22 Burst results for "Hirschfeld"

The Bible Is Your Anchor in a Sea of Blurring Lines

Truth For Life Daily Program

02:07 min | 3 months ago

The Bible Is Your Anchor in a Sea of Blurring Lines

"You don't have to look far to find that there is a difference between the revelation of the Bible and the investigation of man. The New York Times had a review entitled on being male, female, neither or both. And I can't read the article and just use it by way of illustration, but I'll give you one quote from it. Until the turn of the century, doctor my out of its rights, gender was defined through a binary taxonomy of opposites. In 1910, a girl in physician, doctor Magnus Hirschfeld, published a pioneering work on transsexuality and articulated a relatively new modern definition of gender. Quotes. Absolute representatives of their sex are heroes. Only abstraction invented extremes. These two notions could not be farther apart. You can not merge them, okay? Which is why I'm saying to you what I'm saying unless you are convinced of the authority of the Bible. Then when you take your New York Times on a Tuesday morning and read this, you are going to be immediately at sea. You're going to be running down the street saying who am I? What am I? Where am I on the continuum? Am I male and my female? What in the world am I? But if you have accepted the authority of the Bible and you believe that God gets the last word on every subject, then you don't disengage your brain, you interact with the material, you think it out in light of what you know as having been revealed by the creator God.

Magnus Hirschfeld The New York Times
"hirschfeld" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

05:16 min | 7 months ago

"hirschfeld" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"I'd be happy to. And for digital rebar, one of the things we built into our database was a raft consensus algorithm. So if you want to have HA environments at the provisioning level, and the more often you provision, the more immutable, faster turns that you get in your infrastructure, the more important that becomes. So just at the digital rebar perspective, we built in those HA capabilities. But there's a different element here that I think from our customers, they're not as worried about digital rebar staying up. They're worried about their data centers staying up. And one of the things that we do and this will sound counterintuitive is that when we find that there's a problem, the automation stops. And you see this even like with the Amazon outage, one of the things that causes outages to become much worse is when automation that retries something when it shouldn't be retrying. So our design philosophy and there are ways that you can tell the system, yeah, I know this is going to fail. I do want you to retry one or two times. But by and large, when something breaks in an automation process, what we have people do is root cause it, figure out why it's broken and then we'll work with them to fix the operational components that are making that break so that the next we're constantly getting through cause and that actually builds much, much more resilient systems. Now there's also a component of because of the infrastructure code capabilities, customers do a dev test sit test production rollout. And one of the ways that you also create very resilient systems is you don't make experimental changes in production. What we've enabled them to do because everything can be locked in immutably and then replicated in a production environment, you can actually go through and do a dev test prod cycle and know when you promote it into prod that you've actually tested the systems really reliably and you've put them through their paces and you've got doesn't keep everything from happening. But it makes a big difference. It also helps because it's immutable that you're not questioning, hey, you know, did rob slipstream in a change to a script somewhere that I wasn't aware of. You can go back and say, okay, this is exactly what was deployed. This was how it changed. This is what the inputs were. And that's one of the places where infrastructure is code to us, as a platform, infrastructure is code platform. You're really treating this much more like a development experience. Then you would like we've done in the past where you reach into a system and say, oh yeah, I'm just going to SSH in and nudge the service back to life. We really work hard to make it easier for our customers to fix problems the right way. Then back door and fix stuff. Before I let you go, I want you to tell listeners about your own podcasting work, or can they find you on the airwaves? I would be delighted to and our podcast is really a community effort more than rob's voice at this point. For boys, since the pandemic sort of settled in and became a fact of life, we started doing a hallway track meeting at called cloud 2030. And people can find it at the 2030 cloud as the website for it. And we have a DevOps conversation over lunch, and then strategy conversation over breakfast. So Tuesdays for DevOps and strategy on Thursday mornings. Where we have topics that we have an agenda for topics and we will sit down and round table real deep, how are we dealing with software supply chains and what is edge, we do a lot of edge technology. What does DevOps look like? What is open-source look like? And we have these amazing conversations where we have some long tenured people who've been coming for a long time and we always have new people showing up who want to add their own own voice. And that becomes a podcast for us. So the 2030 podcast takes those weekly sessions and then streams them so people can catch up on these discussions. They are unlike anything else that I've seen in the industry because it literally is this hallway track where we sort of decoupled people from vendor relationships and allowed them to think through a ten year horizon in what's going on. And it's open, so people can show up and say I have opinions I have questions and be part of that conversation. It's been remarkable. I just have, I'm in awe at the community and the conversations. And they make excellent listening. I just learn stuff going back, going back through them and when I'm in the person too. Absolutely. And where can listeners learn more about rack and reckon a simple or ACK N dot com is your place to drop in and see more about infrastructure pipelines, download a trial for digital rebar try it on your own infrastructure. And show yourself how infrastructure is code could really be transformed into a development process. Absolutely. Rob, thanks for coming on software engineering daily. Kyle, I appreciate the questions this has been fantastic.

rob slipstream Amazon rob Rob Kyle
"hirschfeld" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

05:15 min | 7 months ago

"hirschfeld" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"And can I trigger something off of a state change? There's a couple different ways yes and there's everything we do as evented. And one of the things that we enable people to do is take an object that you want to watch and subscribe to the event stream for that object for that reason. So you can totally do that. You can also build triggers that come back and watch for objects to change in specific ways and then take additional action, or when they change for them, like we have a plugin for file beat. Which then can feed like an elasticsearch. And that can then say, oh, I'm going to monitor this class of equipment for this change in this field and then push that into another database. So yeah, everything we do is invented. So it's incredibly powerful what you can do with that. I'm wondering if there's a story for traceability. I'm imagining a certain area in which something bad has happened. The root cause is certainly a few weeks ago and I've got a digital archeology mission I have to undertake. How can you tooling help me? In a couple of ways and this is where in automation when I look at logging and what type of data I'm collecting, there's layers of action here. So we have sort of digital rebar logs where we know who took what on which machine with which permissions and sort of the classical role based off. And we also have a job logging system. And this is real time. So it's super fun to watch. If I'm running a terraform plan, digital rebar is running a terraform plan on my behalf, I can actually watch live as that terraform plan is run, even though it's running on the server. And I don't have to worry about logging out or being disconnected. It's going to keep happening. Servers managing that process. But I can see a lot of logs. In that job logging system, that information is incredibly helpful for diagnostics. So I can go back in time and say, okay, this job I had ran, it decomposed into all these components, and I can actually see exactly what happened through the course of that work stream. And figure out everything that had to get done, everything that was supposed to happen, what updates were made and things like that. Can generate a lot of data. One of our we had customer crossover 10,000 machines managed by a single digital rebar endpoint. And for them, their system had generated so many jobs. I was like billions of jobs. That we actually had to reorganize how we store jobs to accommodate that type of workload. Because they didn't want to throw away too much of that data to solve. I didn't want all of them. But they definitely needed to be able to say, yeah, I'm a bank. I care about seeing what happened with this system for a little while. And we also had a customer who pushed it all to elastic and then would start to do time based analytics. Why is this job taking longer? Why does this task take on average 30 seconds, but every once in a while take three minutes or ten minutes? That's incredibly powerful. When you can go back and say, okay, I have anomalies in my operational environment. You have the data to make that determination. And you can come back and actually resolve what's causing it. Because a lot of times anomalies like that are operational failures that are lurking in the background for you. If you start to start up that, I don't know, sells t-shirts or coffee mugs or something. I don't want to say you can be laxed about security and whatnot, but you know you can kind of adopt tools and that look too much under the hood. The antithesis must be true at a bank who has a bunch of worries that the average company doesn't have and has to ask a lot more questions than the average person. What's it like to make yourself available or exposed in the right way for banking technologists to look at the product and decide to adopt it? Transparency, transparency and transparency from that perspective. We have a design philosophy, and this is super important for opt for tech that's doing automation and provisioning and ops. Any magic is bad. So black box, it happened, I can't open up Y and look is fundamentally a problem. And this is one of the reasons why it's nice not to be a sass. When customers are running our software, they can see everything that's going on. They can see the logs. I don't have to worry about seeing some bank information or security number because it's not us. It's them. They already have jurisdiction. But for them, they actually need to be able to watch and see what's happened and go through that log and decompose the activity. It's really helpful for us when we go to troubleshoot because we can pull those you can pull those logs or have them send it, and we can a lot of times figure out what's going on. But that's been a key part of what we build and how we build it. Well, with any large distributed system, there's an adage we have to keep in mind that assume any component can fail at any time and everything has to kind of work out in some way. Can you describe what the failure experience is and how maybe digital rebar can help me get back.

