit when I first got adopted and then at three years old we moved into Detroit where my father became the pastor of a church in Detroit where we lived was in a black neighborhood. So from age three eighteen, I was always around kids that looked like me. And that was life changing for me. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, what was your feeding at that time or how did you feel? You know, I mean, obviously you knew eventually there's something different. Lens and growing up but I knew yeah, of course. Yes, there was that physical difference that I always knew I was in biologically connected to my home but because we like I said, grew up in this black neighborhood. That was the that was first neighborhood. I remember all those it's were black. And so I remember feeling really bad for my white brothers and sisters cuz they weren't fly. Really? Okay. Oh, is that way..

Detroit Civil Rights Movement Kevin Huffman De Palma America UK South Africa
"hofmann" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

Podcast RadioViajera

03:18 min | 2 years ago

"hofmann" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

"Either. The <Silence> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> real GAL <Speech_Music_Male> is him loose. <Speech_Music_Male> Upper lower <Speech_Male> now you <Speech_Male> gotta guessing Gaga <Speech_Male> Damn <Speech_Music_Male> Vieira's <Speech_Male> supports US <Speech_Male> defenders. The <Speech_Male> steelers now <Speech_Male> that he will see now. Amigos <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> seeming to <Speech_Male> familiar. They <Silence> still know all not <Speech_Male> da <Speech_Music_Male> Costa on Castillejos. <Music> The <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> in <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> moist <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> is not the end though. Is <Speech_Male> that those. <Speech_Male> Get them into <Speech_Male> that. Mutual <Speech_Male> brought <Speech_Male> in on the <Speech_Male> dears <Speech_Male> yet. <Speech_Male> I'm you <Speech_Male> know sallow how <Speech_Male> you can drive <Speech_Male> from. Whence <Speech_Male> he on <SpeakerChange> these other <Speech_Male> no <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> lasts. <Speech_Music_Male> This is <Speech_Male> super important. <Speech_Male> This <Speech_Music_Male> the <Speech_Male> implore <Speech_Music_Male> La Di <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Vita Istanbul <Speech_Male> and <Silence> <Speech_Male> Nazi <Speech_Music_Male> Gum may contact. <Speech_Male> O'brien's Jeremy <Speech_Male> hold this <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to impo <Speech_Music_Male> contact with any <Speech_Male> spin so as that any <Speech_Male> stumbled pirker years <Speech_Male> the homolka <Silence> grotto. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Bill <Speech_Music_Male> came in Tuscon <Speech_Music_Male> though. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Not seek this year. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> There's Pay <Speech_Music_Male> da <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> immediately <Speech_Male> started <Speech_Music_Male> gory. Normandy <Speech_Music_Male> finale <Speech_Male> came <Speech_Male> in eastern. <Speech_Male> Who <Speech_Male> Know <Speech_Male> little trees <Speech_Male> as <Speech_Male> they go. <Speech_Music_Male> Hand this <Speech_Music_Male> also. <Speech_Male> It's <SpeakerChange> going to <Speech_Male> Kasa <Speech_Music_Male> Hosie <Speech_Male> of take <Speech_Male> it as I <SpeakerChange> put. <Speech_Male> Allah <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and there's their <Speech_Male> spending knows <Speech_Male> dino's <Speech_Male> they think Guntram or <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> whatever. <Speech_Male> They <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> shocking. Not South Vietnamese <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> print <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> web is bike <Speech_Male> by Keith <Silence> from Tacoma <Speech_Music_Male> a <Speech_Music_Male> at Mit <Speech_Music_Male> this book will blow. <Speech_Male> Iberia's they're GonNa <Speech_Male> let you do <Speech_Music_Male> a lot. <Speech_Music_Male> I'm in put <Speech_Music_Male> him on. Commentary <Speech_Music_Male> in Youtube <Speech_Male> is by tacking <Speech_Male> onto <Speech_Music_Male> or facebook <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> is <Silence> is more by <Speech_Male> it. Owns <Silence> Tara <Speech_Music_Male> a <Speech_Music_Male> way <Speech_Music_Male> to contact us <Speech_Music_Male> your yellow Hindia <Speech_Music_Male> Laurie? Meal <Speech_Music_Male> most <Speech_Music_Male> forget novel <Speech_Music_Male> Star. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Or you get tallied <Speech_Male> dot no but if you do <Speech_Music_Male> it then it'll <Speech_Music_Male> may of lar- <Speech_Music_Male> SKELETON. Kyrie <Speech_Music_Male> I'll push <Speech_Male> I get. I <Speech_Music_Male> get <Speech_Music_Male> a would be interested <Speech_Music_Male> tigers. I've <Speech_Music_Male> lost over Tolan to this <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> kid. I let me read is <Speech_Music_Male> a contact <Speech_Music_Male> army but <Speech_Music_Male> the timing to <Speech_Music_Male> last Martinez Seven. <Speech_Music_Male> When he's around <Speech_Male> mount photos <Speech_Male> he's read <Speech_Male> the low end up with <Speech_Male> him by by kids. <Speech_Male> Come to go <Speech_Music_Male> there <Speech_Male> and laboratory <Speech_Male> NBA show. <Speech_Music_Male> I used to <Speech_Music_Male> last <Speech_Music_Male> for two <SpeakerChange> store. <Speech_Male> Interesting <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Bushman Blessed Attack <Speech_Male> Daego. <Speech_Male> Then they must spend the entire <Speech_Male> combat south. <Speech_Male> Yo bhagwandas <Speech_Male> Marie. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Ibm <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Echo Moscow <Speech_Male> Mujtaba <Speech_Male> segments. <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> We <Silence> went through. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> The <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> borough

