35 Burst results for "Hiroshima"

A Kennedy is on the ballot in Massachusetts. Here's why he's not guaranteed a victory.

Erin Burnett OutFront

03:47 min | 2 weeks ago

A Kennedy is on the ballot in Massachusetts. Here's why he's not guaranteed a victory.

"And out front up next we're. Just. From one of the most closely watched primaries this year a young Kennedy on the ballot in Massachusetts but can he unseat a seventy four year old incumbent? Because it's about ideas I am the youngest guy. In. This race. Tonight and the fight for twenty twenty a usual dynamic emerging Massachusetts ahead of tomorrow's Democratic Senate primary. The incumbent in his seventies was support from progressives, his challenger young and Kennedy Manu. Raju is out front. The Hiroshima Political Dynasty the grandson of the leap Robert F Kennedy campaigning to serve in the Senate like his famous great uncles and grandfather before him the. Certainly. I think you're doing great job. Hello. The candidate he's right there. For Life Magazine. Thirty nine year old Joe. Kennedy is facing something unexpected. Seventy four year old senator who has been in Congress for almost forty four years. Has Managed to galvanize support of young voters. Ahead of Tuesday's Massachusetts Senate primary I think that a lot of young people that are our age at least. From from our town have been similarly really inspired by Ed Markey polls show Senator Ed Markey as the favourite threatening to make the four term. The first Kennedy to lose a race in Massachusetts unlike other primaries this year were democratic incumbents have been ousted by liberal newcomers. Marquis has managed to turn that dynamic on its head because it's about ideas. I am the youngest guy. In this race Alexandria, it's been murky seizing the mantle of the insurgent, touting his support of liberal causes at the green new deal and endorsement of the progressive firebrand. Alexandria Cossio Cortes such the green new deal that I introduced Alexandria Cossio. Healthcare justice is on the ballot. That's Medicare for all that I next the Bernie. Sanders. When he introduced it yet, it's been Kennedy with the badging of the party establishment leader Speaker Nancy Pelosi Allies have been frustrated that marquee has not been held to account for full record over four decades like his backing of the Iraq war in two thousand and two the NAFTA deal in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, three, his position on racial issues like school desegregation dating back to the nineteen seventies progressive willing to look those hurdles that's up to a progressive movement. Out. I think an awful lot of folks in many parts of Massachusetts have a different view of that records and what that means to our communities after going door to door in working class Boston neighbors weekend. Kennedy. Accused Marquis of abandoning the state. He's been less time in the state than anybody else delegation in an interview with CNN Marquis fired back there is. No real record of Congressman Kennedy in his eight years leading on issues of of generational change in Washington Kennedy has waited until late in the campaign to stress that it's his family I. Guess It's a fighting. His blood wants to continue in the Senate tried to be really clear that it's GonNa Balance It's not my father, my grandfather brothers or anybody else and. You vote for me you're going to get now Kennedy does pull off an upset on Tuesday night it could be thanks in part to the fact that he is allies have spent more on television advertising than Markey and his allies roughly two million dollars more. But if he loses what Kennedy will do next still an open question we posed that question to him he didn't want to entertain it and said, he looks forward to running through the finish line and celebrating on Tuesday night.

Congressman Kennedy Kennedy Manu Massachusetts Senator Ed Markey Robert F Kennedy Marquis Massachusetts Senate Senate Democratic Senate Alexandria Cossio Alexandria Hiroshima Political Dynasty Senator Life Magazine Raju CNN Speaker Nancy Pelosi Iraq Sanders
"hiroshima" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:06 min | Last month

"hiroshima" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Some of them had flesh hanging from their bodies. I. Mean he saw just unspeakable sites as he ran into the city because he had a wife and infant daughter, he wanted to to find his parishioners. The closer he got towards the detonation. The worst the scene was I mean, the the ground was just littered with scalded bodies and people who were trying to drag themselves out of the ruins and wouldn't make it. You know there were walls of fire that consuming the areas of enormous firestorm was starting to consume the city. He. Just. At one point was picked up by a whirlwind because wins had been unleash throughout the city and and these tornado. whirlwinds and he was lifted up in a red hot worldwide and then dropped from a a height of about eight eight feet i. mean it was just. Unbelievable that he survived not only the initial blast, but then heading into city centre and the extreme trauma of having witnessed what he witnessed it's it's remarkable that he that he came out of it alive right and he meant he mentioned grabbing some cushions and meant dousing them with water to try and get through the flames and find his family he did find his wife and daughter. It was again another another near Miracle somehow his wife and child had been in their house which collapsed on them upon detonation they'd somehow been managed somehow managed to escape and as Reverend. Tanimoto is tearing hysterically through the city centre looking for survivors he runs into his wife who's in a blood-stained dress and just making your way out of the neighborhood with their baby in there in in her arms trying to find any respite but it's unclear to any of them where where there's going to be any kind of place to escape from the flames. Eventually, the family does make its way to a park on the outskirts of the city and the park was at one time. The. Manicured beautiful top Garden and becomes a scene from hell survivors make their way into it in the ground is just. Frankly. It's just slick with corpses and that's where were they. They're able to seek refuge. Did many of the people that he spoke to seemed to be suffering from Rizzi radiation poisoning. Yes and he was able to including Reverend Tanimoto had been very sick with what you know. He called in in his own diary. The disease is They still really didn't understand. They understood what what at that point you know what had happened is that they had taken to their bodies an enormous amount of radiation at during the blast. There was still no way to treat them. Japanese doctors were completely at a loss seeming. Sometimes, they would give them vitamin injections and it would have terrible terrible effects. Father Klein's Orga who was the German priest who had been her sees main entree to the blast survivor community also had been horrifically ill the young widow who Hersi also profiled. Mrs. Nakamura you know she and her children were all. Wracked with radiation poisoning and been throwing up since the early hours of escaping. So one of the things that Hersi did in detailing. In really in excruciating detail the the after effects of having received these. Astronomical amounts of radiation was he was showing the world that these were not conventional weapons and they were not as a General Leslie Groves told Congress earlier earlier a few months earlier that they were not. They did not give blast survivors quote a very pleasant way to die and quote. The general actually said that to Congress the dying of radiation poisoning is very pleasant way today. Yes I know that John Hersi went back decades later to to revisit and a lot of the these people were still alive head they suffered from. Medical Effects, most of their lives from the radiation. In varying degrees yes fighter cleanser..

Reverend Tanimoto John Hersi Congress Mrs. Nakamura Leslie Groves Father Klein
"hiroshima" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

03:20 min | Last month

"hiroshima" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Also you know obviously people are seeing the mushroom cloud photos taken from from the bombers themselves from recon missions and. but in terms of the radiation, even in the announcement. Truman's Dowsman of the of the bomb. He's painting the bombs in conventional terms. He says, you know these bombs are the equivalent to twenty thousand tons of TNT, and so Americans you know they they don't understand they know that it's a mega weapon, but they don't understand the full nature of weapons. Yeah. You know the radiological effects are not. In any way. Highlighted to the American public. In the meantime, the US military is scrambling to find out you know the how the you know the radiation of the bombs is affecting the physical landscape, how it's affecting human beings because they're about to send tens of thousand occupation troops into Japan. So they you know they're sending their own RECON missions? In late August of nineteen, forty, five onto the ground to Hiroshima national hockey to to see if they can in good conscience clear..

Truman TNT US Japan
Nagasaki urges nuke ban on 75th anniversary of US A-bombing

WBZ Morning News

00:51 sec | Last month

Nagasaki urges nuke ban on 75th anniversary of US A-bombing

"City of Nagasaki, marking the 75th anniversary of the U. S atomic bombing on August 9th, the city's mayor and a dwindling number of survivors Calling on world leaders to doom or to bring a nuclear weapons ban. It was at 11 02 AM Nagasaki survivors stood in silence, marking the moment in American B 29 dropped a £10,000 a plutonium bomb. Dubbed Fat Man. More than 70,000 were killed three days earlier. On August 6th, the US dropped a bomb on Hiroshima in the first ever nuclear attack, killing 140,000 people. Japan surrendered on August 15th marking the end of World War two. Many survivors of the two bombings developed cancer and other illnesses from exposure. To radiation.

Nagasaki Hiroshima United States Japan U. S
"hiroshima" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

The Daily Zeitgeist

08:01 min | Last month

"hiroshima" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

"Mean. That man come on what are the fourteen words is that the? Area. Hiroshima and Nagasaki are trending. Yeah. Well, why are they trending miles man? Well, you know. Just historically between the sixth and the ninth or when the two bombings took place in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Respectively and yeah, it's it's A. It's an interesting sort of. To look at history such a, you know the only time we've used nuclear weapons you know in a civilian context in a war context a, but also a reminder that we also have two very large superpowers with nuclear arms in China, and India also in conflict and it just the you know the idea of nuclear disarmament is really really important it's it's some of the most horrific should you can see And it's I to me. This is a very D- sort of resonates with me because I've told destroying and like other podcasts before but if for my family specifically, my grandparents lived in. Tokyo. But all of the firebomb it like the bombings of Tokyo pretty much. Anymore, there was nothing to live for and my grandparents were had to flee Tokyo. Because they had nowhere to go They had family in a town called me got up where they ended up settling to escape Tokyo. Got was actually one of the. Targets propose targets for one of these atomic bombs dropped on and at the time. The United States was dropping leaflets. Saying that like, Hey, you're gonNa town that the United States government is like possibly considering destruction. and. When you have steph like data like my grandparents were pretty much they're like, well, we played our only card by coming here. So we have nowhere to go. So we're going to go out of the family like this is this is what it is and you know by the grace of God whatever the universe it ends up being different target being selected. So this is I think about this moment very much because it completely just to know that where my family was was on the list could you know y'all wouldn't have podcast. So listen to I think that would be the big tragedy but yeah, all that to say is yeah, it's a very It's a really stark reminder that like we're really not that much. Safer, there's just more nuclear weapons and we have. We have more problems that. We're not sure how we solve them peacefully so. Yeah. Important moment history. Yeah I think Kyoto was the target when they took off and it was two. Cloudy and so they moved on or something well, they were to argue I know there were some arguments about what Matt likes. There were arguments like it's to culturally significant and what the strategic value was I mean there's I can only imagine how casual those conversations go about being which city in vaporize with a bomb that's actually into scare the shit out. There were other targets that it was like based on cloud cover. I think Kyoto was the secretary of of the army. You had gone to Kyoto on his honeymoon and was like Nah not on now. Nice. I I. Like it there. Right, and so that was like the just random shit that. Yeah some guys honeymoon saved though one of the oldest cities in the country and the weather it's yeah. I mean and I think just how the how even minor of decisions from governments back can have to resonate decades centuries into the future it's just a always. mind-blowing. Yeah. Did. You ever watch carnival that HBO. Series. I watched like the first ten minutes I remember when I was like I'm either to freaked out by this or I but I I definitely did not get through the first pilot. Yeah. I. Never got too deep into it either but my friend who is really into it was talking about how that Has This has this like overall idea that like we live in a period of like darkness and science and like the border between that and an area an era of magic in wonder is like the atomic bomb detonations like like changes like the metaphysical. Makeup of the universe like at that moment, it's kind of an interesting idea. anyways. Some cool shit. I saw on TV once not even that some cool shit somebody told me about some shit they on. TV. Once hell. And finally, Cuomo is trending. Governor. Cuomo announced that he is going to be able to open New York City schools if the numbers hold. The infection rate stays low Cool I mean that is. That sounds cool part of me just like we'll always like is it really is it still worth the risk right? You know like if we're not St-, you know like a seven year old child passed away from Kovic recently who did not have any underlying like co morbidity conditions and things like that. It. Just makes me really like if I was a parent I would be. So my heart goes out to people having to make those decisions right now because on one hand like you'd think like well, if the numbers are down are the experts saying that's good enough. But teachers are still concerned because they're still very much at risk despite trump's claims of children being completely immune superhumans. Yeah. It's just it's just the whole thing just will always feel uneasy because we're not even close to having a handle on it as a country. Yeah. So it's like hard to than like the confidence of one city and be like yeah okay, well Matt area of a more power to the people who've been. Able to keep their transmission rates low yeah. Does seem like they were the one place that took it very seriously got very aggressive because of how bad it got right away but even then I mean there's criticisms of every governor and mayor sure how much it could have been done. But yeah, at the very least like on the results are there that the infection rates you know measurably in a place that they're not overwhelming they're hosp. Yeah. I'm not saying anything positive about how it was handled from the start just seems like as a culture as a as a city, the people of New York because they saw how bad it got right away. We're like ballot it like after that. Well. You know in La. Man. I had a buddy of mine was just like at the beach like taking the job. It was like one out of ten people wearing masks. Night. See this like more athlete areas there really is this wealth equals health mental. Of like non now, you're rich like we wouldn't be in this neighborhood if we didn't have money so I don't have to worry about you like this socio economic like vaccine that they have to make them immune. It's really it's interesting to see what the different ways this manifests people and I see this culture in Los Angeles that people with more money tend to really truly the people who are like flouting the mask laws and not even like even like pockets of conservative parts of the valley, you still see mascot option. but like then you see other people who truly actually. Money. Protects me good. Little bubble. Not For me. Alright guys will that is going to do it for this week. have a great weekend. Be kind to each other become to yourselves wash your hands where a math don't go out. and. don't do nothing about white supremacy and we'll talk on Monday. The. Weekend I later. Geneva analog. Business Solutions Cabs a twenty twenty Washington Post top workplace is working professionals like you in the Greenbelt Maryland area to join its team cabs specializes.

