35 Burst results for "Hiv Infection"

'Berlin patient', 1st person cured of HIV, dies of cancer

News, Traffic and Weather

00:22 sec | 2 weeks ago

'Berlin patient', 1st person cured of HIV, dies of cancer

"Ray Brown, the first person cured oven HIV infection has Reid. He was known around the world as the Berlin patient and was cured in 2008 after undergoing a stem cell transplant for lymphoma. His partner in a social media post says he died at home in Palm Springs, California Tuesday. The cause a return of cancer he had remained HIV free. Timothy

Hiv Infection Ray Brown Palm Springs Lymphoma Reid Berlin Timothy Partner California
'Berlin patient', 1st person cured of HIV, dies of cancer

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 2 weeks ago

'Berlin patient', 1st person cured of HIV, dies of cancer

"He was the first known person to be cured of HIV, according to the International Aid Society, Timothy Ray Brown. Is died of cancer. Brown, who was also known as the Berlin Patients, was considered cured of his HIV infection and 12 2008 in the years prior, Brown received a bone marrow transplant in Germany to treat a separate disease. He had been diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia. Rounder made HIV free. But for the past six months he's been living with a recurrence of the leukemia that it entered his spine and brain. Timothy Ray Brown was 54 years

Timothy Ray Brown Hiv Infection Leukemia International Aid Society Berlin Germany
1st man cured of HIV infection now has terminal cancer

KCBS Radio Weekend News

00:32 sec | 3 weeks ago

1st man cured of HIV infection now has terminal cancer

"Cured of HIV infection, says he is terminally ill from a recurrence of the cancer that prompted his historic treatment 12 years ago, Timothy Ray Brown, known for years as the Berlin patient, Brown had a transplant in Germany from Adana with natural resistance to the AIDS virus. It was thought to have cured Brown's leukemia and HIV, but Brown says his cancer returned last year and has spread widely. This case has inspired scientist to seek more practical ways to try to cure the disease.

Timothy Ray Brown Hiv Infection Adana Berlin Scientist Aids Germany
First man cured of HIV infection now has terminal cancer

KCBS Radio Midday News

00:31 sec | 3 weeks ago

First man cured of HIV infection now has terminal cancer

"Been cured of HIV infection, says he is terminally ill from a recurrence of the cancer that prompted his historic treatment. 12 years ago, Timothy Ray Brown was known for his years as the Berlin patient. Brown had a transplant in German, Germany from a donor with natural resistance to the AIDS virus. It was thought to have cured Brown's leukemia and HIV, but Brown says his cancer returned last year and has spread widely. His case has inspired scientists to seek more practical ways to try and cure the disease. This news segment has been brought to

Timothy Ray Brown Hiv Infection Berlin Aids Germany
Coming Out Stories: Tim Sigsworth MBE

Coming Out Stories

06:37 min | 6 months ago

Coming Out Stories: Tim Sigsworth MBE

"I came out to myself when I was probably fourteen years old. So that's a for a few years ago. It's a fifty one now. Was there a particular person or incident that made you question sexuality? Well I have every thing to thank my last girlfriend for owns worth and Co was a friend on on my stay on. We were dating and she knew I was gay and I didn't anyway. I I try to take my own life when I was a teenager because I was so petrified about what would happen if I came out as gay in the era of the crisis I thought I would die and that that my parents were desert me and know that panic. We could find me realize what was going on and she. She told me I was gay. Before I even thought about what was going on to me. I go to thank you for. Wow and so. She realized because you weren't acting her other boyfriends active presumably. I don't know I mean she just picked up all the signs the signs but really and I was trying to ignore it for so long. You know the turmoil will always starts before you actually go on to accept yourself and expect to you all so let some sort of place this time and a place so we are in northern England's in the early nine hundred ninety s away yes. I grew up on what was called to keep a council estate in Berry. Which was you know? I felt completely isolated in and I just locked myself in my room reading as a kid and didn't really have that many friends. My parents are quite elderly when they had me. So I'm in this world y. For a lot of isolation any shred of exploring who I was was just you know hidden away deep in the depths and that's why walls and nobody taught to and Manchester eight or nine miles away might as well as being a thousand miles away so you really felt that they didn't know any other gay people of the term absolutely a now. It's always ironic when you suddenly you go back to your hometown. And you see people scurrying around and think I went to school with you and your gay and I no idea and it's just is it just tinged with a little bit of sadness you think I could have had a group of mates at school who lgbt. I know idea but because they were going for the same thing that you're going through presumably just internalizing it and vocalizing it absolutely in. What's interesting for me? Actually one of the leads. That bullied me at school turned out to be gay. I mean I got a rendering bullied at school. Not necessarily because people thought I might be gay but I just got bullied. Generally and he was horrible to me and I just wondered if he knew because he certainly was hiding zone sexuality at the Time God. So what sort of things we getting billed for. It wasn't anything to do with sexuality then basically being swapped most of it but also because of where I grew up compared with the people I went school wage I went to bury grammar and for a lot of the Council of State that I grew upon the just unknown unheard of so there was a lot of lot. People thought. I shouldn't be at that school. People who were peed off by our well I was doing at school. And you know just mini picked on me for that. Plus all the usual stuff they picked up on little things in. How behaving you know my flamboyance and stuff like that. And they turned it into reasons to hate me since things. A lot of people have spoken to have gone through that homophobic bullying. But it sounds like it was bit more broad fear but still does massive Damage for for quite a long time. Did you find the yes? I mean I search low self worth and self esteem and without going on to what was happening at home the moment at it it was just. I didn't feel I at any words. Go for support and Kerr. And that's why when I finally made intimate Sta and to the Youth Group. It was a completely different. So I suppose kind of exploded my sexuality in a my Mid-teens okay so talk us through the journey from being fourteen to then finally going to this bt youth group at the first thing you did or did you. Did you tell anyone you will befall them? I'm Gina why didn't the the the irony is that the the age from fourteen to seventeen and a half? I think before I went to the Group. I just hit away. I'd sneak to a bookshop and get a copy of gay news or whatever it was called. Then you know things are looking the listings and gay times and do things like that and fantasize about who could be obviously channel. Four was taking off with some of the LGBT CONTENTS. Why was hidden in my bedroom watching the lgbt stuff that they were putting out so. I had literally completely private world until I got about seventeen and a half so obviously boyfriends it was just you accessing the world from your bedroom but not actually ever vocalizing it. No absolutely not obviously sizing my boyfriend what that might be like and thinking about but also. This was all happening while the iceberg was on tv all the whole world of remember the adverts for around HIV and AIDS. And he messages. Like this. And I was just. I just become petrified about right so basically been gaming Lucia family and your risk of HIV infection. That's that's the image I heard and this is legitimate risk of those of the. Yeah I mean I attempted to take my own life. Because I couldn't see a future I can see a way forward annoyed go. What do I do well? How old were you there? I think I might be fifteen a new annoy and take my all levels at that point so it was before took my all levels and the fact that my parents. I mean my parents are dead now but I don't think my parents ever knew about thought. So someone rescued. Yep I mean yeah. Well accent was wonderful and helped me see you. I walls and that was wonderful so I I suppose I come out to somebody other than lgbt people and it was over. And I always wonder who is now but certainly from South Africa. We just map. You know she lived to no. That'd be really interesting because she was phenomenal and she got me through all all

Group Berry BT Hiv Infection Manchester Youth Group Northern England Aids Council Of State Kerr South Africa Gina
"hiv infection" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