"hofmann" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

11:29 min | 2 years ago

"hofmann" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"And one Hofmann coming to you live from the wind studios on Packard road and beautiful and Arbor Michigan we're talking with her good friend Dr Kathryn Williams Williamson the department head of the Bonhams auction house for rare books maps in entertainment memorabilia and the reason the Catherine is coming back is to describe beautifully for us an upcoming auction taking place on December tenth that's Tuesday of nineteen thirty nine Hollywood's greatest year this is I think just a stellar example of a series of auctions abundances been doing in partnership with Turner Classic Movies for number of years now many of those auctions we've highlighted on speaking of art with doctor Williamson this one is really special one of the I guess the sort of keystone piece in this among many first year pieces in this auction is the only surviving one of the good witch of the north Glinda played by Billy Burke in the nineteen thirty nine of the iconic film Catherine again thank you for holding on and joining us again you're welcome yeah we're talking about the wizard of oz and not only the Glinda is the only surviving one which is just a beautiful prop when you look at it you have the diamond years of faux diamond and a fact just the craftsmanship of the piece is wonderful but there's actually an Emerald City coat from the wizard of oz the colors are absolutely outstanding this piece looks like it has been you know in a plexiglas container ever since nineteen thirty nine it's it seems to be in wonderful condition so many great pieces here a a day this catalog itself is a wonderful reference work of art gone with the wind of course is well represented and one thing I particularly like not only the could tour and works on paper like books the bounce scripts for instance you have a couple versions of gone with the wind down scripts one that was on a gift da da da by David O. Selznick the other was Leslie Howard's own personal copy both of them down but also Scarlett o'hara's jewelry I'm looking one this is one of the most beautiful pieces are from the she wore on our honeymoon I in that scene in gone with the wind at the fabulous on ruby necklace and then before that which I think is just about as beautiful lot ten forty nine the coral necklace that sudden worn if the twelve oaks barbecue in gone with the wind one we would notice maybe you know quite so readily but an absolutely beautiful piece along with you know cigar case almost looks like a snuff box beautiful that Rhett Butler has of course he's a privateer to you see a three masted of or clipper ship really on the the the the lid of that the server gilded let the condition is absolutely incredible on these iconic pieces this is just wonderful they are in great shape yeah the the the coral necklace she wears for a long I mean really for the duration of the twelve Bucks barbecue she's wearing that coral necklace did it back to respect that and then the other one which is it last year and and you know more glitchy and glamorous yes which she wears during the honeymoon sequence all the the the all of the jewelry and the acoustic not provided when were produced by this fellow called Joseph of Hollywood yes was that he was the costume jeweler who sold it on his own had it online and custom jewelry that was sold to the marketplace but also did a lot of historical pieces for the studios in other words he was the expert he was the LA based expert in historical jewelry there with you war if you need a hand necklace for clean from eighteen hundred guy you went to get it done you know if you were doing it now and you needed the jewelry to look historically accurate and you want it to be beautiful and well made if you didn't have the ability to make it yourself this is the guy you went to so we had a great business producing that or not for the studios and actually he he often rented things to the studios over and over and over he was naked and drink it again it went back into his our guide so a lot of the I think the coral necklace actually appears in a in several movies in addition to gone with the wind and it's been tweaked a little bit he doesn't exactly match what you see on screen because it's been tweaks for later production but just as was very clear about keeping records about what they'll need each piece went into so we know exactly what movie with Dan and what modifications were made and that and went so that why why and that's why they're so beautiful in the first place because it wasn't just made with a hot glue gun and and Bob ball it you know in the back room it was made by a real chore who had expertise and two this was not just a one off doc this is something that she yes ranch house over and over and over again so they're really well made and really well preserved he's a darn good businessman I mean he he made he was contracted to make them but he didn't give them any gets them back so we still owns the property and rent them out and all the while building that Provan ons that Hollywood Provence N. D. it was a designer's own right I mean he had clients right that we're necessarily you know in pictures or whatever but