19 Burst results for "Ho Chunk"

"ho chunk" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

04:51 min | 5 d ago

"ho chunk" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is national native news. I'm Antonio Gonzalez. A northeast Nebraska farming operation is starting the new year with an even bigger commitment to conservation and they're hoping other farms take note. Debra van fleet reports. Cover cropping in organic farming are already practiced by the Winnebago tribes Ho chunk farms, and through the USDA's natural resources conservation service equip program, they'll be adding more conservation practices this year. Farm senior manager Erin the point says they've enrolled all 3500 of their irrigated acres into a technology driven water conservation program known as the water smart initiative. There's lots of equipment that tool and form you on your groundwater levels, which alerts you want to arrogate at the optimal time using the least amount of water. And also if you over watering, that brings more of an issue when you start talking about leaching, of different pesticides and herbicides and getting things into our groundwater. The NRCS shares the upfront costs of water meters, soil moisture probes, weather stations, and inspecting irrigation pumps to be sure they're functioning properly. The point says their confident this will be a good long-term investment, both for water and soil health. The point explains they've also enrolled all their irrigated acres into another NRCS program to monitor their herbicide and pesticide use. It allows you to efficiently use a certain amount of chemical that you need to kill weeds without overdoing it because any excess that you spray could eventually end up in groundwater or causing other issues and other things. Ho Chiang farms is part of the Winnebago tribe's economic development corporation. It will plant nearly 7000 acres this year, 1000 will be cover crops in another thousand will have organically certified crops. The point says they hope their successes will encourage other farmers to take a look at what the NRCS offers. We personally might sit here and say, well, is our 3500 acres really making a difference? But if you start inspiring more people to do it, now you're starting to make some real change. And if there's somebody that's going to kind of set the trend and inspire people to maybe move in that direction, I think it should be us. I'm Debra van fleet. Filmmakers of imagining the Indian, the fight against Native American mascot, joined demonstrator Saturday at the Kansas City football team's playoff game to advocate for the team to change its name and end the appropriation of native culture, producer yancy Byrne says the experience showed him the importance of educating the public about the fight against Native American mascots. He says he witnessed people who came by the protest who may be open to dialog but says there was also a different side. There's a folks who maybe don't understand the issue, but are just not happy and are just willing to be awful and then further along on that spectrum of folks who just really have malice in their heart. And it's incredible that so many folks who I think the ones who have malice in their heart probably understand less than the ones who are just on the other side of the spectrum who just don't understand anything because there's no reason to have malice, especially towards the folks who are protesting. It was a peaceful nonviolent protest, all the protesters were not in honor of asking for is to think about the issue to change the name to stop the chop. And there's no reason that the folks that are encountering should bring violence towards them, and that's what they're doing. And it was incredible to see. The documentary examines the movement to end the use of Native American names logos and mascots and the world of sports and beyond. It was screened in Kansas city last week, the group not in our honor host demonstrations during the NFL season outside the Kansas City football team's home games. The Kansas City football team has stated the team is continuing dialog with the native community to identify ways to educate and raise awareness of Native Americans. Native American NASA astronaut Nicole Mann took part in the first spacewalk of 2023 on Friday alongside a Japanese astronaut. They spent more than 7 hours working outside the International Space Station. Man is the first Native American woman to go to space. I'm

Debra van fleet Antonio Gonzalez northeast Nebraska NRCS Ho Chiang Winnebago tribe's economic dev Native American mascot yancy Byrne USDA Erin Kansas City football Kansas city Nicole Mann NFL NASA International Space Station
"ho chunk" Discussed on Gambling Podcast: You Can Bet on That

Gambling Podcast: You Can Bet on That

05:28 min | 5 months ago

"ho chunk" Discussed on Gambling Podcast: You Can Bet on That

"To you can bet on that. A podcast for the recreational gambler. I marked of all. And I'm doctor Mike. Mike, you've been doing any gambling out your way at all recently? Well, just made one trip to Ho chunk casino in baraboo, Wisconsin. Right by the dells there, right? Yep, yep, right in the dells. And I wanted to go to meet up with listener Michael James. Yeah, we had a good time. We were there maybe 5 hours. Did pretty well. Never hit the all, but we hit half of it either the smaller the tall 5 or 6 times. Okay, and is that the only side bet they have at the crabs table there? Yeah, that's the only side that there's no fire bed or anything. Yeah. And the lemon is just $5. Okay, good. Oh, you mean on that bet? Yeah, on that bet. The max is $5. The max is $5. Okay. Yeah. And yeah, it went well. Nothing crazy to report. One guy had a pretty nice roll. And we both ended up winning. So oh good. There you go. Yeah. And you'd say you'd like the casino? Yeah, I like the casino. It's small that crab steelers are nice and friendly, and they're all good. They have two tables. And I asked when I was there, you know, about the second table. This was a Sunday that we went around noon, and they said, yeah, that probably won't open today. And I said, well, when does it open? And one dealer kind of looked at me like, well, lately, not very often. Yeah. And that Pitbull said, yeah, you know, staffing problems. Yeah, we usually just get one table sometimes on a Friday or Saturday night after 8 p.m. they open the second one if there's a big demand and they have the dealers. Okay. You know, that's the one thing about their plus the maximum bet on the crafts table is 300 bucks. 300, okay. That sounds like a state line maximum. We'd stop at state line and that'd be the max, yeah. Okay. Yeah. But they do allow put bets. So, you know, if you get like a $300 6 and you want to go higher, just make a put bet with ten times. Ten times odds. There you go. Okay. $10 table. It was a $10 table. Did you hit the max while you were there? 300. Oh yeah. Oh yeah. Of course. What do you mean? I started with 300.

Ho chunk casino Mike baraboo Michael James Wisconsin steelers Pitbull
"ho chunk" Discussed on Gambling Podcast: You Can Bet on That

Gambling Podcast: You Can Bet on That

03:44 min | 5 months ago

"ho chunk" Discussed on Gambling Podcast: You Can Bet on That

"We <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> love getting your <Speech_Male> feedback. All right, take it away, <Speech_Male> doctor Mike. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Well, I got a few things <Speech_Male> to say, Mark. <Speech_Male> First <Speech_Male> off, listener <Speech_Male> Michael James, and I <Speech_Male> are <Speech_Male> going to meet up <Speech_Male> tomorrow <Speech_Male> at Ho chunk casino <Speech_Male> in Berlin. Oh, good. <Speech_Male> Oh, good, good, good. <Speech_Male> Good luck for that. <Speech_Male> Yeah, and my wife's <Speech_Male> going along <Speech_Male> too. So <Speech_Male> yeah, we've talked <Speech_Male> many times, but <Speech_Male> we've never met. So <Speech_Male> we're going to meet <Speech_Male> up there, hopefully we'll have some <Speech_Male> good luck. I'll have a <Speech_Male> report on that on the next <Speech_Male> trip. Great, excellent. <Speech_Male> And I also <Speech_Male> wanted to say <Speech_Male> that on <Speech_Male> Veterans Day <Speech_Male> this year, <Speech_Male> November 11th, <Speech_Male> that's a Friday. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> on that weekend, <Speech_Male> 11, 12 and <Speech_Male> 13, <Speech_Male> Chris and <Speech_Male> Josh from <Speech_Male> the crap Vegas <Speech_Male> podcast <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> are going to come out <Speech_Male> here. Okay. <Speech_Male> And hopefully <Speech_Male> you are too. <Speech_Male> Yeah, so you just mentioned <Speech_Male> that to me the other day, <Speech_Male> you know, as soon as <Speech_Male> you sent me the text, <Speech_Male> sherry said, <Speech_Male> go for it. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> that's great. It'll <Speech_Male> just be a fun weekend <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> people have it off. <Speech_Male> I assume a lot of people <Speech_Male> have it offer veterans. <Speech_Male> Yeah, I <SpeakerChange> have it all. <Speech_Male> I'm still <Speech_Male> trying to decide <Speech_Male> what casino <Speech_Male> we're going to meet at <Speech_Male> because there's no <Speech_Male> casinos around <Speech_Male> here that are <Speech_Male> in a big group where there's <Speech_Male> four or 5, <Speech_Male> right? <Speech_Male> So we have to meet at one, <Speech_Male> but we might be able to <Speech_Male> drive to another one <Speech_Male> since I have a vehicle <Speech_Male> here and stuff. Oh, <Speech_Male> you've got a vehicle there. <Speech_Male> Oh, good. Oh, <Speech_Male> okay. I didn't <Speech_Male> realize that you actually <Speech_Male> took one with you <Speech_Male> when you moved to Minnesota, <Speech_Male> doctor Mack. <Speech_Male> A big vehicle. <Speech_Male> Oh, okay, a big <Speech_Male> 9 people. <Speech_Male> All right. <Speech_Male> So we can <Speech_Male> go wherever we want. <Speech_Male> Wow. Oops. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> anyone listening who <Speech_Male> wants to meet <Speech_Male> us? There will be details <Speech_Male> coming <Speech_Male> sometime <Speech_Male> in October. <Speech_Male> Good. But keep that <Speech_Male> weakened open because <Speech_Male> yeah, we're going to <Speech_Male> head here or maybe spend <Speech_Male> a weekend at some casino, <Speech_Male> maybe drive to <Speech_Male> another one even. Great for a day, <Speech_Male> something like that. <Speech_Male> You know, there are a couple hours <Speech_Male> apart each, but <Speech_Male> it goes by so fast <Speech_Male> when you're <Speech_Male> with a group. So <Speech_Male> yeah, that's going to be <Speech_Male> a really fun time, I think. <Speech_Male> Good fantastic. <Speech_Male> And the other <Speech_Male> thing I wanted <Speech_Male> to mention is, you know, <Speech_Male> getting back to that <Speech_Male> variety <Speech_Male> of life and <Speech_Male> all the <Speech_Male> bad things <Speech_Male> or superstitions <Speech_Male> or whatever you want <Speech_Male> to call it. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I went a <Speech_Male> couple days ago, Mark <Speech_Male> to get my <Speech_Male> Minnesota driver <Speech_Male> slice. Okay, good. <Speech_Male> Change my California <Speech_Male> to Minnesota. <Speech_Male> And we had to <Speech_Male> change the <Speech_Male> license plates <Speech_Male> and actually <Speech_Male> get new IDs. <Speech_Male> It's a long <Speech_Male> process. <Speech_Male> And so Lin and I are <Speech_Male> there and the lady <Speech_Male> who helped us, which <Speech_Male> was excellent. <Speech_Male> We had a ton of <Speech_Male> stuff to do. It took quite a <Speech_Male> while, but she was very <Speech_Male> efficient at <Speech_Male> her job. <Speech_Male> So she goes to take <Speech_Male> my picture. <Speech_Male> And she's like, <Speech_Male> okay, look right here <Speech_Male> and do this and <Speech_Male> do that. And I said, <Speech_Male> oh my God, if I <Speech_Male> had known I was going to be <Speech_Male> doing this today, <Speech_Male> I would have shaved my <Speech_Male> eyebrows off. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> she <Speech_Male> laughed <Speech_Male> so hard. <Speech_Male> Mark, for like ten minutes <Speech_Male> later, she was still <Speech_Male> giggling about that <Speech_Male> in my <Speech_Male> wife's just totally <Speech_Male> embarrassed. <Speech_Male> Yeah, good. That's <Speech_Male> one of the reasons you do it. <Speech_Male> That's one of the reasons <Speech_Male> I do it. <Speech_Male> My only <Speech_Male> regret is my daughters <Speech_Male> weren't there. <Speech_Male> That's right. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I'm <Speech_Male> sorry. That's <Speech_Male> what life's <SpeakerChange> all about. <Speech_Male> Minnesota is <Speech_Male> getting the doctor Mike <Speech_Male> treatment <SpeakerChange> finally. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Finally, they're getting them. <Speech_Male> That'll <Speech_Music_Male> probably