03:48 min | 7 months ago

"hiv infection" Discussed on KCBS All News

"A built in genetic resistance to HIV thanks to a bone marrow transplant the exact method that's now cured to med of HIV infection is not one that's going to be widely available to the nearly thirty eight million people worldwide living with the virus but the news is rekindled hopes of finally winning the war against the virus that causes aids medical experts say the Berlin and London patients benefited from a combination of medical and genetic chance and even with luck on their side the two men had to undergo a grueling treatment that could easily have killed them the cure is involved a bone marrow transplant that wipes out a person's immune system and amfar the foundation for aids research is reporting a third person now cured in Dusseldorf Germany Matt Piper CBS news some California chefs are bringing a bit of home to the weary passengers and crew aboard the virus stricken Graham princess cruise ship docked at the port of Oakland K. CBS's Holly Quan tells us it's the second time around for some of them who flew to Japan last month to cook for those quarantined aborted different ship every time there's a wildfire or a flood world central kitchen a humanitarian and food efforts and chefs into the disaster zone this time they're making twenty three hundred meals for those still aboard the grand princess that includes crew who will not be disembarking Josh Phelps is relief operations manager we need to see the crew the next couple weeks and see what that looks like with the way it works it's a pan we fed until the crew was entirely off the boat and then we also help prepare meals for where they went secure their quarantine off site in Japan what they didn't have to deal with in Japan that they're confronted with here of the tides of the port of Oakland which give them a small window in which to fork lift on the food yeah and that's not just us it's anybody put anything on the boat getting stuff also if you think about it when people are disembarking the store is half way below the edge of the dock you can getting bites like it's also each meal has to be individually packed though they can be dropped off outside cabin doors which means it's labor intensive and they need volunteers you can sign up at WCKD dot org PolyOne KCBS well it's a new day at SFO has the airport prepares for a new Harvey milk terminal KCBS is Matt Bigler checked it out construction crews are putting the finishing touches on the new Harvey milk terminal which features gleaming new ticket counters nine additional gates three restaurants or shops and an exhibit from the SFO museum honoring the first openly gay elected official in California I'm looking at a beautiful photographic timeline of Harvey milk's life with the dates nineteen thirty to nineteen seventy eight that's the year he was shot and killed at San Francisco city hall I'm glad the terminals named after him was very important activists and you know a big part of San Francisco says Andy votes one of the artists who sculpture is now on display in the terminal SFO spokesperson Doug giggle notes the exhibit is open to the public and this is very cool because it's something that people pre security can enjoy so you don't just have to be a ticketed passenger to enjoy this so we're hoping that the public can really enjoy what this facility is all about and that's honoring Harvey milk in his life the two point four billion dollar terminal will officially open on March twenty fourth meanwhile many airlines here are starting to scale back flights in light of the corona virus we'll have details on that tomorrow on the key CBS morning news at Harvey milk terminal at SFO Matt Bigler KCBS March eleventh bill is one of the best known star patterns in the night sky and one of the easiest to find it's a short line of three fairly bright stars right now it's in the south southwest as night falls with the Ryan's other bright stars.

HIV infection
Doctor behind gene-edited babies sentenced to prison

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:30 sec | 10 months ago

Doctor behind gene-edited babies sentenced to prison

"China today announced a doctor involved the world's first genetically edited babies has been sentenced for illegally practising medicine a court in the southern city of Shenzhen sends hugs and quay to three years in prison and a fine of four hundred thirty thousand US dollars how shocked the world last year when he announced that he had successfully use crisper technology to remove genes and at least three babies to make them immune to HIV infection the scientists was roundly condemned around the world and shortly disappeared from view in China it was thought to have been placed under house arrest for the

China Shenzhen Hiv Infection United States
New government program provides HIV prevention drugs for uninsured

NPR News Now

00:30 sec | 11 months ago

New government program provides HIV prevention drugs for uninsured

"Federal government is launching a program provided daily. HIV Prevention drug for free to people who need it but lack the insurance coverage to pay for it it's part of the trump administration's goal of ending the HIV epidemic in the US by twenty thirty taking certain anti-hiv drugs. Dramatically reduces the chances someone who still healthy will become infected but health and Human Services Secretary. Alex as ours has too few people are getting the medication. -cation one reason is cost thirty eight thousand new. HIV infections in the US annually

HIV United States Federal Government Human Services Secretary Alex
"hiv infection" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

Reset with Jenn White

13:58 min | 11 months ago

"hiv infection" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

"Hi I'm Jen. White and this is reset on. Today's show we WANNA know. What does Chicago goes sound like it just a bit? We'll talk with Jill Hopkins. She's the host of the morning amp on. WBZ's sister station vocal. She'll introduce us to some of the talented people around the city. Who are being highlighted invoke h-a-l-o series? This is what Chicago sounds like. We shine a spotlight on and pass the microphone to people who do do things not just for Chicago but because of Chicago but first rates of HIV diagnoses are falling in cities across the country. Cities like New York Philadelphia and right here in Chicago. That's the good news. The bad news cases of the virus are cropping up more and more in rural areas like West Virginia and other parts parts of Appalachia. Joining me to talk about this trend is Steven thrasher. He's an assistant professor at Northwestern University's School of Journalism. He has an op-ed in the New York Times this week on the topic to mark World Aids Day it's called. HIV is coming to rural America and Thrasher says rural. America isn't ready Steven Thrasher. Sure welcome to reset. Thank you so much for having me. Why are cases of HIV falling in cities? Cities are being very proactive about the root causes houses of the virus. So they're they're addressing the virus and AIDS as well very directly with public health campaigns but there are also some cities are decriminalizing sex work. Many of them aren't doing things around harm reduction and making healthcare available for people who inject Intravenous drugs and they're also being very proactive with a drug called prep It's a drug drugs. You can take that people who are at risk for HIV can take all the time To prevent onward transmission. So cities are being very proactive about those things and they have general infrastructures for health care. that have been existing for some time so they're able to deal with these things in ways that rural America is not. Where are the country? Are we seeing An increase in new HIV diagnoses. Yes our cities rates are falling and lots of big cities and there are these spikes that are happening in pockets of the country For a long long for the past few years. We've had some sense that the Mississippi Delta was a place where there was high prevalence and there's been active work about that but in rural counties all around the country there are these outbreaks that are happening. The first one that we saw quite extensively was in Scott County Indiana in two thousand fourteen in two thousand fifteen and that was when now vice president Mike Pence was then the governor and it was really newsworthy at the time because his public health people came to him. And said we need to do something about a needle exchange the way that these These outbreaks are happening in deindustrialized places when economic hard times hit The the unemployment and the issues around that really deft Jeff to help with the opioid crisis and many of these communities legally the drugs have been pumped end by corporations There's one town in West. Virginia that has a population of about twenty nine hundred people were twenty million. Drugs have been sent over just a few years. So when deindustrialization happens and people lose their jobs. They're addicted to they. Become addicted acted to legal Prescription drugs and they can't get those. They often turn to using syringes with Paul and with heroin and so in places like Scott. Not County The Public Health People Indiana saw what was happening and knew something to be done about. Pence famously said he needed to pray about it and took some weeks before that came to be but the real issue which my colleague Greg Gonzales does research about this at Yale is that the issue wasn't just that pence took time to pray about it was also the Indiana had gotten rid of a lot of the testing mechanisms in the first place and when that happened when Scott County happened. The Centers for Disease Control Found Two hundred twenty counties throughout the United States where there were similar. Similar things ready to happen that these counties where there wasn't much infrastructure and the elements were at play for another outbreak to happen and now that's happening in rural West Virginia. So when you talk about testing are you talking about community. Health facilities are what falls under that umbrella. Their various ways that testing happen so so there are testing clinics directly for HIV. But also at the level when I was reporting the story for the New York Times I found out that and it was ah news to me because I lived in New York and our live here in Chicago and as a gay man my doctors in various capacities will ask me to get tested or I'll proactively get tested But in many of these places the the family doctor community doctors never asked for people to be tested. They might not even know how to test or just might not be part of their practice and so Testing is not happening at the level of the family doctor. There aren't campaigns to get people tested. There's not sort of public. Health drives to get tested in these places and then when people become increasingly at risk because they might be using intravenous drugs or that they're having intimate relations with somebody. Who is using intravenous drugs? Their doctor might not think to get them tested at at that point another thing. That's really difficult as even in these places where there might be some kind of testing or testing ability people in rural America. I've found for my conversations with people might feel stigma. Might keep them from getting tested and so here in a city like Chicago or New York or San Francisco. People might feel like they could go to a clinic. Run by AIDS service organization and feel relatively anonymous and whereas in rural America the country. Doctor that you know that you I know knows everyone even if they're not gonna tell anyone else's doctors of course they're not allowed to by law but the stigma of it might keep them from doing it. They don't they don't WanNa think that that person might know and so that's another way. That testing is lower in rural America than cities Chicago is seeing its HIV rates fall. Do we know how things are looking in the rest of the state kind of what I've been seeing being in my own research is that we just don't even have a handle on rural places so the city of Chicago will the the people who do the work here around. HIV and AIDS. We'll have a pretty good handle handle on knowing what's happening here and in rural parts of this stay around the country there aren't the infrastructure snow about that my my understanding having just land in in Illinois a few months ago and starting to get a sense of things here is that we have decent infrastructure through our state for doing this but what I was just looking at in West West Virginia and other parts of the country. There just isn't account so you don't even know what's happening until there's already a problem developing in Chicago if we found out that there what the cases were rising in some way there lots of mechanisms to kind of deal with that and try to bring help and protection to communities around safe sex use around injection drug use or a number of things like that around which has been a really big thing in the past few years. You just don't have that in other parts of the country. We'll even you said we are seeing a criminalization of HIV infection in many states as they're seeing a rise in transmissions they're taking a punitive approach rather than public health oriented approach talk about how that affects the epidemic. Sure so I got interested in the story that I was writing for the Times about from a tip from an activist who is is really concerned in her state about what was happening there and one of the really disturbing things that that she identified for me that I saw her name is Aton Young was that there. I think fifty five counties in West Virginia and there were needle syringe exchange programs in fifteen of them but one of them has been closed in the past astier and another one was severely was severely downsized because of stigma and fear around. And that's exactly the wrong thing that should be happening. There needs to not only be these kinds of programs throughout the state particularly when you see that this is how the virus is moving and the criminalization of having syringes itself keeps people from getting clean syringes syringes and not only as a harm to them but his harm to their sexual partners everyone in their networks. So that's one way. The criminalization affects things. And it's going in the wrong direction there and my own research. I've been studying for the past six years now. prosecution in Missouri young man named Michael Johnson. It was known as the Tiger Mandingo case and he was prosecuted for exposing a transmitting. HIV to other people initially sentenced to thirty years in prison Part because of our reporting he he was able to have his sentence overturned because of prosecutorial misconduct and he got out of prison in July and I was there to meet him. But everything about that case since I've been reporting at Criminalization Association doesn't help it increases stigma. It doesn't decrease It doesn't decrease transmission. Most people who are living with the virus and its transmitting transmitting through them. Don't even know their status and so- criminalization doesn't help in any way at the same time what I've felt really disturbed about. Is that the county that I study. Study Saint Charles County spent. I don't know spend a huge amount of money and time trying to prosecute this young man ostensibly. I think their reasoning was that they thought thought that would help. Lower rates of each of the prosecutor is now actually calling for the repeal of these laws But at the time I think they thought that this would help lower transmission and at the same time they just closed two years ago. They're only sti clinic in the county They were seeing about a thousand patients a year and they closed it down and so that's is also a really good. Wait understand that criminalizing. Something doesn't help that the the money that that county was putting into criminalising. It wasn't helping it at the same sometimes. Losing their STI clinic so now if there is an outbreak in a place like that It's more likely to happen because people aren't getting tested. Were not going to know about it until it's moved quite a bit this even historically when we look at who was most affected by HIV Queer. Black men And and I'm curious. What role do you think that played in determining the initial public health response to the disease and how that's playing out today? All all of this has something a huge amount to deal with race and even from the beginning of the time. The epidemic was being counted. It was disproportionately a black disease or black people were disproportionately affected that disparity has grown actually even after nineteen ninety six. This is kind of where I think the change happens. Ninety six six medication becomes available called. Irvy's that are highly effective and for the people who get them. It's life saving for the people around them who have sex with them who who are intimately involved with them. It is a game changer. And so the prevalence goes way down amongst white Americans. The real problem is that White Gay Americans ends even White Gay Americans living with HIV. After they get the drugs become very disinvested in AIDS politics. And so there's all this frenetic activity before ninety six my research actually the rate of if you look at it by race and not bisexuality. The rate of AIDS before ninety six is lower then is for African Americans today when there was no medication it was it was lower and all the split activity this for African Americans how does not because african-americans Working Americans engaged in quote unquote riskier behavior. It's just that because we largely didn't get the drugs the prevalence has actually gone up in our community and so so racist had a lot to do with the and it's been interesting. My story for the Times was the most read time story yesterday and which is not been the case about other. It's things that I've written before but it is really about the the crisis coming to rural white in America and I think that may actually Engender much more the political will to to deal with the crisis. What do you think lawmakers can do to help counter rising HIV infection rates or to continue the work that we see in places like Chicago where we're seeing those rates fall? policy-makers need to a one embrace a sex positive education including reading queer and Trans Specific Education. Very excited here in Illinois when I when I knew I was going to be moving here that we are going to be having. LGBTQ education in public schools. And that's really important to understand to decrease stigma and to help young people not feel about their bodies and become Sexually active to know how to protect themselves himself. So that's one thing they can do at an emergency level municipalities and states and the federal government needs to decriminalize drug use and the use of syringes. Because because even if a locality create some kind of a SYRINGE EXP- program in Indiana was A. It was a felony to have a syringe and many places in the country. It's a felony. It's illegal under federal. I believe So undoing that and then also decriminalizing sex work a drug. Use these things that make it really hard for people. When times are tough de-industrializing places? People often are using injection drugs and they may often be engaging in sex work to survive and when the the means of life life particularly kind of the the hardest means of life or criminalize. It makes it hard for people to get the care they have cities are really at the forefront of having comprehensive health approaches which is around this and it's been great New York and Philly just released their numbers in the past few weeks and have a huge strides through the use of the Structure Vodka But but also of course cities are. We're not counting. Everybody in homelessness is a major factor in how people say oh convert So dealing with policies that keep people housed housed and one of the reasons I study. HIV and AIDS is because it's just a price For understanding all the things that are going wrong in the society so lawmakers lawmakers and policy people can address things that make life better for people in general and that's going to decrease rates of HIV when people are healthy and able to have access to housing medicine that Steven thrasher assistant professor at northwestern. University's Medical School of Journalism Media and Communications Steven. Thanks for joining us..