"hirschfeld" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:37 min | 7 months ago

"hirschfeld" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Is they were all successful because they became enterprise ready. Becoming enterprise ready means adding security and compliance features required by enterprise IT admins. When you add these features, enterprise users can buy your product, and they'll buy a lot. These features unlock larger deals and faster growth. But enterprise features are super complex to build. They have lots of weird edge cases. And they typically require months or years of precious engineering time. Thankfully, there's now a better solution. Work OS is a developer platform to make your app enterprise ready. With a few simple APIs, you can immediately add common enterprise features like single sign on, SAML, SCI M user provisioning and more. Developers will find beautiful docks and SDKs that make integration of breeze. Or OS is trying to be like stripe for enterprise features. Work OS powers apps like webflow hop in Versailles and more than a hundred others. The platform is rock solid, fully socked to a compliant and ready for even the largest enterprise environments. So what are you waiting for? Integrate work OS today and make your app enterprise ready to learn more and get started, go to software engineering daily dot com slash work OS that software engineering daily dot com slash work OS. From.

"hirschfeld" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:29 min | 7 months ago

"hirschfeld" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"To handle the variation. The long answer, I can dig deeper if you want. There's a lot of moving parts. Absolutely. I mean, the state management is often a challenge for a lot of systems. Can you explore what my interactions as a developer are going to be? Do you make any consistency guarantees or maybe one of my typically going to store in my state? I'd be happy to. So what we've done and state management for us, this is actually one of the things that digital rebar had to do. Digital rebar is a self contained golang binary. We by design have no external dependencies when we install the system, which means we don't use a standard database. We actually built a database into digital rebar to handle the fact that some of the components a lot of the components in an environment are immutable and are uploaded as content packs and read only to an individual digital rebar server. And some of the pieces are very state specific. And when you build up a machine state, you build up that machine state. What we did was, instead of trying to create objects, this is a hybrid approach. There's a lot of things in the models machine model or cluster model or resource broker model. That are defined. Things that we know we need an address or a Mac address or what workflow you're doing or the name of the system. And there's also an incredibly flexible parameter system where you can add information to any system and define it, you can let it be at hawk, but you can also define exactly what it is and then build that up. And that parameter system combined with like, here's known things about my object, and here's known things about the parameter system allows us to do incredibly dynamic capabilities. So then we can say, all right, I'm in Amazon's cloud. There's information I need to collect for Amazon cloud so it's unique to Amazon. And there's some that's completely standard across all the clouds. And so you can define and set these parameters in a uniform way that is discoverable and understood across every infrastructure that we have. And you can also say, you know what, and there's some unique stuff too that I only care about if I'm an Amazon. And all of that because it's done with this parameterized system, you can make we actually use patch a lot in strictly HTTP speed, right? People are used to get put post delete. There's also strongly encouraged as a whole hour discussion. People to use patch in their APIs where you can make individual field changes to objects. And our whole system encourages that behavior. And so when I'm making an update to an object, you can make updates down to the very edge of that object and just that one thing. And test it to make sure that you haven't had a race where somebody else changed the same thing. But that thinking about state where we're not changing a machine object at a time, but we actually have a decomposed object where I can make incremental changes to sub components of its state for automation is transformative. We can do things and interact with other tools and manage data across life cycle in ways that are incredibly powerful. Here's.

