35 Burst results for "Hiroshima"

"hiroshima" Discussed on Mere Mortals Book Reviews

Mere Mortals Book Reviews

02:51 min | 3 weeks ago

"hiroshima" Discussed on Mere Mortals Book Reviews

"I particularly want to read this pot so my obviously review of this is tainted a little bit in that. I have read this before and then also i really tried to not look at far doors and pictures and other sources in this and really just focus on this book because you know the such rabbit hole of looking at the statistics or looking at other people's stories or other narratives that created around the bombing of hiroshima hiroshima. And so yet. My review of this is based on a sort of second interpretation of my reading of this book so summary. It's a brief snapshot of the event. That changed the lives of sars so many people some of the stories in this book will really imprint on you and it's going to be hard to forget i definitely had that experience reading it again and going like. Oh i remember this section. I remember what happened to this person. I remember how he was astounded that his briefcase managed to survive which had the important documents and the money from the church and they're sort of savings all wrapped up this thing so you will remember certain sections and even though it's told in unemotional way and it's i would argue not designed to elicit emotions in that real story crofting type of way. I think you still gonna tear up a bit because it is just such a brutal subject and just reading about the concrete individualize story of what happened to these six people and then expanding that out to the hundred thousand extra more than that who were also in the area. I'm going to give it a seven out of ten. It's hard to say whether the book was amazing or not. You know it depends on you as an individual depends on what you're actually looking for in the book. I feel it does it justice and not does it justice in other ways but it's a hard read that's it's not pleasant but also necessary so hiroshima by john. Hersey a seven out of ten for me and so that's it my mobilize thinki- for joining me to this pot of the audio damn. It's a rather harsh read. I actually even had qualms myself about recommending this book because it is not pleasant at all to know about how cruel humans can be to each other what we have done to each other and the death that destruction. The radiation sickness the poisonings. All of those sorts of things are truly horrific. So i'm not going to ask for particularly comments on this. If you want to you can find me at the me and models podcast. I'm going to include some chapters and links into this once again. If you don't want to see that. I would actually recommend not going on a two point zero app and you will avoid most of those if you want to send me a boost. Graham all of those good things that really helps in this really nice other than that. I really do hope you have a fantastic day wherever you are in the world carnet..

hiroshima Hersey john Graham
"hiroshima" Discussed on Mere Mortals Book Reviews

Mere Mortals Book Reviews

05:39 min | 3 weeks ago

"hiroshima" Discussed on Mere Mortals Book Reviews

"Welcome my name or lights to another round of the book reviews. My name is carne. And i do these book reviews for those who want to transcend beyond their own mortality. Who want to learn something from their books to gain some knowledge to find something interesting. Today is a rather depressing. A rather sad one. I have the book for you. Hiroshima by john hersey. This book was originally published in one thousand nine hundred forty six a year after the bomb had actually gone off and it's about two hundred and forty pages in the lodge print version. Which is what i have. So it's only a couple hours of reading. It's not super long. It is the accounts of six survivors of the bomb in hiroshima on august. Six thousand nine hundred forty five at eight fifteen a. m so these are their personal accounts of the bomb the aftermath. What exactly happened will really go into the details of death. The destruction their own physical ailments. What happened to them physically. What happened to their loved. Ones the people around them. Their immediate reactions. The gruesome deaths that they saw on the street the horror the carnage a bit about the human spirit and the revival and the banding together of people but most of the book is a look at the destruction that was caused. The style of the book is of it. Split into five separate chapters so these being cold a noises flash the fire details of being investigated pen across and fever few and the aftermath and these are really concerning different time links that occurred after the event off the the atomic bomb was dropped on hiroshima so it was before during one day afterwards three day afterwards and then forty years afterwards and speaking of the time link and the chapters there is a lot of switching going on in between the actual chapters. So it's not one person's account across a certain time period across all of these nodes lot of rapid switching between the different characters in the actual chapter itself. The author john hersey was a war correspondent so in nineteen forty five hundred forty-six he actually went to japan and was reporting. On the bombings. Surrender the carnage the building up again of japan and its resources and things like that and he found a document relating to one of the survivors and he himself managed to interview. I believe the all six of them and get their stories of what actually happened. And he was a proponent of or one of the first adopters of new journalism so this is introducing fictional storytelling elements into non fictional writings. And this was originally written as an article so hence it's not super great length because it was published in the new yorker and received amazing reviews. Basically everyone read it at the time and said wow. This is something special. This is an amazing article and was eventually turned into the book that we have here today. There's only one real theme that came to me from this book and that was devastation. And so i'm going to give a bit of a definition here of what that means so it can be great disruption or damage severe and overwhelming shock or grief. One thing. I think this book does really well as it's told in a very flat style so it's not supermo tional. The words robin numbing but you can really just get a good idea of the radiation sickness the bones that were occurring to people..

john hersey hiroshima Hiroshima japan fever
Operation Crossroads: The Test of Atomic Weapons in Naval Warfare

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:15 min | Last month

Operation Crossroads: The Test of Atomic Weapons in Naval Warfare

"World war two had just ended the year before in nineteen forty-five while the war was over. The cold war between the united states and the soviet union was just beginning at this particular moment. The united states had a monopoly on atomic bombs. However it while they had vanished to create and detonate several bombs. There was still a great deal. They didn't know about this weapon. Only three atomic bombs had been detonated at this point. The original trinity test explosion in new mexico. The bomb used over hiroshima and the one used over nagasaki. All three of these were detonated over land. What no one knew was what would happen. If these weapons were used in naval warfare. What would happen to ships which were hit with an atomic blast with they sankar would they flow it. People in the navy had speculations but no one had any proof to this end of the. Us navy initiated operation crossroads. This was to be an a of atomic weapons in naval warfare. The navy search for a location where they could conduct such a test. They needed somewhere remote yet somewhere where they could set up headquarters on land and have observation posts. They eventually settled on a remote coral atoll in the pacific ocean in the marshall islands. The navy move the one hundred sixty seven people who lived on the island to other nearby islands so they could begin testing. They also sailed a fleet of ninety five ships to the atoll which would serve as target ships for the test. These were ships that were set for retirement and the scrap yard and instead would be used for testing they would get newt facilities for over. Forty thousand people were constructed. Who would be there to the tests. They had to build everything from scratch. They build bunkers to observe the test. They built barracks kitchens offices clubs for officers and clubs for enlisted men. It was a massive undertaking and all done far away from prying eyes in the middle of the pacific ocean on july first. The first of these tests took place he would be the fourth atomic bomb ever detonated. In the first above water the test was given the codename able it was dropped from a b twenty nine bomber and exploded approximately five hundred feet above the surface. It caused surprisingly little damage to the ships because the bombs were about a third of a mile or six hundred meters off target the next day. The news of this event spread around the world and everyone became familiar with this remote pacific island which was named

Navy Sankar United States Nagasaki Soviet Union Hiroshima Pacific Ocean New Mexico Marshall Islands Pacific Island
"hiroshima" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

03:37 min | 2 months ago

"hiroshima" Discussed on Fresh Air

"That had Had returned to her she a so he sought them out and fortunately couple of them spoke english and hersi one over there their trust they gave him their testimonies about what it had been like for them on august. Sixth nineteen forty five and then not only did. They agree to be his translator because they spoke japanese. Hersi did not They also began to make introductions for him within the blast survivor community right so he ends up focusing the story on six people who survived the blast to clergyman one catholic methodist to were physicians. Both of those were men and then to women was a widow who had three children and was at home cooking rice when the explosion happened and then a twenty year old woman who was at work at her job as a clerk in a ten works I thought maybe you could tell us about reverend tiny moto who was because he was a methodist clergyman. Who was in the area at the time. And i'll just give little warning to listeners that we're going to be dealing here with some info some accounts that are obviously May be very upset about what happened in hiroshima. So if you don't hear that you might turn away for a couple of minutes so tell us a little bit about what reverend taina moto experienced. Reverend tanimoto on the at the moment of the bombing was slightly. Outside of the of the city he had been Transporting some goods To the outskirts of the city and he was up on a hill and so therefore he had a bird's eye view of what what happened he He fell to the ground to win. The actual bomb went off but then when he when he got up he saw that the city had i been enveloped in flames and black clouds and slowly. He would see he saw per session of survivor is starting to struggle. Out of the city was just absolutely horrified by what he had seen and baffled too. Because you know usually an attack on this level would have been perpetrated by a fleet of of bombers but this was just a single flash and the the survivors who were making their way out of the city and who would not survive for long. I mean most of them were naked. Some of them had flesh hanging from their bodies. I mean he saw just unspeakable sites as he ran into the city because he had a wife an infant daughter he wanted to to find his parishioners the closer he got towards the detonation. The worst the scene was i mean the. The ground was just littered with scalded bodies and people who were trying to drag themselves out of the ruins and wouldn't make it. You know there were walls of fire that consuming. The areas of enormous firestorm was starting to consume the city. He just at one point was picked up by whirlwind cause wins had been unleashed throughout the city and and these torn attic Whirlwinds and he was lifted up in a red hot worldwide and then dropped from a height of about eight feet. I mean it was just unbelievable that he survived not only the initial blast but then heading into city centre and you know the extreme trauma of having witnessed what he witnessed. It's it's remarkable that he that he came out of it alive right and he meant he mentioned grabbing some cushions and meant dousing them with water to try and get through the flames and find his family. He did find his wife and daughter right. it was again another another near miracle Somehow and child had been in their house which collapsed on them upon detonation. They'd somehow managed somehow managed to escape and as reverend tanimoto is tearing hysterically through the city centre looking for survivors..

hersi Hersi reverend taina Reverend tanimoto hiroshima reverend tanimoto
"hiroshima" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:36 min | 2 months ago

"hiroshima" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Being said about radiation at its effects. I mean american generals had testified before congress on this. How did the character risk. Yeah in immediate weeks you know very little. I mean a lot of it was really painted in you. Know landscape devastation You know photographs landscape. Photographs were released to newspapers. Showering the decimation of hiroshima. And sake and i mean they were rubble pictures And also you know. People are seeing the mushroom cloud photos taken from from the bombers themselves or from recon missions and but in terms of the radiation even the announcement truman's announcement of the of the bomb. He's painting the bombs in conventional terms. He says you know. These bombs are the equivalent to twenty thousand tons of tnt. And so americans you know they. They don't understand. they know that. It's mega weapon. But they don't understand the full nature of the weapons. Yet you know. The radiological effects are not in any way highlighted to the american public. And in the meantime you know the us military is scrambling to find out. How the you know. The radiation of the bombs is affecting the physical landscape how it's affecting human beings because they're about to send tens of thousand occupation troops into japan. So they you know they're sending their own recon missions in late august of nineteen forty five onto the ground to hear shema nagasaki to to see if they can in good conscience clear the atomic cities for occupation and they they do declare privately amongst themselves that The the the radiation has dwindled to nothing because of because of the height at which had been detonated they said that much of it had been reabsorbed back into that fear but they would also you know. Start to study the blast survivors. Who had taken in radiation to their bodies you know when the blast went off and look at how it affected them. The fact is that the the people who created the bombs didn't have a full understanding of what the bombs were going to recon landscape in humans. And we're going to be studying that for years. While they were on the ground occupied japan. You mentioned a lieutenant general leslie groves..

hiroshima truman congress nagasaki japan us leslie groves
"hiroshima" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

03:59 min | 2 months ago

"hiroshima" Discussed on Fresh Air

"This is fresh air. I'm davies infra terry gross. Today marks the seventy six anniversary of the first wartime use of a nuclear weapon. The atomic bomb dropped on the japanese city hero. Shema while the horrors of the explosion and radiation from the bomb are now widely acknowledged. They were far less well-known in the months after the attack american. Gi's serving in the occupation force. In japan would regularly visit hiroshima to pick up atomic souvenirs from the rubble to take home. The scale of the destruction and suffering was eventually told in the book hiroshima by journalists. John hersi which became an international bestseller. What many don't know is that. Her book was originally a lengthy article that took up an entire issue of the new yorker magazine. A year after the bombing it became one of the most influential pieces of journalism ever written today. We're going to listen to my interview with writer leslie. M m blum. Who's book tells. The story of her sees quest to bring the real story of here ashim to the american public and the impact that had on the world's understanding of nuclear weapons. Leslie m bloom is a los angeles. Based journalist author and biographer. I spoke to her last year about her book. Fallout the hiroshima cover up and the reporter. Who revealed it to the world. Well leslie bloom. welcome to fresh air. Thank you for having me. We've all grown up in a world with nuclear weapons in. We know they were developed during world war. Two in the top secret manhattan project and then used of course nineteen forty five to end the war with japan but in nineteen forty five. This was all new. First of all. How much americans know about the nature of the weapon that was used in china for americans didn't know about the bomb period until it was detonated over hiroshima. And you know it manhattan. Project was cloaked enormous secrecy. Even though tens of thousands of people were working on it. I mean many of them didn't even know what the end product of their labor was going to be President harry truman did not know about the bomb He he learned about it only upon the death of his predecessor. Or you know in the spring of nineteen forty five. That's how under wraps the project was so when president harry truman announced that america had donated the world's first atomic bomb over the japanese city of her shema. He was announcing new. Not only a new weapon. But the fact that we had entered into the atomic age americans had no idea about the nature of these then experimental weapons namely that these are weapons that continue to kill long after detonation and it would take quite a bit of time and reporting to bring out so a second bomb was dropped on nagasaki. Japan surrendered and after years of war. Americans course deliriously happy that it was over. What did they know about the destruction and death that the weapon had visited on here ashim. Well i mean at first appeared that the us government was being almost ecstatically forthright about the new weapon. And when you know. President shri announces the the bombing. He says look. This is the biggest bomb. That's ever been houston history of warfare and the japanese should surrender or they can expect a rain of fire. Ruined from the sky anybody's ever seen before. We unleashed the power of the sun. I mean it was almost biblical language. So they knew everybody who heard the announcement knew that they were dealing with something totally unprecedented not just in the war but in the history of human warfare what was not stated. Was you know the fact that this had radiological qualities. Not even blast survivors on the ground would be Dot dr in an agonizing for in the days and the weeks and the months and years that followed right and so in the weeks and months that followed what was.