Chicago the Times HIV infection AIDS America New York West Virginia United States Steven thrasher New York Times Indiana Mike Pence Illinois WBZ assistant professor White Jill Hopkins Virginia Centers for Disease Control
New government program provides HIV prevention drugs for uninsured

WBBM Early Afternoon News

00:42 sec | 11 months ago

New government program provides HIV prevention drugs for uninsured

"News the government's launching a free program to provide a an HIV prevention drug access is being expanded to what's called prep pre exposure prophylaxis it's free to people who need the protection from HIV but don't have insurance to pay for it some HIV drugs can cost two thousand dollars a month the government says only about eighteen percent who might benefit got a prescription last year drug maker Gilly add sciences agreed to donate enough of its HIV prevention medicines for up to two hundred thousand people a year for ten years the trump administration aims to reduce HIV infections by seventy five percent in five years and by ninety percent in ten years and Donahue

Donahue HIV Ten Years Seventy Five Percent Two Thousand Dollars Eighteen Percent Ninety Percent Five Years
Health program offers free HIV prevention drug to uninsured

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 11 months ago

Health program offers free HIV prevention drug to uninsured

"The government is launching a program to provide an HIV prevention drug for free access is being expanded to what's called prep pre exposure prophylaxis it's free to people who need the protection from HIV but don't have insurance to pay for it some HIV drugs can cost two thousand dollars a month the government says only about eighteen percent who might benefit got a prescription last year drug maker Gilly add sciences agreed to donate enough of its HIV prevention medicines for up to two hundred thousand people a year for ten years the trump administration aims to reduce HIV infections by seventy five percent in five years and by ninety percent in ten years ed Donoghue Washington

HIV Ed Donoghue Washington Ten Years Seventy Five Percent Two Thousand Dollars Eighteen Percent Ninety Percent Five Years
Success at preventing HIV but putting profit ahead of public health

Second Opinion

03:09 min | 1 year ago

Success at preventing HIV but putting profit ahead of public health

"Dennis is in one thousand nine year old man who engages in high risk sex with men often exchanging sex for money at his last medical visit and my goal was to get dentist to value himself and take more precautions to protect his health. This is Dr Michael Wilks with a second opinion prevention. It is now possible using a medication called prep which is short for pre exposure prevention or prophylaxis prep has changed the face of the the disease for hundreds of thousands of at risk Americans it prevents nearly all about ninety seven percent of HIV infections if taken Achon exactly as prescribed but still only one in five people at risk are taking the medicine. It's no surprise that those with poor access access to healthcare those with less education and those with fewer financial resources are far less likely to receive the medication and thus more vulnerable to to acquiring issue. A significant part of the problem is the ridiculously high price of the drug about twenty thousand dollars a year and and people at high risk need to take the drug over years those without health insurance simply can't afford the drug like we've learned with measles easels and other infectious diseases the more people in a community that are protected with a vaccine or in this case with medicines the less likely the infection can spread within the community so we need to boost the rates of high risk people who are taking prep far above the current level. So how do we get get people like Dennis to take the drug will I. We need to make it affordable. When I tell Dennis the drug will cost him about fifteen hundred dollars a month. He smiles smiles and gently shakes his head. No no in Australia. The drug costs only three hundred and forty dollars a year so it is possible to bring bring the price down to about thirty dollars a month other than profit gouging. I am not sure why prep is exponentially more expensive in the US in all fairness. I should mention that the drug's manufacturer Gilead had has agreed to donate a small proportion of the drug to those who can't afford crap but the small donation won't be enough to help the eighty percent who need the drug but can't get it in addition to the cost of the drug high risk risk people also need to obtain regular lab tests that can also cost hundreds of dollars a year even if the drug was free. Dennis still still might not choose to take it. He's a bit skeptical of medicine doctors and doesn't currently even have a place to live. He's living on the street but as a civil society we ought to be able to find a way to at least have the drug available to every person who needs it in the end. It's going to be a lot cheaper to do that then paying for Dennis's care once he gets H._I._V. This is Dr Michael Wilks with a second opinion.