rebar Amazon
"hirschfeld" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

06:07 min | 7 months ago

"hirschfeld" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"To extend and this is another one of our core missions. So let me back up a second. And if I could actually do this for the story from our original day. So when we were originally for rack end, we were a team at del charged to ship with shipping clouds from the Dell factories. So the idea is you buy a cloud dropship that you get a rack. Yeah, everything's great. And that was not that didn't work. It didn't work because every operational environment was different. And so by the time people started turning all that stuff on, the differences in their operational environments meant that we actually rebuilt every single rack to conform with the operational environment. And at first we were really frustrated and angry about that. And eventually we realized that was the reality of the system. And so what we had to do it rack in is find this balance between a whole bunch of stuff that works out of the box and that we can continue to maintain and patch and give you our automation. Standardized automation libraries. And give standard extension points and override components in places to inject configuration so that your unique and operating environment can be reflected back in the automation also. And that's the infrastructure as code magic. Of being able to say, all right, I'm using standard modules and a standard process and also added in the unique things that make my environment a little bit different. My IP range is my naming conventions the systems I have to interface with or data I have to pull in to make everything work. And the extent that we do that without then breaking it for you being able to patch and upgrade your automation process, that's taken years of refinement. Well, having the API is, I think, a fairly unique feature of your service. Do you have some typical use cases for how people do that? Part of another automation system on their end or a developer who's pulling that? Why an API I guess? Oh boy, my cofounder has always had this vision that the best use of our system is when it's fading into the background. That you can just count on it working and feeding and interacting with the systems around it. And that's a big part of how we look at operational environments. Nobody wants a person to have to put their thumb on a button to make operational logic work. It's really an anti pattern. And so we have a big media company that just hooked us into their CI CD infrastructure. They have a big Spinnaker, very big Spinnaker infrastructure. And we got involved with them because they wanted to repatriate some of their rendering workloads. And it also had to be done from a Spinnaker job. So when work happens, it goes through Spinnaker, Spinnaker calls us. It does the work and it calls it back. We have a game company. Exactly the same thing. And they only don't log in to the system very often. They can watch everything happen, transparency is really, really, really important to us and to our operators. But fundamentally, the process starts, it runs it ends and we're just feeding the system back and forth on either side of that. And that's a really important thing. Same thing with financial institution where they bring in racks of servers all around the globe. And they turn those servers on, they've already pre populated the inventory servers recognize their entry and then they go through a complete process to build a vCenter cluster with no additional interactions. And critically, and this is really important is if something doesn't match what it's supposed to do, the system stops raises a red flag and says, hey, you need to fix this before I do any additional work. And that in itself saves incredible amounts of time and money. Well, I'm curious about the core deployment this being able to run anywhere is it's got to be a challenge under the hood, that especially I guess the clouds, you know, they all, if they honor their posted APIs, that's maybe easier, but you have to code it prep three or four times. But bare metal, I mean, there's any operating system configuration. How do you test infrastructure like this? Oh boy, some of it's a battle scars and scar tissue and resilience from that perspective. We didn't reinvent like bios flashing tools or out of band management interactions and things like that. We use other vendors tools. So that's part of what we've been able to do here is have a very flexible way to handle, oh, wait a second, this raid controller is different than that rate controller or if you looked at the way we do cloud interfacing every single cloud is completely different. It's not just that their APIs are different. They're operational patterns are different. You have to build things in special ways for each cloud to make it consistent and repeatable. And so a lot of what we've done here is we've decomposed systems and collected data incrementally. So the way we handle state is really important to this whole model. And it's worth expanding a little bit. Our expectation for state is that we are not a single source of truth. Single source of truth, especially since everybody needs to be one as an anti pattern. Instead, when we build up state, we assume that it's evolving and being added to an incrementally updated. And so we can get state updates from outside of our system. We can build state over time during the workflow and handle the fact that we didn't know things when we started a process to when it was finished. And then all of the infrastructure is code components that go into that actually have typed variables. We have the options for ad hoc, but we encourage as an infrastructure as code platform, typed variables, and you can actually come in and say, this task requires me to have this information. And it's got to be in this schema so that you know that you're going into that place. But it's a combination of pulling all those pieces together to give you the.

Dell del
"hirschfeld" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

05:26 min | 7 months ago

"hirschfeld" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Well, another element from the news recently is we've had a pretty serious Amazon outage. It's got a lot of people thinking that maybe they need to be multi cloud. Is that a common path you're seeing and can rack and help me do that? Oh dear multi cloud is real. Although maybe not because of the Amazon outage. And we don't think of it as multi cloud. We think of it as multi infrastructure, which would sort of include hybrid, but the goal that we see customers wanting is they don't want to care about which infrastructure they're using. So multi cloud is about being able to abstract out the cloud to an extent so that they have portability. It doesn't mean that I'm running an app in three locations. So the Amazon outage, I don't think anybody's waking up and saying, oh, I really wish my Amazon application had parts of it running in another cloud because the reality is you're actually making the systems weaker because of the complexity of those systems. What they are waking up and seeing is, okay, did I assume not realize how connected I was into these different systems or am I more locked into Amazon than I might want to be or maybe I should instead of assuming that Amazon is the magic bullet to solve all of my operational woes, which it never was and we need to get over that cargo cult. But they're coming back and saying, wait in a second, maybe I have all this infrastructure and all this IT experience that I'm already using. Maybe I should make that better. Maybe I should slow down, so my role a little bit from that perspective. And those are healthy conversations for it. I do think the other component of the Amazon outage that people should be awake about is how complex the Amazon operating environment is. So we've been told for a long time Amazon is smarter than us. They're better than us. They wear capes when they're operators show up. They're just that much better and we should give up trying to be like Amazon and let them be like Amazon. One of the things that this outage exposes is Amazon's operating environment is much, much more complex and harder than any other companies operating environment is because they're operating at a different scale with a whole bunch of services they've chosen to connect together. And so I think and I hope that when companies look at Amazon's operational capabilities, they start thinking, wait a minute, I don't have to operate at the level Amazon does to be an excellent operator. And our hope is that this is sort of racket's mission that we are showing up with a whole bunch of out of the box proven processes and things that are wired together and best practices from global financial institutions and security aspects from hyperscale hosting providers and media companies. And when we have built something, you can just lean on it as working. But you're not leaning on us having to operate it. You have a degree of isolation and separation. Are there any compliance advantages to adopting your solution? There's a lot of compliance. One of the things so when we run, we don't run our software. We help our customers run it themselves. And to us, it's important to ask because I actually don't want my customer secrets and credentials and tokens and log messages running on my servers. That's always struck me as a problem. And the fact that sass companies take on that burden is always made me scratch my head when I sign up for any sass and give them credentials or secrets or special information. So there is a big degree where doing the operational work and having that sense of information and managing it yourself does reduce your compliance risk. Considerably, and there's a balance, right? You have your responsible for it, but you're responsible for it even if you sign a contract with the SaaS that says they absolutely would promise to not give it away. If they give it away, you're still your data. What's a typical onboarding like for a company that maybe doesn't have a solution today and decide they want to adopt who gets involved and how long does it take? So we work really, really hard on keeping things simple for that out of the box experience. So a lot of our prospects come on board, they get the system running in an hour. By the end of the day, they're doing pretty sophisticated operational tasks in a lab. And that is by design. We work really hard for that out of box pre wired components to work so that people can be productive. The challenge with operations is that that's really great for if you follow everybody else's pattern exactly and the hint is nobody ever follows everybody else's pattern exactly. And so from that sort of baseline, you do need to start learning enough to start to integrate your systems your operational environment into the way digital rebar does it or sort of vice versa. And we spend a lot of time creating easy ways to extend and this is another one of our core missions. So let me back up a second. And if I could actually do this for the story from our original day. So when we were originally for rack end, we were a team at del charged to ship with shipping clouds from the Dell factories. So the idea is you buy a.