Ho chunk casino Michael James Minnesota Berlin Mike Mark Vegas Mack California
"ho chunk" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:23 min | 8 months ago

"ho chunk" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Together. And so I don't expect and I never had an expectation that my chamber music would get performed all that often. I make these things because I have to. Because they're inside of me and they have to come out. But, you know, it's something that's not, you know, even on everybody's radar. I think the general public doesn't go to see classical music or definitely not contemporary classical music. At the same time, it's not might not be their fault. These things are accessible to a lot of communities, especially our native communities. We don't have our own orchestras or anything like that. Let alone the music education to encourage that. We're watching the video, there were musicians, strategically positioned throughout the cathedral and then there was a conductor there at the front and of course the pipe organ was up there at the front and somebody playing a percussion instrument, but Raven, where were you at during that performance? Because in the video. Yeah, I was another member of the audience. I was sitting somewhere in the middle because I knew that that would be the position to hear all of the instruments. So I situated myself early in the not in the front, but in the middle of the audience. And so yeah, it was a beautiful event. They invited the local drum group from the area, Ho chunk artist, skyhook and was there. And showed a film. So they were very acknowledging of that anniversary of being something that they wanted to include native voices inside of. Oh yeah. So, and then for somebody like myself, I mean, I apologize. I don't know a lot about chamber music or being a composer, but as a composer. So you are commissioned to compose this piece to write it all down and then, and then you turn it over to the conductor and the musicians, and they take it from there, right in terms of the performance. How does that work that whole creative process and these different partners that are involved in making it what you envision and you hear in your mind and then from that, putting it on paper and then actually having a finished product like what was performed that evening there at the cathedral. Yeah, that's pretty much the process. I think it's anywhere from 6 months to a year in advance. Somebody might commission a piece. They came up with some funds for my work to make it happen. And that's about how long it took me. It took me about 6 months to work on this composition. Amongst other things that I'm working on, you should go in the morning to the studio and just sit and write it out by hand. Eventually, you know, put it into a notation software so it can look cleaned up and be in a presentation for the instrumentalists and you send it off to the conductor and they start dispersing the parts to the ensemble. And under normal circumstances, I might have had the opportunity to go and visit the organ. Because I don't know anything about the organ, or I didn't. You know, this was a completely new instrument for me to compose for and I had to do a lot of research from afar. So I had to pick the brains of some organists, friends that are around the world and watch a lot of YouTube videos and just try to understand how this instrument works. And eventually, you know, we have a date for the performance, which I already knew was going to be Thanksgiving and showed up earlier that week to rehearse with the musicians. And so that would be the time that everybody is gathering for the first time. And playing through it. And I give my give suggestions. I might see what works, what didn't work, tweak a few things. And you should get a one or two rehearsals. Maybe more. And maybe not maybe one inside the space where it's going to be performed. And that's it, you know? And then on to the next project. Oh, wow. It's just so cool. And I did read a recent article in the LA times and it drew some parallels between the performance of voiceless mass last fall. And some of the racial justice demonstrations that were going on around the same time in Wisconsin was all related to the cow rittenhouse acquittal and all that stuff. And I'm going to paraphrase here, but your performance was described as offering. Almost a therapeutic or healing atmosphere to the tension and turmoil that was occurring outside the cathedral throughout Wisconsin. And was that your intention to provide a release like that or did it just occur on its own? I mean, I love that description. I'm honored by descriptions like that. I do admit that inside of the work there is tension and eventually, if you listen more, you have this tension that gets resolved musically. You have tones that are just apart and then coming back together into unison. And even though I'm describing very technically what happens with the notes, of course, that symbolically creates the same thing we can imagine. The unison is, of course, this metaphor for people aligning. People feeling people coming to resolutions. And so that's what the work demonstrates in its sound and if people can feel that or can liken that to the situation that they're feeling as a community than I'm appreciative of that description of that. The thing that happened as well is a few days after the yeah, it was just after the premiere was that written house verdict. So people in that community just 30 minutes away from Milwaukee. You know, this is what they were dealing with. And we were dealing with this all over this country. There were protests around Black Lives Matter around confederate monuments. Those are those of us in the Southwest had the conquistador monument that we were dealing with. And so this was a time even though the role of silence during lockdown did we have a lot of people finding opportunities to voice their concerns to still gather outdoors. And protest. And let their voices be heard amongst the silence that the pandemic was putting on us. Yeah, and I want to ask you more about what that was like composing the piece during the pandemic and during the performance you could tell a lot of the people there. Parishioners had masks, some of the musicians. But right now, Raven, I want to go to the phones. We've got Chris listening on KU and M in Albuquerque. Chris, thanks for calling in today. Thank you for having me. Really appreciate it. You.

Ho chunk Wisconsin LA times YouTube Milwaukee Southwest Chris Albuquerque
"ho chunk" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

08:16 min | 8 months ago

"ho chunk" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Support by the American Indian college fund, the American Indian college fund provides millions of dollars of scholarships to thousands of native students every year. Tribal citizens of every age and experience are eligible. Scholarship applications are now open for the upcoming school year at college fund dot org. That's college fund dot org or by phone at 807 6 6 F, UND education is the answer. Thank you for tuning in to native America calling. I'm your host Sean spruce. We're talking about the world of personal finance today and there's still time if you have a question or comment or at one 809 9 6 two 8 four 8. That's also one 809 9 native. And let's go to the phones now. We have Ken, listening on KU and M in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Ken, thanks for calling the show today. Hi. Thank you very much. Very exciting. Show today for me. I work at a credit union here in Albuquerque and we serve the whole state of New Mexico, including a great deal of the native population. And the previous speaker, just a while ago, we were talking about getting ready to open a credit union. And I think that's a vital resource for the Native American community. One thing about the credit unions is they are member owned. So the Native American community that the members actually own that and have a say in that. And additionally, within the credit union movement itself, there are other resources such as forming a Crusoe with maybe a more established credit union. Or a better finance credit union or better positions in some way that would allow for things such as some of the FinTech options for the members to be able to get more accessible banking options and certainly the lending. Opportunities that are there, the we're working hard to eliminate things that go overdraft fees and other types of kind of communities type of income that we have and making it more about the members and the resources for them. We also do financial literacy free to the members and things that would help them build their credit. Acquire additional credit sources and just a lot of different resources they're there. So getting the Native Americans also involve say in forming boards and developing board members for other credit unions that maybe are not necessarily completely lady of American, but being part of that leadership. Sure. Ken, thanks for calling in to the show today and sharing that information. And I would like to ask Christy Ken mentioned the mobile banking and we talked earlier about being able to use a smartphone, but that technology does come with risks though, right? Christy, can you offer any advice for how folks can protect themselves when using mobile banking and these other types of FinTech apps and such? Yes. For those who do have the capability with a smartphone, for example, to be able to do online banking, you would just make sure that you're having some privacy, maybe around using some of your banking services, depositing checks and things like that online. And being able to check your bank account online and make sure that the deposits are being deposited into the account and making sure that there's not weird fees associated or other things that you weren't expecting. So just kind of due diligence and practice in terms of checking your bank statements and then occasionally looking at your credit report just to make sure everything's fine there. Really what we are trying to promote is that zen tech is a fabulous option for those that have the technology for the broadband access in the smartphones and other devices to be able to use it. But Sharon mentioned we still have to have options for in person banking, especially in Indian country where we have so many people that do not have proper broadband access. And so we also have to have manual workarounds for the nonprofit in if we're trying to do collect information to be able to put out emergency cash assistance or other things like that where we're taking some banking information. So just kind of all together and it's not that same tech is going to be, I think, cure all for all of these issues. But at the same time, we want to be able to try to have that technology available with people are interested. Sure. And speaking with you today and sharing, and I think there's these broader conversations that we're hearing nationwide that we're getting to this point where we really don't need actual bricks and mortar bank branches and people can do everything online, but what's coming through loud and clear today is that in our native communities, that's not the case, and we still very much need those physical financial service locations. We need those personal relationships with the folks that we're working with with regard to our financial transactions. So again, just a really, really interesting discussion today, and let's bring another guest into the conversation now. He is joining us from Minneapolis, Minnesota, Gary Garvin is a financial representative. He is Ho chunk. Gary, welcome to native America calling. Hey, good morning, Sean. Thanks for having me on. Absolutely, Gary. And I know that financial planning is a big part of your job. What else does that entail? Yeah, so I guess I'm with a M and a catalyst and the firm specializes in insurance strategies, investment strategies. Retirement income planning, college, one strategies, maybe if someone's in the charitable giving that it's a real comprehensive financial planning firm. And so just let me take a couple of minutes and I can explain a little bit about what we do and how we do it. Typically, typically, how it works for us is our team gets hired to be a CFO or a PFO type of person for a client and or their business if they own a business. So PFO that would be a personal finance officer. And what we're going to do is walk in partnership with that particular person to help them make all their ongoing decisions and it's built around ten, 15, 20 plus year relationship. So ideally we want to work together forever because that's where we can build scale synergy and trust when we're helping to make decisions. And most of the people that we work with are pretty smart people and they're diligent. They do a good job saving, sometimes they need help with the financial piece, but they've got pretty good habits built out and it's not necessarily that they need us. Typically going to do a good job and have enough things and accomplish a lot of goals, but what they typically hire us for is two main reasons. One, you know, they want to spend their time doing what they're good at and where they want to spend it, that could be their job, their business, their family, whatever. And they want to be able to spend their time doing those things and they want to be able to get delegate all the financial insurance investment tax and all that stuff to somebody else. And so we're a good fit for that. Because people are able to buy their time back through us. And then maybe the second is even if things may be may end up in a great spot. Interested in optimizing everything. So everything they have, I guess..