davies infra terry gross ashim John hersi new yorker magazine m blum hiroshima Leslie m bloom leslie bloom President harry truman japan manhattan leslie los angeles President shri china nagasaki america us government houston
IOC's Bach Gets Mixed Reaction in One-Day Visit to Hiroshima

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 3 months ago

IOC's Bach Gets Mixed Reaction in One-Day Visit to Hiroshima

"International Olympic committee president Thomas Bach got a mixed reception in his visit to Hiroshima in Japan this is he met with an atomic bomb survivor everybody wears been here and to estimate this experience and has got this inspiration we'll leave here Russia as an ambassador for peace the Olympics start next week in Tokyo the city is under a coronavirus state of emergency there were protesters in her Rocha do you want to you know this you Kiana she because mother was an atomic bomb victims he says he's opposed to the Olympic Games saying as you can see from box actions they are trying to use the sports to make money Bach repeated the games in Tokyo will be safe and secure I'm a Donahue

Thomas Bach International Olympic Committe Hiroshima Japan Tokyo Olympics Rocha Kiana Russia Olympic Games Bach Donahue
"hiroshima" Discussed on The Kame House Podcast

The Kame House Podcast

07:38 min | 6 months ago

"hiroshima" Discussed on The Kame House Podcast

"To look look at like several times. Just like kate in. I am choosing to support the english translations the physical english translation copies when they come out. Don't know in the fifth one comes out. I think may be june. But i'm all right with their time Yeah i think. I said once before i do agree that man is is. It's good no matter how you read it. But i am glad that i read it. Weekly and sparked out rather than spending it all at once now. Wish i would've already weekly. That's i'd saw it. And i wish i would have read it but you know i'm here now. I'm on the bus. I'm behind like like. I'm sitting at the back of the bus but i'm away up. I'm a move my way. But i'm really enjoying it like i said i'm gonna talk about that next week. And then the last of manga. That's on my Weekly reads. I'm this one's on this one's finished its complete Is my and. I talked about it before. It's a life lessons with your meanchey only son. It's only two volume. So i have volume to israel. Sure yes. I'm going to go on and completed. That is also going to be a just a heads up now to let you know that the kami house podcast is on the wave okay. there will be a summer anime coming up and we did talk about that in a previous podcast. That's also Instagram post but Yeah that's one of my That's one of the anime that i'm ready to watch for anime For summer anime. Twenty twenty one. So let me talk about sakamoto days this week at work. I had some downtime bro. Quick and i decided to read a chapter sixteen and seventeen of soccer moday. I by the time this podcast episode releases after eighteen will already be out. If you're listening to this you get a recap of sixteen and seventeen. And then you'll be fresh for eighteen. Or if you just want to cute little recap and you've already rich after eighteen. By the time this came out you know during the motherfucking party. So let's get into it so chapter sixteen which is pretty much a filler filler chapter. It wasn't it was cute. It was cute. So i always get confused on. Why people use filler. Filler is tell me tell me the right way to you like it's not it's down. I i use the word. Downtime filler is what anime uses to fill time. Manga can go further so they have more material work with. Oh like one piece. One piece has filler. Where the mangas keep keeps on going week by week. The enemies go so much faster. It's because people feel like filler. Is anything that does not push the story. line forward. yeah they haven't. I don't think they have been. They haven't been quite so perceptive as you to know that. That is the reasoning behind. Why they do that so now. If you're not looking into stuff like that you just think they're just pause and the storyline and it's annoying because either way rather it's filler. Whether it's it's annoying. And i was used rod. That's a lack of a better word on my end. Yeah yeah what's the correct way to say it. It's okay. I think even though it's not action bag i think the slower chapters are probably more my favorites and i wouldn't call those failures. I love. I liked chapter. Sixteen is the shopping. Yeah that's the shopping one. Where like he's getting their backpacks for his daughter and like he is literally live beedon s in order to get it iago chapter sixteen now because that's really cute in his daughter is adorable and i just oh my god it was just like the Sock is the way the houses as episode we watch. Yeah the fight in the supermarket and you know you ever think about your parents. Had they just go through hell and high water just to get you the things that you wanted as a child now granted you have my momma fucked up. And she wasn't going to fight for not a goddamn thing but she did go to the high water for me. And i just. That just tugged at my heartstrings. So cute manga chapter. Check it out. Don't skip it. Don't don't skip it because yanni did. Y'all need it. Give jaffrey's sometime. Sometimes when i because they want the storyline. Sometimes some people will read like a chapter. I don't do it. I don't do it because listen. I like to read every be in peace of my mongo. Okay i want to take it in. I wanna consume it. I wanna love it. I wanna be in side of it. That's how much i love my manga. Damn bitch is it. A mega round the corner neymar. I'll do this shit but there are some people who i'm not judging you but i am raising my but Don't skip that one is cute. It's cute now. Chapter seventeen is where they pick it up and wu bear with me Is your bride notes. And you like abbreviation shit. Any forget what you forget. Ooh i wanna do that to myself. So bear with me out so chapter. Seventeen opens with a new character. It opens haas gay in his Pet bird and they're talking about How killing mrs sakamoto would solve problems. Now there is. Of course there is a bounty on sakamoto. Mr sakamoto and it is one billion yen. I'm not sure how much one billion yen. Us tim miller that ten million. So roughly ten million so husky right baby is them marine. He's a little this little slow missing. He missed an array of ground. He he missed missing. He missed the bless his heart. His -posedly got out pieces. Okay it ain't got it. He ain't got it now he actually meets sakamoto right now. He doesn't realize mississau- komodo is mrs sakamoto because he has a picture of skinny sakamoto and shows up and was like yo. I'm looking for this man and it was like nope that's not me. Sakamoto looked at that shit. And say first of all you dumb ass nigga you stupid first of all you stupid second of all you don you know in third of all. That's not me if you read sakamoto days and you know mississau- komodo doesn't get dozen. Skinny mode is kind of like his beast mode right so if you see him home it you see him go into skinny mo but he only goes..

ten million Sakamoto sakamoto june next week kate one billion yen One piece one piece fifth one this week two volume Sixteen Instagram israel kami house one english Seventeen twenty
"hiroshima" Discussed on The Kame House Podcast

The Kame House Podcast

09:43 min | 6 months ago

"hiroshima" Discussed on The Kame House Podcast

"Commie house this week. We talk about the new anime. That we're watching including way the househusband tokyo injures and make low box to this week's black table talk is what makes something your favorites right. Let's show take welcome economy house where we heard a bitch said that the ending theme to tokyo vendors slaps i am reading below. I'm crystal that shit was popping up on it i wasn't expecting ardent. I wasn't expecting a whole like jamming ahead at the end of it. I wasn't sure it was the end. They write in and opening usually the episode Plays the open at the end. Oh wow you learn something new. Every day about anime now automate doesn't okay either way. The shit was dope. Oh how was your week. Might week was. Yeah i watched anna may. Besides that's how i think i'd just people move. I have my sister move. And god damn. I'm feeling that i went one flight of stairs. Like moving her matches your seventeen. I feel like it. Hit me 'cause. I remember in college. I used to be moving people late three times a year. I'm easy pay me some food payment food and we good. You know what that is law longer. S negative day. Not staff knocking knocking on. It's knocking ranking 'em. I don't know escape today. I just got to come start recording. And ooh hit me my knees guinea. You know maybe you need already thirty. I'll say that they probably are i. We'd ask injuries when i was young injury. We already talked me as i don't wanna hear badger rowdy as whiteboard. No friendly youtube videos. I'd always happen crystal. He's gonna gloss over my knees tire boss and i'm tired today. He's on your knees are on on the point of view. I'm sorry that was me anyways. Start as it. What's your first week back. second week. i'm going into my third week in office now. In the fact that ed there was a time where i used to get up at the s crack of dawn as something if you are a person who has a job where you get up early. Never stop because you can never go back. Yeah initiatives or or picking up a second job. Is i after you drop a second. It's like bitch. The ghetto i never if you person who has get up in the morning for the job I wanna thank you. Because i don't have to do it. I got to support you from afar. Shantha bill yourself tied their conversation. Never be okay. Cut this episode and beat his. I know i'll be bitching about my job lot. One of our fans in one of my friends he was light. You really hate your job. And i was like damn i. I wasn't saying it like that is explained to him. And i was like it. Ain't i hate it. It's just that you know really accomplish dot com or something but when things go wrong i kinda wanna throw myself off a little bit and i feel like you know. There's this toxic relationship between me and my job. And i can see that. It's not sustainable. And then i look at the message was lake mosso to get rid of it. That was me talking to myself. Knows my spirit saying you know. She didn't let her walls down. I'm gonna let a little bit of this out. Because she on some bullshit square told me today feel you say listen figure out what it is you do. Your job is going to make. You is old as balinese do the team. Yeah i'm i'm tired. I just issues wild. Why no one is. I know when is being tired because her as will disappear the face and then for two seconds i'll be late is a me and then i'll be like no no it. Ain't she need a break. I'm picking up on your friend. I just. I'm real topped out in talk talk. Doubt that's the best way to say occurs and you on the plug as you you true sold. Thank you true soldier so lie in. I work in sales. Y'all y'all need to know what i do but girl makes money from time to time right and like i spend the majority of my day talking and Sometimes sometimes which jess wants some silence. I'm glad i'm working in a job that allows me. I have to talk consulate. Yeah and it's And i am moving into another position. So i won't be talking on the phone as much but yeah you a lot of people don't realize in especially in sales that it's a really big energy exchange and it's a lot of energy to be outgoing energy. Yeah word period. Because you've got all day long it's fucking draining. Yeah this this. Is money's not everything but i kind of need it though right in. It's like i've just kind of gun to point where it's like. I've just checked out at work. Because this isn't what i wanna do. I'm we're we're having a real. I'm not gonna smoke. No more you've seen it like. I said spear pushed it out. I'm not trying to say. I'm not grateful for my job. But it's chris. Home on this. I this i need this eighty and i don't know i'm just. I'm just checking here for a check. I'm not interested in going above. And beyond and i actually told my other best friend is. She actually works of me. I actually told her this. I said i'm not. I'm done bending over backwards. I can't. she was also my supervisor. And i said listen. You're the only person if you are a supervisor you. You're the only supervisor that i've been over backwards for her because she made sure i got paid everybody else. I'm not. I'm not interested in doing your labor for free. My goal is to leave group. That's that's tricky. Because like i said. I have things i want things and i gotta have the money in order to have those things but i would like even if i can't fully leave corporate america than i'd like to have something part time that's what i wanna do and then you know even if i didn't leave because i don't who i downgrade i don't hate my job. It's the dynamic. That i mean right now i hate if i could just drop down parts on but i still had like a fool fledging something on the other side that was really lurching issues for me in a field that are work in. And if you listen you guys know filled we work in mammon snotty your business. Now if you don't not explaining it but Sorry not explain it but At least on my side. I don't i don't have a lot of vacation. I can't take a lot of vacations in. it's just. I'm just getting to a point where it's like. I just wanna have fun in life ditch. One a bitch kinda wants to fall in love. You know kinda to go on vacation really just getting to a point where it's like i've just spent so much of my life behind so much. Oh like my late twenties behind the cubicle. And do this. I want to do it. I just wanna live metoo. Snow will making money right. It's nothing wrong with making a lot of money but you so don't sell your soul and just know that this is this is some aren't gyms right now. Okay jim pick it up. Just snow that the more money that you make comes a lot of bullshit with it so before you decide to even say damn..

youtube Shantha seventeen thirty third week today one this week Commie house two seconds one flight chris first week second job anna may second week dot com america eighty three times a year
The Doomsday Clocks Historic Wake-Up Call With Rachel Bronson