Amazon del Dell
"hirschfeld" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

04:26 min | 7 months ago

"hirschfeld" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Log for J because and this isn't true for just log for J it's true for bios. It's true for routine patches. What we've enabled customers to do is have this end to end automated process. And one of the things that we encourage in our customers love is this idea of re paving their data centers. It's a ransomware component too, and regulatory for some of our large bank customers. But we allow you to say, you know what I need my system to reset itself. And you can push a button and tear down infrastructure, rebuild it and reset it back into the states that you want it to be or into a new state. And when you look at log four J, it's an example of across the industry. If you don't have a process by which you can quickly roll out infrastructure, configuration and patches and have it predictably used, then you're in real trouble. And fundamentally, that's what infrastructure pipelines are doing. If I could, it's very similar to what we talk about with ci CD. We're very excited about the ICD platforms that can take code and rebuild it and get new binaries. What we haven't seen yet is what digital rebar does for infrastructure pipelines, where you can do similar type of, oh, I need to roll my cluster or update and patch my systems and make that part of a routine. Oh, I have a new patch to roll out. There's an automated process that just takes it through that whole life cycle. So what are historically have companies done in lieu of having a solution? Oh, they've run around with their hair on fire. Frankly, or hope they don't get caught in the breach. I mean, this is a lot of times we just ignore these problems. There's been a series of drum beat of firmware patches even at chip chip level execution problems that should get patched. And a lot of times we just don't worry about it. We see people move very slowly through picking up new versions of software, even when they know their security vulnerabilities at stake. Long for J's unique. One in its breadth and also its severity. And people are realizing that systems that they didn't think they would have to patch or all of a sudden vulnerable. I hope that it's spawns a conversation about software life cycle, but really how you're doing these ongoing maintenance and process operations. Yeah, I've always found this sort of lack of concern in some organizations to be a bit shocking. Like if you're a startup and you have limited budget, I'm not saying that excuses you from having good security policies. But at least you're looking at some bottom line. If you're a large enterprise company, you can add one headcount and that might be all it takes to just do some basic pen testing sometimes. Why isn't this happening? Yeah, and I don't think it's a pen testing problem. It is a rollout. It's a pipelining problem. And there's a couple of reasons that I see that are endemic in the industry. One of them is that we are siloed organizationally. And so you get into cases where it's very, very hard to get teams to collaborate together because they each have their own responsibility for that. And because of that, and sometimes there's expertise reasons for it. Sometimes it's politics. Sometimes it's budget. Let's accept a stylus status quo. But we have turned around and built tools because it's easier to sell to asilo than it is to sell a cross silos. And I know this firsthand because racket is really a cross silo app tool. Our goal of building pipelines means you want people to collaborate. And so when we built things, we haven't worried about how do I hand off my terraform work to my ansible task. We built them as two different tools for two different teams and two different users. And nobody sort of got upset that you couldn't integrate those tools together easily. We did reckon said, wait a second. What we do has to connect all the dots together. And that's what makes these seamless interactions work. But as industry, it's so much easier to sell to make it all about the sales motion, not about the tech, but sometimes that's what it takes to get a tool ubiquitously adopted. Influx.

"hirschfeld" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

07:12 min | 7 months ago

"hirschfeld" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"It's not. You have to optimize the performance of the whole system. And sometimes that means that you actually should go slower and do work to support other groups or add in protections or more quality. Do those things, you running at a 100%. If everybody has that mentality, the whole system is actually much more fragile. And much more likely to break. Good note, yeah. So your cofounder at rac N, what is rec and do? Reckon is an infrastructure as code platform. And where software. So we're a little bit different in that we help companies run and operate infrastructure. So everything from bare metal data centers up to cloud infrastructure. And we do it in a way that lets them do it themselves. So customer autonomy is actually our driving mantra. So rather than taking operational control away from people, we're actually looking for ways to make it easier for them to maintain and run their infrastructure. So what does that look like from an engineer's perspective if I want a SQL Server database and two or three other things? How can I speak existence? That's where we talk about something of an infrastructure pipeline. Getting down to an application at the end of that pipeline is the final steps. So what we really focus on is not as much, how do I build SQL Server? There's good ways to do that. It's how do I prepare my environment so that when I go to do the SQL Server work, it just works reliably repeatedly on any infrastructure I want to choose. And so what that looks like, we have a software platform called digital rebar. And that software platform lets you assemble and connect together different infrastructure automation components in a sequence. What we would call a workflow. And then those workflow components are all infrastructure as code modules. So you pick and choose the components and modules that you want. They can use other tools like terraform or ansible or bash scripts or PowerShell. And then string them together into this end to end flow. And that actually starts. We have customers where that starts even before the server is delivered on their data center floor. It can start when they get a manifest and import the data for the manifest to tell the server what it should be when it's plugged in and turned on. And then for day two, they can then come back and say, oh, I need to rebuild and reset this infrastructure and take that all the way through the process. So as digital re bar a no code solution, it isn't and we really haven't tried to build it as no code. And there's a couple of good reasons for that. One is because of the operational aspect of automation that when operators do work, a lot of times they need to have the transparency and controls to fit that automation into their environment. So doing it as sort of drag and drop modules that you piece together can undermine your effectiveness as an operational platform that doesn't mean we don't have a lot of pre built components that then fit together and we have a lot of what I would call opinionated infrastructure pipelines that you start them and they just run all the way through the system. The value of having people like when I think of no code, I think of it as like I have a graph and I drop segments like I used to do and whale back visual basic programming. So click this to click that and yay. For us and in our experience, that's not as good an operational pattern for automation. Gotcha makes sense. When you look across adoption, is this something that maybe a software engineer feels empowered to do themselves or is it something maybe an IT or DevOps professional is building? Generally we're talking to DevOps professionals, but today, and I would actually say SREs from an SRE's perspective, coding and writing that automation is a big part of what they do and what they're trying to do. The thing that I would say is if you're looking from a development perspective. And this is an interesting question because there's definitely different rules of thought on some of the lower level infrastructure as code platforms, like halloumi, where it's very develop developer focused, write code, terraform, where it's very config file, write, build your ammo files and JSON files, oriented. We're actually very API focused. And so from our perspective, what the developer wants to be able to do is have an API, a declarative way to say, start this work, let it run, and there's a service that actually runs that work for you, and then you can monitor and check and watch things that are happening. So as a developer mindset, it very much becomes starting a domino chain if you want to think about, but the APIs that enable you to say, I need this thing to go and become something else at the end of that chain. And there's an interesting thing. This is why they're infrastructure pipelines. A lot of times what you want is I want to start an infrastructure pipeline with these settings, maybe run something on one cloud. And then you want to be able to say, I want to use that same pipeline. And this is where the infrastructure is code mentality is so important and where rack and is really about this reuse and portability concept. I'm going to take that pipeline and let it run on a different cloud or a different operating system. And as a developer, I want to be able to say this is a thing I can use. I can just start the pipeline and let it run and then copy it and reuse it and get the benefit of that modularity and reuse. And what about destinations? I mean, we talked about deploying to the cloud. There's lots of other places people want to ship code to these days. What's the reach that digital rebar can help me achieve? So we actually are one of the only products anywhere that has the depth, really the only that has the depth in bare metal and all the way down at the physical air on the infrastructure. So we have in our past automated everything from raspberry pies to regular server class enterprise class infrastructure that has clean very well thought out APIs and everything in between. That is ads a lot of useful complexity, if I will, to the operational environment, you can't take a server and say, you know, I want to ignore how the networks work or I want to ignore how storage works. You have to be able to adapt to that. But the ability to do that actually allows you to build a pipeline that abstracts it away. And then you can say, oh yeah, I'll rely on digital rebar to do the OS provisioning and set up The Rain bios and patch the systems and firmware and get all that stuff going. So I don't have to worry about that, even down to building ESXI clusters or installing virtualization platform. I know this is a bit of a non sequitur, but we're on the topic of what you're building for people. How has this recent log for J bug impacted you in some of your customers? Us personally we're everything we do is going. And so we have very minimal exposure from a Java perspective. Every one of our customers is scrambling to one extent or another, if not nothing else to prove that they're not affected. But what we do is absolutely critical for customers who are.