this is like a major part of his business the coral necklace is is actually went you know I dare say Catherine that his jewelry might have been more accurate period wise and I'm thinking of like Lloyds of London or film like that in some of the costumes themselves the couture in terms of rain accurate all bit his jewelry was spot on in a correct what I think I think that it's not spot on and the fact in the sense that they are not real jewels right they are writing this down in terms of but but in terms of the look yeah they are very very he is very very active he is the yeah he was you know a scholar of the shop of your and he had enough and like a tremendous reference library but so with able you know was always the person you could go to to answer those questions what should this look like which of these hearings look like how should they work what color should they be right how big should they be he was the guy in these are unique pieces everybody to be able to buy and I think that is what makes these these auctions so special they what we have a cultural association with these objects from these films Catherine and now people can buy the one thing I love about these auctions and this one is just another example there's a price point for everybody and the auction is coming up on Tuesday the tenth but people still have time to be able to register online with Bonham's everywhere just gotta Bonham's dot com and you can register for this wonderful auction nineteen thirty nine Hollywood's greatest year and we are speaking with doctor Catherine Williamson head of that department entertainment memorabilia as well as rare books and maps Catherine ask you this question never asked you this before as far as I know what brought you to the Hollywood artifacts from a rare books which is my own specially maps I and it is it I guess certain amount of ephemera and then going into entertainment memorabilia had headed to make that segue because I think it's brilliant and I'm sure extremely rewarding I think intellectually to be able to involved in this you're very very fortunate headed how did you get there well I know I came to work at what was then called better feeling better yeah in the book and manuscripts department so I came I was hired in that department by prior to coming to work better if I'd I'd done graduate work in my and even though I was in the English department my dissertation had been on film history and theory so I heart I came to the company with a foot in both worlds I worked in the book department for many years and then there was a you know a big kind of turnover of staff at in the member billion side of things and I just said well you know I'm just I know a little bit about this I knew a lot about film history I didn't know a lot about costumes and cops and how they were made and and how you are going to get done what I said a lot but I'll you know I'll figure it out and I'll take care of this so you guys a body could do and and people have come and gone but we have a lot of we had a lot of turnover in the department and and so it was with me and then they hired somebody and I will and I put it back and I put on that personal desk and then and then it came back to my desk again and then we kind of got into the TCM relationship and it and it just hasn't left my dad and probably any unlikely to I think at this point because I'll bet a E. every moment of your time is taken up between the rare books in the match and then to do the Hollywood things and get these catalogs out I don't know how you do it I'm I just turned one page here and I'd seen this already but the north by northwest concept painting of the cantilever modern house in north by northwest were James Mason with the big sort of climax takes place on believe I I love that in film and to be able to own the drawing itself is absolutely incredible the car that is a that is a great piece the bound scripts I think of gone with the wind and other pieces the photograph of Norma Shearer of all the photographs there Norma Shearer could be alive with us today the way her hair style the way she looks she is absolutely time was wonderful still photography stills from Disney films also do you have a favorite I know I've got to let you go but it do you have kind of like a favorite piece that you're waiting for when it comes up beyond Glenda's a wind they'll actually like this I really like the springtime for Hitler poster producer yes my favorite well Catherine I want to thank you so much on behalf of my listeners again for describing this wonderful auction nineteen thirty nine Hollywood's greatest year being offered by Bonhams in Los Angeles in partnership with Turner Classic Movies I can't wait for us to be able to speak again so many great auctions we talked about also there's another component to this to the Mitzi Gaynor collection is what could you try just before you go could you say something about that that that the photograph on the back of the catalog of Mitzi's apps we fantastic and what a collector she was could you just say something briefly about her eclectic tastes I mean at has been singing and dancing and performing and probably one moment she could walk right you she had a lifelong career incredible career screen and stage and television and.