Tokyo Kyoto Hiroshima Los Angeles New York Nagasaki United States Cuomo Washington Post Maryland Matt China secretary Kovic trump India
"hiroshima" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

05:08 min | Last month

"hiroshima" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"hiroshima" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:16 min | Last month

"hiroshima" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Seventy, five years ago, this week, the B twenty, nine, bomber, Nola gay dropped little boy, the world's first use of an atomic weapon. At Eight fifteen in the morning of August six Japanese time. The first atomic thumb has done enemy talk. It detonated over. Hiroshima immediately killing around one hundred and forty. Thousand People I'm was aimed to explode about zero point. In the city at the junction of. Untold River. Three days later, another stroke sake. As Japan marks the anniversary, it hopes to keep the wartime memories alive using the stories of people who survived the attacks. On all. Holland. But the average age of survivors is now over eighty three. But those. This'll be the last chance to hear from those witnesses during a major anniversary. August sixth nineteen forty five was supposed to be a day off for seventeen year old. Takeo to Toco. No Snyder is the economists Tokyo Bureau chief. She had made plans to meet two girlfriends at eight fifteen owning at a train station on the west side of Shema. She was running late, and then she stepped outside, she saw flash and heard a bang. Which you regained consciousness, she found herself lying thirty meters away a mushroom cloud rising over the city. People with charts skin peeling from their arms rushing over a nearby hillside. Mr K. Ohka left's to look for her mother. and. Found rivers filled with bodies took her six days to locate her mom who is still miraculously alive. Mom lived for another twenty two years. We stuck ohka became a prominent voice amongst the hypocrisy shower, atomic bomb survivors, atomic sufferers. Telling Her story abroad many times in hopes of preventing atomic bombs from ever being used again. I heard this tale from her daughter. He got no. Mario. Who's part of a fascinating unique project underway in both your Sima Nagasaki to help preserve the stories, of Hypoxia, <hes> for generations to come to, how does this project work? So there are still some hundred and thirty thousand living. inbox. <hes>. Amiss. Gone. But their average age is now over eighty three and the number who can tell their stories publicly is declining drastically. Just. You got the fact that could have done this. So the city government's in both fishermen sake have been recruiting scores of volunteers like music Otieno to become <hes> what they call dense Shosha or legacies successors. These are essentially memory keepers, people who learned the stories of the hypoxia down to the most gruesome details in order to be able to retell them with power and veracity for years into the future do. So the volunteers in, Hiroshima, have to go through a rather rigorous course, three years of study training discussion with hypoxia before they're allowed to retell the stories in public. Ms Higashi, no is somewhat unusual in that. She inherited own story, most of the Dan Shosha, take on a stranger's burden. And it simply because that's that generation of of survivors passing that the these city governments have started this program. Yeah, it is. It's really reflective of the anxiety that many people in here, C.`mon, Nagasaki and throughout Japan feel about fading wartime memories I'm what will happen. Once this generation firsthand witnesses passes away the city governments and the peace museums. Atomic bomb museums in both cities have been collecting and recording testimony for many years. But this then social program is away, they hope to preserve these memories in living form to retain the emotional impact. The comes from searing these stories from another human being. and. So where does this fit in with the the wider of up the bombing of of the war in Japan? For Japan, the Hiroshima Experience became central to wartime memory and park has some scholars have argued because it allows victim narrative to dominate shifting the focus away from the atrocities Japanese soldiers committed abroad in Asia and the Pacific certainly oaks in China and Korea have bristled at the lack of context that some of the retailing's of the aroma and Nagasaki experiences or trey. and. If you look at Japan today, it's of course, wrestling a new with the legacy of the Second World War and its aftermath in particular the constitution that America imposed on Japan after the war, which renounces war bars Japan from maintaining armed forces. In practice, Japan does maintain a powerful military which it calls the Self Defense Forces and its Prime Minister Obey Shinzo years has hoped to change the constitution to revise the constitution in order to make explicit that Japan's military is constitutional and and perhaps to expand the limits of what they're allowed to do. Curiously, the public still supports maintaining the postwar constitution. So in short pacifism is still deep seated in today's Japan. and. What about the the the effort of auction others to to learn the lessons of the second. World War d? How does nuclear non-proliferation look at this stage from where you are. Well. This is another source for concern. Of course, non-proliferation efforts in recent years have been faltering just this January. The Bulletin of Atomic Scientists. It's doomsday clock. It's subjective measure of our proximity to self-annihilation closer to midnight than anytime since its establishment in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, seven, the hawks are are pleased and take solace in the signing of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in two, thousand, seventeen, it invokes there unacceptable suffering in its preamble and a nod to how the memory of interesting Nagasaki continues to shape non-proliferation efforts globally yet at the same time, no country with nuclear weapons has signed up to that treaty neither has Japan in fact, which shelters under America's nuclear umbrella. And, and how does that sit with Hypoxia at this stage at this anniversary being marked. I spoke with US Akihiko the governor of the prefecture, and he expressed the view that I heard from many others both your seem sake, which was a wish that Japan would use its moral authority as the only victim of atomic weapons to push harder for their abolition. The hypocrisy. Have Long gramps and spoken about abolishing the bomb before the last houses away. Just to make the do. You call. You can. That's unlikely. But the hypocrisy hope that their stories at the very least. Deter the world from ever using his weapons again. Thank you very much for your time. Thank you very much for having me.

Japan Hypoxia Hiroshima Nagasaki Bulletin of Atomic Scientists Sima Nagasaki Untold River Mr K. Ohka Dan Shosha Toco America Takeo Holland Ms Higashi Snyder Tokyo Bureau chief Mario US
That history should not repeat: Hiroshimas storytellers

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:16 min | Last month

That history should not repeat: Hiroshimas storytellers

"Seventy, five years ago, this week, the B twenty, nine, bomber, Nola gay dropped little boy, the world's first use of an atomic weapon. At Eight fifteen in the morning of August six Japanese time. The first atomic thumb has done enemy talk. It detonated over. Hiroshima immediately killing around one hundred and forty. Thousand People I'm was aimed to explode about zero point. In the city at the junction of. Untold River. Three days later, another stroke sake. As Japan marks the anniversary, it hopes to keep the wartime memories alive using the stories of people who survived the attacks. On all. Holland. But the average age of survivors is now over eighty three. But those. This'll be the last chance to hear from those witnesses during a major anniversary. August sixth nineteen forty five was supposed to be a day off for seventeen year old. Takeo to Toco. No Snyder is the economists Tokyo Bureau chief. She had made plans to meet two girlfriends at eight fifteen owning at a train station on the west side of Shema. She was running late, and then she stepped outside, she saw flash and heard a bang. Which you regained consciousness, she found herself lying thirty meters away a mushroom cloud rising over the city. People with charts skin peeling from their arms rushing over a nearby hillside. Mr K. Ohka left's to look for her mother. and. Found rivers filled with bodies took her six days to locate her mom who is still miraculously alive. Mom lived for another twenty two years. We stuck ohka became a prominent voice amongst the hypocrisy shower, atomic bomb survivors, atomic sufferers. Telling Her story abroad many times in hopes of preventing atomic bombs from ever being used again. I heard this tale from her daughter. He got no. Mario. Who's part of a fascinating unique project underway in both your Sima Nagasaki to help preserve the stories, of Hypoxia, for generations to come to, how does this project work? So there are still some hundred and thirty thousand living. inbox. Amiss. Gone. But their average age is now over eighty three and the number who can tell their stories publicly is declining drastically. Just. You got the fact that could have done this. So the city government's in both fishermen sake have been recruiting scores of volunteers like music Otieno to become what they call dense Shosha or legacies successors. These are essentially memory keepers, people who learned the stories of the hypoxia down to the most gruesome details in order to be able to retell them with power and veracity for years into the future do. So the volunteers in, Hiroshima, have to go through a rather rigorous course, three years of study training discussion with hypoxia before they're allowed to retell the stories in public. Ms Higashi, no is somewhat unusual in that. She inherited own story, most of the Dan Shosha, take on a stranger's burden. And it simply because that's that generation of of survivors passing that the these city governments have started this program. Yeah, it is. It's really reflective of the anxiety that many people in here, C.`mon, Nagasaki and throughout Japan feel about fading wartime memories I'm what will happen. Once this generation firsthand witnesses passes away the city governments and the peace museums. Atomic bomb museums in both cities have been collecting and recording testimony for many years. But this then social program is away, they hope to preserve these memories in living form to retain the emotional impact. The comes from searing these stories from another human being. and. So where does this fit in with the the wider of up the bombing of of the war in Japan? For Japan, the Hiroshima Experience became central to wartime memory and park has some scholars have argued because it allows victim narrative to dominate shifting the focus away from the atrocities Japanese soldiers committed abroad in Asia and the Pacific certainly oaks in China and Korea have bristled at the lack of context that some of the retailing's of the aroma and Nagasaki experiences or trey. and. If you look at Japan today, it's of course, wrestling a new with the legacy of the Second World War and its aftermath in particular the constitution that America imposed on Japan after the war, which renounces war bars Japan from maintaining armed forces. In practice, Japan does maintain a powerful military which it calls the Self Defense Forces and its Prime Minister Obey Shinzo years has hoped to change the constitution to revise the constitution in order to make explicit that Japan's military is constitutional and and perhaps to expand the limits of what they're allowed to do. Curiously, the public still supports maintaining the postwar constitution. So in short pacifism is still deep seated in today's Japan. and. What about the the the effort of auction others to to learn the lessons of the second. World War d? How does nuclear non-proliferation look at this stage from where you are. Well. This is another source for concern. Of course, non-proliferation efforts in recent years have been faltering just this January. The Bulletin of Atomic Scientists. It's doomsday clock. It's subjective measure of our proximity to self-annihilation closer to midnight than anytime since its establishment in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, seven, the hawks are are pleased and take solace in the signing of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in two, thousand, seventeen, it invokes there unacceptable suffering in its preamble and a nod to how the memory of interesting Nagasaki continues to shape non-proliferation efforts globally yet at the same time, no country with nuclear weapons has signed up to that treaty neither has Japan in fact, which shelters under America's nuclear umbrella. And, and how does that sit with Hypoxia at this stage at this anniversary being marked. I spoke with US Akihiko the governor of the prefecture, and he expressed the view that I heard from many others both your seem sake, which was a wish that Japan would use its moral authority as the only victim of atomic weapons to push harder for their abolition. The hypocrisy. Have Long gramps and spoken about abolishing the bomb before the last houses away. Just to make the do. You call. You can. That's unlikely. But the hypocrisy hope that their stories at the very least. Deter the world from ever using his weapons again. Thank you very much for your time. Thank you very much for having me.