American Indian college fund Sean spruce Ken Native American community Albuquerque New Mexico Christy Ken America Gary Garvin Christy Ho chunk Gary Sharon Minneapolis Minnesota Sean
"ho chunk" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:59 min | 1 year ago

"ho chunk" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Complement these abstract ideas of law into how tribes are utilizing them in their businesses, I want to bring in Lance Morgan into the conversation. He is actually the founder and CEO of Ho chunk incorporated and he's from Winnebago to tribe of Nebraska. Welcome Native American colleagues. Thank you. Thank you. So these new laws and provisions that risa spoke about, how is the Ho Chi nation using them and their businesses? We're really not. I was curious about what she was saying, because they're so new. We can ask her some questions. Well, I mean, we've struggled with the international business element over the years. Where whole trend is 25 years old. And we've grown up from a very small company to a pretty large company. And we've had a native foods business that I always thought would be really prime for international. We just couldn't get to scale. And then we have a tobacco manufacturing plant and we really couldn't really get into the international market. We couldn't get this we couldn't sell enough to really matter. I think and we had other regulatory issues here in the United States that cost us trouble. But we always thought that that brand our tribally oriented brand would do well. But what we've done really well in is we have a government contracting division. And I think we've been doing it for 20 years, but we've done probably half a $1 billion worth of international business with primarily State Department and Defense Department. So it's exactly what we do as sort of on the ground doing what we can to get by. And it's exactly the opposite, I think of the first challenge I was talking about something about indigenous to indigenous sort of international development. You know, we're just sort of like hustling from deal to deal to get something going. So that's sort of our perspective. Well, sounds like you've been doing pretty well. I mean, hundreds and hundreds of millions in federal contracts that you've been able to execute. That's a bit more than getting by and say. Well, you know, the government gives the tribes enhance them an advantage in this. And I'm not sure it's international trade. It's just international business. And if you can create the relationships with the federal agencies, you can do some of this work. It can be difficult though. Getting employees paid over there, getting them back here, getting there's a lot of complications to the international side of it. But international, so that's international business. International trade itself it's always been sort of difficult to me we're sophisticated company, but I get kind of nervous when I'm wiring money and so I think that the institute was working on some of these kind of things. Those are great resources for people because it's just a little bit different system and it makes it's always made me a little bit nervous. I've never had anything bad happen. But I've always wondered about wiring money and waiting for a container or shipping something over somebody list, something goes wrong. And so there's an element of trust that really has to be built up that can be that's hard to do. Can you expand on the barrier as you see for tribes getting into international business? And I know you keep making the distinction between domestic business that takes place internationally and then also international business in the sense of nation to nation outside of our borders. I think there's huge demand. I mean, people everywhere I go, they're always interested in tribal issues and tribal products and that sort of thing. I mean, myself, I was at a farmer's market and I bought some I hope it's true, but it's indigenous, Guatemalan coffee and things like that, or I'll buy jewelry made from indigenous communities in Africa or those kinds of things. I think that you can actually get a premium price for those kinds of things. But if you're talking about coffee, you might be able to get to some scale, but if you're talking about individual sort of handcrafted stuff, it's a very difficult thing to hit to hit the scale and coordinate it. We once had an international we once had a site that sold lots of things around the country. We had a catalog for native art. But we could never get consistent product. We could never get consistent quality. And so you almost have to buy in and now maybe somebody can correct me on how to think about this, but you almost have to buy heavily into the capitalist model in order to play that game. And I hadn't thought about it the way it was being discussed earlier. And so that's going to be a little more to think about. But you have to have which part. Which part, how do you not thought about what maybe selling indigenous to indigenous communities, those kinds of things? That's a smaller scale item. But I mean, to me, the way international business works, that you've got to have some sort of local distributor there. And they're going to buy in volume and they're screwed down a little bit on price and you've got to have consistent quality and you've got to deliver or they just move on. Just an inference on my. On my end, it'd be attractive to another nation to want to do business with a tribal nation and not directly with the U.S. government, or is that really not how it takes place given how many regulations I assume the U.S. government has on tribal trade and business? Well, I will defer, but I mean, we sell I mean, I got rated by the seds once for selling one tribe directly to another on our tobacco products from Nebraska to California. So I can't imagine what happens if I try to sell it into Canada or somewhere in New Zealand. I think that the federal barriers tend to be substantial and I don't know if there's I don't know the lady who was a lawyer on her head any comment on that or not. Well, yes, let's ask. Risa, any comments on this? No, I agree. It's sort of a three stage process. And we're still on stage one and two. And stage three is indigenous indigenous trade. So the first stage is making the international rules more favorable for indigenous peoples and trade. So and that's sort of a two pronged approach. Ensuring that there's more market access for products that are produced by indigenous nations and also as I have talked about making sure the government procurement contracts stay and are allowed in trade agreements. So there is a trade aspect to those government contracts. Because countries negotiate if there's going to be competition for government procurement, usually above a certain amount. But there's exceptions for indigenous peoples built in by the U.S. through provisions for minorities and specifically for Aboriginal peoples in Canada. So let me make sure those exceptions stay. Because they have been helpful for additional businesses. And then the third stage of the approach, which I'm hopeful that conversation is starting for this new international arrangement, the indigenous peoples economic and trade arrangement. That's where the discussion is happening on how to have indigenous to indigenous trade. But the U.S. right now is no member of that derangement. It is still really new. It is open to all countries that are part of the apec and I know the U.S. is part of a tech. So that's something that made me we should talk to government officials about to see if there's an interest in joining this arrangement and starting that.

Lance Morgan Ho chunk Ho Chi State Department and Defense D risa Winnebago Nebraska U.S. U.S. government government Africa Risa apec New Zealand California
"ho chunk" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"ho chunk" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is national native news. I'm art Hughes in for Antonio Gonzalez, and investigation that included undercover purchases led to federal charges against two Washington state men for allegedly falsely representing themselves as native artists. The Justice Department says the two men had work in two galleries in Seattle's pike place market. Biographies of the artist claims they were Native American, other references to items sold online, also claimed to be from a native artist. Jerry Van Dyke represented himself as nez perce, but is not an enrolled member. Lewis Anthony rath falsely claimed to be a member of the San Carlos Apache tribe. Undercover agents purchased works by the man from the galleries, a search warrant served at the home of one of the men, revealed he also had feathers from eagles, owls, hawks, and other federally protected birds. The owners of the galleries have not been charged. The Ho chunk nation Supreme Court ruled against the tribal president in a dispute over an emergency budget passed last year. The Green Bay press gazette reports the court decided the tribal legislature acted properly in approving the budget in response to the pandemic that included cuts to the president's office. President Marlin white eagle filed a lawsuit in tribal court claiming the legislative branch had no authority to make budget decisions that affected his office, legislative officials argued the emergency budget avoided what would have been much more devastating economic consequences. President Joe Biden nominated Navajo citizen sunshine susanne Sykes to the U.S. district court for the central district of California. She is currently a superior court judge for riverside county. The first Native American hold that seat. Our previous work includes time with California Indian legal services, The White House notes if confirmed she would be the first article three judge in California and the first from the Navajo Nation. High schools across the pine ridge Indian reservation are benefiting from the influx of 900 new musical instruments, the donation is part of the tune for tots program by The Rock band widespread panic. Richard tubal reports. The nonprofit organization conscious alliance brought the most recent delivery to pine ridge high school. Music teacher and chess Lee says she's been keeping the school's music department alive anyway she could. A lot of the instruments that we have, I've put together, I've bought at garage sales and punch ops, big burrowing steel, everywhere we could get them and these are new. These are specifically what we want, what we ask for. Conscious alliance collaborates with musicians to raise food awareness and is committed to youth empowerment initiatives. Natalie hands the organization's pine rich fill director. Our belief at conscious alliance is music is medicine. You know? And we have so many gifted and talented young la cotes that just need the resources in order to express themselves and share their talent. The donation not only supports the high school music programs, but also The Rock the res music program and the pine ridge flute society. Will Peter's directs the society. A lot of these flute society members have graduated. They've gone on. But since they started, the recognition from their own people comes from when they're asked to come to play at a wake or funeral or at a wedding or at a Sundance to offer a spiritual uplifting. Red cloud, crazy horse and little wound high schools are also receiving instruments. In pine ridge, I'm Richard tubal. The Cherokee nation unveiled plans for a new $400 million healthcare facility, principal chief chuck hoskin signed the legislation to replace the 40 year old hospital in tahlequah. The original hospital was designed for about 60,000 patients per year, the paper reports the actual number of patients in recent years is close to ten times that. With.