Big Brains

05:11 min | 8 months ago

The Doomsday Clocks Historic Wake-Up Call With Rachel Bronson

"Forty five. The united states detonated two atomic bombs over hiroshima and nagasaki. It is harnessing of the basic power. The universe shortly after a group of manhattan project scientists at the university of chicago who helped build the atomic bomb but protested using against people started the bulletin of the atomic scientists. Huge choice is peace or total destruction. the atomic is yeah. They wanted to urge fellow scientists to help shape national and international policy to mitigate the risk of the nuclear technology that they themselves had helped create and they wanted to help the public understand the dangers of nuclear weapons. To the future of humanity world would not be the same. i remember anthony blind from hindu scripture. The by gerrad gita. Now i am become death. Despoil worlds are another in designing the cover of its magazine. The bulletin created something striking o'clock running out of time. It started as artistic piece created by chicago based marta lanes door. She was very to manhattan project. Scientists issues gender stood the scientists concerns about this new technology and the need for public engagement and they had asked her to create some sort of design that would engage the public on. How serious the threat of this new technology. And she said it seven minutes to midnight every year since then. The bulletin set the hands of its metaphorical clock in relation to how close to doomsday. We might be last year. The group moved it to a mere one hundred seconds to midnight. And at the time we got a lot of chiding like it's twenty twenty how come it so close. Do you really believe it's this close and then sure enough. We saw the massive wildfires right outta the gate in in australia. That got repeated in california this year but obviously covid and the inability of the global community to deal effectively with covid is was to us a clear indication of our inability to deal with existential threats. Known some ways you can make an argument that it should have been even closer to midnight this year because you had your existing threats then you had that real life pandemic which is continuing to affect us. How can we didn't go further to midnight. Yeah so in some ways You know we don't want to double count right and so a lot of the warning signs. Were what moved to one hundred seconds to midnight but it is a very dangerous in environment. And we'd we do want to acknowledge that hundred seconds to midnight is dangerous. We do see some bright spots and some opportunities so those bright spots helped us from moving forward but we weren't prepared to move it back. It may be tempting to look at the clock this year and take some hope from the fact that it didn't move closer to but remember it's still the closest to midnight that we have ever been and this year the bolton highlighted new threat one that they said is a threat multiplier to all the other problems that we face with the world health organization called a massive info democ he really grappling with what our trusted new sources. And how do you find them. And how do we share the so. We're all overwhelmed with data and information. But it's very optimistic. When it comes to share it information or what you and i know and so that becomes very disorienting and it becomes Quite dangerous right. It sets up the ability for authoritarian leaders to create their own information and different sites secrete. Their own information will get into the surprising. Ways that this info democ touches every threat factor to the doomsday clock but will start with the issue that was really the canary in the coal. Mine of this info dynamic climate change. The scientists have been warning us for decades and yet they're the ones who have experienced a lot of these issues in terms of misinformation and disinformation. I that denying climate science the marginalization of them the using of science which is kind of about uncertainty and evolution to dismiss what scientists have to say. All of. this was the global warming. And that it's a lot of it's a hoax hoax. Moneymaking industry okay. Climate change is not science. it's religion it pulls the rug out from under scientists and expert exactly the time when such expertise is actually needed and within the context of the us there could be real differences among republicans. Democrats or what you think about market versus regulation. Those are really really important questions that we should be debating fiercely right now that we can when it's being defined as climate change yes or no we can't even have the kind of real political conversations that we should be having

Gerrad Gita Marta Lanes Manhattan Nagasaki Hiroshima University Of Chicago The Bulletin Anthony Chicago United States Australia California Bolton World Health Organization
Project Rainbow and Flying Saucers

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

05:15 min | 10 months ago

Project Rainbow and Flying Saucers

"To kids myths and mysteries. I've your host. Kent chrome today rothwells theory. I'll begin with three assumptions. That most theorists can agree on first that flying saucer did crash near roswell new mexico in july nineteen forty seven second that bodies were recovered from the crash site and third that there are scientists working on projects that are rated above top secret and the us government and military branches are not privy to the thread. That connects the pieces of this theory. Is that the security team surrounding these super top secret. Scientific projects has access to the best technology in the field of stealth investigation and manipulation and are possessed of the ability to control all branches of military as well as federal government with the purpose of keeping these projects secret. Only the purpose of this theory is to establish not just a flying saucers crashed near roswell bodies were retrieved but the source of the flying saucer the nature of the crew and the evidence that security teams protecting various super top secret projects were involved to understand the crash of flying saucer at roswell nineteen forty seven we need to go back four more years to nineteen forty three and parallel projects intended to bring world war two to an end. The project brought to fruition was dubbed. Little boy it was the first atomic bomb. The one that was dropped on hiroshima the first control nuclear reaction was in one thousand nine hundred forty two at the university of chicago's reactor and rico firm oversaw the first controlled energy release from the nucleus of an atom after intense effort. The oakridge plant in tennessee began to produce bomb-grade us to thirty five from nineteen forty two to nineteen forty five manhattan project continued progress toward the end result an atomic bomb now. The parallel project. I mentioned was dubbed project rainbow on august twelve nineteen forty-three. It was leaked. That the us navy conducted a test of some sort on the uss eldridge a d. e. class destroyer at the philadelphia navy yard. The exact nature of this test however is open to speculation that tasks or tests were conducted but only produced undesirable results afterwards. the project was supposedly cancel. Not as the public was led to believe because it failed. But because the manhattan project was moving ahead without a hitch but project rainbow was not only not cancelled. It was not an attempt to make the. Us eldridge invisible nor was his project conducted by the navy. It was simply the a naval vessel was chosen as a guinea pig. The name rainbow was attached to the project because of the nature of a rainbow to start at one point ended another. It was determined that if the navy vessels could be transported from an allied area to a battle zone in a matter of minutes that it could turn the tide of the war project. rainbow was based on is stein's theory on the space time continuum too. Massive tesla coils which acted as electromagnetic generators were utilized. One was mounted forward mounted aft. Other accounts state. Their series of generators called gaza's were us when activated. The electromagnetic field would extend out from the ship when the actual test was put into motion. A number of unexpected. A bizarre side effects occurred as the electromagnetic field increased in strength to begin to extend this for out as a hundred yards from the ship in all directions. Forming a large spear within this field to ship became fuzzy and indistinct and agrees hayes formed around the vessel obscuring it from view eventually the only visible object was the outline of the whole of the eldridge where it entered the water then to the amazement of onlookers. The entire ship vanished from view. It was at this point. The vanishing of the alridge that the true power of electromagnetic field that had been created was revealed. Eldridge had not only banished from the view of observers philadelphia. It had vanished from philadelphia altogether. This ship had been instantly transported several hundred miles away from philadelphia to norfolk virginia. And this was the goal after a few minutes. The ship once again banished to return back to philadelphia the failings of the task to become purposefully obscured and vague. As was the intention of the team that was in charge of keeping project. Remember secret secure. Little boy was dropped on hiroshima august. Six one thousand nine hundred forty five and twenty two days later. Japan's surrender in world. War two was brought to an end but the research on project rainbow continued.

Kent Chrome Roswell Navy Philadelphia Navy Manhattan Us Government New Mexico University Of Chicago Rico Eldridge Tennessee Guinea Stein Philadelphia Gaza Hayes United States Norfolk Virginia
The Big Red Button

Why It Matters

06:28 min | 10 months ago

The Big Red Button

"I'm gabrielle. Sierra and this is why it matters today a look inside the rules for nuclear launch in the united states and the risks of giving one person so much power. Hey i'm alex bill and i name is abigail sto thurston. Bell and stow. Thurston are both experts at the center for arms control and non-proliferation an ngo that focuses on nuclear security. This means they spent every day thinking about how to prevent nuclear war. Okay so the only person that is in charge of launching a nuclear attack is the president. There's no stopgap. There's no other people he asked to consult. There's nothing else just his decision. Yes so there's no requirement that the president consult with anyone they can and our command and control system is designed so that he can get in contact with advisers that he wants to speak to but no requirement that he consult with anyone before we go any further. Let's get our terms straight. There are two kinds of nuclear strikes retaliation. And i use. The details are complex but both are essentially what they sound like. Retaliation involves responding to a nuclear attack with a nuclear attack. I use means being the first to use nuclear weapons in conflict. Neither of these scenarios requires the president to consult with experts. So if the scene with the big board and the president talking to all of his advisors doesn't need to happen. What actually does need to happen. The protocol for launching nuclear weapon is highly secretive but the main components are known. Could you walk me through. How a i use nuclear strike would go down. It basically starts with the president deciding that he wants to use a nuclear weapon. He can decide this because he feels like an attack is imminent on the united states. He can decide it because we're in a conflict and he wants to use a nuclear weapon to end the conflict you know basically escalate so far that the other side will back down or it could just decide. He wants to use a nuclear weapon their issues surrounding whether or not it would be a legal order. But i think in the heat of the moment you're not gonna have a bunch of lawyers running into the room saying i don't think this is legal. He actually has a direct line to the national military command center. This facility run by the pentagon is ready at any minute of the day to receive a launch order remember. The president is the commander in chief of the military. All he has to do is pick up the phone. Indicate the target and the number of weapons he would like to launch. He has something called biscuit which is a little card that has launch codes on them. Someone verifies that is in fact the president giving this order. The order goes out and within five minutes from the president deciding. I want to launch a nuke to nuke in the air. That's how easy it is terrifying short amount of time and terrifyingly easy today and you're relying on the person who has the authority to know and have thought through all of those consequences. We take it for granted that that person will have thought about that before they do it. There's no checker balance to make sure that that presidents in the right head space has thought through everything has talked with our allies. None of that's there and has it always been this way. So historically commanders did have the ability in the eisenhower administration at the beginning of the nuclear age to use nuclear weapons on their own authorities. Should they not be able to get into contact with the president and then it was in the kennedy administration that we really solidify the idea that it should be the president and the president alone that the consequences of nuclear use is so massive that it really should be a decision at the top level. The idea being that. The american public would always electa relational and straight thinking president and And so that's why. This sort of very undemocratic process develops was a bit of a nuclear monarchy. So the idea was that this one person who was elected by all these people would have the wherewithal to make the right decision in this situation. Yeah it was theorized that way but not everybody always agreed with it. In fact during the height of the cold war there was a lot of debate about whether or not this was a good structure and it kind of went to macab places at times where somebody was positing that. Actually you should have the launch codes in a pill inserted inside of the heart of military attache and the president would actually have to kill that military attache to get the codes and be able to kill hundreds of thousands of people. Obviously that was not an actionable plan by theorists at the time is sort of making the case about how much you're putting on the shoulders of one person and whether or not that's a good idea when it comes to a weapon that's capable of flattening cities and and beyond the stakes surrounding the decision to launch a nuclear first strike are as high as they get and since the attacks on hiroshima and nagasaki. No president has done so in an ideal world the president would think and hard and hear a wide range of opinions before undertaking a first strike but when it comes to the other nuclear scenario retaliation the president would not usually have the luxury of time for retaliation you have to be able to decide and execute the retaliation and a very short time. Lsu you risk being wiped out neutralize before you can do. so this is richard vets. He's the director of the saltzman institute of war and peace studies at columbia university. An adjunct senior fellow here at the council he's served on the senate select committee on intelligence the national security council and advised three cia director's. How short is that time. Well that depends on where you are between india and pakistan which right next to each other could be almost instantaneous. for the united states and russia the Time was generally thought to be once. The missile age began about twenty to twenty five minutes list for the united states depending on various technical details.

Alex Bill Abigail Sto Thurston Center For Arms Control And No National Military Command Cent Thurston United States Gabrielle Kennedy Administration Sierra Bell Eisenhower Administration Pentagon Nagasaki Saltzman Institute Of War And Hiroshima Senate Select Committee On Int LSU Columbia University Richard CIA
Do Not Adjust Your TV

Your Brain on Facts

04:10 min | 11 months ago

Do Not Adjust Your TV

"Their feet a lot of the time though. It's simply a matter of broadcasting a stronger signal than the station is the equipment can be sophisticated but it can also be made of scrap. Parts from things like ham radios. The motives vary widely from frustration. To it's just a prank bro. to we don't even know what heads up. There will be real clips in this episode and some of them are weird with a capital. W t f the earliest signal intrusion anywhere in the world that we know of happened back in nineteen sixty six in the soviet city of kaluga and almost triggered a nuclear war. If you know only one thing about world history in the second half of the twentieth century it would probably be the cold war decades of itchy trigger finger tension between the us and the us are one night. The regular broadcast was suddenly interrupted by a seemingly official emergency warning that nuclear war had just broken out with the united states. Many viewers took the message seriously running for cover and seeing their final prayers thankfully as what happened with stanislav petrov. Nineteen eighty-three when he correctly guessed that the early warning system was malfunctioning. When it reported incoming us bombers you can hear all about that way back in episode eleven for want of a nail government. Officials weren't quick to react a good thing to at the time. The ussr had over seven thousand nuclear weapons at their disposal. Ducted eighteen nuclear weapons tests that year alone. The us had nearly four times as many. But that's neither here nor there. It would only take fifty hiroshima sized bombs to plunge the world into nuclear winter. The soviets weren't messing around. If one official had thought another department had put out jim. It message about the us attacking. That could've been the start of a very fast extinction level event thankfully. The officials didn't panic at least not officially it would later be found that a teenager had hacked the station. His name was never released possibly because of his age and possibly to save him from retaliation from his neighbors or maybe it was a made up. Cover story tin foil hat. Nuclear war became a running theme for signal takeovers and it wasn't confined to the cold war in june of two thousand seven a show called panorama was part of the regular programming in the city of prague. In what is now czechia. The show was meant as a sort of tourist program to display calm scenic areas around the country. Like a tv travel brochure. This particular episode started off as usual with long. Lingering shots of picturesque locales around prague. Without warning the screen was bathed in a blinding flash and mushroom cloud began to climb into the sky above the city. This would be disturbing enough to see on its own but panorama was usually aired live meaning terrified viewers. At home were left. They had just witnessed a nuclear strike on their hometown. The hijacking was seamless. There had been no static or breaks in the tv signal. It was so realistic. In fact that even government officials and authorities believed the explosion was real. Luckily it doesn't take many phone calls or glances out of a window to confirm that there is not in fact a mushroom cloud rising above a blast crater in the middle of the city authorities soon turned their energy to finding the perpetrators. It would eventually be discovered that a guerrilla artistic collective called sto hoven which is known for their extravagant hoaxes and pranks were the culprits. Apparently this was a piece of performance art whether or not making hundreds of people think they're about to die.