Dennis Dr Michael Wilks Gilead United States Australia Fifteen Hundred Dollars Twenty Thousand Dollars One Thousand Nine Year Ninety Seven Percent Eighty Percent Thirty Dollars Forty Dollars
Scientists sharpen gene editing tool

AP 24 Hour News

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Scientists sharpen gene editing tool

"The use of the gene editing tool takes another step forward A. P.'s objected quit explains scientists in China reporting the first use of it to try to cure a patient's HIV infection the twenty seven year old patient has HIV I needed a stem cell transplant to treat cancer Chinese scientists tried to create HIV resistance which they have achieved in the past by editing a gene in blood cells to mimic that mutation using the crisper tool to cut DNA at a specific spot it didn't cure the H. I. V. but genetics experts think that it does show promise for treating disease a different researcher came under fire last year for altering embryos that led to the birth of twin girls but experts say trying to cure one patient of disease doesn't present the same ethical challenges as altering DNA which can affect future

A. P. China Hiv Infection Researcher Twenty Seven Year
Scientists Break Ground In Use of Gene-Editing Tool

AP 24 Hour News

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Scientists Break Ground In Use of Gene-Editing Tool

"Use of the gene editing tool takes another step forward A. P.'s objected Quinn explains scientists in China reporting the first use of it to try to cure a patient's HIV infection the twenty seven year old patient has HIV I needed a stem cell transplant to treat cancer Chinese scientists tried to create HIV resistance which they have achieved in the past by editing a gene in blood cells to mimic that mutation using the crisper tool to cut DNA at a specific spot it didn't cure the H. I. V. but genetics experts think that it does show promise for treating disease a different researcher came under fire last year for altering embryos that led to the birth of twin girls but experts say trying to cure one patient of disease doesn't present the same ethical challenges as altering DNA which can affect future

A. P. Quinn China Hiv Infection Researcher Twenty Seven Year
Scientists Break Ground In Use of Gene-Editing Tool

America's Morning News

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Scientists Break Ground In Use of Gene-Editing Tool

"Scientists are reporting the first use of a gene editing tool called crisper to try to cure a man's HIV infection they gave a blood cells that were genetically modified to resist the aids virus now that tools long been used in research labs it your remember a Chinese scientist was scorned last year when he revealed he used it on embryos that led to the birth of twin girls but that new work is considered ethical it involved a man with cancer and HIV the treatment seemed safe and put his cancer into remission it did not cure HIV the New England journal of medicine published the results

Hiv Infection Scientist New England Journal Of Medicin
         Sexually transmitted infections on The  rise in The  military

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

02:50 min | 1 year ago

Sexually transmitted infections on The rise in The military

"Seven a disturbing new report shows dramatic increases in the rates of sexually transmitted infections in men and women serving in the US military, ABC news. Correspondent Mark Remillard, a report saying that three particular infections are most concerned committee gonorrhea and syphilis around the rise within the, the nation's military services, and that has a broader affect on the military would have an effect, obviously, on the personnel both short term and long-term on their wellbeing, but also in their unit readiness and by extension the larger military military, for example, this report cited in two thousand twelve SEI's in the navy accounted for healthcare costs of five point four million. And that's in the navy alone. So there's an economic cost. There's a personnel readiness cost to this, and they're saying that part of the conservative. This is the result of more risky behavior. The majority of our military. Branches are made up by eighty four percent are male. And they say that they're starting to see based on surveys that they done more risky behavior. Especially in the age group of eighteen to twenty five so the younger male populations talking about higher rates of sex with multiple partners, higher rates of having sex with new partners without condoms and things like that, that they are saying. May may be the reason behind the rise in this, these STI's and one of the main contributors to that being what they say is potentially dating apps is actually a one of the reasons that they may be seeing more non counters in these kinds of things. This is an age group of people who simply weren't alive to hear the safe sex message that was, you know, made very, very clear in the immediate. Wake of the aids crisis of the eighties. Yeah, exactly, it actually a part of that, too. And part of this report did talk about HIV being still, obviously, a concern in the military, and that, that there may be members of the military, you don't realize that there are their fellow colleagues and fellow service members who may have HIV now rates of HIV infections are steady between between twenty twelve in two thousand seventeen the rate remained pretty steady. But the rates of these bacterial infections, which are easier to treat they, they can be used by antibiotics rather than viral infections like HIV HP herpes, these kinds of things, which have all decreased these bacterial infections like gonorrhea. And are on the rise. And that is concerning. ABC news. Correspondent Mark Remillard. Thanks for taking the time to talk with us today. Thank you,

Mark Remillard Navy ABC United States Syphilis STI HP Eighty Four Percent
Daily HIV prevention pill urged for healthy people at risk

WBBM Early Afternoon News

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Daily HIV prevention pill urged for healthy people at risk

"Be preventative services task force has new recommendations for doctors. It's urging them to prescribe a daily prevention pill to people at high risk of HIV infection. Studies show Terada cuts the chances that someone who still healthy becomes infected from risky sex or injection drug use with nearly forty thousand new HIV infections, each year in the US, only a fraction of people who could benefit are prescribed the drug for

Hiv Infection United States
HIV Infection discussed on Paul and Jordana

Paul and Jordana

00:19 sec | 1 year ago

HIV Infection discussed on Paul and Jordana

"The anti aids is in sight as a huge study finds drugs. Stop HIV transmission. So the aids epidemic there could be an end here because this landmark study, and it found men whose HIV infection was fully suppressed by particular drugs and had no chance of infecting

Hiv Infection
HIV Infection, Rebecca Atkins And Department Of Health discussed on Red Eye Radio

Red Eye Radio

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

HIV Infection, Rebecca Atkins And Department Of Health discussed on Red Eye Radio

"A spot in Albuquerque New Mexico is now the epicenter of HIV infection. Scare state health officials say to people who received so called vampire facial injections at VIP spa. Have now tested positive for HIV care Kiwi. TV's Rebecca Atkins alert to anyone who may have had injection related procedures. Like the vampire facial procedure. Take samples of your own blood extracts, the plasma then injected back into your face with needles. The department of health says the esta Titian running the business was using unsafe practices. Those infected went to the spa between may in September of

Hiv Infection Rebecca Atkins Department Of Health Albuquerque New Mexico
"hiv infection" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"hiv infection" Discussed on KCBS All News

"To eliminate new HIV infections in the city. San Francisco is a model for other cities crafting their HIV response. Dr Diane handler says and we are on track to be the first city to eliminate new HIV infections, but as the leader of SF generals HIV AIDS program, and a member of the getting zero coalition Adler sees much more to do things have really changed. But yes, there are still sixteen thousand people in our city living with HIV and nearly a person every other week who still getting infected with HIV. So our work truly is far from done as an example of the stubborn challenges in the way of getting to zero she points to homelessness people going through it accounted for fourteen percent of those new HIV infections in two thousand seventeen even though they represent less than one percent of the city's population. Overall. All in two thousand seventeen San Francisco had the smallest number of new infections since the early eighties. Gentlemen, KCBS. It was not only the scene of protests and clashes with police, but it is still a symbol of the will of the people KCBS reporter Curtis Kim says there are plans to honor people's park in Berkeley. It was a scene of violent confrontations between police and protesters who wanted a construction site near the campus turned into a place together and commute. I believe the legacy of this part needs to live forever. There's so many stories that haven't been told yet.

HIV San Francisco Dr Diane handler Curtis Kim AIDS Adler reporter Berkeley fourteen percent one percent
"hiv infection" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"hiv infection" Discussed on Science Friday

"Welcome back to bar. Hello nice to be here. You're you're welcome. Thanks for joining us. Dr cannon as I just said, the this patients cure, or require that you have a bone marrow transplant from a donor who happened to have this rare genetic mutation that makes people resistant HIV infection. He is as I say now the second person to ever achieve remission for more than a year. There may be another patient and Dusseldorf right on the on the way to the same thing. But is this a practical cure for the other thirty seven million people? No, not until but that doesn't mean this is not incredibly exciting and of great value on what researchers are, you know, focused on doing. Now is saying can we understand why this, you know, very specialized and boutique treatment worked for these patients on come. We recapitulate the elements of that. And find a way to do it. That's you know, safer and applicable to, you know, people who don't have an underlying council that would make them undergo my transplant Dr bar with about other things like vaccines or other work that isn't getting as much attention. There was a case of a potential cure. That got a lot of press coverage earlier this week one publication actually leaked the news earlier than there was supposed to what are what are you excited about? Yeah. That's a great question. I mean, it is hard not to be excited about the second example of a possible cure. But but you're right. Dr cannon is right. This is not directly translatable to a large number of people. So when we think about the thirty seven million people as you mentioned who are infected with HIV right now in the world, we want to think about things that are a little more simple and a little bit more broadly applicable, and and honestly the HIV cure research field for those approaches is a little bit earlier on. So we're looking at strategies to reduce the size of the virus population. That is infected and remains in the body despite long periods of HIV medicine, and then we're looking at novel immunotherapy mechanisms so way to train the immune system or enhance the immune system to identify those cells, and then clear those cells. So you're right. There are things like vaccines. There are things like antibodies. There's many stra-. Deji that have been used in other types of cancer approaches that we're looking to apply to the situation of HIV. But I will say that many of these stages are in the very beginning of development, and though there are positive and really exciting developments. We're not at the stage of being able to even do large stage clinical trials or or implement them. Broadly to all the people who could benefit ultimately deduct cannon. What about gene therapy? We hear so much about that with is that useful and applicable line of work here. Let's lutely..