Hofmann Dr Kathryn Williams Williamson Arbor Michigan department head
"hofmann" Discussed on Emerging into Greatness With Sade Popoola

Emerging into Greatness With Sade Popoola

03:59 min | 3 years ago

"hofmann" Discussed on Emerging into Greatness With Sade Popoola

"Yeah you know. It's it's we do a lot of networking Those that way we go to lunch together. We experienced each other. We work together to build those long term relationships. That's really gonna make a difference in your business even if you're saying while i'm not really wanting to be a speaker just to be around the mooners acres if you're trying to sell anybody. Don't hang around people that are just broken. Weiner's come on get out there and connected the influencers that will connect you other people and this is a great opportunity for people in the uk that do come speak in the united states absolutely read and we got on. Yeah so why not start your connections from home which is then whatever what What else do you wanna do. What else how. However else do you want to connect if you don't connect physically when the american here with us. I have the best so much fun i know. I can't wait but definitely can't wait so unfortunately we've come to the end of the program so now we're about you know we've managed to get everything in. I am hoping that people who have listened to this woman who have listened to this and have been put off may be through lack of confidence or just just really given up on may because they had to introvert. I hope you have had this. And if you do have the time please come to the. Oh let's hang out that's meet you you know and it see how much we can happen if you are listening to this even after the conference. How can they get in touch with you. Tanya does he go to the website public speakers with an s. association all spelled out dot com got a calendar that pops up at the bottom and i would love to have a conversation with. Abm view i will be back to start those conversations in july But hopefully i get to meet you in person anyways. Yes yes yes yes. Well thank you so much on your hoffman for comment onto the emerging integrate nece put cost with sassy study well. I hope we've been very sassy today most times. I do say. I hope for today. Help having very sassy you get the message that hey get out of it and come come to the program. If you do wanna be a speaker there is time there. You know that this coaching for you. And i bet that you will feel at home instead of feeling very intimidated. It's the emerging integrate cut costs. Tiny hoffman thank you so much for coming on board and i will see you. At the event yay get wait to see everyone at the public speakers. S conference dot com of it. Yes say that again. Www dot public speed kerr's with an s. association dot com. We will see you keep it. We keep it kicking and we make sure it's says it's merging into greatness. Oh you ready to take your business to they matching to greatness we've your host sassy shoddy talking all things business business business talking to c. e. o.'s directors and leaders in business keeping alive keeping and definitely sack. They're merging into greatness costs with sassy shy. There is absolutely no.

Tanya july united states uk today Weiner american hoffman dot com kerr sassy shy sassy
"hofmann" Discussed on Emerging into Greatness With Sade Popoola

Emerging into Greatness With Sade Popoola

07:57 min | 3 years ago

"hofmann" Discussed on Emerging into Greatness With Sade Popoola

"It gets easier and gets easier and gets easier. It is italian challenge and Yeah i have told myself off that women. If you really wanna move with what you're doing you're gonna have to get out of it so i am looking into it it by bit and i did do one. I think she days a few weeks ago but yeah. Let's get back to you. Yes you come in london. I'm coming from all the way from texas in the usa. And i saw that in your on on the website. Ladies and gentlemen there is an event coming up puppies. I know you're gonna go through this. I want you to go through. Just let people be aware. It's gonna be this month in june in the next week also so tell us all about it. People can not miss this three days thing. And there's gonna be I saw on the website that you're going to have a visiting going around play. Says something like. Oh you though. If i'm going to go all the way to london i'm going to have some fun and you know especially since the united states i could write off all of it in my taxes. Young tennis tell us more so it's the public speakers. Conference is june twentieth through the twenty second so next week starting on thursday friday saturday and i am so excited to bring my conference over there. It's an annual conference. I've done it last. Two years was in las vegas. But what i started seeing from my members and people attending one of the biggest challenges that they have is to become an international speaking. Yeah so i'm like well. I've got a fabulous friends over in london. I've personally never been to london in all of the other places. But i know it's kind of crazy so i'm like well there you go. Let's do a conference in london. So i've been blown away with how people are already interacting getting book for opportunities and we haven't even gotten there yet ready already and so we're everyone who comes to the conference gets for speaking opportunities and it doesn't have a huge conference or international. It could be as someone show or webinar or something. But it's about that connection sector connecting to my friends who are all super nice and just fabulous to know that are willing to open up their hearts and their businesses to help each other. Oh i like to develop groups of people that have each other's backs and that is just about what's in it for them I love playing in that field and so those are the people that are coming Already especially if you're wanting to speak in the united states there's going to be speaking opportunities that we're gonna be talking about their people are gonna be able to get booked for the us I've got a lot of people there at the conference. That do a lot of events around london. There'd be a lot of fun amazing. I'm definitely looking forward to that. Because i also i would love to do that and to speak especially you know with the challenges and things that i've been through and helping other women in my age bracket where i mean my fifties and interest as and gotten to that point where you know you've made bad decisions and we have a lot of out. There who have done that was made really bad decisions and gotten to the point where you know that i fed up and my are welcome to do anything. Who's gonna miss them. Hey that story the somebody out there who wants to hear it so yeah yeah definitely. Something and i can't wait. He can't wait to meet you too. I'm gonna brag about it to is gonna be so exciting you know not only from all of the info because we do real training. It's not just you know snuffy cloud talk or just sell. Sal is not that at all so it's really about helping people not just in the stage presence of speaking which we will cover but is reportedly the business of speaking. How are you going to be a speaker and make money at it. Do you need to do to build yourself as the speaker. You need to be so that you can go out and change our lives right exactly and when i went to your website i remember seeing a gentleman who was an canton and then but now he's he never really thought he something that he can do but now he's actually coaching people and he was given people a few if you ideas unknown. I don't know if you remember that gentleman. That was the gentleman i'm speaking about. Come remember his name but you were having an interview with him And he said it was because you know he connected with you that made him to be able to do what he's doing now which is advising the people how to what not to say. I think had to do with communications. The say when know. Kyrie gary mckenzie he. Yeah yeah yeah. Yeah that was him. Yeah there's we've all got these expertise and we've got all of these messages that can truly change people's lives and to me. We're doing a disservice in our own life. If we don't go out there and help others. And i love it. I love watching. People transform themselves and cicero fun. I can't imagine. I can imagine by while this has been really has been good informed. I'm especially inspired by the fact that you know because they other introverts are gonna be listening to this show and listening to you and seeing where you are. I mean fifty two networking events that you've been to. This is a woman that does not give off. Do not give until you get that burn. How might. I'm hoping that a lot of other people are listening. Who are probably thinking are kennedy today. S office no way. I can't like a an abc over that part with what you're telling me now. One almost feels very comfortable to be able to come quite approachable. Also you know. Come to this. And i i am not people to try and make it. To this event honestly speaking you need succumbed this is not a fluffy thing. This is not A shiny object kind of thing where yes soon as you leave everything. Just kind of deflates. You'd something i believe. You're gonna hold on because i've heard i've heard about your your your engagements speaking engagements done my homework. And and after speaking to you now this just hits it all hits the hammer on the nail basically you know and Yeah because it is about not just you know content but about those connections when you are around people who are willing to open themselves up and to help those will you need to be in person right so it's really great when you can be there. I mean a super cheap to come to the three day event. Anyways is low as like nine nine pounds right now..