Kaluga Stanislav Petrov United States Ussr Hiroshima Prague JIM Sto Hoven
"hiroshima" Discussed on Charlotte Readers Podcast

Charlotte Readers Podcast

07:22 min | 1 year ago

"hiroshima" Discussed on Charlotte Readers Podcast

"Yes and if you look further down the line from five years the first five years there was a lot more people that would end up dying As a result from it so it wiped out so quickly on you figure in an instant. Eighty thousand people and very few personnel or locations. Were involved in that Disaster all right so on that sobering. Not we're going to take a short break here and then when we come back. We're going to dive in some of the culture. We're gonna talk about the day of the bombing. Renew the ryan life segment. And we got one eight. So hey. Please stay with us listeners. Thank you listeners. I like to share some information with you. bet four more important players are literally community and They're also supporters of the podcast spark publications charlotte charlotte writer's club and north carolina. Riders network sparked provocations is one of the early supporters and they have been sending may some wonderful authors some well-designed books they are an award. Winning independent publishing firm helps authors. Bring their work life. There were strategically with authors complete. Their manuscripts does other covers books for marketability rich to their aspin's and arbor congress numbers proof-read managed the options market and much more. Talk more about how you can publish a nonfiction. Our book for the sport of inexperienced team checkout spark publications dot com charlotte. Lip pillow is known as charlotte center. arts is an organization which i'm a number. It's a nonprofit arts center whose mission is to celebrate the literary arts educating and engaging writers and readers to classes conversations and community i really enjoy participating in those classes by themselves and i do too as a valued in vital part of charlotte arts community and become a premier creative writing center for the region. Find out more about them and how to participate at charlotte dot more for ninety eight years. The charlotte club has continued to offer a supportive right environment in greater charlotte community. I was a board member of that organization for a few years recently really enjoyed the participating that way and also in their regular meetings their contest in their community organizations they offer a monthly newsletter for meetings speakers. Yeah our speaker chairman to lead you. Take groups of the mics. And they offer writing workshops writing contests and find out more about Charlotte rogers club at charlotte. Writer's club dot war. I'm also remember the northbound riders network. They offer six annual competitions. Three annual conferences. And i think attended all three of those many online classes at critiquing editing services for their members. They server fourteen hundred members in the northland beyond and all genres and all levels of experience with all manner published credits to find out more about the northbound rights network. check out in see writers dot for as a writer and a reader. I have benefited from participating in all three of these writing organizations. Sean club charlotte lit and north on riders network. Spent a great experience for me. I also enjoy collaborating with spark obligations meeting Interviewing your authors and looking for work if you'd like to check out what each of these sports has the offer Good our show notes. Scroll the bottom. And you'll find information about each one links and also the promo code listeners. I'm back with kathleen birkenshaw. She's the author of the last cherry blossom. It's a it's a young adult novel for children who are trying to understand the horror of the What happened in august of nineteen forty-five when the bomb dropped on hiroshima and got a little rating that gets into some of the culture Kathleen say to set up this reading. This takes place where they had. These events called shohei potties and they were basically whenever someone was conscripted untold to fight for the emperor. They would have a little get together so people could go on to say provided now. I wish them luck as well as Be able to take them off to the training kind of being with them all of that so it was a quite often of a response. That happened in her count and she lived in at her. Papa actually had some extra money in a used as extra rations so that he could then help them. Have those parties to celebrate could send the men oft An interesting i'd like to say about that is a lot of times for the young men. They didn't always want to go They were they sometimes. Were a threatened that something would happen to their parents. If they didn't go on they also did not choose to sign up to do the kamikaze bombing as They like to show in a lot of movies. A lot of that is they. Were very scared. Young boys who were told to do with needed to do and sometimes to protect their family and the military was very me to their own people in japan as well so So before you start. I'm just curious but one thing because there was this deification of the emperor in japan that He was like a god that he didn't speak publicly. That maybe the first time they heard and speak was after the bomb drop. Oh so what was your mother's understanding of the emperor of before and after. He was shaimaa well before she believed like everybody else did that. He was a deputy and you know the the reverence that they had for him that could look upon his picture when they had the school assemblies in the morning and then she said she was just very confused when after the war. They said that wasn't true anymore. He was just a man and he the emperor but he wouldn't. You wasn't what they originally ought and she didn't quite get that because it was very hard to go from what you've been taught for twelve years then all of a sudden updates so that's not true anymore and she said it just made her out of other things in her childhood of what they would talk about the war and that's what she started to find out more about what was really happening in why men signed up to go to war and how some of them had to leave and i think for her. It was just kind of a a discover that she didn't expect to make into it really kind of shook her because she didn't know who to believe or what to believe. Afterwards i think it really set hurts beyond the fence and they really fight for something that was worth it. Okay well let's let's if you would read this little section and we'll talk about it as we approached the are. I noticed a photographer taking a picture of what is on her son. Judo under the shade. Of the gingko tree i had learned at the first show hit heidi. I'd attended that this last family portrait was taken in case. The sun die while fighting for japan. Doodo sam looks much older in his army uniform that he did when he was a mechanic. Covered in grease stains. You define actually looks quite handsome. Might chico set..

charlotte japan charlotte arts community charlotte center. arts Charlotte rogers club charlotte club Writer kathleen birkenshaw Judo north carolina writer chairman Doodo sam heidi Papa hiroshima
A Kennedy is on the ballot in Massachusetts. Here's why he's not guaranteed a victory.

Erin Burnett OutFront

03:47 min | 1 year ago

A Kennedy is on the ballot in Massachusetts. Here's why he's not guaranteed a victory.

"And out front up next we're. Just. From one of the most closely watched primaries this year a young Kennedy on the ballot in Massachusetts but can he unseat a seventy four year old incumbent? Because it's about ideas I am the youngest guy. In. This race. Tonight and the fight for twenty twenty a usual dynamic emerging Massachusetts ahead of tomorrow's Democratic Senate primary. The incumbent in his seventies was support from progressives, his challenger young and Kennedy Manu. Raju is out front. The Hiroshima Political Dynasty the grandson of the leap Robert F Kennedy campaigning to serve in the Senate like his famous great uncles and grandfather before him the. Certainly. I think you're doing great job. Hello. The candidate he's right there. For Life Magazine. Thirty nine year old Joe. Kennedy is facing something unexpected. Seventy four year old senator who has been in Congress for almost forty four years. Has Managed to galvanize support of young voters. Ahead of Tuesday's Massachusetts Senate primary I think that a lot of young people that are our age at least. From from our town have been similarly really inspired by Ed Markey polls show Senator Ed Markey as the favourite threatening to make the four term. The first Kennedy to lose a race in Massachusetts unlike other primaries this year were democratic incumbents have been ousted by liberal newcomers. Marquis has managed to turn that dynamic on its head because it's about ideas. I am the youngest guy. In this race Alexandria, it's been murky seizing the mantle of the insurgent, touting his support of liberal causes at the green new deal and endorsement of the progressive firebrand. Alexandria Cossio Cortes such the green new deal that I introduced Alexandria Cossio. Healthcare justice is on the ballot. That's Medicare for all that I next the Bernie. Sanders. When he introduced it yet, it's been Kennedy with the badging of the party establishment leader Speaker Nancy Pelosi Allies have been frustrated that marquee has not been held to account for full record over four decades like his backing of the Iraq war in two thousand and two the NAFTA deal in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, three, his position on racial issues like school desegregation dating back to the nineteen seventies progressive willing to look those hurdles that's up to a progressive movement. Out. I think an awful lot of folks in many parts of Massachusetts have a different view of that records and what that means to our communities after going door to door in working class Boston neighbors weekend. Kennedy. Accused Marquis of abandoning the state. He's been less time in the state than anybody else delegation in an interview with CNN Marquis fired back there is. No real record of Congressman Kennedy in his eight years leading on issues of of generational change in Washington Kennedy has waited until late in the campaign to stress that it's his family I. Guess It's a fighting. His blood wants to continue in the Senate tried to be really clear that it's GonNa Balance It's not my father, my grandfather brothers or anybody else and. You vote for me you're going to get now Kennedy does pull off an upset on Tuesday night it could be thanks in part to the fact that he is allies have spent more on television advertising than Markey and his allies roughly two million dollars more. But if he loses what Kennedy will do next still an open question we posed that question to him he didn't want to entertain it and said, he looks forward to running through the finish line and celebrating on Tuesday night.

Congressman Kennedy Kennedy Manu Massachusetts Senator Ed Markey Robert F Kennedy Marquis Massachusetts Senate Senate Democratic Senate Alexandria Cossio Alexandria Hiroshima Political Dynasty Senator Life Magazine Raju CNN Speaker Nancy Pelosi Iraq Sanders
Nagasaki urges nuke ban on 75th anniversary of US A-bombing

WBZ Morning News

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Nagasaki urges nuke ban on 75th anniversary of US A-bombing

"City of Nagasaki, marking the 75th anniversary of the U. S atomic bombing on August 9th, the city's mayor and a dwindling number of survivors Calling on world leaders to doom or to bring a nuclear weapons ban. It was at 11 02 AM Nagasaki survivors stood in silence, marking the moment in American B 29 dropped a £10,000 a plutonium bomb. Dubbed Fat Man. More than 70,000 were killed three days earlier. On August 6th, the US dropped a bomb on Hiroshima in the first ever nuclear attack, killing 140,000 people. Japan surrendered on August 15th marking the end of World War two. Many survivors of the two bombings developed cancer and other illnesses from exposure. To radiation.

Nagasaki Hiroshima United States Japan U. S
"hiroshima" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:16 min | 1 year ago

"hiroshima" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Seventy, five years ago, this week, the B twenty, nine, bomber, Nola gay dropped little boy, the world's first use of an atomic weapon. At Eight fifteen in the morning of August six Japanese time. The first atomic thumb has done enemy talk. It detonated over. Hiroshima immediately killing around one hundred and forty. Thousand People I'm was aimed to explode about zero point. In the city at the junction of. Untold River. Three days later, another stroke sake. As Japan marks the anniversary, it hopes to keep the wartime memories alive using the stories of people who survived the attacks. On all. Holland. But the average age of survivors is now over eighty three. But those. This'll be the last chance to hear from those witnesses during a major anniversary. August sixth nineteen forty five was supposed to be a day off for seventeen year old. Takeo to Toco. No Snyder is the economists Tokyo Bureau chief. She had made plans to meet two girlfriends at eight fifteen owning at a train station on the west side of Shema. She was running late, and then she stepped outside, she saw flash and heard a bang. Which you regained consciousness, she found herself lying thirty meters away a mushroom cloud rising over the city. People with charts skin peeling from their arms rushing over a nearby hillside. Mr K. Ohka left's to look for her mother. and. Found rivers filled with bodies took her six days to locate her mom who is still miraculously alive. Mom lived for another twenty two years. We stuck ohka became a prominent voice amongst the hypocrisy shower, atomic bomb survivors, atomic sufferers. Telling Her story abroad many times in hopes of preventing atomic bombs from ever being used again. I heard this tale from her daughter. He got no. Mario. Who's part of a fascinating unique project underway in both your Sima Nagasaki to help preserve the stories, of Hypoxia, <hes> for generations to come to, how does this project work? So there are still some hundred and thirty thousand living. inbox. <hes>. Amiss. Gone. But their average age is now over eighty three and the number who can tell their stories publicly is declining drastically. Just. You got the fact that could have done this. So the city government's in both fishermen sake have been recruiting scores of volunteers like music Otieno to become <hes> what they call dense Shosha or legacies successors. These are essentially memory keepers, people who learned the stories of the hypoxia down to the most gruesome details in order to be able to retell them with power and veracity for years into the future do. So the volunteers in, Hiroshima, have to go through a rather rigorous course, three years of study training discussion with hypoxia before they're allowed to retell the stories in public. Ms Higashi, no is somewhat unusual in that. She inherited own story, most of the Dan Shosha, take on a stranger's burden. And it simply because that's that generation of of survivors passing that the these city governments have started this program. Yeah, it is. It's really reflective of the anxiety that many people in here, C.`mon, Nagasaki and throughout Japan feel about fading wartime memories I'm what will happen. Once this generation firsthand witnesses passes away the city governments and the peace museums. Atomic bomb museums in both cities have been collecting and recording testimony for many years. But this then social program is away, they hope to preserve these memories in living form to retain the emotional impact. The comes from searing these stories from another human being. and. So where does this fit in with the the wider of up the bombing of of the war in Japan? For Japan, the Hiroshima Experience became central to wartime memory and park has some scholars have argued because it allows victim narrative to dominate shifting the focus away from the atrocities Japanese soldiers committed abroad in Asia and the Pacific certainly oaks in China and Korea have bristled at the lack of context that some of the retailing's of the aroma and Nagasaki experiences or trey. and. If you look at Japan today, it's of course, wrestling a new with the legacy of the Second World War and its aftermath in particular the constitution that America imposed on Japan after the war, which renounces war bars Japan from maintaining armed forces. In practice, Japan does maintain a powerful military which it calls the Self Defense Forces and its Prime Minister Obey Shinzo years has hoped to change the constitution to revise the constitution in order to make explicit that Japan's military is constitutional and and perhaps to expand the limits of what they're allowed to do. Curiously, the public still supports maintaining the postwar constitution. So in short pacifism is still deep seated in today's Japan. and. What about the the the effort of auction others to to learn the lessons of the second. World War d? How does nuclear non-proliferation look at this stage from where you are. Well. This is another source for concern. Of course, non-proliferation efforts in recent years have been faltering just this January. The Bulletin of Atomic Scientists. It's doomsday clock. It's subjective measure of our proximity to self-annihilation closer to midnight than anytime since its establishment in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, seven, the hawks are are pleased and take solace in the signing of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in two, thousand, seventeen, it invokes there unacceptable suffering in its preamble and a nod to how the memory of interesting Nagasaki continues to shape non-proliferation efforts globally yet at the same time, no country with nuclear weapons has signed up to that treaty neither has Japan in fact, which shelters under America's nuclear umbrella. And, and how does that sit with Hypoxia at this stage at this anniversary being marked. I spoke with US Akihiko the governor of the prefecture, and he expressed the view that I heard from many others both your seem sake, which was a wish that Japan would use its moral authority as the only victim of atomic weapons to push harder for their abolition. The hypocrisy. Have Long gramps and spoken about abolishing the bomb before the last houses away. Just to make the do. You call. You can. That's unlikely. But the hypocrisy hope that their stories at the very least. Deter the world from ever using his weapons again. Thank you very much for your time. Thank you very much for having me.