Japan Hypoxia Hiroshima Nagasaki Bulletin Of Atomic Scientists Sima Nagasaki Untold River Mr K. Ohka Dan Shosha Toco America Takeo Holland Ms Higashi Snyder Tokyo Bureau Chief Mario United States
Hiroshima: Atomic Blast That Changed The World Turns 75

WBZ Midday News

01:00 min | Last month

Hiroshima: Atomic Blast That Changed The World Turns 75

"The United States dropped the first of two nuclear bombs on Japan. We are delaying the start of our scheduled program to bring you the latest direct report on the atomic bomb attack on Japan. It was on CBS radio, where Americans heard from correspondents like Webley Edwards report on the bombing of Hiroshima in Guam. We can W. Tibbets Jr of Miami, Florida. Out of the B 29 the first atomic bomb in history. Hired in 1957 former CBS radio correspondent Marvin Kalb worked with the generation of journalists who covered that bombing. Everything was dependent upon what President Truman or his top officials wanted to share with the American people, and that was very, very little. In fact, it would be weeks after the bombing. American journalists would even be allowed to report first hand from the destroyed Japanese city. Steve Dorsey, CBS

CBS Japan Cbs Radio Marvin Kalb W. Tibbets Jr President Truman Steve Dorsey Webley Edwards United States Hiroshima Guam Miami Florida
Hiroshima bomb: Japan marks 75 years since nuclear attack

Rush Limbaugh

00:42 sec | Last month

Hiroshima bomb: Japan marks 75 years since nuclear attack

"Atomic bomb dropped by the US on this day in 1945 in back ceremony owing to the Corona virus outbreak. A bell rings in Hiroshima to start a moment of silence at 8:15 a.m. A time when the U. S launched the world's first nuclear bomb attack 75 years ago forced our mayor of Hiroshima, urging world leaders to commit seriously to abandoning nuclear weapons. The bomb killed an estimated 140,000 people and was followed by another attack on Nagasaki before Japan surrendered. Ending World War two Simon Oh,

Hiroshima Simon Oh Nagasaki United States Japan U. S
Hiroshima: Atomic Blast That Changed The World Turns 75

Mark and Melynda

00:25 sec | Last month

Hiroshima: Atomic Blast That Changed The World Turns 75

"In Japan move to bring in a moment of silence 75 years to the day after the U. S dropped the first atomic bomb mayor of Hiroshima, urging world leaders to commit seriously to abandoning nuclear weapons. The bomb killed an estimated 140,000 people and was followed by another attack on Nagasaki before Japan surrendered ending

Japan Hiroshima Nagasaki U. S
Survivor of World's First Nuclear Attack Recounts Hiroshima Bombing 75 Years Later

Brian Mudd

00:48 sec | Last month

Survivor of World's First Nuclear Attack Recounts Hiroshima Bombing 75 Years Later

"Explosion this 1 75 years ago and now an urgency for survivors of the atomic bombing in Hiroshima, Japan. Fox's Simon Owen reports. Hideko Tamara was 10 years old when her home in Hiroshima, Japan, collapsed around her. It's 75 years since the U. S launched the world's first nuclear bomb attack. I don't want this happened to anybody else ever again, now 85 Tamara is among a dwindling number of survivors. But it's still warning against the use of nuclear weapons. My health is fragile. And I'm doing this not because on physically really in top shape and able But because I'm so determined the attack helped end will board too, But it killed 140,000 people. Simon Oh, in Fox News

Hideko Tamara Hiroshima Japan Simon Owen Simon Oh FOX Fox News
Survivor of world's first nuclear attack recounts Hiroshima bombing 75 years later

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:46 sec | Last month

Survivor of world's first nuclear attack recounts Hiroshima bombing 75 years later

"For survivors of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, Japan. 75 years after the attack. Fox's Simon Owen has that story. Hideko Tamara was 10 years old when her home in Hiroshima, Japan, collapsed around him. It's 75 years since the U. S launched the world's first nuclear bomb attack. I don't want this happen to anybody else ever again, now 85 Tamara is among a dwindling number of survivors. It is still warning against the use of nuclear weapons. My health is fragile. And I'm doing this not because I'm physically really in top shape and able But because I'm so determined The attack helped end World War two, but it killed 140,000 people. Simon Oh

Hideko Tamara Hiroshima Simon Owen Simon Oh Japan FOX Japan.
Hiroshima marks 75th anniversary of atomic attack

Morning Edition

00:59 sec | Last month

Hiroshima marks 75th anniversary of atomic attack

"Marked the 75th anniversary of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima today with a ceremony that was scaled down because of the pandemic. As NPR's Anthony Koon reports from Seoul. The bombing killed 140,000 people, most of them civilians. Participants observed a minute of silence at 8:15 a.m. At a ceremony in Hiroshima's peace Park. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe remarked that as the only country to suffer an atomic bombing, Japan must work for the elimination of nuclear weapons. Hiroshi Montemayor. Kazumi Matsui pointed out, though, that Japan itself has refused to sign a U. N treaty to ban atomic bombs. In a videotaped message, U N Secretary General Antonio Good, Harish lamented the fact that Postwar arms control agreements are unraveling. Japan still has more than 136,000 survivors of two atomic bombings. Their average age is over 83 there are 9200 fewer of them than last year.

Japan Hiroshima Prime Minister Shinzo Abe Kazumi Matsui Hiroshi Montemayor Anthony Koon Seoul NPR Peace Park Antonio Good Harish U. N
Hiroshima marks 75th anniversary of atomic attack

BBC World Service

00:39 sec | Last month

Hiroshima marks 75th anniversary of atomic attack

"The ceremony is being held in the Japanese city of Hiroshima to mark the 75th anniversary of the world's first atomic bomb attack. Oshima's may urge Mohr International cooperation to face global threats like the covert 19 pandemic. In a video message played at the ceremony, the United Nations Secretary General Antonio Guterres, Fish paid tribute to Hiroshima's resilience 75 years ago was single Lukla weapon brought unspeakable death and destruction upon this city. Effects linger to this day. The city and its people, However, if chosen not to be characterized by calamity, but instead by resiliency, conciliation and

Hiroshima Mohr International Oshima Secretary General Antonio Gute United Nations Fish
"hiroshima" Discussed on Between The Lines

Between The Lines

09:42 min | Last month

"hiroshima" Discussed on Between The Lines

"This bomb has this frank for twenty thousand tons of TNT. . Harnessing, , the basic power of the universe. . What I fifteen I am on August six, , nine, , hundred, , forty, , five, , the US Air Force dropped the little boy uranium fission bomb on central hero. . Shema. . Making it the first city ever to be destroyed by a nuclear bomb. . On August nine Nagy became the second when the bomb exploded around thirty percent of Hiroshima's population that were killed instantly many more died in the months and years to come. . Now, , the bombs brought to an end to world war two but the wool was horrified at the human cost. . Russia has since become a byword for nuclear holocaust forever linked to the words never again. . Now, this , week marks the seventy fifth anniversary of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki joining me to reflect on the legacy of those events. . Tashi. . Tauch. . She is assistant professor at Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service and the author of political fallout, , nuclear weapons testing, , and the making of Global Environmental Crosses. . Welcome. . Tasha. . Thanks for having me and Michael Gordon Professor of history at Princeton University and Co. . it is a of a new book called the age of Russia. . Welcome. . Welcome. . It's very good to be here. . Now, , Michael the fear of the nuclear age is the period after World War Two when the US dropped the bomb. . The fee was that the nuclear weapons would become a common part of conventional warfare but in the seventy five years since he Russia and Nagasaki, , there's not been a single bomb dropped in a conflict. . Question is this because deterrence works or have we just been lucky I would say we've mostly been lucky <hes>. . It's quite rare that there are conflicts between nuclear-armed nations. . The major example is the nineteen sixty, , nine border conflict between the People's Republic of China and the Soviet Union. . So there haven't been many occasions for things to escalate, , and there's a strong incentive in those cases to de-escalate. . There have however been very close near accidents whether missile just that needing on its own or people launching almost launching in fear of an attack and there. . Have Been Plenty of conventional wars that could have escalated that way. . So by and large, , we've been lucky but we've been abetted by the fact that there has been an ambient taboo that has grown over the years against nuclear first use although that is rarely the policy of any nuclear power. . Okay. . Now from an Australian perspective, , Tic- Japan was seen as an aggressor in the war, , the war crimes but also as a victim because of the destruction wrought by the nuclear bombs have is the wool remit in Japan now aggressor and victim. . Tarshi. . Many pass through consider themselves as victims thinking that Japanese were misled by the government inter- Disastrous Wall Conquest. . In this view here stands at the as the ultimate symbol of Japanese victim. . But today is victim narrative faces two competing accounts. . One is to recognize Japan's acts of wartime aggression, , including tweeting massacres, , forced labor, , and sexual violence. . If we see hero Shimmer from this perspective, , it takes on a whole different meaning not. . Not as a national tragedy, , but rather as international event. . killed not only the Japanese residents but also many colonial subjects and allied. . POW's who are present in the city at the time of the Tom Bombing. . The other interpretation that has also gained for Japan is to see the wartime conduct Japan as an act of self defense. . This This lesion is narrative recaps here. . As the ultimate proof of Western aggression. . So fitting the predation of Japan's Joel Roles as. . Aggressor and victim during the war will gain the upper hand in the future will depend on how sweet society around the world comes together and develops a shared understanding of the complex legacies or Corna reason on the war in the Asia Pacific region and back to the United States markle. . There's a popular conception that Washington had to drop the bomb that it was the only way. . To win the war, , of course, , the war in Europe come to an end in May of forty five. . This is early August two, , forty five is that true I mean what? ? What President Truman's options? ? So. . This is a great question and it's one with a lot of confusion around it. . Functionally. The . only way the only government that had any power to end the war was the Japanese government which was in a position to surrender and the question was when would that happen would have happened later or earlier by summer nineteen, , forty, , five, , it was already clear that the war was militarily lost. . <hes> President Truman and the US government in general had basically fixed options of what they could do to try and encourage the Japanese government to take that move. . There's only two that people usually talk about dropping the atomic bomb or invading the home islands of Japan. . Both of those were on the table also having the Soviet Union inducing them to enter the wars of belligerent which happened on August eighth increasing the intensity of firebombing tightening the blockade of foodstuffs into the home islands. . <hes> and modifying the terms of unconditional surrender to allow Japan to keep the emperor. . The interesting thing is all six of those happen Truman pursued all sex and the war ended. . It's unclear which ones were determinative. . But the point is there wasn't like we had one option or nothing else. . The US had plenty of options and exercised actually all of them. . On the one level target for the bombs was obviously Japan on another level. . Real target was the Soviet Union. . How did the Kremlin of you? ? He Russia Mirror Negga? ? Second Markle. . So. . Really, , the question here is a small set of people within the Kremlin stolen and his closest advisers and you that there was an atomic bomb project going on in the United States for years they've found that out from spies from Britain from spies in the United States, , and they had their own uranium enrichment and bomb development program that was going on at I would say a medium scale <hes>. . What happens after the destruction of Hiroshima is I in <hes> absented himself for a few days he went into a depression and didn't. . React to any of his advisors and then immediately massively escalated the Soviet development of their own atomic bomb. . So they were both caught by surprise and not caught by surprise. . It's true that the Americans <hes> didn't always think about the Soviet Union as a factor in any decision related to how the war was going to end but they also very strongly, , we understood that the key issue was trying to get this the Japanese government to surrender faster because the faster they surrendered the less impact. . The Soviet entry in the war would have to how the end game would play out in Asia, , my guest, , Michael Gordon, , and Tashi Hitachi, , and we're reflecting on the seventy fifth anniversary of Hiroshima. . Tashi. . One, , hundred fifty thousand atomic bomb survivors still living in Japan. . In fact, , as a guest of Japan's Ministry of Foreign. . Affairs this would have been in September twenty, , sixteen I met one of one of the survivors now they're all in education and public law has plied an important part in shaping Japan's post-war Pacifism. . Now, , as generation dies out, , is the role of pessimism in Japanese politics is that diminishing especially in the face of Rausing China Toshi? ? I don't think the passing of the atomic bomb survivors will diminish the strengths of pacifism in any short-term. . The correctly memory of human magazine Japan has been fairly robust and the taken deep roots in popular culture. . I can think of a good example that is <hes> Japanese animated wartime drama film released just four years ago in two thousand, , sixteen cold in this corner of the world. . This picture <unk> accounts of the wartime life in here she was a smash hit in the box office. . Be, , atomic bomb survivors will also active in passing down lessons from the world's first nuclear war to the next generation. . The city's over here streaming nagy training. . Many Japanese Ron Tears as storytellers who share the testimonies are waging victims and a second generation survivors are spearheading efforts for peace unjustice. . Well, , that brings me to today and really in the last that he is the end of the call was thirty years ago the US. . And the Soviets on Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty non stop this was President Bush senior and Gorbachev in Russia in the inside at Union. . Then just as it was collapsing now, both , agree to significantly reduce their nuclear stockpiles and of course, , the updated treaty between Moscow and Washington that expose I. . Think it's February Knicks Jeez. . So that's just a few days after the next president is warning Michael Do you think it will be resigned. . I think that's entirely dependent on the results of the election. . Joe. . Biden has indicated that he would refine the treaty <hes>. . The trump administration has had many opportunities to re-sign the treaty, , but they have not taken advantage of those opportunities yet. . Russia's indicated that they're very interested in extending

Soviet Union Japan United States Markle Hiroshima Truman Ron Tears Japanese government Tashi Hitachi Russia Asia Rausing China depression Ministry of Foreign Michael Gordon Britain absented
75 years after Hiroshima, they're still feeling its impact.