Antonio Gonzalez Jerry Van Dyke Lewis Anthony rath San Carlos Apache tribe Ho chunk nation Supreme Court President Marlin white eagle President Joe Biden susanne Sykes U.S. district court Richard tubal California Indian legal servic nez perce Justice Department organization conscious allianc pine ridge high school chess Lee Hughes owls hawks Green Bay
"ho chunk" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"ho chunk" Discussed on Native America Calling

"So i can't say enough about the support i had As the loose student. But i'm saying like we're ahead. It's very encouraging to hear about all the support that you had and i wanna know. Why did you then or did you always know that you wanted to return back to your community and and work for in practice venison in in in four the ho chunk nation. That always the white. Yup i did i'm I did not like. I said i was a navy brat and i grew up away from my tribal community. We all came back right for holidays. Easter christmas summers That it was never Where we lived for any length of time So but it was always home. That wisconsin was always home and i think as a navy bread i was just i wanted I wanted to come back home. I wanted and i wanted to stay. You know i knew what it was like travel But i wanted to stay and build roots and raised my family and in one place and have them be close to their grandparents and their extended family and their culture and language. Like get all of that by being here. Sounds like you were the or the ideal candidate that dr owen was touching on that they're trying to look for people that have a commitment to return to their community and serving serving their Fellow people in their tribal dr owen. We talked about a little before we started the show and the episode about Indian healthcare system. Can you talk about what's the truth. That's in that and then also some of the things that maybe not be as representative i Hi dr delong. Great to hear you classmate of mine. It's fun to be able to connect The what's you know. You and i both laughed at because we saw some right The experience of feeling like you're waiting forever for your appointment. and That the other piece. That was really funny. I thought was that connection. Everybody knows everybody right. So there's Concern that some of our patients sometimes have going into our clinics. But i would also like to was just a sense of familiar and family even the Even through all of that that was connection but that they had with the clinic. You know it was an and i really try to get that through to my patients. These are our clinics these. We are the people who should be making the decisions about these clinics and getting more involved to make sure that they are meeting. Veeps sure. There's some frustrations but Again their hours and we just have to make them fit us the way that that they need to fit us do what we need them to do saw. Thanks mary and know. Can you expand on what aimee was saying about. The simple gestures make a big difference. Are you are you asking me..

dr owen navy dr delong wisconsin aimee mary
"ho chunk" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"ho chunk" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"It's rare, especially during baseball season. It's rare to have an eight o'clock hour. It's well, it's It's kind of like Witnessing a witnessing a unicorn prance through a meadow of four leaf clovers during a lunar eclipse. We like to call The eight o'clock hour. On a Monday night Scott Wars with you, And did you know that today is the 50th anniversary. 50th anniversary. Of price is right. 50 years ago. Today, Bob Barker, who had much darker hair, then sauntered across the stage there in CBS, It's actually now called the Bob Barker stage. And started the first ever taping of the price is right. And, of course, now we know that Drew Carey is the price is right Host. Drew Carey who I've said this before he he puts me at ease, because I remember the I prefer my Drew Carey. I prefer my Drew Carey, bald and fat. And now he's He's got a full head of hair and he's skinny and he's old. I don't know. I don't know. Maybe that's what happens out there in Hollywood. I don't know. But I thought we could do this for just a little bit little fun time here in the eight o'clock hour. And that is What is the one game show at which you would have loved or would love to take a shot? I would love To be a contestant on Blank. And why, in honor of the 50. Maybe maybe it's price is right. Maybe you would want to. Maybe you would want to be up there in the plane co board. Everybody wants to play Plank. Oh, That I think for most people is the game at the price is right that most people would really like to, uh, to to compare. But I thought, you know what we have decades and decades of game shows should have gotten Jim Peck for this segment. What's the one that man? You know what? That's the one I wanted? Maybe you were on a game show. We'll put people at the head of the head of the line if you actually were in a game show where competed on a game show 85561616 20 on the accurate mortgage talking text line. 855616161 okay. Bill Cullen was the first guy. Okay, Fine. Sorry. Bob Barker did not saunter across 50 years. It was Bill Cullen. Then Bob Barker now, Drew Carey. Mhm. I'll tell you what. Yeah, Prices, right is great. And you think there are moments where you could really think I could win something on the price is right. I every once in a blue moon 85561616 20 Every once in a blue moon. What is great is the game show network. GSN Right Game show network. I will come across that station and I will turn it on. And I will get hooked on. You know what? I'll get hooked up match game. Remember Match game match game You had what 68 celebrities. And I think I could have been really good at match game as a contestant. Because there are times where now I will sit there and I will watch and I will. I will play along and many times, folks many times I can sit there. And I am matching Many of the celebrity guesses I am and I, You know what if I could turn back the clock and play match game? I think I could do well in match game. What is the game show? In which you think you could You could you could succeed, you could win. You could. You could come away a contestant that won something. 85561616 20 accurate mortgage talk and text line 85561616 20 like I said. If you actually did appear on a game show I once tried out for a game show. I didn't make it. I thought I did. And maybe we can get to that. I didn't make it 85. If you did will put you at the head of the line, but otherwise just, you know, in your mind. What's the game that you always saw yourself? Well appearing in 85561616 20 accurate mortgage talk and text line If you're on the game if you're on the game if you're on the line, hold on. Open lines for you at 85561616 20 more wtmj nights coming up two guys that love talking football. Rust is one thing losing games because your starters aren't ready is another thing And don't show up and use that as an excuse Steve's graffiti in Brian de Go all things. Packard's snap to Rodgers looking right, Lost it down the right side and he's got his man go for the touchdown. M V This. It's the Monday morning. Quarterback. Every morning at 8 35 after each Packers game sponsored by Steinhafel and Ho, Chunk Gaming Wisconsin Dells pay boaters Where else you gonna find weather stripping for a 77 carver? That's what he said. And I don't know the answer to that. 1 20 sure was glad he found it here. I'm Dave Dora with tender Marine, And when it comes to both parts and supplies, we have it all. If you're a voter, and you need it, we got it. And that's why you got to get here. Borders and then no know exactly where to go. Kendall, Marine.

Bob Barker Jim Peck Bill Cullen Dave Dora Rodgers Monday morning Today Drew Carey Steve 50 years Monday night today 50 CBS eight o'clock hour 855616161 50th anniversary Scott Wars 85561616 85561616 20
"ho chunk" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"ho chunk" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Morning quarterback on WTMJ. Shift a rod looking winds up rainbow for mvs and overshot everybody, and it's intercepted at each secondary. Marcus Williams across the 40 cutting it back, right, 45. He's to the 45 40 down the right sideline to the 30. The 25 chase down out of bounds inside the 15 yard line of Green Bay. Oh, my goodness! Little symbolic of that lost yesterday 38 3 to the New Orleans Saints and you've got to give credit for this. Saints. Carol and Brian. They played very well yesterday for week. One and go, Carol. No, no, no, I agree. I mean, it was just you had one team that showed up in one team that actually didn't. It's just a fact. And I think the most impressive part about about the same performance in one layer if he talked about this on Wisconsin's Morning news, the longtime voice of the Packers They have had anything but an easy couple of weeks. Right? Hurricane Ida rolls through. They get this place is a football team They have now been practicing in Fort Worth, Texas. Not only that their families all got this place to right. So the Saints organization first class moved all the families to safe area and then they had to play this game away from home in front of a predominantly green and gold crowd in Jacksonville, which turned out to be the case yesterday afternoon. And still came out looking, super prepared, ready year old. Let me ask you about this Erin Andrews interview because I thought it was interesting that he said he didn't want to cause any drama. It was more. He used contemplation as his word. But then he said something about Jordan love and getting traded. That I thought was fascinating. Yes. So for those that missed the interview aired in pre game on Fox and Aaron was honest. Um, he was asked if he legitimately considered retirement what his gripes were, and if he got his hopes up, that he was going to get traded, he said, yes, to all of those things. He said, Yeah, I was considering retiring. And, yeah, I was thinking about playing elsewhere. Maybe San Francisco. Maybe Denver because I wanted to kind of stick it to the Packers and say, Look, you didn't guarantee uh, you know anything in my contract past 2022. If you guys wanted to draft this young guy and play and then playing and I want out here, he was honest. I don't think you said anything in the air and Andrew's interview that we didn't know already, and he's been honest about that stuff all the time. So I wasn't shocked and taken aback by anything you said on Fox yesterday. I think he was straight forward to his credit. I think this is the reason he approached. Remember that, like long press conference he did on the first age range camp. He can let it all out. He laid out everything in 40 minutes that day and said, Here's what happened. And that gives him the liberty to have these conversations and not have anybody be shocked by them at this point. No, I don't know the answer this one. I'm going to ask you, Brian. We certainly know that not having your starters playing pre season can be a factory in, you know, in a bad week, one performance Can the frog of the off season all the drama all the you know, not knowing all the trade and retirement talk. Could that be part of this malaise that we saw yesterday? I don't see how it couldn't be right. When things start to go arrive. People started out a little bit of just the natural human reaction Now. I don't think Aaron Rodgers missing the off season program until training camp was the reason they got smacked 38 to 3. I think there are other things that play there, but It was definitely a part of it. And then, from Erin's perspective, I mean, there were plays where he looked off. Yesterday, His timing was off. His rhythm was off. He looked far removed from the dude that we saw when the M V p last season, and I got to believe some of the drama creeps into his mind. It's a natural human reaction for that type of stuff to happen. You know, the other other interesting comparison is. The Bears did play Dalton and Fields in the preseason. And they didn't look that sharp either. So I mean, there's certainly a young and yang to that to that conversation. Yeah, for sure. But the Bears also didn't necessarily go through some of the drama the Packers that no As far as I'm concerned, there's a trickle down theory that's happening here. You know everything at the top. Just seems kind of rotten. I don't know why I'm just Carol talking. It just seems kind of spoiled and rotten. And that's just going to trickle down into the rest of the more you might see The reason you see some of these guys on the defense, just like, uh, I don't know if I would use spoiled rotten and I understand why you want to use those adjectives. I think the word I would choose to describe the entire top level of the Packers organization. Everybody in power. Is ego, right? Marc Murphy's got an ego and agenda, as does Brian. Good, as does Aaron Rodgers, as does Matt LaFleur. And when you've got big egos at the top That are, you know, trying to grasp the power of the organization and want things their way. I think other guys on the roster probably see that other people in the organization see that and go. Okay. Well, this is the way we do things around here so I can grab this and I think there could be down the line a trickle down effect in some validity to what you're talking about. You know what you want Your way to see wants his way. I want my way. But you know what? It doesn't work that way. Only at subway. Hello? Wow. Especially not in the teams for it. By the way, we need to get subway on his apartment. Yes. Yes, yes, but it doesn't work that way in a team sport where you need everybody in the organization pulling the same direction. One Super Bowl. We've got to take a break. It is Monday morning. Quarterback. Thanks for the folks have Steinhafel is and Ho Chunk Gaming Wisconsin Dells for being are great partners throughout the season and hopefully the playoffs as well after the break. Let's talk about this defense. This job, Ari lead defense and Overall loop around the NFC North when we come back on Monday morning, quarterback right here, WTMJ, you're listening to the Monday morning quarterback on Wisconsin's radio station, WTMJ. Do you have what it takes.