Japan Hypoxia Hiroshima Nagasaki Bulletin of Atomic Scientists Sima Nagasaki Untold River Mr K. Ohka Dan Shosha Toco America Takeo Holland Ms Higashi Snyder Tokyo Bureau chief Mario US
That history should not repeat: Hiroshimas storytellers

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:16 min | 1 year ago

That history should not repeat: Hiroshimas storytellers

"Seventy, five years ago, this week, the B twenty, nine, bomber, Nola gay dropped little boy, the world's first use of an atomic weapon. At Eight fifteen in the morning of August six Japanese time. The first atomic thumb has done enemy talk. It detonated over. Hiroshima immediately killing around one hundred and forty. Thousand People I'm was aimed to explode about zero point. In the city at the junction of. Untold River. Three days later, another stroke sake. As Japan marks the anniversary, it hopes to keep the wartime memories alive using the stories of people who survived the attacks. On all. Holland. But the average age of survivors is now over eighty three. But those. This'll be the last chance to hear from those witnesses during a major anniversary. August sixth nineteen forty five was supposed to be a day off for seventeen year old. Takeo to Toco. No Snyder is the economists Tokyo Bureau chief. She had made plans to meet two girlfriends at eight fifteen owning at a train station on the west side of Shema. She was running late, and then she stepped outside, she saw flash and heard a bang. Which you regained consciousness, she found herself lying thirty meters away a mushroom cloud rising over the city. People with charts skin peeling from their arms rushing over a nearby hillside. Mr K. Ohka left's to look for her mother. and. Found rivers filled with bodies took her six days to locate her mom who is still miraculously alive. Mom lived for another twenty two years. We stuck ohka became a prominent voice amongst the hypocrisy shower, atomic bomb survivors, atomic sufferers. Telling Her story abroad many times in hopes of preventing atomic bombs from ever being used again. I heard this tale from her daughter. He got no. Mario. Who's part of a fascinating unique project underway in both your Sima Nagasaki to help preserve the stories, of Hypoxia, for generations to come to, how does this project work? So there are still some hundred and thirty thousand living. inbox. Amiss. Gone. But their average age is now over eighty three and the number who can tell their stories publicly is declining drastically. Just. You got the fact that could have done this. So the city government's in both fishermen sake have been recruiting scores of volunteers like music Otieno to become what they call dense Shosha or legacies successors. These are essentially memory keepers, people who learned the stories of the hypoxia down to the most gruesome details in order to be able to retell them with power and veracity for years into the future do. So the volunteers in, Hiroshima, have to go through a rather rigorous course, three years of study training discussion with hypoxia before they're allowed to retell the stories in public. Ms Higashi, no is somewhat unusual in that. She inherited own story, most of the Dan Shosha, take on a stranger's burden. And it simply because that's that generation of of survivors passing that the these city governments have started this program. Yeah, it is. It's really reflective of the anxiety that many people in here, C.`mon, Nagasaki and throughout Japan feel about fading wartime memories I'm what will happen. Once this generation firsthand witnesses passes away the city governments and the peace museums. Atomic bomb museums in both cities have been collecting and recording testimony for many years. But this then social program is away, they hope to preserve these memories in living form to retain the emotional impact. The comes from searing these stories from another human being. and. So where does this fit in with the the wider of up the bombing of of the war in Japan? For Japan, the Hiroshima Experience became central to wartime memory and park has some scholars have argued because it allows victim narrative to dominate shifting the focus away from the atrocities Japanese soldiers committed abroad in Asia and the Pacific certainly oaks in China and Korea have bristled at the lack of context that some of the retailing's of the aroma and Nagasaki experiences or trey. and. If you look at Japan today, it's of course, wrestling a new with the legacy of the Second World War and its aftermath in particular the constitution that America imposed on Japan after the war, which renounces war bars Japan from maintaining armed forces. In practice, Japan does maintain a powerful military which it calls the Self Defense Forces and its Prime Minister Obey Shinzo years has hoped to change the constitution to revise the constitution in order to make explicit that Japan's military is constitutional and and perhaps to expand the limits of what they're allowed to do. Curiously, the public still supports maintaining the postwar constitution. So in short pacifism is still deep seated in today's Japan. and. What about the the the effort of auction others to to learn the lessons of the second. World War d? How does nuclear non-proliferation look at this stage from where you are. Well. This is another source for concern. Of course, non-proliferation efforts in recent years have been faltering just this January. The Bulletin of Atomic Scientists. It's doomsday clock. It's subjective measure of our proximity to self-annihilation closer to midnight than anytime since its establishment in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, seven, the hawks are are pleased and take solace in the signing of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in two, thousand, seventeen, it invokes there unacceptable suffering in its preamble and a nod to how the memory of interesting Nagasaki continues to shape non-proliferation efforts globally yet at the same time, no country with nuclear weapons has signed up to that treaty neither has Japan in fact, which shelters under America's nuclear umbrella. And, and how does that sit with Hypoxia at this stage at this anniversary being marked. I spoke with US Akihiko the governor of the prefecture, and he expressed the view that I heard from many others both your seem sake, which was a wish that Japan would use its moral authority as the only victim of atomic weapons to push harder for their abolition. The hypocrisy. Have Long gramps and spoken about abolishing the bomb before the last houses away. Just to make the do. You call. You can. That's unlikely. But the hypocrisy hope that their stories at the very least. Deter the world from ever using his weapons again. Thank you very much for your time. Thank you very much for having me.

Japan Hypoxia Hiroshima Nagasaki Bulletin Of Atomic Scientists Sima Nagasaki Untold River Mr K. Ohka Dan Shosha Toco America Takeo Holland Ms Higashi Snyder Tokyo Bureau Chief Mario United States
Hiroshima: Atomic Blast That Changed The World Turns 75

WBZ Midday News

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Hiroshima: Atomic Blast That Changed The World Turns 75

"The United States dropped the first of two nuclear bombs on Japan. We are delaying the start of our scheduled program to bring you the latest direct report on the atomic bomb attack on Japan. It was on CBS radio, where Americans heard from correspondents like Webley Edwards report on the bombing of Hiroshima in Guam. We can W. Tibbets Jr of Miami, Florida. Out of the B 29 the first atomic bomb in history. Hired in 1957 former CBS radio correspondent Marvin Kalb worked with the generation of journalists who covered that bombing. Everything was dependent upon what President Truman or his top officials wanted to share with the American people, and that was very, very little. In fact, it would be weeks after the bombing. American journalists would even be allowed to report first hand from the destroyed Japanese city. Steve Dorsey, CBS

CBS Japan Cbs Radio Marvin Kalb W. Tibbets Jr President Truman Steve Dorsey Webley Edwards United States Hiroshima Guam Miami Florida
Hiroshima: Atomic Blast That Changed The World Turns 75

Mark and Melynda

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Hiroshima: Atomic Blast That Changed The World Turns 75

"In Japan move to bring in a moment of silence 75 years to the day after the U. S dropped the first atomic bomb mayor of Hiroshima, urging world leaders to commit seriously to abandoning nuclear weapons. The bomb killed an estimated 140,000 people and was followed by another attack on Nagasaki before Japan surrendered ending

Japan Hiroshima Nagasaki U. S
Survivor of World's First Nuclear Attack Recounts Hiroshima Bombing 75 Years Later

Brian Mudd

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Survivor of World's First Nuclear Attack Recounts Hiroshima Bombing 75 Years Later

"Explosion this 1 75 years ago and now an urgency for survivors of the atomic bombing in Hiroshima, Japan. Fox's Simon Owen reports. Hideko Tamara was 10 years old when her home in Hiroshima, Japan, collapsed around her. It's 75 years since the U. S launched the world's first nuclear bomb attack. I don't want this happened to anybody else ever again, now 85 Tamara is among a dwindling number of survivors. But it's still warning against the use of nuclear weapons. My health is fragile. And I'm doing this not because on physically really in top shape and able But because I'm so determined the attack helped end will board too, But it killed 140,000 people. Simon Oh, in Fox News

Hideko Tamara Hiroshima Japan Simon Owen Simon Oh FOX Fox News
Survivor of world's first nuclear attack recounts Hiroshima bombing 75 years later

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

Survivor of world's first nuclear attack recounts Hiroshima bombing 75 years later

"For survivors of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, Japan. 75 years after the attack. Fox's Simon Owen has that story. Hideko Tamara was 10 years old when her home in Hiroshima, Japan, collapsed around him. It's 75 years since the U. S launched the world's first nuclear bomb attack. I don't want this happen to anybody else ever again, now 85 Tamara is among a dwindling number of survivors. It is still warning against the use of nuclear weapons. My health is fragile. And I'm doing this not because I'm physically really in top shape and able But because I'm so determined The attack helped end World War two, but it killed 140,000 people. Simon Oh

Hideko Tamara Hiroshima Simon Owen Simon Oh Japan FOX Japan.
Hiroshima marks 75th anniversary of atomic attack

Morning Edition

00:59 sec | 1 year ago

Hiroshima marks 75th anniversary of atomic attack

"Marked the 75th anniversary of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima today with a ceremony that was scaled down because of the pandemic. As NPR's Anthony Koon reports from Seoul. The bombing killed 140,000 people, most of them civilians. Participants observed a minute of silence at 8:15 a.m. At a ceremony in Hiroshima's peace Park. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe remarked that as the only country to suffer an atomic bombing, Japan must work for the elimination of nuclear weapons. Hiroshi Montemayor. Kazumi Matsui pointed out, though, that Japan itself has refused to sign a U. N treaty to ban atomic bombs. In a videotaped message, U N Secretary General Antonio Good, Harish lamented the fact that Postwar arms control agreements are unraveling. Japan still has more than 136,000 survivors of two atomic bombings. Their average age is over 83 there are 9200 fewer of them than last year.

Japan Hiroshima Prime Minister Shinzo Abe Kazumi Matsui Hiroshi Montemayor Anthony Koon Seoul NPR Peace Park Antonio Good Harish U. N
"hiroshima" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"hiroshima" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Form or former Audi executives in Germany or facing charges stemming from a global scandal. Howdy was at the heart of the emissions cheating scandal that erupted within the Volkswagen Group nearly five years ago. Engineers of the company first developed the software, which was later used by Volkswagen to manipulate emissions testing in the United States. The three former board members are accused of having allowed affected cars to be sold despite having been aware of the manipulation. A former head of department is charged with having initiated the development of engines equipped with the illegal software. The former chief executive of Audi Rupert Stadler, was himself charged with fraud last year and is due in court in September 2. BBC's Theo like it Survivors of the world's first atomic bombing have gathered in diminished numbers near an iconic, heavily damaged dome marking the 75th anniversary of the attack on Hiroshima. News and analysis a townhall dot com UConn becomes the first FBS program to cancel the 2020 21 football season because of the pandemic. Yukon Athletic Director David Benedict says competition would place student athletes at an unacceptable level of risk. Other schools that are already taken the Huskies off their schedules and governor Ned Lamont was reluctant to allow Yukon to travel to states with high infection rates. LeMond said the Huskies would be subject to the States 14 day quarantine rule After returning from away games. Yukon had been preparing for its first season as an independent after leaving the American Athletic Conference. Jeremy House reported. Julie Baseball is cracking down on Corona virus safety protocols mandating that players and staff where face coverings at all times, including in the dugouts and bullpens, except for players on the field of play. God of all Street this hour. The Dow futures are down 75 points more on these stories, the townhall dot com Individual results. Very exclusions apply. Imagine feeling the freedom of 2020.