Between The Lines

09:42 min | Last month

75 years after Hiroshima, they're still feeling its impact.

"This bomb has this frank for twenty thousand tons of TNT. Harnessing, the basic power of the universe. What I fifteen I am on August six, nine, hundred, forty, five, the US Air Force dropped the little boy uranium fission bomb on central hero. Shema. Making it the first city ever to be destroyed by a nuclear bomb. On August nine Nagy became the second when the bomb exploded around thirty percent of Hiroshima's population that were killed instantly many more died in the months and years to come. Now, the bombs brought to an end to world war two but the wool was horrified at the human cost. Russia has since become a byword for nuclear holocaust forever linked to the words never again. Now, this week marks the seventy fifth anniversary of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki joining me to reflect on the legacy of those events. Tashi. Tauch. She is assistant professor at Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service and the author of political fallout, nuclear weapons testing, and the making of Global Environmental Crosses. Welcome. Tasha. Thanks for having me and Michael Gordon Professor of history at Princeton University and Co. it is a of a new book called the age of Russia. Welcome. Welcome. It's very good to be here. Now, Michael the fear of the nuclear age is the period after World War Two when the US dropped the bomb. The fee was that the nuclear weapons would become a common part of conventional warfare but in the seventy five years since he Russia and Nagasaki, there's not been a single bomb dropped in a conflict. Question is this because deterrence works or have we just been lucky I would say we've mostly been lucky It's quite rare that there are conflicts between nuclear-armed nations. The major example is the nineteen sixty, nine border conflict between the People's Republic of China and the Soviet Union. So there haven't been many occasions for things to escalate, and there's a strong incentive in those cases to de-escalate. There have however been very close near accidents whether missile just that needing on its own or people launching almost launching in fear of an attack and there. Have Been Plenty of conventional wars that could have escalated that way. So by and large, we've been lucky but we've been abetted by the fact that there has been an ambient taboo that has grown over the years against nuclear first use although that is rarely the policy of any nuclear power. Okay. Now from an Australian perspective, Tic- Japan was seen as an aggressor in the war, the war crimes but also as a victim because of the destruction wrought by the nuclear bombs have is the wool remit in Japan now aggressor and victim. Tarshi. Many pass through consider themselves as victims thinking that Japanese were misled by the government inter- Disastrous Wall Conquest. In this view here stands at the as the ultimate symbol of Japanese victim. But today is victim narrative faces two competing accounts. One is to recognize Japan's acts of wartime aggression, including tweeting massacres, forced labor, and sexual violence. If we see hero Shimmer from this perspective, it takes on a whole different meaning not. Not as a national tragedy, but rather as international event. killed not only the Japanese residents but also many colonial subjects and allied. POW's who are present in the city at the time of the Tom Bombing. The other interpretation that has also gained for Japan is to see the wartime conduct Japan as an act of self defense. This This lesion is narrative recaps here. As the ultimate proof of Western aggression. So fitting the predation of Japan's Joel Roles as. Aggressor and victim during the war will gain the upper hand in the future will depend on how sweet society around the world comes together and develops a shared understanding of the complex legacies or Corna reason on the war in the Asia Pacific region and back to the United States markle. There's a popular conception that Washington had to drop the bomb that it was the only way. To win the war, of course, the war in Europe come to an end in May of forty five. This is early August two, forty five is that true I mean what? What President Truman's options? So. This is a great question and it's one with a lot of confusion around it. Functionally. The only way the only government that had any power to end the war was the Japanese government which was in a position to surrender and the question was when would that happen would have happened later or earlier by summer nineteen, forty, five, it was already clear that the war was militarily lost. President Truman and the US government in general had basically fixed options of what they could do to try and encourage the Japanese government to take that move. There's only two that people usually talk about dropping the atomic bomb or invading the home islands of Japan. Both of those were on the table also having the Soviet Union inducing them to enter the wars of belligerent which happened on August eighth increasing the intensity of firebombing tightening the blockade of foodstuffs into the home islands. and modifying the terms of unconditional surrender to allow Japan to keep the emperor. The interesting thing is all six of those happen Truman pursued all sex and the war ended. It's unclear which ones were determinative. But the point is there wasn't like we had one option or nothing else. The US had plenty of options and exercised actually all of them. On the one level target for the bombs was obviously Japan on another level. Real target was the Soviet Union. How did the Kremlin of you? He Russia Mirror Negga? Second Markle. So. Really, the question here is a small set of people within the Kremlin stolen and his closest advisers and you that there was an atomic bomb project going on in the United States for years they've found that out from spies from Britain from spies in the United States, and they had their own uranium enrichment and bomb development program that was going on at I would say a medium scale What happens after the destruction of Hiroshima is I in absented himself for a few days he went into a depression and didn't. React to any of his advisors and then immediately massively escalated the Soviet development of their own atomic bomb. So they were both caught by surprise and not caught by surprise. It's true that the Americans didn't always think about the Soviet Union as a factor in any decision related to how the war was going to end but they also very strongly, we understood that the key issue was trying to get this the Japanese government to surrender faster because the faster they surrendered the less impact. The Soviet entry in the war would have to how the end game would play out in Asia, my guest, Michael Gordon, and Tashi Hitachi, and we're reflecting on the seventy fifth anniversary of Hiroshima. Tashi. One, hundred fifty thousand atomic bomb survivors still living in Japan. In fact, as a guest of Japan's Ministry of Foreign. Affairs this would have been in September twenty, sixteen I met one of one of the survivors now they're all in education and public law has plied an important part in shaping Japan's post-war Pacifism. Now, as generation dies out, is the role of pessimism in Japanese politics is that diminishing especially in the face of Rausing China Toshi? I don't think the passing of the atomic bomb survivors will diminish the strengths of pacifism in any short-term. The correctly memory of human magazine Japan has been fairly robust and the taken deep roots in popular culture. I can think of a good example that is Japanese animated wartime drama film released just four years ago in two thousand, sixteen cold in this corner of the world. This picture accounts of the wartime life in here she was a smash hit in the box office. Be, atomic bomb survivors will also active in passing down lessons from the world's first nuclear war to the next generation. The city's over here streaming nagy training. Many Japanese Ron Tears as storytellers who share the testimonies are waging victims and a second generation survivors are spearheading efforts for peace unjustice. Well, that brings me to today and really in the last that he is the end of the call was thirty years ago the US. And the Soviets on Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty non stop this was President Bush senior and Gorbachev in Russia in the inside at Union. Then just as it was collapsing now, both agree to significantly reduce their nuclear stockpiles and of course, the updated treaty between Moscow and Washington that expose I. Think it's February Knicks Jeez. So that's just a few days after the next president is warning Michael Do you think it will be resigned. I think that's entirely dependent on the results of the election. Joe. Biden has indicated that he would refine the treaty The trump administration has had many opportunities to re-sign the treaty, but they have not taken advantage of those opportunities yet. Russia's indicated that they're very interested in extending

Japan United States Soviet Union Hiroshima Michael Gordon Russia Japanese Government President Truman Nagasaki Us Air Force Tic- Japan Washington Nagy President Bush
Elaine Pearson on free speech at UNSW

Between The Lines

08:26 min | Last month

Elaine Pearson on free speech at UNSW

"Battle of free speech on Australian University campuses. Allying piece was interviewed by the Media Department at the University of new. South. Wales about the human rights implications of Hong. Kong's new national security role as. Director at Human Rights Watch and an adjunct law lecturer at the university. She expressed concern about the laws and called on the United Nations Secretary General to appoint a special envoy in Hong Kong. Well, it's hardly a very controversial stuff in democracy lock Australia Russia. Will sell you think. We'll after the article, win online the pro. Chinese Communist Party students at the university they demanded the article be removed. You see caused a fence it was hurtful to the communist government in China. The university caved in and pulled the article. Only. After an outcry in the press was the article riposted. So. How did we get to the point when one of Australia's leading universities agrees to political censorship in favor of another nation state? Elaine. Joins me now aligned welcome to between the lines. Great to have you on the program. Thanks Tom. Now, the article is back on the University of New South Wales website but with caveats that the views expressed do not represent the views of the university you happy with this outcome. Well I'm glad that they put it back up. But I am pretty disappointed at the university's response I mean I think you know the views expressed in that article of us about the human rights situation in Hong Kong and I think that shouldn't be something that should be controversial and I was a bit surprised actually that the university was so quick to distance themselves from those views and I think you know I presumed that the ferocity of the campaign by the Pro Chinese Communist Party. Students really took them by surprise. But I think now the question really is how is Going to respond to this and I, think the students you know really are looking to see what is going to be the public response and what next is the university going to do to address these shoes mind you. This is not the only incident of academic freedom being compromised. Can you tell us about some of the other cases? Yeah, Human Rights Watch has actually been documenting Chinese document lit threats to academic freedom since two thousand fifteen not just in Australia about universities all around the world we've looked cases in the US the UK Canada France and right here, and what we've seen is that there is A universities are in a tight bind because the become quite dependent on foreign students. Many of those students coming from China those students have a very different world view, many of them and when they come here. Obviously you know coming here should come with a guarantee of academic freedom and what these should be quite basic things for an Australian university education. But in reality if those students try and for instance, join protests on campus about Hong Kong or Fin Jiang they are often then reported to the Chinese consulates So they are very afraid of doing anything like that they just. Try and keep the hits down and you know you only have to look at the controversy that's happened on Q. Withdrew Pavlou and how he has been treated to see that you know we you know it's not a very impressive response from the universities to to say, Scott Free speech and academic freedom only sorts of sensitive topics like shin-jang like Hong Kong, and like human rights in China. Now you mentioned drew heavily, he was expelled from the University of Queensland in part. For, organizing, what was it very noisy pro Hong Kong protests is that right? Well, he's been suspended. So I, think you know the industry who six months suspension six month suspension so He has been you know he's had been a pretty provocative campaigner. Some of these methods may have been a bit unorthodox, but at the end of the day, look at what happened to him on on that campus I. Mean there were fistfights erupting you cue between the different student groups you had in our pro CCP's students you know supporting the Communist Party trying to tear down. The messages from? Hong, Kong democracy supporters and the only person who's actually suffered any retaliation or reprisals is is drew himself, and so we wanna see universities really safeguard academic freedom and free speech and I think that means also acting against those who are intimidating or harassing all those on campus and making the campus a safe space to express all sorts of different views. Now in your case, a lot of the outrage amongst the Chinese students was expressed and organized I understand on Chinese soil media platforms way chat. which are now apparently watched by Beijing and to what extent you concerned about those platforms like we had and I think the other one is is a waiver we Yes that's right. Yeah I mean. These were the platforms where they organize. Look if students want to express different view an opposing you that's fine I think. I'm concerned is the extent to which this campaign became one of intimidating and harassing other students who expressed different views and as I understand it were threats made that they would report people to the Chinese consulate. For expressing excuse so I think the universities actually really need to monitor. Their social media channels and not just use them as a means of advertising for you know potential new students come to the university but also make sure that those channels are being you know being up being watched not to to censor free speech. But as I said, you know where that free speech is crossing the line. I also think they just need to be clear to the students. You know what what that means that it means. Going to a means being exposed to two different views and a free to discuss and debate those issues, but you're not free to shut down. The views of others. Of course, a line universities in Australia and this is cried sacred I've become increasingly dependent on. Overseas students for their budgets. Some have more diversified student bodies but others locked. University of new, South, Wales away opposite talking about University of New South Wales because of your special case this week they heavily concentrated on the Chinese market now since covert. US W has been one of the hardest hit by travel restrictions at recently made nearly I think five hundred staff redundant. Do you think this budget anxiety affected their handling of the issue align peace and? Yes I've been I think this reliance on the revenue from foreign students is something that you know all universities are facing now and so it it is putting them in a difficult position but I think that's why actually universities need to have a unified front. I think they really need to look at their existing. Codes of conduct they don't actually deal with these issues of foreign students might come from very different oil you, and so you know what I've suggested to you, and it's still view and to many other universities in Australia is to adopt a twelve point code of conduct specifically on these issues and they need to be alive to these issues. They need to incorporate it more into the orientation when you foreign students coming to campus so that they really understand what academic freedom means with our and they need to sort of monitor and. Safeguard, for you know acts of intimidation or harassment because I'm not so worried about myself but I'm more worried about other students on campus who will see how the situation has developed and then they might be too scared to speak out on. Hong Kong will fit in the classroom or other academics who might think twice about taking a meteorological on Hong Kong because they'll be worried about the potential backlash. So you know I think universities really need to take a stand on this and you know it needs to be done. You know jointly. By by all USTRALIAN universities.