HIV infection Dr cannon
HIV injections to replace daily pills pass medical trial

Science Friday

11:28 min | 1 year ago

HIV injections to replace daily pills pass medical trial

"Hopeful news this week for people living with HIV a couple of drug trials have shown that a monthly long acting injection is as effective as daily dosing of pills and keeping HIV in check. This news comes just days. After researchers reported that a second man has been cured of infection from HIV man known only as the London patient. This comes twelve years after the cure of the world's first person. Now, why why a cure for these two? Well, both men in addition to HIV had cancer, requiring bone marrow transplants and both receive transplants have cells with one very particular. Genetic twist HIV resistance, if the London patient remains off drugs HIV free as he has for eighteen months. Months then that would make to people in the whole world who have been cured of the virus and only after risky procedures meant to save them from advanced cancer. So what does research hold for the other thirty seven million people hoping to live the best lines? They can with the virus. That was once a death sentence here to talk about the future of HIV research are to HIV researchers working on different kinds of treatments to pull a canon is professor of molecular microbiology and immunology at the school of medicine university of southern California in Los Angeles. Welcome back to Canada. Hi, nice to have you start to Catherine bar assistant, professor of medicine and the factious disease division university of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. Welcome back to bar. Hello nice to be here. You're you're welcome. Thanks for joining us. Dr cannon as I just said, this patients cure require that you have a bone marrow transplant from a donor who happened to have this rare genetic mutation that makes people resistant HIV infection. He is as I say now the second person to ever achieve remission for more than a year. There may be another patient in Dusseldorf right on the way to the same thing. Yeah. But is this a practical cure for the other thirty seven million people know, but that doesn't mean this is not incredibly exciting and of great value on what research is odd, you know, focused on doing now is saying can we understand why this very specialized and boutique treatment worked for these patients, and can we recapitulate the elements about and find a way to do it. That's you know, safer and applicable to people who don't have an underlying council that would make them undergo by my transplant Dr bar with about other things like vaccines or other work that isn't getting as much attention. There was a case of a potential cure. They got a lot of press coverage earlier this week one publication actually leaked the news earlier than they were supposed to what are what are you excited about? Yeah. That's a great question. I mean, it is hard not to be excited about the second example of a possible cure. But but you're right. Dr cannon is right. This is not directly translatable to a large number of people. So when we think about the thirty seven million people as you mentioned who are infected with HIV right now in the world, we wanna think about things that are a little more simple and a little bit more broadly applicable, and and honestly the HIV cure research field for those approaches is a little bit earlier on. So we're looking at strategies to reduce the size of the virus population. That is infected and remains in the body despite long periods of HIV medicine, and then we're looking at novel immunotherapy mechanisms so way to train the immune system or enhance immune system to identify those cells, and then clear those cells. So you're right. There are things like vaccines there things like antibodies. There's money. Strategies that have been used in other types of cancer approaches that we're looking to apply to the situation of HIV. But I will say that many of these stages are in the very beginning of development and end though, there are positive and really exciting developments. We're not at the stage of being able to even do large stage clinical trials or or implement them. Broadly to all the peoples who could benefit. The Decca cannon. What about gene therapy? We hear so much about that. With is that a useful and applicable line of work here? Absolutely. Yes. Unin deed as we are trying to figure out how to sort of recreate what happened with these transplant patients. Gene therapy is is really playing a starring role. We have two challenges, you know, first of all we have to figure out a way to sort of devote the reservoirs HIV that exists in patients. That's kind of one of the things that happens when somebody gets chemotherapy for that council. We we don't want to have to do that. We don't have to give people chemotherapy. So instead, we're trying to sort of figure out kinda jump Lhamo targeted ways that could specifically remove HIV infected cells. But then that's not going to be enough because we'll never be able to get rid of all the HIV. And so what we want to do then it's used gene therapy to take some of the patient's own cells and make them resistant to HIV to sort of mimic. What happened with these? Stone as off the bone marrow transplants on twenty nine teen. And it sounds crazy to me that I can even say this. But doing gene therapy to recreate the genetic quack that these HIV resistant down this hot is is almost becoming routine. We have amazing tools like like, Chris bustle example, that allow us to go in and target the specific gene that can make people cells resistant to HIV JEAN CLAUDE c- c- all five. And so so that part of the treatment pot that gene therapy can do I kind of feel like, you know, we can do that already. But what we don't know is if that's going to be enough. And instead, what do we combine that with to kind of if you like deep oak people's HIV reservoir, if you can you think do gene therapy that kind of work already are there trials with gene therapy? Yes, indeed does actually trial. What's going on already what people's own bone marrow stem cells are being taken out and with reagents that are a bit like Krista cool zinc finger nuclear crisis. They act like genetic scissors, and they are mutating this, gene, the five G in the patient's own stem cells, which are then kind of return to them. So there are ongoing trials in Los Angeles looking at whether or not that can help patients if not completely kill them. At least get them some benefit in some way of controlling the virus. Katherine let me ask you. What makes HIV such a hard disease research is it just that the virus is a is a complicated problem. Yeah. The virus is a very tricky adversary. You know, it's a small virus. But it's very flexible, and it changes quickly to sort of fight off, whatever strategy we use. So it can quickly develop resistance to HIV medicines. And that's why we have to use multiple medicines at the same time in order to even suppress it, effectively, not not a radical the, you know, the reservoir for care, but just to maintain suppression. But the other thing that makes it really tricky is that it's it's a type of virus called a retrovirus, which means it takes a copy of its DNA or its genetic material and puts it into the host cell and so shortly after infection and just a very short period of time the virus embeds itself permanently and an HIV positive person's body. And so that that window to prevent the seating of HIV is very very narrow. And so basically every person who becomes. Infected with HIV has these permanent copies within their own selves? And that's this major barrier for HIV care that all the research is sort of trying to reduce and hopefully completely clear more and more. We're seeing the overlap between cancer research and HIV as you point out both of these men involved in this cure had cancer and treating the cancer. Also got rid of the virus. Doesn't mean there are still other things from cancer treatments that we could apply HIV. Yeah. I think that's actually a very exciting area of research. We are borrowing a lot of immunotherapy strategies as well. As a lot of the knowledge that cancer. Researchers have gained from exciting new and really groundbreaking treatments and cancer. But one of the problems is, you know, when you think about someone who has a a life threatening cancer that that maybe caused their deaths in three to six months, you're really willing to take a lot of risks in order to try to extend that person's life so side effects are Texas cities for for very exciting therapies are are tolerated in that situation. But when we talk about HIV positive individuals is doing well on HIV medicine, and and really leaving living a very functional life. We're not willing to entertain serious toxicities. And so that that margin or that window of what we're able to tolerate in order to see the effects of these exciting, immunotherapy strategies is much smaller. And so that's one of the limitations of applying many of these exciting immunotherapy strategies that are. Are currently being so successfully employed in cancer limited by the number of candidates who have both cancer and HIV finding them. If you wanted to. Paula. What do you think? Oh, yeah. No, absolutely. I mean, you know, really, if if you if you have a blood cancer, and you failed initial treatment. So that you then become a candidate for transplant. It's almost like, you know, the planets have to be aligned, and you know, you have to have HIV have a blood cancer need a bone marrow transplantation. And then find a donor who is not just what we call it tissue much somebody who can you know, service, your bone marrow donor, but he also has this Rudge mutation the see all five mutation that only about one percent of the population. Do so, you know, it's it's always going to be a very very unusual circumstance. But one of the things that I think quite exciting is, you know, increasingly Counci doctors know about this. There's a large consortium in Europe called icy stem, which is actually it's. Funded by the American Foundation for aids research, which is the charity that Elizabeth Taylor setup, and they are putting together a database of potential bone marrow donors who are carrying the mutation. They got more than twenty thousand people on the books, if you like ready to go, so although it's always going to be a very unusual and only be possible in the smoker to patients, I think what's exciting is that you know, that's going to be made available to people who you know, who qualify for that. And who wants to undergo that

Hiv Infection HIV Los Angeles Dr Cannon London Canada Dusseldorf Canon School Of Medicine University Professor Of Medicine Professor Philadelphia University Of Pennsylvania Texas Europe Jean Claude Paula
"hiv infection" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:19 min | 1 year ago