Audi United States Yukon chief executive Volkswagen Group Yukon Athletic Volkswagen Huskies Ned Lamont Germany Hiroshima American Athletic Conference BBC Jeremy House Julie Baseball LeMond Theo David Benedict fraud
Hiroshima marks 75th anniversary of atomic attack

BBC World Service

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Hiroshima marks 75th anniversary of atomic attack

"The ceremony is being held in the Japanese city of Hiroshima to mark the 75th anniversary of the world's first atomic bomb attack. Oshima's may urge Mohr International cooperation to face global threats like the covert 19 pandemic. In a video message played at the ceremony, the United Nations Secretary General Antonio Guterres, Fish paid tribute to Hiroshima's resilience 75 years ago was single Lukla weapon brought unspeakable death and destruction upon this city. Effects linger to this day. The city and its people, However, if chosen not to be characterized by calamity, but instead by resiliency, conciliation and

Hiroshima Mohr International Oshima Secretary General Antonio Gute United Nations Fish
"hiroshima" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"hiroshima" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"From ABC News. I'm Richard Cancer. Deutschebank, long time financier of Donald Trump is complied with the subpoena and surrender trumps past financial records of the Manhattan district attorney. The New York Times says the bank turned over the records, including financial statements Trump submitted to it. Financial records produced by the bank to prosecutors could be a major piece of the puzzle when it comes to an investigation of possible bank and insurance fraud by the Trump Organization. A lawsuit by Trump is still pending. Seeking to keep the wraps on other records about his holding ABC News legal analyst Royal Oaks the president repeated his claim that despite rising pandemic numbers, the virus will disappear with more than a dozen states reporting rising covert positive tests and deaths. The president insisting he is right about his prediction. The virus will vanish. It's going away now it will go away. Things go away. Absolutely. It's You know where my mind will go at Virus Trackers show covert case is rising in 15 states over the last two weeks, and he's failed. ABC NEWS Washington The president's sparking controversy with musings about making his nomination acceptance speech from the White House. That would be a first Democratic Party announced that Joe Biden would not go to Milwaukee to accept the nomination, opting instead to deliver his speech from Delaware. Hiroshima, marking the 75th anniversary of the world's first atomic bombing that shattered the city killed 140,000 people. Peace activists Coco Condo was an infant when the bomb hit in 1945.

Donald Trump president Trump Organization ABC News Virus Trackers ABC Coco Condo Richard Cancer Joe Biden Democratic Party Hiroshima Manhattan Delaware Milwaukee Royal Oaks analyst White House
"hiroshima" Discussed on Between The Lines

Between The Lines

09:42 min | 1 year ago

"hiroshima" Discussed on Between The Lines

"This bomb has this frank for twenty thousand tons of TNT. . Harnessing, , the basic power of the universe. . What I fifteen I am on August six, , nine, , hundred, , forty, , five, , the US Air Force dropped the little boy uranium fission bomb on central hero. . Shema. . Making it the first city ever to be destroyed by a nuclear bomb. . On August nine Nagy became the second when the bomb exploded around thirty percent of Hiroshima's population that were killed instantly many more died in the months and years to come. . Now, , the bombs brought to an end to world war two but the wool was horrified at the human cost. . Russia has since become a byword for nuclear holocaust forever linked to the words never again. . Now, this , week marks the seventy fifth anniversary of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki joining me to reflect on the legacy of those events. . Tashi. . Tauch. . She is assistant professor at Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service and the author of political fallout, , nuclear weapons testing, , and the making of Global Environmental Crosses. . Welcome. . Tasha. . Thanks for having me and Michael Gordon Professor of history at Princeton University and Co. . it is a of a new book called the age of Russia. . Welcome. . Welcome. . It's very good to be here. . Now, , Michael the fear of the nuclear age is the period after World War Two when the US dropped the bomb. . The fee was that the nuclear weapons would become a common part of conventional warfare but in the seventy five years since he Russia and Nagasaki, , there's not been a single bomb dropped in a conflict. . Question is this because deterrence works or have we just been lucky I would say we've mostly been lucky <hes>. . It's quite rare that there are conflicts between nuclear-armed nations. . The major example is the nineteen sixty, , nine border conflict between the People's Republic of China and the Soviet Union. . So there haven't been many occasions for things to escalate, , and there's a strong incentive in those cases to de-escalate. . There have however been very close near accidents whether missile just that needing on its own or people launching almost launching in fear of an attack and there. . Have Been Plenty of conventional wars that could have escalated that way. . So by and large, , we've been lucky but we've been abetted by the fact that there has been an ambient taboo that has grown over the years against nuclear first use although that is rarely the policy of any nuclear power. . Okay. . Now from an Australian perspective, , Tic- Japan was seen as an aggressor in the war, , the war crimes but also as a victim because of the destruction wrought by the nuclear bombs have is the wool remit in Japan now aggressor and victim. . Tarshi. . Many pass through consider themselves as victims thinking that Japanese were misled by the government inter- Disastrous Wall Conquest. . In this view here stands at the as the ultimate symbol of Japanese victim. . But today is victim narrative faces two competing accounts. . One is to recognize Japan's acts of wartime aggression, , including tweeting massacres, , forced labor, , and sexual violence. . If we see hero Shimmer from this perspective, , it takes on a whole different meaning not. . Not as a national tragedy, , but rather as international event. . killed not only the Japanese residents but also many colonial subjects and allied. . POW's who are present in the city at the time of the Tom Bombing. . The other interpretation that has also gained for Japan is to see the wartime conduct Japan as an act of self defense. . This This lesion is narrative recaps here. . As the ultimate proof of Western aggression. . So fitting the predation of Japan's Joel Roles as. . Aggressor and victim during the war will gain the upper hand in the future will depend on how sweet society around the world comes together and develops a shared understanding of the complex legacies or Corna reason on the war in the Asia Pacific region and back to the United States markle. . There's a popular conception that Washington had to drop the bomb that it was the only way. . To win the war, , of course, , the war in Europe come to an end in May of forty five. . This is early August two, , forty five is that true I mean what? ? What President Truman's options? ? So. . This is a great question and it's one with a lot of confusion around it. . Functionally. The . only way the only government that had any power to end the war was the Japanese government which was in a position to surrender and the question was when would that happen would have happened later or earlier by summer nineteen, , forty, , five, , it was already clear that the war was militarily lost. . <hes> President Truman and the US government in general had basically fixed options of what they could do to try and encourage the Japanese government to take that move. . There's only two that people usually talk about dropping the atomic bomb or invading the home islands of Japan. . Both of those were on the table also having the Soviet Union inducing them to enter the wars of belligerent which happened on August eighth increasing the intensity of firebombing tightening the blockade of foodstuffs into the home islands. . <hes> and modifying the terms of unconditional surrender to allow Japan to keep the emperor. . The interesting thing is all six of those happen Truman pursued all sex and the war ended. . It's unclear which ones were determinative. . But the point is there wasn't like we had one option or nothing else. . The US had plenty of options and exercised actually all of them. . On the one level target for the bombs was obviously Japan on another level. . Real target was the Soviet Union. . How did the Kremlin of you? ? He Russia Mirror Negga? ? Second Markle. . So. . Really, , the question here is a small set of people within the Kremlin stolen and his closest advisers and you that there was an atomic bomb project going on in the United States for years they've found that out from spies from Britain from spies in the United States, , and they had their own uranium enrichment and bomb development program that was going on at I would say a medium scale <hes>. . What happens after the destruction of Hiroshima is I in <hes> absented himself for a few days he went into a depression and didn't. . React to any of his advisors and then immediately massively escalated the Soviet development of their own atomic bomb. . So they were both caught by surprise and not caught by surprise. . It's true that the Americans <hes> didn't always think about the Soviet Union as a factor in any decision related to how the war was going to end but they also very strongly, , we understood that the key issue was trying to get this the Japanese government to surrender faster because the faster they surrendered the less impact. . The Soviet entry in the war would have to how the end game would play out in Asia, , my guest, , Michael Gordon, , and Tashi Hitachi, , and we're reflecting on the seventy fifth anniversary of Hiroshima. . Tashi. . One, , hundred fifty thousand atomic bomb survivors still living in Japan. . In fact, , as a guest of Japan's Ministry of Foreign. . Affairs this would have been in September twenty, , sixteen I met one of one of the survivors now they're all in education and public law has plied an important part in shaping Japan's post-war Pacifism. . Now, , as generation dies out, , is the role of pessimism in Japanese politics is that diminishing especially in the face of Rausing China Toshi? ? I don't think the passing of the atomic bomb survivors will diminish the strengths of pacifism in any short-term. . The correctly memory of human magazine Japan has been fairly robust and the taken deep roots in popular culture. . I can think of a good example that is <hes> Japanese animated wartime drama film released just four years ago in two thousand, , sixteen cold in this corner of the world. . This picture <unk> accounts of the wartime life in here she was a smash hit in the box office. . Be, , atomic bomb survivors will also active in passing down lessons from the world's first nuclear war to the next generation. . The city's over here streaming nagy training. . Many Japanese Ron Tears as storytellers who share the testimonies are waging victims and a second generation survivors are spearheading efforts for peace unjustice. . Well, , that brings me to today and really in the last that he is the end of the call was thirty years ago the US. . And the Soviets on Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty non stop this was President Bush senior and Gorbachev in Russia in the inside at Union. . Then just as it was collapsing now, both , agree to significantly reduce their nuclear stockpiles and of course, , the updated treaty between Moscow and Washington that expose I. . Think it's February Knicks Jeez. . So that's just a few days after the next president is warning Michael Do you think it will be resigned. . I think that's entirely dependent on the results of the election. . Joe. . Biden has indicated that he would refine the treaty <hes>. . The trump administration has had many opportunities to re-sign the treaty, , but they have not taken advantage of those opportunities yet. . Russia's indicated that they're very interested in extending

Soviet Union Japan United States Markle Hiroshima Truman Ron Tears Japanese government Tashi Hitachi Russia Asia Rausing China depression Ministry of Foreign Michael Gordon Britain absented
75 years after Hiroshima, they're still feeling its impact.

Between The Lines

09:42 min | 1 year ago

75 years after Hiroshima, they're still feeling its impact.