Hong Kong Australia University Of New South Wales Human Rights Watch University Of New Chinese Communist Party Australian University Chinese Consulate China Hong Pro Chinese Communist Party University Of Queensland Wales United Nations Communist Government Media Department Director
Atomic bomb dropped on Japan's Hiroshima 75 years ago still reverberates

John Rothmann

00:21 sec | Last month

Atomic bomb dropped on Japan's Hiroshima 75 years ago still reverberates

"Quite realize it was that dangerous. The dwindling witnesses to the world's first atomic bombing marks had 71st anniversary on Thursday. Hiroshima's mayor and others noted that Japanese government refusal to sign a nuclear weapons ban treaty. US dropped its first atomic bomb on Hiroshima on August 6th of

Hiroshima United States
Hiroshima marks 75th anniversary of world's first atomic bombing

The Savage Nation with Michael Savage

00:21 sec | Last month

Hiroshima marks 75th anniversary of world's first atomic bombing

"Dwindling witnesses to the world's first atomic bombing. Marks had 71st anniversary on Thursday. Hiroshima's mayor and others noted that Japanese government refusal to sign a nuclear weapons ban treaty. US dropped its first atomic bomb on Hiroshima on August 6th of 1945 destroying the city and killing 140,000 people.

Hiroshima United States Marks
Hiroshima survivors worry that world will forget

Marketplace

05:18 min | Last month

Hiroshima survivors worry that world will forget

"Exactly 15 minutes past eight in the morning on August 6th, 1945 Japanese time at the moment when the atomic bomb flashed above Hiroshi MMA Miss Yoshiko Sasaki, a clerk in the personnel department of the East Asia, 10 Works had just sat down at her place in the plant office and was turning her head to speak to the girl at the next desk. That rather ordinary sentence is the opening to the extraordinary August 1946 New Yorker article titled Oshima. It was published a year after the United States dropped the first nuclear bomb on that city, a year in which the U. S government had gone to great lengths to conceal the human devastation caused And to depict the bomb as a conventional humane weapon. The writer of the Peace John Hursey, uncovered a very different story reporting on the ground in Japan, author and journalist Leslie Bloome chronicles foresees work and the reaction to it in her new book, Fallout. She joins me now from Los Angeles. Leslie Bloome. Welcome. Thank you. Start with Who? John Hursey Wass and how he came to be the one to tell this story. Oh, John. Her see was a young World War two correspondent who had covered action in different theaters throughout the war for Time magazine. And like many war correspondents, then he was pretty supportive of the U. S military. And he even wrote an almost overly complimentary wartime bio of General Douglas MacArthur and That the U. S military knew him entrusted him would be an important factor in my story and how he eventually got his story about Hiroshi MMA, and I don't want to give away too much. But I will say that how he got in was by being the perfect Trojan horse reporter, The perfect Trojan horse reporter. You've hooked us where we're intrigued when I got there. He didn't report this out as a war correspondent. He focused very much on ordinary people on he picked six of them. Why did he want to tell the story in that way? Well, I mean, the fact of the matter is is that the bombing of Hiroshima was widely reported when it happened, and it was reported as a very big end of days. Story mean there were pictures of the mushroom clouds that were released in pictures, the landscape devastation. But there were no pictures that were released or no stories that were released about the human toll that it happened on the ground there, and the government was really going to enormous lengths to cover up the reality of theater. Tomic aftermath in Hiroshima, Nagasaki They were very concerned with as the former secretary of war, put it, not being seen as having outdone, Hitler and atrocities. So her C and his editors at the New Yorker magazine became determined to tell the story from the point of view of survivors. You know, these are among the on ly humans who have ever experience what it's like to be on the receiving end of nuclear attack. He ultimately picked a widow with young kids, a young female clerk to medics, a priest and a minister with with a young family, and his idea was to create a sense of empathy. In his readers with these individuals, because, after all, not everybody could understand the physics of how the bombs works or visualized. You know, an all out nuclear attack that anyone could relate to being a mother or a father or colleague or doctor who's going about their everyday business. One catastrophe strikes I wonder if you would give us a sense of just one telling story of what he did find when he was there What it was that so shocked American readers who had no idea what was unfolding in Japan. One story that particularly resonated with him. He interviewed a young female clerk who was in her company when the bomb was detonated. This's the clerk I mentioned in the intro exactly one of the most famous introductions in journalistic history, and when the bomb exploded over her factory bookshelves fell upon her, and she was nearly crushed to death by books. And he thought How ironic it was to have somebody nearly crushed by books within the first moments of the atomic age, and literally when he was leaving here, Oshima and standing on the surprisingly intact train station platform, he thought that he was going to have to write about that line. And that's one of the incidents that most resonated with readers. So August 1946 The New Yorker publishes. What was the reaction? Both in the United States and around the world to this story. Well in her sees own words. The reaction was quote explosive mean, I try not to use that word in my book for obvious reasons. But he did, And the article was simply titled here, Oshima, and it comprised nearly the entire contents of the August 31st 1946 issue of The New Yorker. It's sold out immediately. You're even black market copies of it going for, you know, astronomical sums. It was syndicated in its entirety, and this is a 30,000 word story in newspapers across the country and around the world. And editors and reporters and readers were enraged. They were horrified by the testimonies in her sees here, Oshima, and they also began demanding to know what else was the U. S government withholding from the US public And then, when President Truman was asked by a reporter if he had personally read it, he retorted. I never read the New York ER. It just makes me bad. But the fact is, is that the government had been put very much on the defensive. That said, You know, they didn't want to look like they were on the defensive, but they were and they had to scramble to try to reclaim the narrative.

New Yorker Magazine Oshima Leslie Bloome United States Hiroshi Mma Reporter Hiroshima Japan U. S Los Angeles John Hursey Wass East Asia John Hursey Miss Yoshiko Sasaki Douglas Macarthur Time Magazine Writer
Lebanese capital rocked by huge explosion

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

00:43 sec | Last month

Lebanese capital rocked by huge explosion

"Lebanese officials comparing the power of the explosions in Beirut to that of the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima baby sister Donna Miller has more from Jerusalem. Lebanon's health minister says at least 2500 people have been injured and 25 killed in the massive explosions that destroyed much of Beirut's port and wreaked havoc on buildings across the capital for several miles, the prime minister now declaring Wednesday, a national day of mourning the death toll certain To rise. Security officials say the blast may have begun in an old confiscated weapons warehouse. Israel, which has indicated it was not involved in the blast, says it has offered humanitarian and medical aid to Beirut. Giordano Miller, ABC NEWS

Beirut Donna Miller Prime Minister Giordano Miller Lebanon Abc News Jerusalem Israel
"hiroshima" Discussed on Scene On Radio

Scene On Radio

02:13 min | Last month

"hiroshima" Discussed on Scene On Radio

"hiroshima" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

06:53 min | 2 months ago

"hiroshima" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Now, we have contributing correspondent Dennis normal. He wrote this week on how seventy five years later. The survivors of the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki have transformed understanding of the effects of radiation exposure on health. Hi, Dennis Arthur we're talking about study. Now. Run by Ari are asked, which is the Radiation Effects Research Foundation this is a very long-term study as I mentioned almost seventy five years. Years and included many many survivors over one hundred thousand. How exactly did this study get started all those years ago? Virginia's Harry Truman authorized launch of the study was in nineteen, forty, seven. They were pretty much should have a full team on the ground in Yoshii Nagasaki. By nineteen, forty, nine, thousand, nine, hundred fifty. The US Navy realized that there would be a bathroom studying the acute impact and. And the long term impact of what happens to humans when they are subjected to the detonation of Tom These survivors involvement in such a long-term study has yielded an amazing array of results, important results for health for anyone who's exposed to radiation and work or an accident. What are some of the key findings from this work us? Not just one study. They actually have a collection of different studies. Studies, they have carried out the most notable one. Is this enormous life span study where they have as you mentioned one hundred twenty thousand people who were enrolled at the outset? If you put together the combination of number of participants and the length of the study, there's probably nothing else like the RRF in his predecessor ABC city simply gathered data on how radiation has long term effects on health. Health of those who were exposed to radiation the Rif previously ABC gathered that data mix epidemiological connections between the amount of radiation. Someone gets and their risk of developing cancer later in life, other or decisions take that data and data from other studies as well, and they turn those into recommendations for the amount of exposure that people should be allowed to get if they are patient for medical imaging. Imaging, or if they are, the technicians were if their nuclear pact workers this gives away how old I am, but I went to the dentist pornography child. You sit in the dental chair and the dentist would real office machine thick x rays of your teeth, and those were go bouncing all over the room these days for dental x Ray. They put you in a special room which shielded technician. Technician is wearing a badge to track how much radiation he or she is exposed to. You're also wearing that vest to protect your organs from straight X rays all those recommendations shielding around the x ray rooms, dosimetry badges with technicians, where and the vest the patients where they all grew out of basic data that was produced by the long term studies by RRF INC with the survivors we talked. Talked about how this research got started very soon after the bombings, US government, Edna Japanese, government, and boasted research with survivors, but with different purposes. How are they different? Hauer their intentions with the studies different. The ABC was very much an American stony when the ABC's got started was so under America's occupation, and the Japanese scientists had difficulty publishing their observations amount of information that was released Japanese. was very much controlled by the occupation of Nargis, so there were real restrictions on what the Japanese scientists could do, but that initial collection of data by the US groups was over within a few months later there was a decision to set up a long-term study of the effects of radiation and at that point yet. Of the Japanese scientists in the American scientists were pretty much aligned. You mentioned in the story that the survivors weren't treated by the US scientist when they were involved in the study. Initially, that's right. Basically for political reasons, the decision was made that the ABC said he would not offer any treatment to the people who were being examined by the ABC physicians. They concern was that if the ABC city which at that time was very much? American funded American. If. They offered treatment. It might be taken as an admission of culpability in their condition, because misunderstandings and friction between the survivors, many of whom believe that they would get some help for doing with their illnesses with their injuries. Yeah, why would a survivor become involved in the study? If they weren't going to get treatment, even decades later if that was the history of the study. Initially. There was a hope that they would get some sort of medical benefit from participating in the study, the didn't get zero. In particular children that were born to survivors got medical checkups that there would not have received not been part of the study later as one of the survivors told me he has continued to cooperate with the study because he hopes that it will help the world recognize how devastating, the effects are of attack using atomic weapons, and so that is what motivates him to continue to cooperate. It's not clear whether there are. Are Health Effects for the offspring of survivors, but this survivors children are obviously concerned about their health. Can you talk about about this tension with the scientists say is that their studies so far have not identified any affects the question is. Are there no effects or are statistical data simply not detailed enough to spot affects the friction arises. Is that some of the children of the survivors? But we've that they are facing health issues that are not faced by big response were not subjected to the. It's on bond radiation, so the children what? As survivors as second-generation survivors, and they now have to court actions going forward, try to force the the government to recognize that the children of survivors should be recognized, says survivors as well, and that should also be entitled to medical support it just as their parents are