Matt LaFleur Marc Murphy Marcus Williams Carol Brian Aaron Rodgers Andrew Jacksonville Monday morning yesterday afternoon Erin Andrews Aaron Erin 15 yard 40 minutes Fox 40 Saints Ari New Orleans Saints
"ho chunk" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

07:23 min | 1 year ago

"ho chunk" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Brian de Winston under center takes the snap back to throw deep drop has time rainbow deep down the left side to the shoulder down. They beat Kevin King 55 yards over the top 37 3. And where have we heard that before? Kevin K. They beat Kevin King joining me for Monday morning Quarterback Carol Kane and the one the only Brian D folks Good morning. I'm just going to step aside and try not to be collateral damage. Make it worse. There's a storm rolling through southeastern Wisconsin right now. All right, Brian 38 to 3 yesterday. Um, I was doing a lot of digging this morning. Aaron Rodgers does not have a great record in Florida, which is kind of a weird status for a guy that's got a great record in most places. Let's set that aside. He didn't look good. The offense didn't look good. The defense certainly didn't look good. They give a five touchdown passes, including, I think a couple by Kevin King, your your initial thoughts. After watching week 12 initial thoughts number one. The defense was atrocious. Now I don't know how long I want to wait to be super judgmental of Joe Barry's defense because it's the first game And this was the first time any of these guys played together in a real game setting because the Packers intentionally sat out all their important players on both sides of the ball for the entire preseason self. I don't know how much stock I want to put into one performance in the first game of Joe Barry's defense, but they got gashed, and there were points in the game at Troy Aikman even circled this and the Fox TV broadcast. After one of the touchdowns, Um, he circled. I think it was Darnell Savage and Kevin King. They were moping the shoulders promoting they didn't look interested. That was not a good look for the Packers defense on the first game of the season. That's number one. Um, The other takeaway is Aaron Rodgers is just as culpable. Here is the Packers defense. I think Joe Barry. Probably, uh, you look at the situation they gave up. 38 points defensively, but the Packers offense put up three. Like what if they lose that game 38 to 35. How much worse is it for? Joe Barry At that point, right? Because Rogers could go out to the podium and say, I did my job. I put up 35 points and you guys couldn't stop them. What's the deal? It's an interesting look at the first part of this season. This is a team that, as you said, took the priest of the preseason off the starters. And I know because I was watching football last night. Only nine teams chose not to play their starting quarterback in the preseason, and I think five of those teams performed horribly yesterday, so there's certainly a trend there. I don't know what to make of this because again, it's one game. I was a little disappointed with Aaron Rodgers comments that this is one game. The only gets 17. And that's an additional game this year unless you're going to use this as a throwaway or the fourth preseason game, which is kind of how they approached it, In my opinion, that's a risky attitude. Now that that definitely is, and and I think you know the the him making that comment stems from confidence that they're going to be okay offensively, at least, which I think they will be, Um I was not disappointed with Aaron Rodgers postgame comments because he did wear some of the culpability, he said. I played bad. I wasn't good enough. I like he used the word I, which is not something he's done a lot. In the past. There have been times where he step to that podium and said, Yeah, I mean, after after bad games of his own like when he turns the ball over, he'll go up there and say it was somebody else's fault. It was the this game and you know our receivers. We didn't run the ball well enough. The offensive lineman didn't protect me well enough. Which I think would have been a true and fair thing to say yesterday, but I'm glad he wore some of the culpability on his own shoulders. Okay, Now, I was doing a little investigating this morning like Steve and I found this article. And it was fascinating to me. So Brian, let me read you. The headline of the article. NFL fans believe Aaron Rodgers played poorly on purpose to get the Packers to trade. That's not Aaron Rodgers. No, no, I'm just I'm just I'm I thought it was fascinated that they would even write an article like that. I think that speaks to the national perception and the Fatigue of this story for the last six months because I do think there's a portion of football fans across the country that think Aaron Rodgers has been winey for the last six months. He's been complaining about it. So all I want to leave a place that's been to the NFC championship game the last two years and we've won 29 games in two seasons, But I want to leave because they're not treating me right. Like I think that mentality exists for a lot of people. Now that that's completely untrue. Aaron Rodgers would never go out there and intentionally take a football game, especially to get treated like why would you want to put bad stuff on tape for a new team to say? Hey, come get me. Now, here's the reality at all. Here's the reality for and Rogers we have the off season that has somehow been mediated. Settled to this. So that the Yeah again with the chief? Yes, for at least one year. Yeah, we'll see what happens after the season. Now he has not played well in week one. Plus adding to that the conduct or performance off the field during the off season. We have a home game next week on a Monday night If he doesn't show up in this offense doesn't show up next week. I would not be shocked Brian D. If I hear some booze echoing through the canyons Of Lambeau Field, and frankly, you're going to act like a team that's ready to go to the Super Bowl, and you're not doing it that's deserved. We know this as well. Steve and you can speak to this as our resident season ticket holder Packers fan of this group on Monday morning quarterback there is a portion of the Packers fan base. I just talked about the national perception of Aaron Rodgers locally here there is a pocket of Packers fans that is also frustrated with him being a diva. I can see it on the text line. I'm getting a lot of lot of commentary already complaining about exactly like Leave a come back and play football. You're the quarterback. The front office is the front office, right? So Yeah, I do think there's going to be frustration if they come out flat against the Lions team that showed signs of life to their everlasting credit against the San Francisco 49 ers yesterday afternoon. No, I think you said it on one of your hits this morning in Wisconsin Morning News, Peter King Guy I have a lot of respect for great NFL writer believe he called the Packers response to this loss was a flippant slip into is the word he used interesting choice of words and he's a guy that's pretty attuned to locker rooms around the NFL. The other thing, he added on to using the word flip. It was Nobody seemed terribly ticked off, right? You got smoked 38 to 3. This was not 31 to 17 where you scored a couple touchdowns and have something to hang your hat on. I think the only good performance yesterday from anybody was Corey Bohorquez, the punter. He played great. He looked awesome out there. Bombs other not nobody's got much to hang their hat on from the Packers organization, and I didn't see Whole lot of anger or frustration on anybody's faces. Other than maybe Matt the forest on the sideline during the game, you know what they call teams who celebrate the actions, their punters in games. Bad losers. Here's Brian Did Carol came to my radio left. It is Monday morning quarterback thanks to the great books that Steinhafel and Ho Chunk Gaming Wisconsin Dells. I love these sponsors. We're going to do this all season long. Right here after every each and every regular season game and playoff game, hopefully, and that's become a little murkier. Now all the way to the Super Bowl. We'll take a break. You can join us as well. 85561616 20 the AC unit, Morgan's talking tax line Monday morning quarterback Don't.