SRE
"hirschfeld" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:31 min | 7 months ago

"hirschfeld" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Things off, can you tell us a little bit about how you got your start in software? I would be happy to. I came at it from an engineering path, although it was always a software person. And I've sort of been trying to build software for a long time, but because I went through this engineering, specifically, industrial engineering, I'm very process focused in my outlook because of my background. I've never done a day of real industrial engineering. But when it comes to supply chain conversations and process and delivery pipelines, I actually have a lot of background in that that served me very well over my career. And this is going to be a difficult question, but is there any way you can encapsulate some of that wisdom in a fortune cookie? What are some of the lessons that someone with a computer science degree is maybe going to have to learn on the job? You know, I'm a big fan of gold rat and theory of constraints, which we talk about with lean software, although I think that people don't necessarily always understand that. And the fortune cookie to me is you can't run systems at 100%. And slack is not a bad thing in a system. As a matter of fact, it's a critical thing in a system. And one of the things I've seen with developers and developer productivity, the drum beat of make my developers more and more and more and more productive is that when you do that, you have a tendency to look at your time and your efficiency and what you do as the thing you have to optimize..

"hirschfeld" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

The Michael Berry Show

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"hirschfeld" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

"Three judge panel of the. Us court of appeals for the fourth circuit ruled that eighteen to twenty year olds do have second amendment rights to gun ownership which are violated by minimum age requirements. On purchases of of guns judge. Julius richardson wrote. Despite the weighty interest in reducing crime and violence we refuse to relegate either the second amendment or eighteen to twenty year olds to a second class status. Richardson was joined by judge. Steven george w bush appointee the challenge was brought by natalia. Marshall and tanner hirschfeld who were prohibited from purchasing firearms in virginia due to their age marshall nineteen had obtained a protective order against an abusive ex boyfriend who had been arrested for unlawful possession of a firearm and control substances court documents. Also state that marshall grew up training with guns and believes that a handgun makes the most effective tool for her protection. Due to its ease of kerry training in use hirschfeld was denied the opportunity to buy a gun when he was twenty but has since turned twenty one in his decision. Richardson noted that were required at the time of the founding to serve in the militia and furnish their own weapons militia laws are helpful because they provide a baseline for determining the relevant political community that enjoyed second amendment rights. They support the affirmative conclusion. That eighteen year olds are protected.

Us court of appeals Julius richardson Steven george w bush tanner hirschfeld marshall nineteen Richardson natalia Marshall virginia hirschfeld marshall kerry
On this day: Karl M. Baer legally recognized as male

This Day in History Class

04:09 min | 1 year ago

On this day: Karl M. Baer legally recognized as male

"Hello and welcome to the podcast. I'm tracy wilson and it's january eighth. Carl m bear was legally recognized as mail on the stay in one thousand nine hundred. Seven bear was born to a german jewish family in eighteen eighty five and after his delivery the midwife said to his mother something along the lines of congratulations on the birth of your lovely daughter but the midwife had a different conversation with carl's father saying that this newborn babies body was ambiguous and that it wasn't clear whether she should call the baby male or female today we might have described him as intersex so the family went to see a doctor and added that when they registered carl's birth they would register him as a girl and give him girls name. But as carl grew up he had a very clear sense of his own self. He later described himself as a boy who was being raised as girl and his own writing he said quote one may raise a healthy boy in a womanish manner as one wishes and a female creature as manish never will. This caused their senses to remain forever reversed and his growing up was not easy at all. He was expected to play with girls but he didn't feel like a girl and the girls also seemed to suspect. Somehow he wasn't one of them not only did he not like most of the pastimes that were considered to be appropriate for girls but the girls in his community excluded him from playing with them his behavior and his interests and as he grew into a teenager his appearance and voice were more in line with what was expected of boys than what was expected of girls in one thousand nine hundred four at the age of nineteen he moved to hamburg. He studied sociology. He started working as a social worker and was also part of feminist organisations including campaigning against the trafficking of women he was also active in the jewish service organization beneath breath that same year. He started introducing himself to people as a man. He changed stress and no longer tried to hide his more masculine physical features and then in the midst of all this. He was injured in a tram accident when he was taken to the hospital. Doctors immediately noticed that his i d did not match the name or the gender that he gave to them. When he was admitted they ultimately contacted magnus hirschfeld of the institute for sexual science which was a research institute medical facility and an advocacy organization for what we would describe. Today as lgbt rights hirschfeld described bear as a case of quote erroneous sexual attribution. He and other doctors at the institute felt that bear would benefit from having surgery. It's what we would today describe as gender affirmation surgery after receiving hormone treatments bear had a series of surgery is starting in one thousand nine hundred six and this made him one of the first people to have surgery for this reason on january eighth of one thousand nine hundred seven. He was legally recognized as mail and was issued a new birth certificate that same year. He published a semi-fictional autobiography called memoirs of a man's maiden years and he published that under the pseudonym nfo body but it was widely known that he was the author of this work on october tenth of that year he got married although his wife died of pneumonia about a year and a half later and he got remarried later on bear continued to work as a social activist in berlin until nineteen thirty seven including becoming the director of the berlin lodges of buzney breath but then in nineteen thirty seven. He was captured by nazis and tortured after settling his affairs as quickly as he could. He fled germany and moved. To what would later become israel. He lived a quiet life there as an insurance agent and he died in nineteen fifty-six

Carl Tracy Wilson Carl M Bear Manish Magnus Hirschfeld Institute For Sexual Science Hamburg Hirschfeld Berlin Pneumonia Germany Israel
Kid Press Conference with Governor Phil Scott