"hiv infection" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"One. Really interesting study that came out recently. I think really is a reminder of something we should all be thinking about it found that when people have their houses destroyed by hurricanes. They're building them back larger. The same places, and that really gets to point that, you know, we pops I had tried to make pretty often is that there's really no such thing as a natural disaster. There are storms that happened where humans have put themselves, and we have done a really bad job of avoiding areas that we should avoid, and especially a lot of very marginalized people who have no other option are ending up on coastlines, and in places where we're going to have these problems, increasingly we're gonna have the insurance companies stepping in on these things. Yeah. Exactly. And they're going to start preventing people are penalizing raising rates rebuilding in this. I think it was a year when the climate for toward the end of this year finally got some press. You know, we got the news media finally saw this don't you think as a Sarah that the news media finally picked up on this as an important story. Well, I mean, I think there's a lot of big reports and big sort of cohesive analyses that kind of brought everything together all of these extreme weather events that we're seeing and sort of creeping average temperature rise average concentrations in the atmosphere. There is the fourth national climate assessment that came out on black Friday, so sort of on a time when you know, some critics thought that was intentional because people wouldn't be paying attention, but people paid attention because the report was pretty dire in basically is predicting all kinds of really expensive and devastating impacts across the country. As a result of climate change from W wildfires to hurricanes that get really bad really fast to heat waves, which heat stress is actually expected to be the leading cause of death associated with climate change people who live in cities where he just gets absorbed by Alva concrete and pavement and not really released. We could see a lot of vulnerable an elderly and sick people. Really taking the brunt of that, you know, that was actually reflected in the comments. We got from some of our listeners let me play one from Terry from Pasadena, California, the big science story for twenty eighteen is the report from the intergovernmental panel on climate change. This is a moment when humanity is in peril. It is defining story of our generation just exactly what we were saying. Rachel, let's move on to human health. Of course, the biggest story, I think that broke late this year involve crisper remind us about that. Yeah. So a Chinese scientists announced quite unexpectedly that he claims he has produced to genetically engineered children that these twins were edited while they were embryos and are the first genetically engineered humans TV born. And you know, according to him there healthy, he engineered them to basically have this this one gene mutation that makes you less susceptible to HIV infection and HIV is a big problem in China. It's also very poorly. Understood by laypeople in China. There's not a lot of good information to the public. The government has not done the best job of managing HIV aids there. So all of that combines two people being very concerned that the parents did not actually. We give what we call informed consent. Meaning they didn't really understand the implications of what was going to be done to the embryos. What the possible outcome was. And then there's a question of isn't enough. If the parents gave informed consent because if these children were indeed, genetically engineered we have no idea what's going to happen to them as they grow up. We have no idea what the effect will be on their own children. So it really opened this can of worms that, you know, scientists have been talking about these ethical questions for a long time and hadn't really come to any solutions. So now, they're they have no more answers way. More questions. Sarah. Do you think they're going to sort this out eventually? I mean, I think what happened with the experiment and China's sort of suggests that they need to rain. I mean, most international scientists had agreed to this sort of moratorium on editing in embryos, while they figured out these ethical questions, but clearly that, you know, if the scientists just gonna keep progressing without that, then the sort of bioethicists they're going to have to catch up and actually here in the US federal law prevents implanting a genetic embryo, but there are experiments going on right now in tempt to develop therapies that might one day be used to treat illness in humans. So yeah, it seems like we're sort of racing down that line. No. This is not unprecedented in the world biology. There have been times on I'm thinking back in the seventies Sylamore conference where gene editing was invented. And they said, what's let's stop and think about what we're doing. Right. And so maybe we're at that point again. Yeah. You know, I think what what really disturbed a lot of members of the scientific community was just that like Sarah was saying they had this this moratorium. There had been conferences on this subject. People had really been gnashing their teeth over what we should do. And there was this consensus in the scientific community that we were not ready for this yet. But clearly at individuals scientists are going to disagree with that. And even the Chinese themselves said, hey, yeah. It does. I mean, it's hard to know. Exactly. What happened? But at least what the Chinese government, and the researchers institution are saying is that they had no idea this was happening in that. They don't condone it at all whether or not that's true. I don't know if we'll ever know. But certainly people understand that it was a bold and probably that move. Well, especially if you want to be known as a world class country of scientific research exactly to want wanna know that there are a rogue, scientists your country going on into doing these kinds of experiment. Right. I mean, it was kind of an exciting year for the future of reproduction in general exciting in like eggs, essentially terrifying at the same time, one of the stories that I found really interesting that I came out in December doctors announced that they had delivered a healthy baby. Some months before that had been stated in a uterus from a deceased donor. So there have been a few uterine transplants over the last few years, but previously the surgery worked by a living donor, usually a family member of the person looking to have uterus planted. It's implanted the baby's just stated then it's removed right away. Because there's no point in risking rejection by keeping the organ in when the point of it is for you to carry the baby and have the baby. So a lot of risk involved for two people and a lot of doctors have been hoping they could figure out using deceased donors. So that the risk is only one person. And there was kind of like, I think a lot of scientists worry. There was too much of like an x factor, which is very interesting because we get from deceased donors all the time. But I think the idea of a new life just stating in an organ from a deceased donor seems like somehow a step too far to some people. But again, you know, lowering the risk of this this surgery, which is kind of controversial because it's like totally elective. You know, there are lots of ways to have children even your own biological children without carrying them yourself. So a lot of scientists have felt like to make this viable long term as an option for people. We really do need to figure out how to take out that living donor necessity, and it seems that now that's possible. So that's very exciting. And a lot of researchers are hoping that this will eventually be available to you trans patients as well. Which will obviously be a huge deal for a lot of people. Well, we're gonna take a break. And after the break, we're gonna come back and talk lots more. We have more highlights from our twenty.

China Sarah HIV infection Chinese government California US Alva concrete Rachel Pasadena Terry one day
"hiv infection" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"hiv infection" Discussed on Science for the People

"Welcome to science for the people. I'm Rochelle Saunders. We're looking back at twenty eighteen and calling out our favourite science news stories from this past year, the ones we think you should remember or hear about for the first time if maybe you've been taking a break from the internet and we've brought in a team of reporters from science news to do it. This first story picks up from one of the top science news stories from twenty seventeen proving that crisper continues to make big big headlines. We've brought Tina Hessman say back to talk about some more big crisper news. And if you don't know what crisper is or how it works. We'll have some links to catch you up in the show notes. Tina, welcome back. Thanks for having me back. So only a couple of weeks ago. There was some pretty big crisper news that came out tell us about it. So this news broke rather unexpectedly that a scientists in China claims that he has created the first gene edited babies what he says he did was to use crisper to edit out a that HIV uses to get into cells. So these babies are supposedly resistant to getting HIV infection. So he did this at the urging of the parents he did this as a general a bit of science where they kinda found people to come participate. How did this all come about? Do we know? So he did this as his it under his own initiative. He recruited eight families from HIV patients in he told them that this was going to be part of an HIV vaccine trial. That's what it said on the forms that he used to inform them about what he would be doing in to get their permission to do these experiments this Kaba informed consent, or so he recruited these eight families one family dropped out, but seven families continued on and he created we don't actually know how many embryos he created. He said that there. There were thirty four embryos. So we don't know how many belong to each family, but in this family, there were four embryos created to them did not have edits to them. Did the parents decided to go ahead and have those embryos implanted even though one of them had an edit that might it was called off target at it. So this is that the crisper cut in a place that you did not intend for it to cut. And he said that it was far away from other genes, and it wouldn't have any effect on the little girl, and the other embryo had an added within the gene that he was trying to hit which is called the CR five, gene. But the problem is is that nobody knows whether that edit would actually make the baby resistant to HIV. But the parents apparently decided to go ahead and transplant that embryo any light. So, you know, there was a there was a combination of it was very much his idea to do this. But also the parents decided to go ahead with this at each step along the way, although there's a lot of controversy about whether he really adequate the implored them. About the risks in the consequences. And whether they were really informed about the whole debate about whether the should happen or not. I mean, he just sort of took it upon himself to defy what a an international body of scientists at the SIS at said in twenty fifteen that we're not ready for this yet. Okay. So there's a whole bunch of stuff here to unpack. So the first question I have is are any of these babies actually born yet or right now are they still are they still yet to be born? So two babies were born there is one apparently that may be on the way early a woman is pregnant, but it's in the early stages of the pregnancy yet. So we don't know if that baby will actually be bored. Okay. So now this was done. My understanding is this was done under the kind of guy or the..