ABC technician Radiation Effects Research Fou US ABC city Hiroshima Yoshii Nagasaki US Navy Sarah Crespi Dennis Dennis normal Dennis Arthur researcher Virginia Nagasaki Lau Harry Truman Tom These Edna Japanese
How Hiroshima survivors helped form radiation safety rules

Science Magazine Podcast

06:53 min | 2 months ago

How Hiroshima survivors helped form radiation safety rules

"Now, we have contributing correspondent Dennis normal. He wrote this week on how seventy five years later. The survivors of the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki have transformed understanding of the effects of radiation exposure on health. Hi, Dennis Arthur we're talking about study. Now. Run by Ari are asked, which is the Radiation Effects Research Foundation this is a very long-term study as I mentioned almost seventy five years. Years and included many many survivors over one hundred thousand. How exactly did this study get started all those years ago? Virginia's Harry Truman authorized launch of the study was in nineteen, forty, seven. They were pretty much should have a full team on the ground in Yoshii Nagasaki. By nineteen, forty, nine, thousand, nine, hundred fifty. The US Navy realized that there would be a bathroom studying the acute impact and. And the long term impact of what happens to humans when they are subjected to the detonation of Tom These survivors involvement in such a long-term study has yielded an amazing array of results, important results for health for anyone who's exposed to radiation and work or an accident. What are some of the key findings from this work us? Not just one study. They actually have a collection of different studies. Studies, they have carried out the most notable one. Is this enormous life span study where they have as you mentioned one hundred twenty thousand people who were enrolled at the outset? If you put together the combination of number of participants and the length of the study, there's probably nothing else like the RRF in his predecessor ABC city simply gathered data on how radiation has long term effects on health. Health of those who were exposed to radiation the Rif previously ABC gathered that data mix epidemiological connections between the amount of radiation. Someone gets and their risk of developing cancer later in life, other or decisions take that data and data from other studies as well, and they turn those into recommendations for the amount of exposure that people should be allowed to get if they are patient for medical imaging. Imaging, or if they are, the technicians were if their nuclear pact workers this gives away how old I am, but I went to the dentist pornography child. You sit in the dental chair and the dentist would real office machine thick x rays of your teeth, and those were go bouncing all over the room these days for dental x Ray. They put you in a special room which shielded technician. Technician is wearing a badge to track how much radiation he or she is exposed to. You're also wearing that vest to protect your organs from straight X rays all those recommendations shielding around the x ray rooms, dosimetry badges with technicians, where and the vest the patients where they all grew out of basic data that was produced by the long term studies by RRF INC with the survivors we talked. Talked about how this research got started very soon after the bombings, US government, Edna Japanese, government, and boasted research with survivors, but with different purposes. How are they different? Hauer their intentions with the studies different. The ABC was very much an American stony when the ABC's got started was so under America's occupation, and the Japanese scientists had difficulty publishing their observations amount of information that was released Japanese. was very much controlled by the occupation of Nargis, so there were real restrictions on what the Japanese scientists could do, but that initial collection of data by the US groups was over within a few months later there was a decision to set up a long-term study of the effects of radiation and at that point yet. Of the Japanese scientists in the American scientists were pretty much aligned. You mentioned in the story that the survivors weren't treated by the US scientist when they were involved in the study. Initially, that's right. Basically for political reasons, the decision was made that the ABC said he would not offer any treatment to the people who were being examined by the ABC physicians. They concern was that if the ABC city which at that time was very much? American funded American. If. They offered treatment. It might be taken as an admission of culpability in their condition, because misunderstandings and friction between the survivors, many of whom believe that they would get some help for doing with their illnesses with their injuries. Yeah, why would a survivor become involved in the study? If they weren't going to get treatment, even decades later if that was the history of the study. Initially. There was a hope that they would get some sort of medical benefit from participating in the study, the didn't get zero. In particular children that were born to survivors got medical checkups that there would not have received not been part of the study later as one of the survivors told me he has continued to cooperate with the study because he hopes that it will help the world recognize how devastating, the effects are of attack using atomic weapons, and so that is what motivates him to continue to cooperate. It's not clear whether there are. Are Health Effects for the offspring of survivors, but this survivors children are obviously concerned about their health. Can you talk about about this tension with the scientists say is that their studies so far have not identified any affects the question is. Are there no effects or are statistical data simply not detailed enough to spot affects the friction arises. Is that some of the children of the survivors? But we've that they are facing health issues that are not faced by big response were not subjected to the. It's on bond radiation, so the children what? As survivors as second-generation survivors, and they now have to court actions going forward, try to force the the government to recognize that the children of survivors should be recognized, says survivors as well, and that should also be entitled to medical support it just as their parents are

ABC Radiation Effects Research Fou Technician United States Abc City Us Navy Yoshii Nagasaki Dennis Normal Dennis Arthur Hiroshima Nagasaki ARI Virginia Harry Truman Tom These Edna Japanese Rrf Inc Hauer Nargis
Sustainable Travel: The Hard Truth with Lucy Siegle

WTM Insights Podcast

09:45 min | 7 months ago

Sustainable Travel: The Hard Truth with Lucy Siegle

"Twenty nineteen year in which the travel industry found itself in the spotlight over its role in contributing to climate change tourists now more aware than ever before the environmental cost of air travel. Tourism contributes around five percent of greenhouse gases according to the Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership at travel alone contributes to two point five percent of global emissions and these predictions suggest that these stats likely to triple by twenty fifty. If important changes are not maids however the tourism industry is responding in many diverse ways. For example the Guardian Travel Section now primarily focuses on destinations. That can be reached without the use of planes. Easyjet will carbon offset all flights by the end of twenty twenty initiatives such as green tourism? Have seen a leap in membership and provide hoteliers with a green check meter to promote more responsible tourism practices and global travel as a certainly more environmentally aware. Now environmental issues. I have to admit their uncomfortable truths for us in the travel industry so today we're taking the bull by the horns as it were and we're asking. Chiyo hey to tell us just how bad it is and also what we can do about it so environment environmental impact on travel. I think it's very good but the travel industry is trying to tackle this head on but I think we've also got some uncomfortable truths to face and in facing those uncomfortable truths. Hopefully we can make some headway into doing some stuff about it. But how in your opinion how? How bad is the travel industry for the world? How bad is the travel industry? Well if you look at some who just start with the elephant in the room so we look aviation you can say that aviation has a small part of the climate change pie in the comes in four percent. Something like that four percent. You might say well you know. In fact I've heard it said well PSA quivalent to say the fashion industry or something like that but we're in a very serious situation. Everyone's mentioned this to you. We all have to decarbonised really rapidly. So it doesn't matter. What your slice of the Pie is he needs to be getting it to zero. Unfortunately and aviation is one of the ones that's increasing and increasing exponentially so we could be seeing like a quarter of the world's carbon budget used by aviation in the very near future and that's not acceptable. Because you look at the amount of people that fly so I think in the UK. It's something like fifteen percent of the population tastes seventy five percent of the flights. Something like that. Probably most of them by me mainly you. Yes exactly so. It's not fair. Is it that all of that. Carbon budget should be used in that way so that that is the really really big existential and the media issue for the travel and tourism industry is that it's predicated on flights which have become cheaper and all the rest of it and then you get into a very interesting territory about offsetting and where we are now. How much needs to help and is by so? You really can't get very far. Ironically when we're talking about travel without coming across a very difficult brick wall I know this is the lady bird version of environmental issues but reminded y need to decarbonised. Oh so yeah so we are in. The era of climate crisis is not the only crisis that's affecting the bias fairs. We call the planet We also in the age of extinction. loss say rapid extinction loss of species. And we've got lots of different pressures. So the oceans absorbed ninety percent of of heat and a report came out a couple of weeks ago so that was in January February and it was irreputable evidence that the planet is is is warming because you can test the atmosphere will time. There's lots of different factors which might account for the heating when it comes to the oceans that is a controlled experiment ladies and gentlemen and we had the hottest oceans on record since records began and it is equivalent to exploding thousands of Hiroshima bombs in the ocean. That's the amount of energy and he is now in the ocean and this affects all sorts of things so for people in the UK who only really like one sort of fish which is called it means that if the oceans warm around the UK the COD will swim off to colder climes. And they all go to the Baltic states and we can't get any cards so it has a knock-on effects like that but it is proof incontrovertible evidence that the world is warming and a warming world brings with it a lot of problems including higher incidences of diseases oceans rising icecaps melting fires that burn hotter and are more widespread as we've seen in Australia etc etc etc so Greta Thambo says this so I'm GonNa say it but but if you were saying it I by the way she seems to have a wide for you have a great plot has exploded but you you were saying say funny because it's almost anniversary of me-meeting Greta Thornburg in Davos upper mountain and I said to my friend. This is absolutely legendary this point while. I don't think she's going to catch them did you. My friend resigned. I don't know I think she might anyway like two days later. Thirty two thousand kids marched in Belgium for Friday's for the future though is already regretting. Why statement and she just seems so as literally. Mitch Leigh Small. Once more young men conscious actually small. She's actually small and she's very softly spoken very unassuming and yeah. I mean what a presence will an accident force and I really care myself. I squandered that did you. Did you feel something around are no? That sounds ridiculous but people that I've got that power to to have an impact on so many people often do when they walk into the room. Yeah think so. I think I was just being very defensive about what this kid you know. I've been doing this for. Aj's join the queue. Hello but I also now you'll court so you were just about to court for a minute. Yes she's incredibly powerful force and she. I remember her face and her being rather than another thing. That's quite disarming if you spend time around High Profile people with this charisma that quite jazz Hans. She's not just handsome toll so I think I just took a while to understand what she was bringing But she's very very good and what I was going to save it. She says a lot of people. Ask Me and when is the climate crisis going to be over? It's not a moment. It is an era. This is the reality so once you accept that of the reality the climate era. What are you going to do about it? But we can't we can't. We're not GONNA stop traveling. People are not going to stop traveling for fun for work. The world is a very a much smaller place. You might say well people might have to but look what's happened this week. The Corona virus so. This plane's not taking off from China China is basically closed. Which is so. They'll be kind of carbon win for that in a way because they'll be some fear emissions. We're in a numbers game now. So you go to you. Go to look at these things but you know there's an example very very recently where we might say. We're not going to travel. But actually you're not gonNA travel so there's a number scenarios that might happen where you went to travel so what's difficult. The moment is that it's just all on us making the decision not to travel and you may have children who are very inspired by Greta. You might be parents. Have I inspired by Greta? Making a decision to take a train journey instead of Dumping on the plane and these are really interesting. Personal kind of points of maneuver and negotiation at the moment within families and stuff like that and it will be very interesting to see how the travel industry which. I'm sure I shouldn't talk about as if it's a big homogenized thing 'cause I know it's very nuanced different parts of it but they've got to kind of surf this weird moment with us really and we have got to come up with more inventive products. We've got to come up with more different ways of doing things we've got to look at some tough

UK Easyjet Greta Cambridge Institute For Sustai Mitch Leigh Small Greta Thornburg Greta Thambo Davos Baltic Belgium AJ China China Australia
"hiroshima" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