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

03:58 min | 2 years ago

Kid Press Conference with Governor Phil Scott

"Peter Hirschfeld Nice to talk with you. Good to talk with you Jane and I have to tell you I'm so excited to hear what questions the kids are going to have the governor today. Yeah me, too. I hope he's prepared. Can you explain just first of all what a reporter is and generally what a reporter does! We have pretty fun jobs. I have to admit because we spend all day learning about things that are happening in our towns in the state in the country, and even the world sometimes, and then we write stories based on what we've learned so that we can get people information that in some cases might be really important to them. In order to do that job, we have to be kind of like collectors of information. And sometimes we collect that information by reading things like government documents for example sometimes we get information by talking to people like legislators or mayors or the governor, people in our communities or sometimes expert who can help us understand different topics that we might not know that much about sometimes we get information just by going to places and watching things like a select board meeting in a local town or going to the State House to watch committees. They're make big decisions. or maybe going to to something like a protest is to learn more about what people are upset about. We have what we call a representative democracy in the united. States in that means we elect people to Serb government, and they make really important decisions about how our society is going to work and reporters tried to do is get people all the information. They needed so that they can decide whether their government is doing a good job. And sometimes when reporter learns about things that maybe aren't going so well. It allows the people who read their stories to. Ask and demand changes and improvements. Can I highlight one word that you said because I to just make sure we're clear on this, you said reporters write stories. This is not the kind of story that is fiction that is made up or not true. What a reporter does has to be based on fact so when you say you write a story, you're writing something that incorporates what you've heard from other people what you know to be true and what you have found out. You're not making things up, and you're not really sharing your opinion. What's the difference between factual reporting and just telling someone what you think about something? Yeah, that's exactly right Jane, so this isn't the kind of story that you would read in a picture book for example or A novel. That is fiction What reporters are doing? Is discovering facts and information, and then just using those facts in that information in the stories that they right so even though we call them stories or not, the kinds of stories you might find. In! Some of the books you read it school. One way I like to think about it is. There's a big difference between I. Think and what I know and reporters stick to telling people what they know. Bar Job is to give the public facts and information so that they can make their own opinions about things. Get an example of something that's happening right now. Governor Scott, who you're going to be talking to assume wants to make some budget cuts next year because Vermont government doesn't have as much money coming in, but a lot of legislators that work in the state. House, don't WanNa make budget cuts because they say there's going to be a lot of people that have a lot of needs and budget got is when you think you have a certain amount of. Of money to spend, but then actually you're only allowed to spend a little less than that. That's right. You don't have as much money as you thought you were going to have so the job of the reporter in telling that story isn't the tell people who's right or wrong. The governor or the legislature. The reporter's job is to collect as much information as possible about their proposals explain to people what those proposals would do and what they would mean. In then explained the potential consequences of those proposals, but then lead up to other people to decide what they think is the right thing to do.

Reporter Jane Peter Hirschfeld Governor Scott State House Representative Vermont
Book alleges Trump called for shooting immigrants at border

Pat Gray Unleashed

05:07 min | 3 years ago

Book alleges Trump called for shooting immigrants at border

"I was fascinated with this story story of president trump apparently at a meeting now this is according to the hill and the New York Times New New York Times reported this and the hill included it in in on their website as well but president trump suggested having being illegal immigrants shot in their legs during the March meeting with the White House advisers in the Oval Office. Supposedly the The Times report is based on interviews with more than a dozen White House administration officials involved in that week of meetings and apparently this stuff is going to be in some new book called from Michael Shear and Julie Hirschfeld Davis border wars inside trump's assault on immigration. It comes out on the eighth so next week. It doesn't sound Bassett. All know doesn't doesn't border wars inside trump's assault bolt on immigration assault. Yeah maybe on immigration not illegal immigration mind you so the AIDS told the The Times that trump's suggested to advisers during the Oval Office meeting we should do is we. We should shoot him in the leg to slow amount. Don't I know it's true but it sounds like him doesn't not I I could hear him say like just shoot him. In the leg is what I mean. Yeah just shoot him in the leg would not slow him down. Why can't we we do that. Officials who spoke to the Times also recalled know what's next that often suggested suggested we fortify the border wall with essentially a moat. Oh stocked with snakes and alligators uh-huh. I mean we just we dig. A water filled trench. We'll put some alligators snakes it then if they cross they get eating and and if this is shocking to you to hear me overton window here. It's not like he said. Let's put out there at the border right here and say right land mines or anything like that. He's just saying it's it's very medieval. I mean I don't know if this note. We don't know if this I really would. He said a lot of people are saying he did and it does kind of sound like I'm sure and a moat might be pretty I might a what a front it's been suggested jokingly oh kingly by many sure probably including us but he also apparently wanted the wall electrified with spikes spikes on top pierce human flesh. Maybe oh my bad you. We read the story would advisers told trump. Some of his suggestions were illegal. He got pissed. You're making me look like an idiot. I ran on this. It's my the issue well so there you go some some interesting ideas on how to get a hold of get some control at the border shoot him in the leg. Okay create a moat and fill it with alligators K. or just a liquid electrify the wall and put spikes that compares human flesh at the top of them. That'd be harder party to get over the top. Okay you know it's past ask Democratic Congress. He says that the make sure the fence. This electrified fence is powered by green energy right and then. Maybe they'll be on board. Lord and everybody's happy sounds like a fun read though yeah does it does fun. I don't know I'm not totally on board with it right but again. It's a concept yes. It's a it's a starting place. We haven't Seen No. We're not going to get the mode with the alligators electrified fence and the spikes go through human flesh. Here's an idea though let's do something that's the table. Let's at least put the wall up. Maybe that's what he was doing. These meetings is overton window in them and say okay. We won't all right. We won't shoot him in the threaten this plan lend maybe maybe actually just get a wall fund the wall and we won't have to shoot him in the leg now. You don't fund the wall where to shoot them in the late. Yeah that's right. That's you got three. We days come up with a different plan or we're going forward with the shoot. 'em. At least at least make him think that right. I'm in favor of him doing that. Reagan did the Gorbachev Right. Yep Do that to the wall. We got this star wars system and we can shoot down all all of your missiles so you might as well not even fire a mattis you might as well not even deploy him anymore.

Donald Trump New York Times Assault Oval Office Bassett President Trump White House The Times Democratic Congress Aids Michael Shear Julie Hirschfeld Davis Reagan Gorbachev
Mojave Desert, California And Fresno discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:54 sec | 3 years ago

Mojave Desert, California And Fresno discussed on Morning Edition

"The shaking has died down from those two big earthquakes that hit the Mojave Desert this holiday weekend but across southern and even central California which also felt the quakes nerves are frayed they're still talking in Fresno it went on for ever I started talking to the person next to me I it could have been a good minute or more that's Kelly Miller who was in a grocery store parking lot when the seven point one quake hit on Friday night and here's Derek Lou who was unpacking in his new house and resting on the couch when the second quake hit in a little bit but there's more exciting I would say because we don't get much action on here heard things moving and was like whoa just a quick the tremors even made it to go leader near Santa Barbara along the coast Katie Hirschfeld was sitting on a log by a campfire when she realized what was happening and it was like a swaying motion so

Mojave Desert California Fresno Kelly Miller Derek Lou Tremors Santa Barbara Katie Hirschfeld
"hirschfeld" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