london texas Kyrie gary mckenzie las vegas usa twenty second today Two years next week thursday friday saturday three day nine nine pounds june united states fifty two networking events fifties this month few weeks ago june twentieth Sal
"hofmann" Discussed on Emerging into Greatness With Sade Popoola

Emerging into Greatness With Sade Popoola

07:07 min | 3 years ago

"hofmann" Discussed on Emerging into Greatness With Sade Popoola

"Marion as this woman is real. Well you know. That's the problem for most people. There is so many ways to connect to people. Check right. Eject messenger you to leave you. Check your texts. You sent email you. There's like so many places to connect to people. Now they're gotta be up on top of it and lead in is by weak point. Go there about every three or four days to check and see who's said something to me but You know you you have to connect and most people what they do is try to just immediately self people you see it on link Is really obvious that really any of the platforms. And then they wonder why they really don't connect the necked or they say something so lofty that. There's no what do i need. What's my next step with you right so to me. It's all about building relationships. I only want to connect people like yourself that reach out and say how can we play together. How can we build a relationship. Yeah you know. And i know a few people so it's great when i can connect them to other opportunities and other people and and have fun and and grow together instead of looking at everything as someone. I'm hungry to eat. You know and we. I think we i thinking business today. We business people. We are at a place where you really do. Have to be real gun of those days where you put off a show an yeah. This needs to be real too many people. Are you know the fake it till you make it. They need to stop be real. Be authentic a lot of people use that authentic word and they don't really need it. I've seen people who want to be speakers and they're trying to steal be that speaker instead of be themselves. I totally get it. Because i've done everything that i talk about. I've done myself. I've done it all wrong. Net at one point you wake up and you're like i remember the day that i went from. I wanna be speaker time yet to. Oh my god. I'm so i okay. I'm just going to be myself. Who cares if they don't like me. Whatever and my business exploded. I remember the actual webinar. That people were like. Oh gosh what was that. You were weren't maisy what you want. You want the real time. All this time. I was trying to be on special mardi special. I mean it was a real eye opener. yeah. Can i get that because i watched your facebook live with. Desert cannot be at the day. And you know i was a sweetie in spite and impressed with it because you would as you you have there was no air is nothing i mean nothing wrong with it gets coin where you know any kind of tone it down especially when you're talking to people because people who are tuning in to the facebook live for that day majority of people want to be a speaker an already that intimidation but you have somebody who's running an organization that says listen. This is what i do. I have an association that deals with this common board. Come and find out more. You know and very very personable. And i think that is what resonates with a lot of people because everyone's tired of the room and tallahassee now and you know the people that are like oh be part of my million dollar club and they're not even making fifty thousand so you know you've got to be real with people they want to know. I mean i know everybody in the world and yet you don't know who i know. I've got all iphone because to me the drawing the name out there and trying to impress people to be just being another form of being sake Why why do that. Why don't i find out who you are and build a relationship with you. That to me has more weight. Dan who i know you know. And most of those guys you don't really know anyways Oh wow oh wow. Is there all people saying that though. The big names are so impressive. Most of them are struggling. This being world is changed. A lot of them. Don't know how to play the new game and so you know a lot of times. People just see what someone has done instead of what they're actually doing still fighting are yeah funny. You say that. Because when i started this import cost which is just what eight eight eight nine weeks ago Yeah i i was going through something. I was going through so much in my business businesses and got point as like you know what i'm done crying. I'm not gonna cry. I don't have time to grab time. Why don't we just start something and speaks other leaders not just any the leaders who have made a certain level. Okay in that business. Because i know they've gone through a challenge at least a challenge you know and they could come on and speak to people and people other people are going through that challenge. You can hear it in being sponsored by it everybody goes through challenges and they still go through challenges because everything is always changing so the you know anybody who is in business and any business is business were always having to adjust and what happens to most people is that we don't see them adjusting. We don't see them struggling so we just assume that they're all so happy. Go lucky oh this is now. Everybody is challenged to market themselves more cells to connect build relationships of used different products and services that are out there now to keep up with the internet. Oh my gosh right me about that. I mean who i know. I'm even having a hard time trying to get myself to do. I live doing. A live is like a big deal. I'm still still. Don't okay girlfriend. You and i are doing a live together. So let's do that. I know i know i have to have. It's really super easy. And i use be live dot tv for the platform. A lot of people use facebook live. Do their own live. But really once you do. It was like with anything first. Time you do a webinar. The first time you do a conference first time you do whatever. It's a challenge because it's the first time but wanted to do it. Then.