10:45 min | 1 year ago

"hiroshima" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Just saying no a couple days ago an asteroid but I'm not getting so the distance between the earth and the moon is two hundred forty thousand miles Turner forty thousand mile an asteroid Mister the earth by forty thousand miles this is a separate it is not the one we talked about a couple weeks ago another Astor miss my forty thousand miles would have hit with thirty times the energy of the nuclear bomb at Hiroshima man so to ABS it would destroy entire city and and tons of other consequences beyond that and we didn't know until it was three days past us that's always my favorite yeah you never like to ritual like we talked about last time you think that you're gonna have time I think there's gonna be a warning system as it is going to get everybody in for impact Tino the survivors you know even those come until three days later not even want to whizzing by us right well look at that three days later you see it and like wave and then they backtrack it in like whoa just just get by us but that could not close the racing they're not gonna go to Lastra thing here but the fact that we don't know what we're gonna get hit but I think it's a nice life metaphor as well so I want to continue with the sauce with from the great Ravi Zacharias we did in the first hours gonna pick it up here you check it out seven sixty KFMB dot com to get the background into all of this but he told a story that is challenging to me and I don't want to accept it which is a sign that I I should probably accept it and I'm gonna try and try and and change how I think about things in light of the story I think it's true so Swami cannot in the in the Hindu monk eighteen at ninety three search frame of reference here eighteen ninety three he was in Chicago for a conference on world religions which were dominated by by Christians at the end he went to the microphone this is what he said he grabbed the microphone he said we who came from the east I have sat here on the platform day after day and I've been told in a patronizing way that we ought to accept Christianity because Christian nations are the most prosperous we look about us and we see England the most prosperous Christian nation in the world with her foot on the neck of two hundred fifty million easy attics Asian people we look back in history we see the prosperity of Christian Europe began with Spain Spain's prosperity began with the invasion of Mexico this person will fit in perfectly to a current your history class at the college Christianity wins its prosperity by cutting the throats of its fellow band at such a price the Hindu well not have prosperity prices I got hit is would never do such a thing that's what it takes to be prosperous there will never I sat here today and I've heard at the height of intolerance I've heard the creed of the Muslim applauded when today the Muslims sort of caring destruction and India blood of the sword or not for the Hindu whose religion is based on the law of love so this is this big conference mostly Christians are but also Muslims and the entire conference cheered they loved it loved him all the universities open up to this guy to speak and the western a Christian academic leaders loved him for this comment as Robbie said he made an enormous impact with a partial truth covered with an unfortunate truth and that's often allies come it's almost always allies come but mostly truth with a little bit ally that changes the whole thing so the untruth is this that and and this is the part that I admit I'm gonna have a tough time accepting but I think it's right Robbie said you never judge a system by its abuse now I'm not saying you never judge abuse course the judge that but you don't judge the system by its abuse you judge the system based on its own merits no I'm I'm I'm getting closer to this I've I've been close to this with communism it's very easy to judge communism bites failures but I I don't judge it solely by that I also judging by its merits because even in its ideal perfect proposed form it's a terrible system is why get annoyed with people sale will communism it sounds good in theory but it won't work in reality no no no it doesn't don't even sound good in theory I'm not judging you based off of its failures I'm judging based off of its merits itself it's a terrible thing therefore of course it veils vality do but about your religion Robbie says don't judge a system based on its abuse and and you know we can judge Hindu as a base to pieces to the apartheid of India India Pakistan twelve million people were killed twelve million people and you're liable to get your head cut off of your Christian in northern India today part of the partition of India was a nineteen forty seven so when we go back thousands of years of of Hindus L. violence of Hindus so he can't he can't but can you judge into is a based off of that you have to judge it defines other by its own merits quite a challenge so the relevancy to today we we are stuck in the strap this tribal trap of defining each party by its worst actors it's so easy to define all Democrats as anti for the worst and for people to define Republicans all Republicans as white nationalists the worst but it's eight sure as absurdly simplistic model which which let's let's try to break it down the next time I'll break down how the whole the whole models right left is even apply in this situation we got cut out trump did not far as the Paso shooter anymore than Elizabeth Warren because the lot far left or far left shooter which again we'll talk about that I think far left shooter in Dayton Ohio you can't define either party by their worst actors the judge each party and ideology and policies of principles on their own merits now their own merits may be bad to give Iraq I'm not saying all the Democrats are all their their their policies are fantastic no they could be very very bad but it it's on its own merit that's a paradigm shift I think but I I just wanna show because it's gonna help me get closer to the truth on on different issues welcome back and once for all we can cut it out with this ridiculous left wing right wing not sure it was very edgy this weekend again if you look at it from very far off perspective pretty amazing that the a river the the first year and an apostle is far right I got a quote your far right but the next day the shooter day in was was an anti Fatah Lizabeth Warren supporting trump hater far left and you got is just a personal challenge you got a judge your self on how you reacted to each of those each of those shootings that is in a time of honesty self reflection no need to call it don't tell me about it but now have your own on a self reflection of how you reacted when you found out that the first shooter was a white supremacist and the second sure was an anti for crazy far leftist I succumb that will break down the the left and right for this one had a seven sixty KFMB whenever seven sixty five three six two and of course got to watch out for the asteroids it's always a from I always think about that is whenever I think of asteroids I think of asteroid fields like you know we were talking about life great point Eric like rat infestation and that's usually the word that comes after rat yeah and when I think of asteroid I think of an asteroid field now here's the thing no such thing as asteroid fields really so we're good well because I think there's one then there's multiple right now so come back with the number but each if there's an asteroid so it's all relative right I mean the universe big yeah so an asteroid field each asteroid trillions of light years of either name clothing I mean for ever distant so it's not like you're you're dodging shooting in Astoria yeah maybe we war see I hear about leaving your way through asteroids casted right and so it's not a problem you're worried about a barrage yeah for the now in there all my gosh the whole of the bar and there's stuff coming our way not a not a problem now this is the one who got to worry about all it takes is the only I know we'll all be dead instantly confirm but it's just this is the one who got to worry about one hundred seven six to care for me to have that line Sir we have breaking news out of tear Santa were a toddler's been found dead inside a car the mother called police saying she could not find her two year old by the time police responded to the navy housing on Leary street the mother and found the child in the car no further details are available but will follow this developing story throughout the afternoon stocks plunged on Wall Street today worries about how much president trump's escalating trade war with China will damage the economy major US indexes suffered their biggest drop since early last year as the Dow closed down seven hundred sixty seven points former president Barack Obama responded to the weekend Nash shootings in Ohio and Texas today with a plea to Americans to reject the language of hatred fear and intolerance from any of their leaders Obama's post on Twitter did not refer to president trump by name you're never more than fifteen minutes away from the top stories of.

Hiroshima three days fifteen minutes two year
"hiroshima" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"hiroshima" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Right, off the water molecule and it forms these very reactive molecules called free radicals which become like hungry little. Beasts and they start to go after DNA very greedy for electrons because they're missing an electron at this. Point and they see this big molecule nearby DNA they go right after it and they start ripping electrons off they basically cut it at various points all of which To say that the moment polite hit him Sutomo Yamaguchi's DNA got. Shredded where did the bomb land in. Proximity to him like right near it more. Was it miles and miles away, it's a little hard to judge but he was about a mile, or so away and. He just remembers waking up lying in the potato field so then what. Happens he wakes up and he has no idea. How long he was unconscious. Because the bomb sucked up so much dirt that it sort of made the. Entire area dark it was like storm clouds over the entire city so, he couldn't tell how long he'd been unconscious but he, got to his feet, and he, looks down at his arms it looked like he had this horrendous sunburn on both of his forearms especially. His left forearm which was closer to the bomb but he's walking by people who are torn open and. Bleeding or staggering they're clearly not going, to make it And he's just sort of, wandering through this field before he realizes that he should go report to work he's going to go to Mitsubishi he knew. He didn't know what to do he was sort, of dazed there was the? Only thing he could think of? To even try to do but, when he gets to the Mitsubishi plant it isn't there it's just rubble his co workers are dead so he. Decides what he's got to do is he's got to find a way to get home and back to his family and he starts hearing a rumor that they're going to be trains leaving. Hiroshima to go south which is where he's from. And he decides he's going to get to the, train station no matter what the unfortunate part is that he has to. Cross over rivers to get to the train station and most of the, bridges had been knocked out at this point he finds, herself walking along one river he goes a little bit downstream and he. Finds that there is a railroad trestle Across the river at. This point and there's one beam of it. Intact so he climbed up. This little tower and basically like a tight rope Walker starts walking across this. Railroad trestle to get to the other side, eventually he does. Find the train. Station and there's predictably kind. Of a mob waiting to get on these trains but he pushes his way through gets to the train and he sits down. And the train leaves to take him home to Nagasaki kgo eight he's Nagasaki's going from here, Shema day later to Nagasaki, is going to Nagasaki the next day going does he find. His family he gets to them he finds him at home spends a day swimming in and out of consciousness, and the next day August ninth he gets up gets to Mitsubishi. Headquarters he's bandaged up not looking very. Good and he starts telling his boss and his fellow engineers about this enormous bomb That had exploded, and devastated the city and after a minute or. So his boss cuts, him off and he says that this is complete. Baloney you're an, engineer calculated how could, one bomb destroy an entire city and as soon as he finished saying that.

Sutomo Yamaguchi Mitsubishi Walker Nagasaki Hiroshima engineer Shema
"hiroshima" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

06:24 min | 2 years ago

"hiroshima" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Talk KFI AM six forty more stimulating talk Ryan suits here on. Iheartradio Appear. Iheartradio edition of dark secret place Well so. This seems to be in my. Lifetime this is like an annual event it's the revisionism of World War, Two a dropping of, the tonic bombs and, it's been a it's been a very very popular hobby of the left for. Years and years and years and years and what they do is they reverse engineer a set of diplomatic and and war related facts that are known and they leave out crucial facts and they highlight miniscule facts so that they can load the dice and come up with the conclusion. That the atomic, bomb wasn't even needed it. Wasn't he that's the irony of it it Tomic bomb wasn't even needed and it sort of the academic equivalent of the conspiracy theory the after the fact either. That or the deserved it we got we've been doling out about nine eleven or the conspiracy. Theory that was actually an inside job the the irony of us Using the atomic bomb and unleashing the atomic genie, when we didn't even, need to is sort, of the the holy grail of a lot of left wing historians and there's. One in particular name Alex Weller Stein who is a Harvard guy at UC Berkeley guy and whole thing and also he's a new policy guy he is this is why to me this is unacceptable he's one of the most well read persons on earth in regards to nuclear history. Nuclear policy and, he he left it to. Twitter he did a Twitter thread where he was pointing out in his estimate of the Nagasaki bump at least the Nagasaki bomb wasn't necessary of the the Hiroshima. Bomb if it was necessary it had no impact which is equivalent of saying it wasn't necessary. And his reasoning was this That the Imperial, War council which included, of course the the emperor and the the. The military members dominated by Bye general Tojo etc that they had seen, the reality, of aerial bombing for the United, States the fall of Okinawa And they. Were they were, also. By the way they were shocked and surprised at the Soviet Union's declaration, of war against Japan Date wise on August eighth Nineteen Forty-five ninety days. After the, German unconditional surrender of course the Japanese supposedly didn't know that Stalin. Had agreed the ninety, days if the Germans surrendered he would enter the war and declare war on Japan and help us. Wrap that whole thing. Up that's that's the claim and so therefore and then also the other part of the argument is and then Secondly were didn't. Get out on Hiroshima anyway and I've talked about that on my. Podcast and connect dot com That one of the weird things about. Russia that, the planners of the Americans hadn't thought of is what if there's. Literally no way for, the information to get out of Hiroshima can the Japanese sit on what happened at Hiroshima and lied. To their people and. So the professor, well esteemed claims somehow that the truth about Hiroshima on August six did not even reach the war castle till. August eighth and only then did scientists confirm it was an s This flat out he's ignoring a couple. Of different facts which was at on August six Hiroshima the Hiroshima naval observatory the Hiroshima telegram Hermosa Hiroshima railroad though there were if Hiroshima had been cut out of the earth and take into space The same thing. Would, have happened the railroads would, be calling the telegram, would be calling, the army. Would be calling the army and Hiroshima the navy would be calling the navy and everybody back in Tokyo would be putting together that Hiroshima was not answering no nothing. In Hiroshima was answering not even the telegram not. The landlines not anything and so on, August eighth on August six hours after Hiroshima a plane was dispatched to Hiroshima does. Come back and tell us. What the hell's going on the plane, radioed back that Hiroshima was a sea of. Fire it was a giant plume of smoke and then reports started coming, in from witnesses who said that was not a firebombing. There was a single plane it dropped. A single thing about forty five seconds later there was a blinding flash there was a shockwave like. I've never felt before and then a cloud the shape I've never seen before rose up over Hiroshima. So word about Hiroshima had gotten, out the Imperial War council had heard about this and they knew that it was one Plane dropping one weapon And then thing. To the Russian attack the Russian declaration of war on Japan in Manchuria in occupied Manchuria that was not a. Surprise of the Japanese the Japanese army had been reporting back to Tokyo that there was a considerable. Build-up of Soviet forces and also they're spies in Russia were telling them that Russian forces were shifting from the west all the way across Russia back to Manchuria And so this was not a surprise to them they they knew that was coming and so therefore. When the Nagasaki bomb was dropped on. August ninth that was the thing that tipped the Japanese, into, saying, well now we've had it. Now there's no negotiated peace there's no way where we can hold out and. Say well. The emperor gets to stay on the throne or any of that, it is this or we lose every city because the Americans clearly. Have more than one those bombs so that's that is how that. Worked there's the popular myth that we're taught. School that that oh yeah we dropped the atomic bomb then the Russians declared war wasn't exactly like. That Russia's weren't waiting for that it was it was a in agreement by then I mean by them anyway back back right after this More on this it is, the, dark, secret place Bryan suits here. Pushing back at World War Two revisionism and why when we come back only. On iheartradio. Tonight because it is the chargers preseason, game.