HIV infection Tina Hessman Rochelle Saunders China
"hiv infection" Discussed on Bad Science

Bad Science

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"hiv infection" Discussed on Bad Science

"I gotta spread these rabies somebody else. One of the things about the work. We're doing is is this idea that a virus can cause a pathology. They'll kill you. Okay. That's good. But before that happens if rabies virus can influence the way neurons talk to neurons and condemn fluence behavior that way, then maybe other viruses can do the same thing. This thing that was exciting to us. Right. You know, there are changes in behavior ill. Okay, you get the flu. And then for some reason you're compelled to go to work rather than stay homesick. But you really wanna go to work. So all your co workers get the flu as well. Right. So maybe do is telling you know, you should be way more diligent professionally there is some thought about HIV infection, and does HIV infection changed behavior patterns of the newly infected to enhance the propagation of the virus there while less limited more, hyper sexual these are theories, these these are theory. Yeah. Well, hold on a second based on that as you talked about earlier, the virus podcast or the or the rabies podcast. We're talking about movies. Well, zombies are infected. All right. I see. We're all we're all connected here. So there's these tree frogs Japanese tree frogs of South Korea that have and there's no chance to say this rights that don't get excited. Batra co Caitriona dendritic batted est a works for me. Okay. I think we all got you know that. Oh, yeah. It's fungus which is well known as a threat to many frog species. But Japanese tree frogs in Asia, do not seem to be dying off. So suddenly when they're infected when scientists listened to the mating calls of forty two male tree, frogs, they realized that nine that were infected had caused that were faster and longer making them more attractive to potential mates. So it's kind of like their sex is they're making them. I mean, that's what it says here. The so the fungus makes the frogs more attractive is that what you said or they make some more sexually aggressive. It makes them. Yeah. Tractive to their mates around them. And then they that's how they spreads fungus instead of becoming more aggressive themselves that almost makes everybody around them workers. So this fits perfectly. Well, right. So so the the infection is changing something to enhance the probability of passing on the infection. So frogs aren't aggressive froze aren't going to go out and bite another frog. Right, right..

HIV infection flu South Korea Asia
"hiv infection" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"hiv infection" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"Thanks for having me for first story today floor. Let's talk about well of late breaking story, actually one that caused a a lot of discussion across the world. What was been going on? Yeah. While a researcher in China claims that two healthy babies, twin girls have been born after being gene edited as a single celled embryo, so previously embryos have been edited. But only for research they've never ever been implanted as a pregnancy and actually become healthy living babies, lots of ethical chats on there. But before we do maybe I mean, this is a big big story where where's it been published? That's the thing. It hasn't been published anywhere. It hasn't been peer reviewed. This is one fellows claims. He's put up a lot of YouTube videos and things about it. But really this is just kind of promotional stuff. So we really don't know if this genuinely happened or not wolf, Laura, what's he claiming to have done. Well, this researcher. He John que- says that just after this embryo fertilized. He's crisper gene editing to change a gene that's involved in HIV infection. It's called the C CR five, gene. And the idea is that he's given these children a mutation that does occur naturally in some of the population, which makes them less likely to be infected with HIV thunder on what a scientist saying. Well, there are a lot of questions world around. This. The first is did this actually happen. So even if the editing took place as the researcher he describes there's a question about whether the mutation did take hold in the children's DNA as they developed after they were born in that that now they have this uniform. Set of cells in their body..

researcher HIV infection YouTube John que Laura China scientist
"hiv infection" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"hiv infection" Discussed on The Takeaway

"All last week leaders in the global health community met in Amsterdam for the twenty second international aids conference and on Tuesdays program. We heard from science adviser for UNH's on efforts to fight the epidemic globally. But within the United States, the HIV pedantic still rages on especially among specific subgroups of the population. If the current trends continue one into black gay men is expected to be diagnosed with HIV in their lifetimes. And that's compared to one in ninety nine Americans overall who will contract the virus and according to estimates from the center for disease control and prevention, fifty, six percent of black transgender. Women are living with HIV. Tori Cooper is an HIV consultant and prevention specialists at a health center outside of Atlanta, and she's also a trans woman who helps target outreach to other trans women. Tori, thanks for joining me. Thank you so much for having me Tenzing. So we know that the state of Georgia has one of the highest rates of HIV infection. Shen in any state. What does it look like on the ground from the work that you're doing? So HIV is a huge epidemic across the world. But especially here in south, I speak as a black trans woman who lives in south and what was seeing is really institutionalized separatism in racism that really is affecting our overall health. It's affecting the way that we earn money. It's affecting our life expectancy. It affects the way that we access care and that we manipulate us through the healthcare system. So it's really, really horrible. It looks very much like it did in nineteen eighty nine versus two thousand eighteen so twenty years ago as far as the healthcare system in Atlanta and even across the country. What is driving that? Because you said nineteen eighty nine. And I remember, you know, growing up in that era where aids in HIV had just started to come to the surface and how. Difficult it was in that era. What do you think is driving the current rates of HIV infection in the communities that you're working with? So are number of different drivers, some of which you wrote a great article titled whizzy empathy and for black poverty and pain. And some of the issues that you addressed in article are some of the issues that we see in trance community. There's homophobia, this transphobia in those two things that are keeping people out of care. We're seeing systematic oppression. We're seeing with systems and healthcare systems really aren't addressing the social determinants of health. That's poverty. That's homeless. That's lower education and literacy levels, and you know, black, trans people. On average, we earn less than ten thousand dollars a year. So we have to add that in as another factor as well. Some people just don't. Have the money to get back and forth to doctor's appointments or they may not have the health literacy to be able to know. Well, when I come back in six months, does that mean six months from today or does that mean six month from when I first got my diagnosis, you know their bunch of different factors that play in current health care system doesn't really address all of those different things. Instead of just kind of soums, you know how to manage it and that's an assumption as causing people's lives. Also, I'm curious about two things you mentioned the literacy around this, and I think I wonder if we are at a point where HIV is something that's considered a manageable disease these days, and because of the medications that we have, you mentioned the magical anti viral load. Is there not enough literacy, or is there not enough public education about the dangers of HIV about the trans. Mission of HIV about the need to be tested. Like is they is. They're just not that conversation happening enough at the public level. So literacy and health literacy are similar, but two different things. So when it comes to I literacy and literature transpeople, we often aren't represented in marketing campaigns. We still see commercials that are mostly white, cinder man in pretty much across the board in marketing, and that's not who the epidemic prioritizes anymore. The fastest greats of.

HIV infection Tori Cooper UNH Atlanta epidemic United States Amsterdam Shen Georgia consultant six months ten thousand dollars twenty second twenty years six percent six month
"hiv infection" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"hiv infection" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"Various organ specific autoimmune diseases is most likely due to a combination of genetic susceptibility and environmental factors mono genyk auto immune pollyanna andrew cohen syndromes have provided an opportunity to learn more about specific factors that are critical for maintaining immune tolerance in parallel major advances in characterizing auto immunity in patients such as the identification of new auto antibody targets associated with distinct diseases and their manifestations have occurred this article reviews some of these important developments and discusses approaches for the appropriate diagnosis and longitudinal follow up of affected patients a fifty five year old man with hiv infection and a mass on the right side of the face a case record of the massachusetts general hospital by kevin ard and colleagues a fifty five year old man with hiv infection and a cd four t cell count of sixty five per cubic millimetre presented to the hospital one week after he started antiretroviral therapy because of a rapidly enlarging mass at the angle of the right mandible one week earlier the patient received a diagnosis of hiv one he reported that he had lost approximately eighteen kilograms during the past two years that he had chronic oral dental pain and chronic cough at night and that the skin on his forehead cheeks and chest was peeling on examination the mass was firm fixed and tender and measuring zero point five centimetres in diameter with no overlying our thema or warmth one week after this evaluation repeat examination revealed that the size of the mass on the right side of the face had increased to one centimeter in diameter one week later the size of the mass had increased to one point five centimeters in diameter and numbness of the right pinna had developed c revealed asymmetric enlargement of the right parotid gland there are several possible causes of parotid gland enlargement including infection anatomical causes mechanical obstruction auto immune disorders benign neoplasms and cancer however several features that are red flags for cancer were present in this patient including numbness of the pinna which suggests neurologic impingement rapid growth and the fixed nature of the mass and aggressive lymphoma.

hiv infection kevin ard hiv chronic cough lymphoma andrew cohen massachusetts general hospital one week fifty five year eighteen kilograms five centimeters five centimetres one centimeter two years
"hiv infection" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"hiv infection" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"So to me it clicked that this was zero conversion ours it sometimes called acute hiv infection and this is the body's reaction in producing antibodies to the hiv antigen it's important to note that not everybody goes through this phase of sickness but i was one of the lucky ones who did and i was lucky as an there were these physical symptoms that let me detect the virus pretty early and i wanna show of hands for these next few questions how many view in here were aware that with treatment those with hiv not only fend off aides completely but they live full and normal lives all educate how many of you are aware that with treatment those with hiv can reach an undetectable status and that makes them virtually uninfected as much less how many of you were aware of the pre and post exposure treatments that are available that reduce the risk of transmission by over ninety percent so what i want to ask next is this if we have made such exponential progress in combating hiv why have in our perceptions of those with the virus evolved alongside when you were diagnosed with hiv who did you tout i told my best friends who who were very supportive and they were great about it on the kind of have this nice exchange this dialogue and that was very affirming and then i told my roommate's who are also very good friends of mine and they had a very interesting reaction they they broke down they started crying they were hugging each other they thought it was going to die in front of them and at this point it's been like four or five weeks since infection all my immediate symptoms were were gone like so i'm feeling okay but things started to change with that group of friends um what what happened i would just notice little um initially was little things i would have my roommate's he would kind of sidestep around me when i was walking around and he was.