Marion fifty thousand facebook Dan iphone first time today four days eight eight eight nine weeks a first one point live mardi every three many people ways million dollar tv
"hofmann" Discussed on Emerging into Greatness With Sade Popoola

Emerging into Greatness With Sade Popoola

06:43 min | 3 years ago

"hofmann" Discussed on Emerging into Greatness With Sade Popoola

"Lady named susan walked in looked like every other person. She wasn't like a gorgeous You know having this person that you're like oh my gosh. of course. she's amazing. She was just a regular woman but as soon as she walked in people jumped up they ran over gave her a hug gave her referrals. It was just all of this flurry around her. And i'm like how do i become susan. What's what does she. I don't have and that's when i realized i had to get out of my fears and when i realized that most people are actually really nice. They're not out to harm me. Hurt me you know. I mean ep. Ugly that most people really nice it was like an all hall moment for me movement and that was when he took the leap. Oh yeah i join fifty two different networking groups and associations that year fifty i was i was a network. Hollick quickly became the networking queen austin And my own networking group organization quickly took that statewide. That's how i kind of got into running groups and creating groups. Because i'm sure by the tenth when you're ready to roll but you fifty times. Sometimes you're a little bit of a go getter but you don't really know when you're in the midst of doing things you don't stop and reflect and one day at the end of two thousand five. I was like exhausted as you can imagine. I wrote down or writing down all the groups. I was involved with. That's how i knew. I was going to fifty two. It was shocked me. And then he's like i don't even like those people those would never even send me anything so i started really kind of looking hard at what was working and what wasn't working in my business and started hiring some coaches to help the mindset. Because you can't get out of your way. What else are you going to do in life. Yeah you just said the magic word that the mindset and being an introvert that must have been something that you had to work on my right. Oh like still. I still have. I been through some horrific things over and over and over again in my life. And i have a tendency to gravitate to the to the negatives of and so i have to remind myself daily. Why i'm doing it and connect myself to the most amazing nicest people. That's why i've got my two roles in my organization. You have to be nice. No meaning negative or loud only perfect people so that it continuously drives the right people in surround me with awesomeness echo of attraction kind of thing. Yeah and you've got to really look at most people. Think about filtration is about creating the right community around you but it's also about filtering out those don't wanna be around you and filtering in the perfect people in not all people think of target market as the oath. I want women between the age of forty five to sixty five that make over eighty thousand. That's all not as important as who they are. What is their value proposition. That to me has more weight because then you start creating a real community that fits you and you're like oh i love waking up every day exactly. I like what you just said their way. You know it's really about the people you know. And because at the end of the day that's what would keep it's one thing official public speaking. You know it's one thing you know to network in holding great that people come That same speaker you keeping in touch as that person become a friend. Have they become a collie. Can you work with them again. If the answer. Yes if they're taking the boxes then it grows exactly and every time you connect to somebody or not just connecting to them. You're also connecting to their people. And so if you. I've done it. Everybody has done it where suddenly you're connected to a group that doesn't fit you because like amazing person. I need to know them. But yet you're god is saying don't do it. Listen to the now you will suddenly a drawl the wrong group to you because they're connected to the same types of people so be really. You know really understand who that person is that you're really wanting to build long term and that a huge difference now is so true because i got to know about you through sharon sharon calix. Oh yeah. I'm gonna be interviewing soon if i could get her. You know and i remember when she Told me about you. And she introduced me to their to your business. Which is the perfect speakers association website and everything. I'm right ooh how they now. What are you thinking. What are you thinking reported this now. It's not for you ready. What do you know and I just foulds. I just found okay. Why don't i see. This is gonna know if i'm gonna if it's something i wanna pursue at all. If this person somebody. I want to get in touch with was said okay. I'm just gonna contact task through victim. A see okay if it's not too much for her to come back to me then. This is my lady area. That was it because i have contacted. Few people th- ruling thin. They have accepted our friendship. A request connection. But we send them something. Don't okay yank. i'm back on it now. I don't need to know you so about when you came back into way you came back you know was so friendly with so womb. It was i was at stake. Now this is a true leader. This is either. I want to speak to and then i went back to your how to good look and okay. And she's taking time out. She has to speak to me. You know yes. He did not respond immediately. Which is obvious when you did you did. And we got talking. And after i talk offense discussion. I was just over the.