Aaron Rodgers Steve Kevin King Joe Barry Corey Bohorquez Brian de Winston Darnell Savage Kevin K. 29 games Peter King Brian D Monday morning Brian D. 35 points yesterday afternoon 55 yards 17 Super Bowl Carol Kane Brian
"ho chunk" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

The Adam Carolla Show

09:39 min | 1 year ago

"ho chunk" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

"Some trending topics with chris. Locks and now in honor of charlie watts. He's going to declare a warm day moratorium on his hatred of emotional rescue. Adam corolla get it on got to get it on a choice but again our mandate get it on. Thanks for tuning in. Thanks for telling the frantic this so the ratings one up gina grad all right. That's great and bald. brian. To cares what i say. Oh all right. Let's see. I got stuff i wanna talk about. We got trending topics to do with max and Also wa. Eric roberts will come in here as well right I don't know if you've got the article. There pat up but During the break a couple of weeks back. I think it was a university of wisconsin decided to remove boulder and So far so good. The polar was racist. And the reason i bring that up. Is you know when people push like me against whatever whichever way the wind is blowing this ten minutes and they're tearing down statues of civil war generals. You kinda go like most people go like all right what's wrong. He focused on the wrong side of history. Why do we have a statue but then it stopped there then then. I think everyone would agree that that makes sense but it doesn't stop. It goes through the statue of lewis. And clark and then christopher columbus and then whoever else statue aka boulder lincoln like at a certain point. But now we're at boulders and it only took us it took us about ten minutes to get from lewis and clark to the boulder. It only took it took like seven weeks to get from lewis and clark to the boulder. It took like fourteen months to get from the general on the south to lewis and clark and then lewis and clark to the boulder at all all of speeds up but a boulder do tell. Yeah and by the way it's a it's it's pushed there by glacier from a glacier i it's like forty million years old it has it has some significance but it was put there and it was named after i think the first president of university of wisconsin who was a botanist or something but he will no longer have the boulder that bears his name. They don't throw it in the river. They just move it to a different that. That's what i'm saying like most of this stuff. Just just move it from here to there so they at great expense higher crane that can pick up a forty ton boulder whatever it was and move it somewhere else on campus. You have the have the store. There dawson a rock that students call a symbol of racism is removed from the university of wisconsin. The university of wisconsin students is one and a half students. But they didn't hear about this until this happened. They removed a forty two ton boulder from the madison campus on friday after complaints from students of color. Who called the rock. A symbol of racism chamberlain rock which had sat on observatory points since. Nineteen twenty five was named after thomas chamberlain. A geologist and former university president who served from eighteen eighty seven to eighteen ninety to nineteen nine twenty five wisconsin state journal article used the n. Word as part of a nickname for the giant boulder from nineteen twenty five ninety nine hundred thousand five. Did you say yeah okay. One hundred years the wisconsin black student union last summer called for the rock to be removed from campus as one of a series of demands. It said were aimed at seeking justice for black students. The cam k. Campaign came in the wake of the police. Killings of. George floyd and brianna taylor. The union said in a statement posted on instagram. On from where that killed with the balder it was very meaningful for me to be there and to see the process all the way through to the end right senior year narcissistic deluge. Who just wants to go. I'm going to say jump and you say how high that it's meaningful not because anyone knew what the boulder stood for but because three people could get a forty five ton. Boulder moved by complaints impressive. Yes it's like a magic trick mcwhirter. Who was the president of the wisconsin. Black student union for the past academic year was there when the boulder was removed friday. It was about a year ago that we released our demands and met with the chancellor and explain to her why those demands meant so much to us. I hope one day he ends up in heaven and sitting at a park bench. Next martin luther king many folks. There's like me. You know that boulder in wisconsin now. Well it's a pretty famous balder familiar full in boulder colorado shaver in boulder. But that's not it's real man. Okay and he was great now and don't look for him up here by the way Now was it was called the n. Word boulder nine hundred and twenty-five that was one hundred and fifty years before i died but on the rock. It's guys are missing this. Oh hold on. Harry tubman here. Yeah so what do you build. The i moved to boulder. I built an underground railroad to free slaves and at the risk my own peril every day on the civil rights movement for a decade. I hired a flatbed truck to move. A bulger was the boulder on top of somebody. No i mean symbolically yeah. It was crushing the hopes and dreams of black america. Way with these black students who got to go to the same college as white student. I had a dream. Oh oh yeah yeah lot. Lots changed their there. I'm at the college. It's great. I'm the head of the black union college. You got this university integrated it'd been integrated in the forties but we can use to not take your eye off the prize. There's appalled there. I got it moved. Okay so kareem is realized. I'm confused well not fully realized there's still work to do because they moved to boulder to another part of the campus. Well just feels like pushing it off to the side. Well this non-problematic boulder to begin with. I suggest that they break the boulder down and make them into the small ball. Bearings of change in k. that sound. good what. What exactly are the better what it means. I felt that coming on embolic or those to be used in actual application. Okay ball bearing. Let's not let's not get take a turn for the mechanical boulder is racist and i got it moved. You guys did your part right. I did my part. Let's not parse out who was more important which parts bigger cars were definitely more important. I feel like the history is going to tell the tale. Well look we really don't know i mean there's a day named after me a federal holiday every child and lamb so rise right right. You guys were living in a time with to drinking phones. I'm living in time was zero boulder's right but we turn to into one. We move the boulder. Okay all right. I guess we all did our part. Yeah congratulations guys. Don't know i'll see you guys at the golden corral which i'm assuming is in heaven somewhere all right so they got the boulder. I'm sorry you can keep Innkeeper eden dawson the native american student. Union walk sheikh. Parker partnered with the wisconsin black student union in the rock removal effort. The university said the boulder sat on ancestral. Ho chunk land. the university. Add to get permission from the wisconsin historical society to remove the boulder as it sat within the area of a native american burial mound. How how many guys who move the boulder were into the cause. I'm looking at the day. They look like they're on an oil. Derrick like three weeks earlier now they're moving ball getting paid. It's true The rock was not sitting on top of a burial site. The removal of the rock was approved by uw madison chancellor rebecca blank in january quote. It took courage and commitment for the wisconsin. Black student union to bring this issue forward than to influence change alongside. Uw's one sheikh student leaders the vice chancellor for student affairs. Laurie research said in a news. Release in the midst of demands for justice following. George floyd's murder last summer. The students wanted change on campus and they worked hard to see this through while the decision required. It's a good sign when you're looking around your campus and one exact some change and now you're looking at nature you gotta boulder mineral. Yeah we're now getting to that point..

boulder university of wisconsin clark lewis Adam corolla gina grad wisconsin black student union madison campus charlie watts thomas chamberlain George floyd Eric roberts Black student union brianna taylor mcwhirter christopher columbus Harry tubman
"ho chunk" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"ho chunk" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"Two thousand dollars sounds pretty. Well it depends on where he lives. Where does where does he live. This is a couple hours north of new york city. I believe and says okay. He said on instagram that he and his family have decided to move out of their home after pictures of the home shared by the new york. Post how's that feel. That's a good question because he and this is the kind of stuff he's done to people over and over and over and over now he's done now it's been done to him and there and it's not fair when he says not fair today. I've had to make a heartbreaking decision. He said after a combination of fox news the new york post and other outlets posted pictures of my home across the internet. We've seen our address. Posted all over. The internet strangers have already started coming by the house. My kids can't even go outside and play during the final months of summer break. So we're moving on july thirty first new york post shared images of his home saying he lived like a one percenter in a sprawling. Lakefront home According to public records kings Home has five bedrooms sits on farrington lake it features a gourmet kitchens surrounded by lush stories that he moved from new york city where he shared a two bedroom apartment with his wife and kids. Now he's been prominent in the black lives movement. You how to get all that money to buy that nice house. I wonder how because he was prominent in the black lives movement. And i'm not saying that. Some of the funds he diverted to himself. I would never say that. No no no you would never say. I would never say that it's just been reported. Yeah is what you're saying. By the way he's white. I'm sorry he's a he's a white guy. These shaun king. Yes sean king is. White is is a white boy. He's a casper. He's a cracker. Samaria rice the mother of tamir rice. Who was twelve. When he was gunned down by cleveland police officer in two thousand fourteen has accused king profiting from her son's death by collecting funds without her permission. Personally i don't understand how you sleep at night she wrote. I never gave you permission to raise nothing. She said Interesting who was from a podcast called the breakdown with shaun king. She added as a white man acting blasio. No what how dare you do. You know he identifies as black. Oh means of course he is black as a white man acting black urine imposter and cannot be trusted. You're a self-centered selfish person in god will deal with you white man. Yeah that is good stuff. So but he's gonna move really sad. I you know. I was trying to squeeze out a tear a minute ago. I guess my tear ducts have dried up. I don't know what's going on there. Twenty twenty one will do that too. Yeah but will he be going to University of wisconsin. Anytime soon shaun king. Because there's something really really terrible of where terrible thing is going rock there than a hundred years ago. They used the no. Don't say iraq zero racist rock. Campus of the university of wisconsin had a terrible terrible Name that they would refer to at the students. They're streaming rock. It's the chamberlain rocket object. That had become a painful symbol of racism to generations of students and the moved it jewish site off campus. So it's a it's a dark rock so they called it inward ahead rack. Which is so stupid and juvenile racist. But i doubt anyone's calling it that today and it's not written on it anywhere and it doesn't say anything about the rotten on the rock again. Move it because somebody called it that one hundred years ago that is lunacy. We have to deal with. How can it have gotten so seventy ton blender dickey's seventy tonnes. Oh my gosh. Wow what. I'm finding now. I don't know how much it costs to move. Oh a lot you don't just pick up seventy and put it in the back of a on. You don't go down the hall. Can i can i this day truck here. You don't fifty thousand dollars i bet. Yeah at least. The wisconsin black student union in partnership with the native american student organization. Wonk chic. i'm sorry. Wonk led an effort to remove the rock from campus u. dub madison's main campus is an ancestral whole chunk land. Wow i didn't know it was on ho-chunk ho chunk. Yeah if it's on ho chunk. Get a discount of corner for coach on no What what. Wait a minute So they moved the rock or are they going to have to remove a river in a tree next Is that is that coming up here. My angelou To help us out with with that. process i hope iraq We have a tree right. Thank you thank you Rock a river a tree. Our world sucks pretty. Messed up right now. I think we'd all agree on that right. I think we're i think we're in agreement. As we end the show were all in agreement. Common ground beings are just a little messed up right number gonna fix it all tomorrow so yeah fixing it just whole things so twice another words if people tuned in twenty two hours. Now you'll find out the solution to everything that's incentive to come back here all right. Am i right. Yeah we can answers tomorrow gotta tobacco right all right so we'll see you then. All the answers pat gray.

shaun king farrington lake sean king Samaria rice tamir rice new york city blasio new york new york post Campus of the university of wi Lakefront fox news cleveland University of wisconsin wisconsin black student union native american student organi
"ho chunk" Discussed on KFAB's Morning News with Gary Sadlemyer

KFAB's Morning News with Gary Sadlemyer

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"ho chunk" Discussed on KFAB's Morning News with Gary Sadlemyer