hiv infection ninety percent five weeks
"hiv infection" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"hiv infection" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Didn't think much of it fast forward about three weeks and it felt like i've been trampled by a herd of wildebeest the aches in my body were like nothing i felt before or since i'll get these bouts of fever and chill i would real with nausea and it was difficult to walk being a biology student i had some prior exposure to disease and being a fairly informed game and i had read a bit on hiv so to me it clicked that this was zero conversion ours it sometimes called acute hiv infection and this is the body's reaction in producing antibodies to the hiv antigen it's important to note that not everybody goes through this phase of sickness but i was one of the lucky ones who dead and i was lucky as there were these physical symptoms that let me detect the virus pretty early and i want to show of hands for these next few questions how many of you in here we're aware that with treatment those with hiv not only fend off aides completely but they live full and normal lives no educate how many of you are aware that with treatment those with hiv can reach an undetectable status and that makes them virtually uninfected as much less how many of you were aware of the pre and post exposure treatments that are available that reduce the risk of transmission by over ninety percent so what i want to ask next is this if we have made such exponential progress in combating hiv why haven't our perceptions of those with the virus evolved alongside when you were diagnosed with hiv.

fever nausea hiv infection ninety percent three weeks
"hiv infection" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"hiv infection" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And like most college students i was sexually active and i generally took precautions to minimise the risk that sex carries now i say generally because i wasn't always save it only takes a single misstep before were flat on the ground and mind misstep is pretty obvious i had unprotected sex and i didn't think much of it fast forward about three weeks and it felt like i'd been trampled by a herd of wildebeest the aches in my body were like nothing i have felt before or since i'd get these ballots of fever and chill i would real with nausea and it was difficult to walk being a biology student i had some prior exposure to disease and being a fairly informed gay man i had read a bid on hiv so to me it clicked that this was ciro conversion ours it sometimes called acute hiv infection and this is the body's reaction in producing antibodies to the hiv antigen it's important to note that not everybody goes through this phase of sickness but i was one of the lucky ones who did and i was lucky as there were these physical symptoms that let me detect the virus pretty early and i wanna show of hands for these next few questions how many of you in here were aware that with treatment those with hiv not only fend off aides completely but they live full and normal lives y'all educate how many of you are aware that with treatment those with hiv can reach an undetectable status and that makes them virtually uninfected as much less how many of you were aware of the pre and post exposure treatments that are available that reduce the risk of transmission by over ninety percent so what i want to ask next is this if we have made such exponential progress in combating hiv why haven't our perceptions of those with the virus evolved alongside when you were diagnosed with hiv who did you tout i.

nausea hiv infection ninety percent three weeks
"hiv infection" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"hiv infection" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"These be nab's can recognize a wide array of viral envelopes sequences and advances in high throughput technologies have allowed the isolation and cloning of the genes encoding these rare antibodies despite the breath and potency of be nab's no single be nab has been able thus far to protect against the vast array of viral variance that are present in infected persons however two recent proof of principle studies using a hybrid simeon model of hiv infection represent in advance in the implementation of anti hiv be naps the investigators found that a try specific broadly neutralising hiv antibody that encodes three be nab domains could mediate potent protection in macau talks that were challenged with the infectious hybrid simeon hiv sexual harassment in medicine hashtag me to a perspective article by reshma jiaxi from the university of michigan ann arbor the news is filled with stories of celebrities who have engaged in egregious sexual misconduct a recent poll suggested that more than half of us women have experienced unwanted and inappropriate sexual advances at some point in their lives because doctor jag see led a study of workplace sexual harassment in medicine she was not surprised when reporters contacted her for comments on the recent disclosures having come of age in the era of anita hill's testimony against clarence thomas during his confirmation hearings for the supreme court doctor jag seat knows that women who reports sexual harassment experience marginalisation retaliation stigmatization an worse even in the mi2 era reporting such behaviour is far from straightforward the many heartfelt messages dr jiaxi has received from strangers since publishing her research reinforce these intuitions the brave physicians who've contacted her say they remain silent and questioned their self worth after their experiences wondering whether they brought it on themselves one to hold of having a senior male leader in her field unzip the front zipper of her dress at a conference social event many report unwanted touching of breasts and buttocks one described having a tormentor during training and others noted remarkably consistent experiences in the operating room that ironically they thought were unique one even described a rape by a superior during her training that she had never reported in fact none of the.

hiv infection harassment reshma jiaxi anita hill clarence thomas rape macau university of michigan ann arb dr jiaxi
"hiv infection" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"hiv infection" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Anemia hiv infection as about bacterial infections liver ser nurses diabetes epstein barr mano fungal infections jinja vitus is a whole bunch all right what you're supposed to do is dilute we to take a small sample delude a couple drops of the hundreds of peroxide testimonials say and doesn't is that good you know it's just a few drops so they they wingers well we know that people have been scorned around with that is a product that everybody has a bottle of hedge oppressor everybody essential present in the house because that's what we use the clean once the pseudoscientists correct from a topical standpoint you clean a wound with hydrogen peroxide that catalase reaction helps you know and and the oxygen and the and the you know and the the the p h some homeless a p h of the solution helps kill off bacteria and viruses now i always cautioned medical students two nods continually use hydrogen peroxide on blows because it could disturb proteins ride because protein is needed to make the reaction whenever its its to protein it gets his public reaction well your body needs he'll and so we don't consistently treat with hydrogen peroxide because we want the proteins to work in attach and and you know form a healed moved so i recommend hijra props are for the first few days keep the wound claim you may be clear with alcohol but hold up on knives depressing and your loved ones ju really really well sell outside it's been around you know some people you know i don't know what they're doing they're you know do they agree the ivy therapy the drink but now we are being told that some minnesota doctors are going guy his okay this is a trend and more people are ended up an oscar on they sought six alone since the start of the year and since this the gsm networks neck of the woods you know i it's kind of heads home to us because right you know what's going on a none.

the house oscar hiv infection minnesota gsm
"hiv infection" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"hiv infection" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"And james you'll just back from the international aids a santi conference in paris where this bit of hiv science is being discussed what else is being talked but while all kinds of things i we this is a global meeting every two years of the leading brains in this field and gino what this been remarkable progress go back to two thousand five two million people were dying from agerelated diseases every year is half since then but we still not the point where the secure and people still need daily antiretroviral therapy so the venlo to stories about how you can improve prevention of hiv infection and how you can improve the lives of people who've already been infected serve had stories about vaginal rings that reduce the risk of infection pad the idea of longlasting injectable drugs replacing those daily pills with a injection maybe every one or two months i've also had the remarkable story about a child whose gone eight and a half years in remission from hiv virtually cured no reading knows exactly why but understanding that could gain fuel more research the cleveland she gets this point where hiv and aids isn't the massive global killer that it is a health and science reporter james gallagher someone gets viciously stabbed in the back and instead of dying in a crumpled heap they start singing about this wants won't view of opera but the all form isn't always about lost loved lost murder a new opera has just opened here in london saturday an unnamed bordercrossing control point as odds correspondent vincent downs been finding out that can be just as dramatic.

paris hiv infection cleveland murder vincent downs aids health and science reporter james gallagher london two months two years
"hiv infection" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"hiv infection" Discussed on Little Atoms

"Next to him and law us uh but also this kind of this uh stunted um ability to imagine tomorrow and those two things combined created a a kind of a powderkeg for men who some of the of the major players in aids drug development um sell almost immediately into drug addiction and other smell emotional and psychological problems following the to reprieve that happened in 1926 when the new drugs came out and um and that included even some of the researchers he even some of the clintons but certainly a large number of the the forward troops in aids activism shell into a kind of depression and uh and addiction faculty at that are it's still today obviously it would be solely to either to to underestimate aids but to a certain extent is simple to control in the developed world is it's obviously is a global pandemic walt mole could be done to to how the developing whoa deal with it well you know we noticed much a prevention these days um and uh and and it just takes money and political will to get that information out we know we have pills that are in an nearmiracle miracles and given people with hiv infection the potential for a of near normal life span and yet still half of the people in the world with hiv will never have access to those pills and will die of old age they'll die a number of months after their first episode of opportunistic infections just the way we were dying in the eighties and early to mid nineties so it it remains a deadly epidemic although the idea that the uh a plague is uh is in the past and and we get overly comfort i think by that that uh that we have these pills that the the the amount of activism that's going to be needed the and i think this is especially true now with the changes of government in his in the united states.

clintons hiv infection united states global pandemic