susan fifty sharon sharon calix fifty times two roles tenth over eighty thousand Hollick one day fifty two two thousand five sixty five Few people one age of forty five two different networking group austin
"hofmann" Discussed on Emerging into Greatness With Sade Popoola

Emerging into Greatness With Sade Popoola

06:19 min | 3 years ago

"hofmann" Discussed on Emerging into Greatness With Sade Popoola

"We're going to have gone. We're going gonna have the real spring. We're going to have the real summa bob. Today is just not one of them however however the sounds outs in today's gets the sun is out it's shining. I'm excited about mighty guests about the next guest. I have on. She is the ceo and founder. Okay off the public speakers association. Now that is heavy. That's just not some company where okay yes. She helps optic speakers. This is an association and She's not just the founder she's also ceo. Which i believe is a lot of work because when talking responsibilities hair we're talking you know getting together and helping other business leaders do and get their message across you know. So yes my next guest net me introduce her stop gabbing on her. Name is tanya hoffman. Tanya you are welcome to the emerging integrate this podcast with asiatic role. I know it's so funny because it's so sunny here that sometimes we wish the rain so no we don't have on the when we do. It's like we almost worship it like she's just longer. I know the other day it was forty celsius here. Nasr or your weather you know about a week ago so we don't him when we do real long walks in it we just want to sit in and just get up and we got auto week. Wanna put it in there and have it stay that way. Welcome thank you. I'm so excited to be here today on. Tanya you are doing something great. A lot of people are trying to get into speaking. And it's a tough world out there And yes we all have stories. We have we have things we want people to know about in help. But it's such a world especially for women and seems to be a male dominated thing but that seems to be changing so tell us more about. I want to know more about you on yeah. I'm a recovering introvert and a recovering perfectionist. So if he does own k we had to. We all have our journey and a lot of times people. Just see us at the end part of our journey verses at the beginning To remind people that everyone goes through that journey no matter who they are yes they do and thank you for pointing out. Which is the whole reason this program because you just see a lot of people who just say yes business you know. This works not making two million a year but really at the end of the day. Sometimes it's not just that as what happened in the middle. What what challenge did you have to go through. And how did you scale truant. So you've been an intro. That must have been hard to do what you're doing now. Oh if you had told me that i would be a speaker and be own a speaking organization. I would have been like impossible. You know so yeah you have to. You know when you start seeing what limitations you have in your own lives and how you're keeping yourself from achieving. Not just what you're meant to here to do but how you're being incredibly selfish by not going out and changing other people's lives because we've got your own mess to clean up you know that's how i kind of put it to myself every day for so many years was okay. Tying don't be selfish today. Go out and challenge yourself and do the things. That's hard for you so that you can go out and change more lives. What was really difficult for you and was the main main thing that was difficult. Well you know like if a lot of people say. The hardest thing is standing up in front of people that whole gosh. I'm i'm a speaker. What are you talking about That was probably the hardest thing in the next one. Is my voice a head to get over to sound and hearing my voice. I started my own. Am radio station way back in two thousand six just to get that issue. So wow so you had to kind of just out some day and still you know i have a little sticker. I love sticky notes a little sticky note a holic so of my sticker says today because you if you get complacent and you don't continue to challenge yourself push yourself you'll never continue to grow and there's always something else to you know do and and it's funny how things still come up fears deal. Come up my why is that there. I thought i got over that by now. Especially if you're an introvert 'cause if you're an introvert and you're going to public speaking what. How did you start like what happened. Tell us all about it. So i started in two thousand and five my next business. I've been an entrepreneur. Since i was twenty five so in two thousand and five thirty eight and my husband and i started our next journey i started networking. I've found networking groups chambers of commerce associations. And what they all want you to do is stand up and do an elevator pitch and it was so incredibly difficult. I was sweating shaking. Couldn't remember my name. Most of the time on. But i saw how effective it was this. All you know. The biggest aha moment was the first kind of real networking group. I went to and.

tanya hoffman Tanya forty celsius today Today two thousand one first twenty five five Nasr a week ago two million a year six five thirty eight about so many years
"hofmann" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