"I mean andrew here and all i would tell you is if you know. If you're on offense i talk to your doctor. Yeah the other thing i tell you. If you don't want to get it get it. I'm not telling people what to do. And but rosie said that's what we should be doing. that don't have a gender reveal party it's friend. Rosie doesn't want you to have just friendly advice. It's just a friendly perspective. I know we don't use guns here. we don't have. Nobody's nobody's under any threat to be stuffed in the back of a black car middle of the night and i have my firearms at home. Wink wink we try. Not the point guns at people here. You can't bring him into an iheart facility. You know where. I know that that was troubling me But then the hey you got to move on. Look look for the positives and move on. I mean there are positives to iheartmedia. That far outweigh the negatives. Even though the negatives tend to irritate annoy the hell out of me but you know there are plenty of positives that say all right. I can live with that. No doubt a great company. I mean well. It's an unbelievable sadler I do want to clarify. Because i've been getting feedback on tiff financing and again. This is an issue about which i think. Most people are a little confused or they don't have all the information accent. Crimen finance just to set the scene for folks who just joined us council yesterday. Authorized a tax increment financing to the tune of seventeen and a half million To help with the upgrade to casino and a big remodel out of -dorsements park. Yes if a piece of property. Let's say horsemen's park. And i'm not saying this is the number but i'll use it as an example on this day the day before the tiff financing was approved. Horsemen's park generated a thousand dollars in property taxes. That thousand dollars goes to douglas county city of omaha and the school districts under tax increment financing of seventeen million dollars. They would like us to loan them. Seventeen million in future property taxes to pay for the improvements today now if after it's all done horsemen park generates ten thousand in property taxes. The city of omaha still gets the thousand but for the next fifteen years which is the term of a tiff financing program. The nine thousand dollars. The difference between ten and one goes to pay off this loan so nobody loses the property tax. They currently get right and nobody gets rich off the property tax. It's just a loan that after fifteen years and you've got all you get all of that fifteen years area it would have been there after fifteen years then. The city of omaha school district county gets all ten thousand and maybe more. I still don't like it in this particular case. But i think it's very useful As a tool in some cases some people think all the property tax disappears when tiffany. That's not true and it is not so away Ladies and gentlemen of the council. I have discovered a very rich vein of gold on my property. And i'd like a little tiff financing. That helped me dig it up. So that's a classic. Did clamp discovered basically i wanna casino is. He went out shooting for food and up from the ground came. Bubbling crew financing for the oil derricks. Is that what you're suggesting. Now you're gonna tell me that. The ho chunk guy who's very sharp guy and he's done a lot of great. He's the casino a great work for for the reservations. He really is. But you're going to tell me that. He he they don't do this. Seventeen happiness okay. I'm not doing it. We're not gonna have the casino that's and that's the gamble right there. Take that bet. Well now stop being negative.

us council Horsemen's park douglas county city rosie Rosie omaha andrew omaha school district county tiffany
"ho chunk" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

08:07 min | 1 year ago

"ho chunk" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is one of the stories. That it's kind of hard to distill down There's still down especially when you're used to tell the story for pretty much everything. it's hard to distill it down and figure out what stories makes sense to be included but I was pretty intentional about wanting to include Wanting to include this. Because i one. I feel like there's a lot of people who know who like know what that may not this specific thing although i have a feeling that Actually call this the the mommy. What am i story I feel like this sort of thing happens to a lot of people Not just needed kids but A lot of kids Depending on where they're growing up and and that sort of thing but it's it's part of feeling Kind of small or invisible in some ways. And i think a lot of people know what it's like to to Be the only person like them in a place And so i. I wanted to include this because it it conveys the hat but like we're not alone in those experiences That people You know pe- people feel that way In their lives and And then and then the second piece is is just Being able to share a bit about kind of both how. My mom approach things. You know like yeah. I'm gonna answer this question but also make sure that you know that like that's not. It's not really a nice way to To be curious about another person And and and then getting the chance to kind of Gave a little bit of the historic context of Of of why You know kids. I might be the only native kid In in a classroom or in a group of friends And and then not even realizing that. I you know in talking to my mom and you know with my aunts and cousins around and all that like i think sometimes we don't we don't realize the You know where we're at in a society because when you're little it's like you and your family you know And so i thought it was really important and You know coming home and and say and telly asking me on my my mom you know. What am i and my mom telling me you know your your hotel and And a bit about the the history of of removal of of native people from From our homelands And and then obviously Learning a bit about like ho chunk being known as People at the big voice or In the in the very very back of the book we got the chance to include some historical information about ho chunk nation and Former president of johns john reindeer Put some Information in there about about Our our language about our par- Clan system and travel history and and that sort of thing Which i was very very excited to be able to share that Through this through this book yeah. I think that that was one of the things i liked about. The book. too is You know it doesn't go into too much in the actual like body of the book. Just sort of Talks a little bit about it. Ensures that story but that There's this opportunity for more learning and more understanding about people who Are like you you know or who are different from you. Which i think is like the most important thing. When it comes to children's books is being able to both see yourself reflected and also learned something new. We're talking with cherise david's. She is a representative for kansas third district and one of Well now to Native women in congress and If you wanna talk with her give us a call. The number is one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight a steak a call. We've got aaron in albuquerque tuned in on k. u. n. m. Hey there erin hi. What would you like to share today. I was just wondering how you feel about them holland Be the interior and what you think. She can do for native communities here in the. Us go ahead three-sided about it. yeah. I'm excited about Now secretary holland I will say that it was a little bit bitter sweet when she got appointed only because For a lot of the for a lot of the first term her and i would do events together and go to things and And i would often tell people. Like i don't know how i would. I don't know how i would do this experience without debt here with me and And now she's not in housing Turns out i can manage it but You know the so bittersweet just because for an i are such good friends And now we have to really plan out how we're gonna hang out with each other and that sort of thing but On the other side of it. I do You know. I think that went her. And i got elected in twenty eighteen. I didn't really get to experience them as a kind collective Joy and happiness that came along with with The kind of historical nature of our elections But when she got appointed to to run the department of interior Both nominated and then confirmed and then Got sworn in I felt like. I could experience a little bit of like what indian country was experiencing when she got when she when she got sworn in and It's it's pretty phenomenal. And so there's like so there's that piece of it because it's a very there's definitely a very personal aspect of Of anything that happens with deb because she's You know like my sister and And then i think that like the impacts of having that holland is our secretary of interior Not just for indian country but for Actually for our planet because of the role that the interior department plays in conservation and way into management. The federal government has millions of acres of of of of land. That come under the purview of the department of interior. And i think that Her approach of of stewardship land Is is going to be really really impactful for that and then for indian country Know having somebody who really understands what. Sovereignty means What a government to government relationship Has looked like and can look like and should look like combined with her you know. She's a lawyer She went to law school. She understands She understands these issues and policies in a way that I'm like no no other interior secretary house before With her from her perspective. If that makes sense So i.

ho chunk johns john reindeer cherise david erin hi department of interior holland albuquerque kansas aaron congress deb federal government
"ho chunk" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:31 min | 1 year ago

"ho chunk" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is native america calling monica brain one november night in two thousand eighteen cherise. David's a ho chunk lawyer and small business owner made history. She became one of the first. Two native women elected to the united states house of representatives. We're going to chat with her about her life and career path that led to her serving in congress. She's covered a lot of firsts in her life. She was a first generation. College student raised by a single mom. Who served in the army along with deb holland. She's one of the first. Two native women elected to congress and david's is openly the first openly gay us representative from kansas. Today we'll talk with representative david's about her new children's book. Cherise zeke voice. It's about her own journey growing up and finding her voice to connect with other people. Welcome to native america calling representative david's. We're glad to have you here. I got good to beat that. Yeah it's great to talk with you. I think the last time we talked with you. You were not an elected member of congress so We're so we're so happy to have you on the air today. Congratulations Thank you. Yeah so okay so i really enjoyed this book I got to learn a lot about your upbringing. Tell us a little bit about you. Know who you were growing up. Well i think one of the things. That was pretty amazing about doing this. project was just Kind of taking the time to think about that actually and You know. I think that a lot of times you know kids look at grownups and they think oh man they've got it all figured out I think most of us know that's just not true And and as a kid. I always so You know i mean. I talked a lot which is in the book I had to learn some lessons from that. Like how to listen as well as talk And i just. I was like a a really high energy kid In addition to talking a lot. I was like obsessed with seriously so i was running around. You know trying to Be a martial artists. Even i am not sure i knew what that meant at the time but Yeah and then. And then of course You mentioned it in your In your kind introduction as my my mom was in the army for twenty years from before. I was born until after i got out of high school so I did get the get the chance to to live in a few different places. Although my mom will joke sometimes that she joined the army thought we'd see the world and we mostly kansas and missouri. Which is how a ho chunk ends up. Ho chunk from wisconsin ends up in kansas. And so what were some of the other places that you got to to visit when you're go and live when you were a kid. Yeah what we were So we were in germany for a little while My mom was stationed there a couple of times. Actually she was stationed there when i was born And then she was stationed there when actually when my brothers were born so i have two little brothers. They're eight nine years younger than me and You know growing up on on army bases It's funny because even though we were in germany and i got to see a a a bit about You know german kind of culture and food and the language and that sort of thing You know as a as a seven or eight year old. I mostly played with other kids. Who were from all over. The united states Whose parents were were stationed Stationed there and then my mom actually got stationed in korea And was at the base near the demilitarized zone. And so I lived with my cousin. In milwaukee In wisconsin for a little while my brothers lived in black river falls which is where You know the ho chunk tribal headquarters is there. And you've got palo grounds there and So it was you know it was interesting. 'cause we lived in kansas and missouri and and then a little bit overseas you. Your mom didn't want to risk it taking you to near the dmz. Oh i think it wasn't even an option Because she When she got stationed there I think that's an interest. That's interesting. Because i always say you know you don't take your kids when you go to the dnc Yeah i think it wasn't even an option she worked with the military police When she was there you know. I mentioned in the intro that you are first generation college student but i was also reading that you actually call yourself a former first generation college student because your mom went back and went to college tells about that. Yeah and actually just then when you were when when we were talking about the my mom getting stationed in korea and I was thinking. Gee my mom should write a book. I've been telling us for years Yeah so my mom actually started taking college classes Doing you know at that time. They call them. Correspondence courses think And and that was like during the time that she was in the in the army and after she got out of the army she did a couple of things and then ended up working at the post office And she just retired from the post office About a month ago And she during that whole time was working on On her You know coursework and then she ended up getting an associate's degree actually johnson county community college. Which is where. I also went and got my associates degree and then. She got her bachelor's degree at the university of missouri and kansas city Which is where. I got my bachelor's degree and she studied history So she was doing that while she was working fulltime and with also you know For portion of that time still raising my brothers because they were You know they were getting getting out of high school And going through high school during some of that time to i'm on is just a very determined person. She sounds like Yeah if you're just joining us today we are talking with congresswoman cherise. David's she represents kansas's third district and she's ho chunk and she's our native in the spotlight today if you'd like to chat with her Or you have questions for her gives a call. Phone lines are open. The number is one eight hundred nine nine. Six two eight four eight. That's one eight hundred nine nine native so representative david's did you. What did your mom share with you about the importance of education when you were growing up and you know when you graduated from high school. Did you know that you wanted to go to college. Or did you have other plans That's a really good question. You know my mom.