"This bomb has this frank for twenty thousand tons of TNT. Harnessing, the basic power of the universe. What I fifteen I am on August six, nine, hundred, forty, five, the US Air Force dropped the little boy uranium fission bomb on central hero. Shema. Making it the first city ever to be destroyed by a nuclear bomb. On August nine Nagy became the second when the bomb exploded around thirty percent of Hiroshima's population that were killed instantly many more died in the months and years to come. Now, the bombs brought to an end to world war two but the wool was horrified at the human cost. Russia has since become a byword for nuclear holocaust forever linked to the words never again. Now, this week marks the seventy fifth anniversary of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki joining me to reflect on the legacy of those events. Tashi. Tauch. She is assistant professor at Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service and the author of political fallout, nuclear weapons testing, and the making of Global Environmental Crosses. Welcome. Tasha. Thanks for having me and Michael Gordon Professor of history at Princeton University and Co. it is a of a new book called the age of Russia. Welcome. Welcome. It's very good to be here. Now, Michael the fear of the nuclear age is the period after World War Two when the US dropped the bomb. The fee was that the nuclear weapons would become a common part of conventional warfare but in the seventy five years since he Russia and Nagasaki, there's not been a single bomb dropped in a conflict. Question is this because deterrence works or have we just been lucky I would say we've mostly been lucky It's quite rare that there are conflicts between nuclear-armed nations. The major example is the nineteen sixty, nine border conflict between the People's Republic of China and the Soviet Union. So there haven't been many occasions for things to escalate, and there's a strong incentive in those cases to de-escalate. There have however been very close near accidents whether missile just that needing on its own or people launching almost launching in fear of an attack and there. Have Been Plenty of conventional wars that could have escalated that way. So by and large, we've been lucky but we've been abetted by the fact that there has been an ambient taboo that has grown over the years against nuclear first use although that is rarely the policy of any nuclear power. Okay. Now from an Australian perspective, Tic- Japan was seen as an aggressor in the war, the war crimes but also as a victim because of the destruction wrought by the nuclear bombs have is the wool remit in Japan now aggressor and victim. Tarshi. Many pass through consider themselves as victims thinking that Japanese were misled by the government inter- Disastrous Wall Conquest. In this view here stands at the as the ultimate symbol of Japanese victim. But today is victim narrative faces two competing accounts. One is to recognize Japan's acts of wartime aggression, including tweeting massacres, forced labor, and sexual violence. If we see hero Shimmer from this perspective, it takes on a whole different meaning not. Not as a national tragedy, but rather as international event. killed not only the Japanese residents but also many colonial subjects and allied. POW's who are present in the city at the time of the Tom Bombing. The other interpretation that has also gained for Japan is to see the wartime conduct Japan as an act of self defense. This This lesion is narrative recaps here. As the ultimate proof of Western aggression. So fitting the predation of Japan's Joel Roles as. Aggressor and victim during the war will gain the upper hand in the future will depend on how sweet society around the world comes together and develops a shared understanding of the complex legacies or Corna reason on the war in the Asia Pacific region and back to the United States markle. There's a popular conception that Washington had to drop the bomb that it was the only way. To win the war, of course, the war in Europe come to an end in May of forty five. This is early August two, forty five is that true I mean what? What President Truman's options? So. This is a great question and it's one with a lot of confusion around it. Functionally. The only way the only government that had any power to end the war was the Japanese government which was in a position to surrender and the question was when would that happen would have happened later or earlier by summer nineteen, forty, five, it was already clear that the war was militarily lost. President Truman and the US government in general had basically fixed options of what they could do to try and encourage the Japanese government to take that move. There's only two that people usually talk about dropping the atomic bomb or invading the home islands of Japan. Both of those were on the table also having the Soviet Union inducing them to enter the wars of belligerent which happened on August eighth increasing the intensity of firebombing tightening the blockade of foodstuffs into the home islands. and modifying the terms of unconditional surrender to allow Japan to keep the emperor. The interesting thing is all six of those happen Truman pursued all sex and the war ended. It's unclear which ones were determinative. But the point is there wasn't like we had one option or nothing else. The US had plenty of options and exercised actually all of them. On the one level target for the bombs was obviously Japan on another level. Real target was the Soviet Union. How did the Kremlin of you? He Russia Mirror Negga? Second Markle. So. Really, the question here is a small set of people within the Kremlin stolen and his closest advisers and you that there was an atomic bomb project going on in the United States for years they've found that out from spies from Britain from spies in the United States, and they had their own uranium enrichment and bomb development program that was going on at I would say a medium scale What happens after the destruction of Hiroshima is I in absented himself for a few days he went into a depression and didn't. React to any of his advisors and then immediately massively escalated the Soviet development of their own atomic bomb. So they were both caught by surprise and not caught by surprise. It's true that the Americans didn't always think about the Soviet Union as a factor in any decision related to how the war was going to end but they also very strongly, we understood that the key issue was trying to get this the Japanese government to surrender faster because the faster they surrendered the less impact. The Soviet entry in the war would have to how the end game would play out in Asia, my guest, Michael Gordon, and Tashi Hitachi, and we're reflecting on the seventy fifth anniversary of Hiroshima. Tashi. One, hundred fifty thousand atomic bomb survivors still living in Japan. In fact, as a guest of Japan's Ministry of Foreign. Affairs this would have been in September twenty, sixteen I met one of one of the survivors now they're all in education and public law has plied an important part in shaping Japan's post-war Pacifism. Now, as generation dies out, is the role of pessimism in Japanese politics is that diminishing especially in the face of Rausing China Toshi? I don't think the passing of the atomic bomb survivors will diminish the strengths of pacifism in any short-term. The correctly memory of human magazine Japan has been fairly robust and the taken deep roots in popular culture. I can think of a good example that is Japanese animated wartime drama film released just four years ago in two thousand, sixteen cold in this corner of the world. This picture accounts of the wartime life in here she was a smash hit in the box office. Be, atomic bomb survivors will also active in passing down lessons from the world's first nuclear war to the next generation. The city's over here streaming nagy training. Many Japanese Ron Tears as storytellers who share the testimonies are waging victims and a second generation survivors are spearheading efforts for peace unjustice. Well, that brings me to today and really in the last that he is the end of the call was thirty years ago the US. And the Soviets on Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty non stop this was President Bush senior and Gorbachev in Russia in the inside at Union. Then just as it was collapsing now, both agree to significantly reduce their nuclear stockpiles and of course, the updated treaty between Moscow and Washington that expose I. Think it's February Knicks Jeez. So that's just a few days after the next president is warning Michael Do you think it will be resigned. I think that's entirely dependent on the results of the election. Joe. Biden has indicated that he would refine the treaty The trump administration has had many opportunities to re-sign the treaty, but they have not taken advantage of those opportunities yet. Russia's indicated that they're very interested in extending

Japan United States Soviet Union Hiroshima Michael Gordon Russia Japanese Government President Truman Nagasaki Us Air Force Tic- Japan Washington Nagy President Bush
Elaine Pearson on free speech at UNSW

Between The Lines

08:26 min | 1 year ago

Elaine Pearson on free speech at UNSW

"Battle of free speech on Australian University campuses. Allying piece was interviewed by the Media Department at the University of new. South. Wales about the human rights implications of Hong. Kong's new national security role as. Director at Human Rights Watch and an adjunct law lecturer at the university. She expressed concern about the laws and called on the United Nations Secretary General to appoint a special envoy in Hong Kong. Well, it's hardly a very controversial stuff in democracy lock Australia Russia. Will sell you think. We'll after the article, win online the pro. Chinese Communist Party students at the university they demanded the article be removed. You see caused a fence it was hurtful to the communist government in China. The university caved in and pulled the article. Only. After an outcry in the press was the article riposted. So. How did we get to the point when one of Australia's leading universities agrees to political censorship in favor of another nation state? Elaine. Joins me now aligned welcome to between the lines. Great to have you on the program. Thanks Tom. Now, the article is back on the University of New South Wales website but with caveats that the views expressed do not represent the views of the university you happy with this outcome. Well I'm glad that they put it back up. But I am pretty disappointed at the university's response I mean I think you know the views expressed in that article of us about the human rights situation in Hong Kong and I think that shouldn't be something that should be controversial and I was a bit surprised actually that the university was so quick to distance themselves from those views and I think you know I presumed that the ferocity of the campaign by the Pro Chinese Communist Party. Students really took them by surprise. But I think now the question really is how is Going to respond to this and I, think the students you know really are looking to see what is going to be the public response and what next is the university going to do to address these shoes mind you. This is not the only incident of academic freedom being compromised. Can you tell us about some of the other cases? Yeah, Human Rights Watch has actually been documenting Chinese document lit threats to academic freedom since two thousand fifteen not just in Australia about universities all around the world we've looked cases in the US the UK Canada France and right here, and what we've seen is that there is A universities are in a tight bind because the become quite dependent on foreign students. Many of those students coming from China those students have a very different world view, many of them and when they come here. Obviously you know coming here should come with a guarantee of academic freedom and what these should be quite basic things for an Australian university education. But in reality if those students try and for instance, join protests on campus about Hong Kong or Fin Jiang they are often then reported to the Chinese consulates So they are very afraid of doing anything like that they just. Try and keep the hits down and you know you only have to look at the controversy that's happened on Q. Withdrew Pavlou and how he has been treated to see that you know we you know it's not a very impressive response from the universities to to say, Scott Free speech and academic freedom only sorts of sensitive topics like shin-jang like Hong Kong, and like human rights in China. Now you mentioned drew heavily, he was expelled from the University of Queensland in part. For, organizing, what was it very noisy pro Hong Kong protests is that right? Well, he's been suspended. So I, think you know the industry who six months suspension six month suspension so He has been you know he's had been a pretty provocative campaigner. Some of these methods may have been a bit unorthodox, but at the end of the day, look at what happened to him on on that campus I. Mean there were fistfights erupting you cue between the different student groups you had in our pro CCP's students you know supporting the Communist Party trying to tear down. The messages from? Hong, Kong democracy supporters and the only person who's actually suffered any retaliation or reprisals is is drew himself, and so we wanna see universities really safeguard academic freedom and free speech and I think that means also acting against those who are intimidating or harassing all those on campus and making the campus a safe space to express all sorts of different views. Now in your case, a lot of the outrage amongst the Chinese students was expressed and organized I understand on Chinese soil media platforms way chat. which are now apparently watched by Beijing and to what extent you concerned about those platforms like we had and I think the other one is is a waiver we Yes that's right. Yeah I mean. These were the platforms where they organize. Look if students want to express different view an opposing you that's fine I think. I'm concerned is the extent to which this campaign became one of intimidating and harassing other students who expressed different views and as I understand it were threats made that they would report people to the Chinese consulate. For expressing excuse so I think the universities actually really need to monitor. Their social media channels and not just use them as a means of advertising for you know potential new students come to the university but also make sure that those channels are being you know being up being watched not to to censor free speech. But as I said, you know where that free speech is crossing the line. I also think they just need to be clear to the students. You know what what that means that it means. Going to a means being exposed to two different views and a free to discuss and debate those issues, but you're not free to shut down. The views of others. Of course, a line universities in Australia and this is cried sacred I've become increasingly dependent on. Overseas students for their budgets. Some have more diversified student bodies but others locked. University of new, South, Wales away opposite talking about University of New South Wales because of your special case this week they heavily concentrated on the Chinese market now since covert. US W has been one of the hardest hit by travel restrictions at recently made nearly I think five hundred staff redundant. Do you think this budget anxiety affected their handling of the issue align peace and? Yes I've been I think this reliance on the revenue from foreign students is something that you know all universities are facing now and so it it is putting them in a difficult position but I think that's why actually universities need to have a unified front. I think they really need to look at their existing. Codes of conduct they don't actually deal with these issues of foreign students might come from very different oil you, and so you know what I've suggested to you, and it's still view and to many other universities in Australia is to adopt a twelve point code of conduct specifically on these issues and they need to be alive to these issues. They need to incorporate it more into the orientation when you foreign students coming to campus so that they really understand what academic freedom means with our and they need to sort of monitor and. Safeguard, for you know acts of intimidation or harassment because I'm not so worried about myself but I'm more worried about other students on campus who will see how the situation has developed and then they might be too scared to speak out on. Hong Kong will fit in the classroom or other academics who might think twice about taking a meteorological on Hong Kong because they'll be worried about the potential backlash. So you know I think universities really need to take a stand on this and you know it needs to be done. You know jointly. By by all USTRALIAN universities.

Hong Kong Australia University Of New South Wales Human Rights Watch University Of New Chinese Communist Party Australian University Chinese Consulate China Hong Pro Chinese Communist Party University Of Queensland Wales United Nations Communist Government Media Department Director
Atomic bomb dropped on Japan's Hiroshima 75 years ago still reverberates

John Rothmann

00:21 sec | 1 year ago

Atomic bomb dropped on Japan's Hiroshima 75 years ago still reverberates

"Quite realize it was that dangerous. The dwindling witnesses to the world's first atomic bombing marks had 71st anniversary on Thursday. Hiroshima's mayor and others noted that Japanese government refusal to sign a nuclear weapons ban treaty. US dropped its first atomic bomb on Hiroshima on August 6th of

Hiroshima United States
"hiroshima" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:54 min | 1 year ago