03:17 min | 3 years ago

"hofmann" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Yeah. What? The people who've been pumping that it literally pumping that and for decades blazingly they're doing that too. Yeah. I know they are they really are doing that. But at least they're lecturing themselves. You know, what I mean, at least be beyond petroleum. No, you're not you're petroleum. Well, but we'd like to be beyond petroleum. Okay. Well, they actually had a legit. Wings to the Brexit their. We're not British. We're beyond petroleum. That's amazing. I it's just it. Just strikes me as embarrassing. There is a level of their of of this sort of Domino's approach though, isn't there are pizza used to suck. But now we're now pizza's good that's kind of what they're doing. They're like they're showing their own ads say, but wait, wait, wait. Hofmann has to answer today for something that he did or said while filming the graduate. Okay. Gillette? Doesn't have to explain what they were doing. I wasn't at Gillette. The did. Joe nemeth? Is one of them. I mean, they don't have to they don't they don't they don't actually have to explain what they were doing when they were selling sex in razors back in the seventies or the eighties or the nineties or maybe two years ago. They don't have to answer for any of that. But if I God forbid said, something my son said something in nineteen ninety-five. My life is destroyed. How dare you? It's really weird. And I think this is a strange thing. We've talked for years. I mean, how long have we been doing this show, and we've talked about how the left and the media are pushing the boundaries, and we're losing those sort of traditional values. Right. Like everybody's having sex with everybody. Like they've now combined that with like this really odd puritanical set of demands where you can't you can't you can't talk about any of these things like you have to at the same time be way over the line and break every barrier of of what was at one point good taste. But at the same time, you can't say anything to anybody. It's a new religion is it's a new religion. These are the puritanical priests that will tell you what you can and cannot say, and what's what's so aggravating about this is you're the one always saying to us that we're too. We're too tight. We're too. We're too afraid of sex and everything else we we just want everybody to be wholesome and will now what is that Gillette ad that Gillette ad is teaching your children to be wholesome. It's teaching your children not to Ogle girls not to pinch their ass. Not to not to whistle at them. In Cabot call that. It's a good thing. Gillette came along because I was teaching by kids. Exactly the opposite. Taught my son how to whistle you, right? I put my kid in cat called class. I was teaching him. How to be a better I put him in construction sites. So that he could learn from the worker smart because all construction site. That's.

Gillette Hofmann Joe nemeth Domino Ogle Cabot two years
"hofmann" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

03:11 min | 3 years ago

"hofmann" Discussed on WTVN

"Fuel. Right. Yeah. And you're like what you're the people who've been pumping that it literally pumping that and four-decade lazily. They're doing that too. Yeah. I know they are they really are doing that. But at least they're lecturing themselves. You know, what I mean, at least BP is like beyond petroleum. No, you're not you're petroleum. Well, but we'd like to be beyond petroleum. Okay. They actually had a legitimate wings to Brexit. We're not British. We're beyond petroleum, right? That's amazing. I it's just it. Just strikes me as embarrassing. There is a level of of of the Domino's approach though. Isn't there like? PC's to suck. But now, we're now are pizza's good that's kind of what they're doing. They're like they're showing their own ads. You say, but wait wait when Hofmann has to answer today for something that he did or said while filming the graduate. Okay. Joe latte doesn't have to explain what they were doing. I wasn't at Gillette did Joe Nemeth. Is one of them. I mean, they don't have to they don't they don't they don't actually have to explain what they were doing when they were selling sex in razors back in the seventies or the eighties or the nineties or maybe two years ago. They don't have to answer for any of that. But if I God forbid said, something my son said something in nineteen ninety five my life is destroyed. How dare you? It's really weird. And I think this is a strange thing. We've talked for years. I mean, how long have we been doing this show, and we've talked about how the left in the media are pushing the boundaries, and we're losing those sort of traditional values. Right. Like everybody's having sex with everybody. Like they've now combined that with like this really odd puritanical do set of demands or you can't you can't you can't talk about any of these like you have to at the same time be way over the line in break every barrier of of what was at one point good taste. But at the same time, you can't say anything to anybody. It's a new religion is it's a new religion. These are the puritanical priests that will tell you what you can and cannot say, and what's what's so aggravating about this is you're the one always saying to us that we're too. We're too tight. We're too. We're too afraid of sex and everything else we we just want everybody to be wholesome. And we'll now what is that Gillette ad that Gillette ad is teaching your children to be wholesome. It's teaching your children not to Ogle girls. Not to pinch their ass. Not to not to whistle at them cap. Call that a good thing. Gillette came along because I was teaching by kids. Exactly the opposite. I taught my son how to whistle you, right? I put my kid in catcalled class. I was teaching him. How to be a better cat. I put him in construction sites. So that he could learn.

Gillette Hofmann Joe latte Ogle Domino Brexit Joe Nemeth four-decade two years