army kansas deb holland congress Cherise zeke david's america Ho chunk united states house of represe david monica wisconsin missouri germany David black river falls korea palo milwaukee dnc
"ho chunk" Discussed on Dear Writer

Dear Writer

05:41 min | 1 year ago

"ho chunk" Discussed on Dear Writer

"I do believe ashley how exciting it doesn't really feel like a years gone by. It certainly does not believe we already. I know everyone is this like what a month is. Like i caught the loop. Were already nearly in. May i still blame covid for the time warping we are. Actually we are admitting this gone really well at the sad goodness. I'm really tired today. I'm going to use the same. Excuse i use every time. It's the morning here. Just woken up snort. The morning here but i have just gone back to full time work for the first time in forever. I'm being source to ready. So that's my excuse anyways. How is your writing going going. Okay i feel like. I've been making quite steady progress over the past probably couple months and sarah and i actually calculated how many words weeds and the other day and we passed the forty thousand mark. Probably actually closer to fifty thousand words so we were very happy with that because it kind of feels like we have in russian very much. I don't know if that makes any sense to any other writers out there feels like we just do in the really early stages of the novel at does we. Probably i mean we are a quarter of the way through probably maybe like a. I'm not sure maybe like fifteen fifteen chapters. If with just saturday does does even know if we've been doing this even though we're fifteen chip disturb most typically. I did finish chapter. I was working on last time. And i'm about one hundred thousand words thousand thousand west actually one thousand. Three hundred weds. I think was lost night through the next one. However i'm going to delete a ho chunk of it because i don't like how my character sounds it doesn't it sounds to sinister i didn't want it to come across. An estonian is reading your back yesterday. So that might be. I might just the delete all the dialogue or just possibly tweak it a bit so we'll see what happens with that and it's kind of good because this chap to although i book is split into pots. It's a three month time. Jump from the previous chapter that i wrote so. I hope it's going to be the easier because our characters now very well accustomed to his new life so hopefully they won't be as much of him not understanding or being confused or questioning everything in it being a bit awkward to right so i'm hoping it will flow a bit easier from us point crust. What about you sarah. Riding when going. I finished the last chapter that i was on so i think last time i was about a third of the way through it and so i managed to get that down fairly quickly and then previously to writing last chapter quite a while..

one thousand yesterday saturday fifty thousand words today fifteen fifteen chapters one hundred thousand words ashley three month estonian forty thousand mark sarah first time Three hundred weds fifteen chip russian third thousand thousand couple
COVID-19 highlights Alaska Native water and sanitation needs

Native America Calling

02:33 min | 2 years ago

COVID-19 highlights Alaska Native water and sanitation needs

"This is national native news. I'm antonio gonzales. The pandemic has highlighted. Water and sanitation needs in alaska. Native communities where lack of infrastructure has already had significant health impacts according to a health official alaska. Native tribal health consortium interim president. Valerie davidson testified. Virtually this week before. The senate committee on indian affairs on water infrastructure needs davidson says. Many families in rural communities do not have running water to help prevent the spread of covid nineteen constant hand washing and cleaning davidson says more than forty percent of alaska native homes lack running water. Many communities typically have a washer area building. It's one building that combines water-treatment laundromat twelve and showers at the entire community uses and what that means from a practical perspective is that Those communities hall their water from the washington area in a five gallon clean bucket and we hall are raw sewage from our home in a different five gallon bucket and unfortunately Our communities continued to be unserved simply because of the high construction costs among recommendations davidson. Says they desperately need at least one billion dollars for sanitation construction in future legislation and resources to preserve what infrastructure is already in place. Wisconsin governor. Tony evers has signed off on the ho chunk. Nations plans to build a casino just north of the illinois border danielle creating reports. Federal law gives governors the power to block or approve off reservation casinos. The tribes plans include one of the largest casinos in the state. Along with the convention center indoor waterpark and a three hundred room hotel. The complex is expected to create more than fifteen hundred permanent jobs and more than two thousand construction jobs. Ho chunk nation public relations officer ryan green. Dear says jobs are central focus as many tribal communities. Shut down their casinos for months last year due to cove in nineteen. This is gonna be the cornerstone of the economic recovery from the pandemic. the complex will be built in the city of beloit beloit city council president. Regina dunkin says the project has been a longtime coming and is a game changer. Fully in terms of jobs created shared revenues and increased arisen. The project now faces final approval from the department of interior once approved wisconsin's governor and the whole chunk nation would amend the tribes gaming compact to include revenues from the new casino. I'm daniel catering

Antonio Gonzales Alaska Davidson Valerie Davidson Senate Committee On Indian Aff Tony Evers Ho Chunk Ryan Green Washington Wisconsin Beloit City Council Illinois Regina Dunkin Beloit Department Of Interior Daniel Catering
The Ho-Chunk tribe of Wisconsin has permanently laid off a number of employees

Native America Calling

03:59 min | 2 years ago

The Ho-Chunk tribe of Wisconsin has permanently laid off a number of employees

"This is national native news. I Megan camera in Perrine Tony Gonzalez. Indigenous activists are asking former Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper to drop out of the Democratic Senate primary over photos of him, and what they say is imitative native. American clothing common dreams, reports, coalition of indigenous women in their allies sent an open letter on Saturday outlining hickenlooper participation in hunting competition where they say winners are dressed in war, bonnets and losers must address like quote. Unquote squaws. The letter points out. This ethnic slur is associated with sexual assault of native North American Indian women. The one shot antelope punt has been a tradition in Wyoming for many decades A. Video from Wyoming. PBS shows the clothing being placed on the winners and losers by members of the Shoshoni tribe. Other? Groups joined the letter including sunrise movement converged. Colorado, and the indigenous environmental network, the latest controversy follows others including video that has surfaced showing Hickenlooper six years ago, comparing politicians scheduled to working on a slave ship. The letter says he has shown a pattern of quote. Behavior. The Ho Chunk Nation in Wisconsin has permanently laid off an undetermined number of tribal employees. The tribe has several casinos in Wisconsin that have been affected by corona virus closures and restrictions in a video statement Ho. Chunk President Myron White Eagle said the difficult decision is aimed at preserving the nation's financial health. This is a hard road to recovery to where we were pre pandemic. No one knows when we'll get back to. To those conditions, we hope to recall as many as employees as we can. But the future is uncertain White Eagle said laid off. Employees are not eligible for health insurance through the tribe, but they can seek services with the state. He said tribal officials failed to approve a budget for the coming fiscal year, but instead are working with a bare bones sixty day, operating budget in the hopes of the financial picture improves. Navajo nation leaders want new, Mexico to end efforts to dismiss a landmark education case meant to address educational inequities in the state. President Jonathan knows and Vice President Myron analyzer sent a letter to lawmakers expressing their opposition to a motion to dismiss the Yes Martinez lawsuit. Nez Native students deserve an educational environment that prioritizes their culture and unique needs. A judge ruled in twenty eighteen that New Mexico had denied English language learners, Special Education, native, American, and low income students, their constitutional right to a sufficient education, the Santa Fe new Mexican reports. The state filed a motion in March to dismiss the suit because it claims it has met the. The requirements of the decision the New Mexico Center online poverty, which representing the as he plaintiffs argues the state's efforts have been piecemeal in an op-ed, and the Albuquerque Journal they right. There are still large inequities in access to reliable Internet and technology, and they say they're still a lack of culturally and linguistically appropriate instructional materials, and there's a shortage of certified teachers. In Brazil people more into the death of KAIAPO leader and rainforest defender Paulino. Akon from covid Nineteen Public Radio International reported con played a key role in creation of tribal territory and ensuring indigenous rights were included in the country's Constitution The New York Times reports pie controversial, the world warning of the destruction of the Amazon appearing with celebrities like sting, but in the early nineteen nineties he was accused of rape. Supporters claim to the charges were. Were created a silence him. More than three hundred indigenous people in the Amazon have died from covid nineteen. The Guardian reports fears are rising. The virus will bring terrible losses of knowledge and tribal history, culture and traditional medicine. Many indigenous leaders accused the government of far-right President Gyro Bolsonaro of failing to protect Brazil's indigenous people by delaying aid and forcing them to risk infection by travelling to nearby towns for help for National Native News. I'm Meghan, camera.

Governor John Hickenlooper Shoshoni Tribe Ho Chunk Nation Colorado President Trump Wisconsin Perrine Tony Gonzalez Wyoming Akon Vice President Myron Analyzer Nez Native Amazon New Mexico Brazil Covid Myron White Eagle Democratic Senate President Jonathan National Native News White Eagle