03:33 min | 3 years ago

"hirschfeld" Discussed on EconTalk

"Would you. Would you be in favor of tariffs to protect jobs for workers who are going to lose their livelihood in the face of foreign competition? Is that a more humane economy than one that allows free trade? I did not have an answer that question. I. 'cause it's hard and there's trade-offs and also a good daughter of the church, I have to deal with the fact, the church is in favor of open borders. So. But I want us to be very, I don't want to accept a logic that says, if we open up the borders, we will get more stuff in. That's the reason why we should open up the borders. I just always wanted to come back and our thinking to what serves human flourishing in an important component of human flourishing human community and all the rest. So if opening up the borders or opening up free trade ends up causing jobs to be shipped out, so certain communities, hemorrhage jobs. And then break down that just has to be in our calculus now is that Trump card also. I don't think so. I mean, there's, there's obviously good from trade. We sure as heck wanna have it, I've not for local only market or anything like that. But beg. Yeah. The only thing I would add and plenty of people want to put it in there is, let's not just do this in terms of economic costs and benefits because there's a lot more involved and start to think through see logically speaking. I don't think the church has yet really grow. I don't know of good way of balancing the goods of building up local communities that have their own integrity with the goods of being openness to the stranger. Right. And they're two kinds of goods, and they're both matter and they can come into conflict, so, so I don't have a one-size-fits-all answer to that question. But I'm not unsympathetic to the people that are worried about what's happening to local communities as a result of free trade and open immigration. It's it seems to me that, that your concerns, even as you say, is your groping toward a away of say balancing, those issues that the voices of communists of your flavor should be in the conversation. It seems to me that economists have spent way too much time arguing for trade, what I think of the wrong reasons which are that what's fish int he got more stuff the pies bigger. But to me, it should be about dynamism in the opportunity. Ity for each generation to mold their dreams and desires to the markets creatively. And, and so people who are aware of these trade-offs, but who also understand markets, like to see your voice get a little more. So that's good. Yeah. Not nick. It's you just want to have it to be part of the give, and take it's not meant to displace. It's just too. I would really like economics move to a place where they retain their insights about how markets work about how incentives work, but start integrating it with these other perspectives about what human flourishing really consistent and I think there would be a lot of really interesting purell work along these boundaries. So it would be great if that started to happen. I guess that as Mary Hirschfeld her book, is clients and the market. Mary, thanks for being part of Konta. Thank you risk..

Mary Hirschfeld Trump Konta nick
"hirschfeld" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"hirschfeld" Discussed on EconTalk

"Wonderful services and to raise the non monetary rewards. You know, the smoky examples really interesting then thought about it before, but you left out something in your summary, which was that it came to be believed that it killed you earlier than you, otherwise would die and, and. But you right, the right point, which is that, that incentive which was an incentive was also went along with a cultural view of smoking that it simply wasn't cool, and not because it kills you I was selling more than that. It wasn't just. Oh, it's really cool, but be carefully kills you. It was as it's an ugly habit. And I think they both happened together, which is which is interesting. I could actually speak to the personal. I was a smoker. And I certainly knew all of the terrible things that was going to do to my health, but I liked smoking and that was by itself, never, ever gonna change my behavior. But change, my behavior was the social stigma become became unbearable fascinating. So interesting, you, you have an remarkably unusual of academic career in the middle of your career as economist you decided to get a PHD in theology. At Notre Dame having a PHD from Harvard economics onto your belt already. And in the course of that you studied Cima quietness quite a bit of a deadly. Has it changed your behavior as a consumer notice? It I'm not I'm not suggesting they don't notice. It, it, it did it did make a difference. It can make a difference without noticing it. But I'm curious if you notice it. I love that. You ask that question. Yes, it made a difference. It took cut been working on this way of seeing the world for fifteen years now. And it took a while. So it really is a conversion but no, I, I no longer need a raise. Like I really am happy with what I have, and it changes, how I you know, I walk into my house, and I just I'm much more able to look at it and go. This is nice, like you know, gay. So the kinds of decisions, I make have certainly changed my orientation what's important in life is as really changed..

Cima Harvard fifteen years
"hirschfeld" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

04:26 min | 3 years ago

"hirschfeld" Discussed on EconTalk

"Rubber hits the road in this kind of argument. Now you would you argue that it's immoral to monetize the donation of a body part. I'm worried about it. So I'm not prepared to endorse or condemn. I am worried about so for me, that's, Nope. In question. Let's say for the sake of argument that, that I don't have a problem with monetize ING it. They're still a real question about whether paint people, I mean, giving up a kidney seems like a major sacrifice a hard thing to do. And maybe get more of it, if you pay people, but maybe get even more of it, if you somehow socially, acknowledged it, as a heroic, noble, lovable, Fakher, Feis, and that to the degree that you monetize, it, then it becomes, oh, she just did it for money, and he may actually have a perverse effect. We get fewer kidneys and not more and send out points to a few studies on smaller issues like Israeli daycare center, where when you bring incentives you actually get the perverse incentive perverse effect that you get less of what you were trying to get because you also inadvertently undermined the norms. I don't know if you need me to spell out that particular example, but there was a day. Care center. Parents were coming late. They were getting irritated. So they just decided to start charging the parents for coming late. And it turned out that parents came even later. And, and what seems to have happened is once you convert coming latest something, you can buy people just by more of it. And, and you have thereby undermined the norm that says out of respect for the daycare workers, I should come pick up my kid on time. So let you mentioned that example, because it is the single most frequently mentioned example that I despise. Okay. And really dislike so I'm gonna let me give my reaction to that, that is what I say is. It's the most common it gets quoted so San del quotes it. I think you quote it your book. Right. Did you mention the book I think he did? No, I did. And Bowles does end Dan pink. Does we talked about it on, on his, I think, was Dan, we talked about on his one of the times I've interviewed him? And I, I just want. To say a couple things about it, and then I'm going to give you a little bit of agreement for it's worth. So. I think. If they had picked a large enough fine. They wouldn't have seen an increase in people being late. They would've picked seen a reduction. So I don't think you wanna say as one should say, as a general principle that substituting money for norms is counterproductive. I think it depends on what you pick a correctly. I think the fundamental claim the paper which is just a hypothesis that when you convert something money, you reduce the impact of the norm could be true. You know, but you just need to pick a bigger, the more mental point, which is made by L Rubinstein the Israeli games there. I think we talked about it in his by a conversation, 'cause I just found his critique so entertaining is that two people who did that study says two things about it one, the actual researchers weren't on the on the ground. They had graduate students or research assistants collect the data, which is a little bit weird because you don't know exactly, whether it was correct could collected correctly. That's number. One. Number two, he said, if you think you can make an Israeli pay a fine at five seven. When they show we're supposed to show up at five and they're charged so many pounds, Isreaeli currency for, for being late, one ninth of our said, you're crazy. No Israeli would pay that fine. It just ain't happened to the daycare center. So he expressed some cultural skepticism of this fact, now having said that, that just my pet peeve about ninety having said that I could imagine I like your first point I agree with one hundred percent rather than quote, oh, it's easy. We just have to raise the return in financial sense. You do have an alternative of creating a social reward honor dignity pride there other ways to motivate people..