Hiroshima Hiroshima naval observatory Russia Nagasaki Japan War council Imperial War council KFI Tokyo Soviet Union engineer Ryan Twitter chargers Alex Weller Stein army Harvard navy
"hiroshima" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"hiroshima" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Officer has been put on desk duty japan's government says at least one hundred and thirty four people have been confirmed dead from the heavy rains floods and mudslides that have struck western japan chief cabinet secretary says seven others were without vital signs and more than fifty people were unaccounted for many in the hiroshima area which was hard hit searchers and cleanup efforts taking place as water subsided well leaders at a texas church where twenty six people were shouting killed last year say nearly three million dollars has been donated for victims and their families san antonio express news reports that the first baptist church sutherland's springs announced it received two point nine million dollars in donations since the november massacre the church was criticized earlier this year for building a multimillion dollar new sanctuary but the pastor said only money designated for that purpose was used for the new church clayton neville klif news coming up what is josh black men are resonant skoda's expert think about president trump's supreme court nominee he will weigh in coming up next and then at seven fifty we'll tell you why you need to get some an aluminum foil immediately but i right now traffic on the fives here's bill jackson near ferris on i forty five northbound as you approach malloy bridge road crash blocks two left lanes looks like that's gonna turn out to be one lane getting by there so that's why backing up forty th street in oak cliff on highway sixty seven northbound at keith boulevard iraq is reported it's backed up past ledbetter and on the north side at the intersection of coit road and frankford road an accident is reported with klif right now traffic on the fives i'm bill jackson i'm meteorologist brad barton's we're going to be partly to mostly cloudy warm and muggy with a high near ninety two this afternoon as gonna feel more like ninety eight in the shade light wind loan you're seventy seven tonight partly to mostly cloudy hot and humid tomorrow with a high of ninety.

Officer japan secretary skoda trump bill jackson iraq ledbetter brad barton hiroshima texas san antonio clayton neville klif president ferris malloy bridge three million dollars nine million dollars
"hiroshima" Discussed on X96

X96

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"hiroshima" Discussed on X96

"In the southern area of hiroshima prefecture more than one hundred reports of casualties have been received but they haven't confirmed those and a lot of it is people in their cars being swept away wow so it'd be a while before they have a real count when i was in when i was in costa rica it's the rainy season and we rented cars the roads in costa rica that's the one thing that if you criticize if you if you want to criticize don't try to criticize anything about costa rica to the face of costa rican because they are very proud of their country okay and and rightfully so but the one thing you can bitch about is the roads they'll go with you they will bitch about the roads and they'll let you bitch about the roads but they're very almost all of it is two lane driving and sometime the rain sometimes the rain was so heavy that i felt like i should pull over until it's really i mean it's that your windshield wipers can't get fast it's nothing like you would ever see here in utah i think it's just astonishing how heavy would you say torrential okay torrential i'll say that sure i yeah i have nothing against the word torrential you bet i'll say torrential thanks for suggesting that to do what you can a week before president trump's visit to britain the mayor of london has said go ahead put out that baby trump balloon that's great do it the balloon a giant orange balloon of president trump in a diaper with small hands the balloon was approved amid star was approved a bid stop trump protests planned for the visit starting on july twelfth activist groups and trade unions organized an online petition calling on the mayor to allow the effigy be flown over parliament it drew over one ten thousand signatories on a petition mr trump's visit to britain was originally scheduled coincide with the opening of the united states embassy in january but he realized that there are some things he had to attend to it is golf course in scotland so he's coming now stopping in great britain that's just as a pretext so that he can go to the golf course in scotland yeah and he has changed his plans do you have that is not going to wonder now oh because of the blue yeah to his meetings will be in the countryside purposefully avoiding these avoiding because he knows protesters are going to be everywhere and they'll find him in the country will and this is let's see three youtube adventurers social media stars came who made a living just doing this stuff on youtube traveling the world and chronicling their experiences online these three stars died last week after an accident at shannon falls in canada about thirty five miles north of vancouver charles reicher gamble alexi lie leica and meghan scraper or scrapper were affiliated with the canadian group high on life on an online travel brand that promotes travel in in adventurous lifestyles the hundreds of thousands of followers high on life i have some it just popped into my mind some memory of them doing something here in utah that was something controversial have to look into that somebody knows let me know quickly at x ninety six dot com or.

hiroshima
"hiroshima" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"hiroshima" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hiroshima in japan a short time ago and american aeroplane dropped one bomb on hiroshima and destroyed its usefulness to the enemy that bomb has more power than twenty thousand tons of tnt when this bomb we have now added a new and revolutionary increase in destruction the supplement the growing power of our armed forces in their present farm these bombs are now in production and even more powerful farms are in development it is an atomic bomb it has a harnessing of the basic power of the universe the forest from which the some draws is power has been loose against those who robbed well are to the far east that was president truman addressing the nation after the atomic bomb the first atomic bomb was dropped in japan ag how did the president come to the decision to use these bob's okay are huge tom's have been written about that uh my in my book uh that's the book is not about that but it's a major theme in the book because it's about the first four months of the truman administration and this is the most controversial decision that any president has ever had to make it happen of three and a half months and to trim his administration if i had the sum this up in the amount of time we have to spend here i can say two things one is every advisor surrounding truman believed that it should be used every one of them there is a couple that disagreed after the fact and general eisenhower says that he advised truman not to use the bomb but eisenhower's a military general in europe and wasn't really in truman's political circle so that's number what everybody said we ought to use this number two is truman really reduce this to math okay so this all sorts of ways to play political quarterback monday morning quarterback and say well the japan was going to surrender this was a political move a shot across the bow the soviet union at the beginning the cold war really what it came down to in my opinion after spending years researching this it was a matter of math we were going to send seven hundred sixty six thousand and seven hundred american soldiers to invade the mainland of japan we knew from our experiences in the war that japan was not going to surrender and that the.

Hiroshima japan president bob tom truman administration advisor eisenhower europe soviet union cold war president truman twenty thousand tons four months
"hiroshima" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"hiroshima" Discussed on KTRH

"Where the term survivors guilt was first used yeah i think on the term actually first came about from looking at memoirs and talking with um holocaust survivors oh okay uh so um that's been the captured in a literature from their and from actually survivors of hiroshima and other disaster such as that in this this pales compared to those with the the feelings in the sensations that those of us who didn't get flooded dealer are every bit as real what sort of symptoms we talking about for survivors guilt sure i think that um the term overall it's it event welldefined in the literature and sort of we have the feeling that we know what guilt is um but one we really think about it i think and survivors guilt is kind of this reaction that psychologists and psychiatrists sort of turn on that you're making these negative judgments about your behavior during a circumstance like the after the fact kind of hindsight being 2020 and having a tendency to feel bad for living through a circumstances you know when other people sustain injuries or you know have their houses sweated in all of that so it kinda just as an all encompassing term for these negative judgement than behavior that we have about um our own how we performed during an event like this is important to understand i think that this wasn't anybody's fall disinterest nature it's an act right audits a natural of whatever you wanna call it and there's nothing you or i could have done to prevent it there's nothing that you or i could have done to make our house lower in somebody else's house higher it's just it's just the way the brain fail isn't it absolutely so something on the list of things that can help to this to minimise our media intake i'm pretty bad about that it's okay to change the channel now isn't it absolutely i think that's wanted a things and especially for children um you know watching this over and over again and especially for them the.

hiroshima
"hiroshima" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:47 min | 3 years ago

"hiroshima" Discussed on WJR 760

"Last train from hiroshima is that you what do i wanna say draw on the voices of the atomic bomb survive five hours and this science can what was it forensic archaeology horrific archaeology were the new yogurt i fell into sort of accidentally as people were beginning to develop the field especially at the titanic with the breakup and impact of the titanic into the bottom of meanwhile from the nineteen dave i had been introduced to an had been interviewing erased shame and naked faqi survivors and have been told back then that there were these people who survived hiroshima and then were moved by the neck at by mitsubishi corporation two naked sacchi and there were more than thirty people who survived both atomic bombing and i got to know a couple of them way and who and when you talk to them were there are some who in surviving hiroshima 72 years ago almost to the hour today the thinking did they would escape or seek shelter in nagasaki well some of them like mr yamagushi short going connecticut thaqi and thing what had happened to other city fees were engineers and some of them and if he was pretty sure that the bomb was going to follow him connec effect ban to add in fact uh at the time of the second atomic bomb he had been telling is barth vip and mitsubishi plan the hiroshima had been destroyed by one atomic bomb his main or did not believe him and fit you were an engineer you're know we could not have been one bomb due to me stephanie said i already have done the math i was there and i saw it and then there was a flash in the sky outside and 800 elder here told everyone that when you see the lashing duck immediate way they old duct everyone in the building were killed most of the building was flattened except for one office where he was because it was behind a steelreinforced stairwell and essentially the only survivors were in that office with him and he did get hair feder his voice at that time what he referred to were one of history's great do you believe me nam moment in and now a charles pellegrino we have north korea and their intercontinental ballistic missiles working on somehow putting a nuclear weapon on top of them and as the statistics have shown very possibly having the capability of reaching here to the united states not just.

hiroshima mitsubishi corporation mr yamagushi barth vip engineer stephanie charles pellegrino north korea intercontinental ballistic mis united states nagasaki connecticut mitsubishi five hours 72 years
"hiroshima" Discussed on Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"hiroshima" Discussed on Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

"Right i wanna watch at look here's what i'm gonna say i'm gonna watch on an article by there's a difference because you're gonna watch too because you going to be some lear and zambia it is going to be oh mira snow watch i don't functionary value you functioning our functions or other be abs before its look at things i want to see we'll you should come over my hosting right because in them have but if i do you have negotiated neuropathy at the hiroshima to who met us yet beyond say is considering buying a share of her hometown nba team the houston rockets lz i think that is awesome it's good i think is fantastic get some quarter with us about all again that's all you got ta what else was about to say i mean come on or you can come up with some performances who is going to be the halftime acts no no no that's bewildering her not this is michigan attract show many great people to be report of this the nba the already there necessary to what priorities are gore oh well beyond my party his brixworth ours water buys is flying in houston and go to a game so to celebrity side of it is not but she can attract celebrity's net united way in our flyer to the houston if he was miami new york la that would probably be you know they missed in has that kinda pull even well beyond so i am not going on not going to just fly here because beyond say owns the team now if it was one of those other three that that the entertainers already know cities right so they'll go to the gay this you see our at yes in no store well i don't know known as he's a few their own some of the heat writer know julio iglesias owns like apart is so tight are old i got some courtside seats are no decisionmaking packets of course i i get clap pray in every now need if we win i get into play and regain annakournakova get to go to the game parray or whatever yes all that i go i think he's great because our merv see assists in certain cells in areas where you have you how winter but how would that affect.

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