Dan pink L Rubinstein Bowles Isreaeli San del one hundred percent
"hirschfeld" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"hirschfeld" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Asked I guess, you know, what is for Allah? Did he hung up the phone finished? But I the left as apartment so he could spend Sunday digging a grave for John Fitzgerald Kennedy. This became one of the most famous newspaper columns ever written by an American it's taught in many journalism schools, and the reason is because it contains the most important lesson for a reporter on a story get away from the pack. Find a fresh angle use your wits. To bring something new and different to the reader. And if you do that, you can distinguish yourself in the business, New York, tabloid journalism was sort of the canary in the coalmine for the the collapse of the daily newspaper economy in this country, and one of the great moments of foreshadowing was when a developer, I think it was named Abe Hirschfeld bought the New York Post, and the first thing he did was fire pays editor and chief, Pete Hamill. This was in the nineteen nineties when newspapers were kind of hemorrhaging cash, and we're changing hands a lot. But this was a sort of a symbol of taking somebody who was absolutely beloved in New York journalism, Pete Hamill and throwing them out on his ear, and then lying about it and claiming that he didn't this is what happened when Hirschfeld told workers he didn't fire Hamel..

Abe Hirschfeld Pete Hamill New York New York Post John Fitzgerald Kennedy reporter developer editor
"hirschfeld" Discussed on The Moth

The Moth

03:10 min | 3 years ago

"hirschfeld" Discussed on The Moth

"Massachusetts where he lives and now everything starts happening very quickly. I'm still in Los Angeles. And I'm actually in my hotel room, and I'm preparing to leave as well. And then the phone rings, Aloha Tammy. I just want you to know that last night our mother read Hirschfeld passed away. And we just I mean, we feel really terrible about this. I mean, we're really sad. We're really sorry. And we're selling the condo. And and I just want to wish you know, you and your family, good luck and God health, and and Aloha. So now, my father this deal that we made with a home healthcare worker is mood because my father has no home and the hospitals ready to release my father, but he is nowhere to go. And I immediately call my big brother, and he mmediately starts scrambling to find some sort of civility that will take care. Of my father and will receive him in a very short period of time, and I'm in Los Angeles. And I'm really kind of freaking out and I'm stalling the hospital, and they're getting really mad at me because it's a hospital and they're explaining it's not a nursing home. And I can't drive, and I'm in my brother calls me, and he finds a place, and this is going to take my father, and this is a big relief. So I call up the airlines my call United, and I'm looking for what's called a compassion discount fare and the woman on the phone the United woman on the phone. She was very nice, but she explained to me that United doesn't offer compassion. They only offer bereavement. So if your father still alive, I'm sorry, but we can't help you. But when you're father does die please feel free to call United. And then we'll be able to take care of men. Okay. So I ended up we're flying American and it's morning of the flight, and I show up at the hospital, and it's quite early in the morning and the hospital sort of empty and I arrive at my father's room. And he's all the beds all made in my father's all dressed up. But the odd thing is the way. My father's dressed. He's wearing sort of a flannel shirt, and he's wearing these suspenders and this kind of baseball cap, and this does not suit. My father does not illustrate my father personally at all. I mean, there's nothing to do with my father was a nightclub owner, and then he was a car salesman. And he does this is generic grandpa aware. And also my father's a Jew, and they don't wear those sorts of things benders flannel shirts, and it was very strange, and I was very uncomfortable with it because I thought that my father was sort of losing a sense of identity through this aging process and people were buying him clothes, and they didn't know who he was pulled off the cap, and I pulled up the suspenders we'll my father out to the nursing station. And and I'm signing him out. You know, then they're giving me like medication and dosage. Instructions, and and they're very kind and then they start stuffing. My carry on luggage with diapers. These adult diapers which is completely unprepared for but I didn't have time to ask any questions and we had a plane to catch. So I'm rolling my father out of the hospital, and and then like dead. Oh, by the way, do you know where we're going, and he says, yeah, we're going back east and sort of laughs diabolically like I'm springing from the penitentiary or something so okay?.

Los Angeles salesman Massachusetts Hirschfeld
"hirschfeld" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"hirschfeld" Discussed on KCRW

"Well, they have this thing coyotes networks, which is the name of the building this project blowed is the name of the establishment is an open mic night, the longest running open mic night for rap in the world. And they have a thing where they chum please post the mic an exposed to be respectful, but I've been down there. And when you hear it in person is no very respectful of your bombing. And they don't shut up just can actually sound very aggressive. If you're challenge it off the stage and was he not nine I think he heard his footsteps that knowing when he walked off. I think it was out of respect. So he couldn't still going back. He went down every week for for a couple of years and did his raps improve. Did he go to mental in the rapper chorus one? Yeah. Who's a very famous rocker you he's one of the east coast. He's from the Bronx. But is very well known in Los Angeles. He wrote the seminal rap hip sounded the place, and he met Dr Sherman Hirschfeld Rapa, then took him under his wing, and he gave him rap lessons, and he told him that he fooled that he was the future of wrap this older man was the future of rap but had in common. What what do they have in common? Both spiritual. So another side effect of the stroke is the doctor became really philosophical and really sensitive really into Buddhism. Religion really in touch with his Jewish. Heritage terrorists wants to sing he grew up on the streets. And he he had this relationship with the hurry Krishna people in New York writes a lot about philosophy and wrap. So really they were they were kinda two sides of the same coin reu- able to ever hear any of his wrappings his wraps his recordings if he recorded anything he never made a record. He was strictly underground. Surreptitiously recorded him or anything like that. There is some video footage on a camcorder. The though I heard he's very raw. It's not what you would understand is being know good rap. It's not Drake is not Eminem. But he's rhyming is very elementary. But one thing you can say about the doctor is he really really enjoyed it. He did wrap a little bit in that same Canadian broadcast that radio show. The quality is not good. But let's listen to a bit.

Dr Sherman Hirschfeld Rapa Los Angeles Krishna Drake New York
"hirschfeld" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"hirschfeld" Discussed on KCRW

"Went down every week for for a couple of years and did his raps improve. They did he got a mental in the rapper one. Yeah. Who's a very famous record. He's one of the east coast. He's from the Bronx. But is very well known in Los Angeles. He wrote the seminal rap hit sounded the place, and he met Dr Sherman Hirschfeld a Rapa then and he took him under his wing, and he gave him rap lessons, and he told him that he thought he was the future of wrap this older man was the future of rap but had in common. What what are they have in common with both, very spiritual? So another side effect of the stroke is the the doctor became really philosophical and really sensitive. He got really into Buddhism religion, really in touch with his Jewish heritage terrorist wants to single he grew up on the streets. And he he had this relationship with the hurry Krishna people in New York writes a lot about philosophy and wrap. So really, they were they were kind of two sides of the same coin you able to ever hear any of his wrappings his wraps his recordings if he recorded anything he never made a record. He was strictly underground. Surreptitiously recorded him or anything like that. There is some video footage on a camcorder. The I thought I heard he's very rule. It's not what you would understand is being you know, good rap. It's not Drake is not Eminem. But he's rhyming is very elementary. But one thing you can say about the doctor is he really really enjoyed it. He did wrap a little bit in that same Canadian broadcast that radio show. The quality is not good. But let's listen to..

Dr Sherman Hirschfeld Los Angeles Krishna Drake New York