"hiroshima" Discussed on KQED Radio

"One day at a time. I'm Lily Jamali. Those stories next time on the California report. Soon in for the California report tomorrow morning at 6 58 50 and then stay with us at nine o'clock performer Michael Krasny, from financial fears to social isolation to close schools and loss of level in Corona virus was taking a major toll on Americans. Mental Health Tomorrow on forum will look at the scope of the crisis and where to find help. Join US reform from 9 to 11 right here on public radio. This is all things considered from NPR News. I'm Stacy Vanek Smith and I'm Mary Louise Kelly at exactly 15 minutes past eight in the morning on August 6th, 1945 Japanese time at the moment when the atomic bomb flashed above Hiroshi MMA Miss Yoshiko Sasaki, a clerk in the personnel department of the East Asia, 10 Works had just sat down at her place in the plant office and was turning her head to speak to the girl at the next desk. That rather ordinary sentence is the opening to the extraordinary August 1946 New Yorker article titled Oshima. It was published a year after the United States dropped the first nuclear bomb on that city, a year in which the U. S government had gone to great lengths to conceal the human devastation caused And to depict the bomb as a conventional humane weapon. The writer of the Peace John Hursey, uncovered a very different story reporting on the ground in Japan, author and journalist Leslie Bloome chronicles foresees work and the reaction to it in her new book, Fallout. She joins me now from Los Angeles. Leslie Bloome. Welcome. Thank you. Start with Who? John Hursey Wass and how he came to be the one to tell this story. Oh, John. Her see was a young World War two correspondent who had covered action in different theaters throughout the war for Time magazine. And like many war correspondents, then he was pretty supportive of the U. S military. And he even wrote an almost overly complimentary wartime bio of General Douglas MacArthur and That the U. S military knew him entrusted him would be an important factor in my story and how he eventually got his story about Hiroshi MMA, and I don't want to give away too much. But I will say that how he got in was by being the perfect Trojan horse reporter, The perfect Trojan horse reporter. You've hooked us where we're intrigued when I got there. He didn't report this out as a war correspondent. He focused very much on ordinary people on he picked six of them. Why did he want to tell the story in that way? Well, I mean, the fact of the matter is is that the bombing of Hiroshima was widely reported when it happened, and it was reported as a very big end of days. Story mean there were pictures of the mushroom clouds that were released in pictures, the landscape devastation. But there were no pictures that were released or no stories that were released about the human toll that it happened on the ground there, and the government was really going to enormous lengths to cover up the reality of theater. Tomic aftermath in Hiroshima, Nagasaki They were very concerned with as the former secretary of war, put it, not being seen as having outdone, Hitler and atrocities. So her C and his editors at the New Yorker magazine became determined to tell the story from the point of view of survivors. You know, these are among the on ly humans who have ever experience what it's like to be on the receiving end of nuclear attack. He ultimately picked a widow with young kids, a young female clerk to medics, a priest and a minister with with a young family, and his idea was to create a sense of empathy. In his readers with these individuals, because, after all, not everybody could understand the physics of how the bombs works or visualized. You know, an all out nuclear attack that anyone could relate to being a mother or a father or colleague or doctor who's going about their everyday business. One catastrophe strikes I wonder if you would give us a sense of just one telling story of what he did find when he was there What it was that so shocked American readers who had no idea what was unfolding in Japan. One story that particularly resonated with him. He interviewed a young female clerk who was in her company when the bomb was detonated. This's the clerk I mentioned in the intro exactly one of the most famous introductions in journalistic history, and when the bomb exploded over her factory bookshelves fell upon her, and she was nearly crushed to death by books. And he thought How ironic it was to have somebody nearly crushed by books within the first moments of the atomic age, and literally when he was leaving here, Oshima and standing on the surprisingly intact train station platform, he thought that he was going to have to write about that line. And that's one of the incidents that most resonated with readers. So August 1946 The New Yorker publishes. What was the reaction? Both in the United States and around the world to this story. Well in her sees own words. The reaction was quote explosive mean, I try not to use that word in my book for obvious reasons. But he did, And the article was simply titled here, Oshima, and it comprised nearly the entire contents of the August 31st 1946 issue of The New Yorker. It's sold out immediately. You're even black market copies of it going for, you know, astronomical sums. It was syndicated in its entirety, and this is a 30,000 word story in newspapers across the country and around the world. And editors and reporters and readers were enraged. They were horrified by the testimonies in her sees here, Oshima, and they also began demanding to know what else was the U. S government withholding from the US public And then, when President Truman was asked by a reporter if he had personally read it, he retorted. I never read the New York ER. It just makes me bad. But the fact is, is that the government had been put very much on the defensive. That said, You know, they didn't want to look like they were on the defensive, but they were and they had to scramble to try to reclaim the narrative. John, her CIA's You document was famously not about garnering publicity. He hit out and didn't give interviews about this the way he was a publicist nightmare right to publish this neighbor. Absolutely. Do we know, though, if he felt like the article accomplished what he hoped it would, in terms of being a wake up call to Americans to consider what their government had done in their name. Yeah, he did feel that he had contributed to deterrence, in fact, is is that there has not been another nuclear attack. You know, in the vein of Hiroshima, Nagasaki and her C said that quote we just kept the world safe from the bomb since 1945 has been the memory of what happened that Hiro Shima and thanks in large part to him. And those brave enough to share their stories of survival with him. We know what really happened in Hiroshima and how horrible it wass. So in many ways here, Shima has become, you know, a pillar of deterrence. That said Percy was very worried. By the 19 eighties, when the Cold War was surging again that as the memory of Hiroshi Emma dimmed it was beginning to lose its potency as a deterrent..

US New Yorker magazine Hiroshima Oshima Leslie Bloome reporter California Japan John NPR News Hiro Shima John Hursey Wass Lily Jamali U. S Michael Krasny Corona Hiroshi MMA
"hiroshima" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

06:53 min | 1 year ago

"hiroshima" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Now, we have contributing correspondent Dennis normal. He wrote this week on how seventy five years later. The survivors of the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki have transformed understanding of the effects of radiation exposure on health. Hi, Dennis Arthur we're talking about study. Now. Run by Ari are asked, which is the Radiation Effects Research Foundation this is a very long-term study as I mentioned almost seventy five years. Years and included many many survivors over one hundred thousand. How exactly did this study get started all those years ago? Virginia's Harry Truman authorized launch of the study was in nineteen, forty, seven. They were pretty much should have a full team on the ground in Yoshii Nagasaki. By nineteen, forty, nine, thousand, nine, hundred fifty. The US Navy realized that there would be a bathroom studying the acute impact and. And the long term impact of what happens to humans when they are subjected to the detonation of Tom These survivors involvement in such a long-term study has yielded an amazing array of results, important results for health for anyone who's exposed to radiation and work or an accident. What are some of the key findings from this work us? Not just one study. They actually have a collection of different studies. Studies, they have carried out the most notable one. Is this enormous life span study where they have as you mentioned one hundred twenty thousand people who were enrolled at the outset? If you put together the combination of number of participants and the length of the study, there's probably nothing else like the RRF in his predecessor ABC city simply gathered data on how radiation has long term effects on health. Health of those who were exposed to radiation the Rif previously ABC gathered that data mix epidemiological connections between the amount of radiation. Someone gets and their risk of developing cancer later in life, other or decisions take that data and data from other studies as well, and they turn those into recommendations for the amount of exposure that people should be allowed to get if they are patient for medical imaging. Imaging, or if they are, the technicians were if their nuclear pact workers this gives away how old I am, but I went to the dentist pornography child. You sit in the dental chair and the dentist would real office machine thick x rays of your teeth, and those were go bouncing all over the room these days for dental x Ray. They put you in a special room which shielded technician. Technician is wearing a badge to track how much radiation he or she is exposed to. You're also wearing that vest to protect your organs from straight X rays all those recommendations shielding around the x ray rooms, dosimetry badges with technicians, where and the vest the patients where they all grew out of basic data that was produced by the long term studies by RRF INC with the survivors we talked. Talked about how this research got started very soon after the bombings, US government, Edna Japanese, government, and boasted research with survivors, but with different purposes. How are they different? Hauer their intentions with the studies different. The ABC was very much an American stony when the ABC's got started was so under America's occupation, and the Japanese scientists had difficulty publishing their observations amount of information that was released Japanese. was very much controlled by the occupation of Nargis, so there were real restrictions on what the Japanese scientists could do, but that initial collection of data by the US groups was over within a few months later there was a decision to set up a long-term study of the effects of radiation and at that point yet. Of the Japanese scientists in the American scientists were pretty much aligned. You mentioned in the story that the survivors weren't treated by the US scientist when they were involved in the study. Initially, that's right. Basically for political reasons, the decision was made that the ABC said he would not offer any treatment to the people who were being examined by the ABC physicians. They concern was that if the ABC city which at that time was very much? American funded American. If. They offered treatment. It might be taken as an admission of culpability in their condition, because misunderstandings and friction between the survivors, many of whom believe that they would get some help for doing with their illnesses with their injuries. Yeah, why would a survivor become involved in the study? If they weren't going to get treatment, even decades later if that was the history of the study. Initially. There was a hope that they would get some sort of medical benefit from participating in the study, the didn't get zero. In particular children that were born to survivors got medical checkups that there would not have received not been part of the study later as one of the survivors told me he has continued to cooperate with the study because he hopes that it will help the world recognize how devastating, the effects are of attack using atomic weapons, and so that is what motivates him to continue to cooperate. It's not clear whether there are. Are Health Effects for the offspring of survivors, but this survivors children are obviously concerned about their health. Can you talk about about this tension with the scientists say is that their studies so far have not identified any affects the question is. Are there no effects or are statistical data simply not detailed enough to spot affects the friction arises. Is that some of the children of the survivors? But we've that they are facing health issues that are not faced by big response were not subjected to the. It's on bond radiation, so the children what? As survivors as second-generation survivors, and they now have to court actions going forward, try to force the the government to recognize that the children of survivors should be recognized, says survivors as well, and that should also be entitled to medical support it just as their parents are

ABC technician Radiation Effects Research Fou US ABC city Hiroshima Yoshii Nagasaki US Navy Sarah Crespi Dennis Dennis normal Dennis Arthur researcher Virginia Nagasaki Lau Harry Truman Tom These Edna Japanese
"hiroshima" Discussed on AP News

AP News

10:55 min | 2 years ago

"hiroshima" Discussed on AP News

"Pope Francis is calling for nations to rethink that reliance on nuclear and reach wide agreement over discarding nuclear weapons he in the pharmacist told political leaders destruction line created by the atomic bomb in Hiroshima and Nagasaki must never take place again in human history the pontiff says history teaches us this complex and misunderstandings between peoples and nations and find a valid solution is only through dialogue he wants you quick question dealt with on the multi lateral plain with nations capable of creating brought international consensus and action I'm sure most of this month

pope Francis Hiroshima Nagasaki
"hiroshima" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

10:45 min | 2 years ago

"hiroshima" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Just saying no a couple days ago an asteroid but I'm not getting so the distance between the earth and the moon is two hundred forty thousand miles Turner forty thousand mile an asteroid Mister the earth by forty thousand miles this is a separate it is not the one we talked about a couple weeks ago another Astor miss my forty thousand miles would have hit with thirty times the energy of the nuclear bomb at Hiroshima man so to ABS it would destroy entire city and and tons of other consequences beyond that and we didn't know until it was three days past us that's always my favorite yeah you never like to ritual like we talked about last time you think that you're gonna have time I think there's gonna be a warning system as it is going to get everybody in for impact Tino the survivors you know even those come until three days later not even want to whizzing by us right well look at that three days later you see it and like wave and then they backtrack it in like whoa just just get by us but that could not close the racing they're not gonna go to Lastra thing here but the fact that we don't know what we're gonna get hit but I think it's a nice life metaphor as well so I want to continue with the sauce with from the great Ravi Zacharias we did in the first hours gonna pick it up here you check it out seven sixty KFMB dot com to get the background into all of this but he told a story that is challenging to me and I don't want to accept it which is a sign that I I should probably accept it and I'm gonna try and try and and change how I think about things in light of the story I think it's true so Swami cannot in the in the Hindu monk eighteen at ninety three search frame of reference here eighteen ninety three he was in Chicago for a conference on world religions which were dominated by by Christians at the end he went to the microphone this is what he said he grabbed the microphone he said we who came from the east I have sat here on the platform day after day and I've been told in a patronizing way that we ought to accept Christianity because Christian nations are the most prosperous we look about us and we see England the most prosperous Christian nation in the world with her foot on the neck of two hundred fifty million easy attics Asian people we look back in history we see the prosperity of Christian Europe began with Spain Spain's prosperity began with the invasion of Mexico this person will fit in perfectly to a current your history class at the college Christianity wins its prosperity by cutting the throats of its fellow band at such a price the Hindu well not have prosperity prices I got hit is would never do such a thing that's what it takes to be prosperous there will never I sat here today and I've heard at the height of intolerance I've heard the creed of the Muslim applauded when today the Muslims sort of caring destruction and India blood of the sword or not for the Hindu whose religion is based on the law of love so this is this big conference mostly Christians are but also Muslims and the entire conference cheered they loved it loved him all the universities open up to this guy to speak and the western a Christian academic leaders loved him for this comment as Robbie said he made an enormous impact with a partial truth covered with an unfortunate truth and that's often allies come it's almost always allies come but mostly truth with a little bit ally that changes the whole thing so the untruth is this that and and this is the part that I admit I'm gonna have a tough time accepting but I think it's right Robbie said you never judge a system by its abuse now I'm not saying you never judge abuse course the judge that but you don't judge the system by its abuse you judge the system based on its own merits no I'm I'm I'm getting closer to this I've I've been close to this with communism it's very easy to judge communism bites failures but I I don't judge it solely by that I also judging by its merits because even in its ideal perfect proposed form it's a terrible system is why get annoyed with people sale will communism it sounds good in theory but it won't work in reality no no no it doesn't don't even sound good in theory I'm not judging you based off of its failures I'm judging based off of its merits itself it's a terrible thing therefore of course it veils vality do but about your religion Robbie says don't judge a system based on its abuse and and you know we can judge Hindu as a base to pieces to the apartheid of India India Pakistan twelve million people were killed twelve million people and you're liable to get your head cut off of your Christian in northern India today part of the partition of India was a nineteen forty seven so when we go back thousands of years of of Hindus L. violence of Hindus so he can't he can't but can you judge into is a based off of that you have to judge it defines other by its own merits quite a challenge so the relevancy to today we we are stuck in the strap this tribal trap of defining each party by its worst actors it's so easy to define all Democrats as anti for the worst and for people to define Republicans all Republicans as white nationalists the worst but it's eight sure as absurdly simplistic model which which let's let's try to break it down the next time I'll break down how the whole the whole models right left is even apply in this situation we got cut out trump did not far as the Paso shooter anymore than Elizabeth Warren because the lot far left or far left shooter which again we'll talk about that I think far left shooter in Dayton Ohio you can't define either party by their worst actors the judge each party and ideology and policies of principles on their own merits now their own merits may be bad to give Iraq I'm not saying all the Democrats are all their their their policies are fantastic no they could be very very bad but it it's on its own merit that's a paradigm shift I think but I I just wanna show because it's gonna help me get closer to the truth on on different issues welcome back and once for all we can cut it out with this ridiculous left wing right wing not sure it was very edgy this weekend again if you look at it from very far off perspective pretty amazing that the a river the the first year and an apostle is far right I got a quote your far right but the next day the shooter day in was was an anti Fatah Lizabeth Warren supporting trump hater far left and you got is just a personal challenge you got a judge your self on how you reacted to each of those each of those shootings that is in a time of honesty self reflection no need to call it don't tell me about it but now have your own on a self reflection of how you reacted when you found out that the first shooter was a white supremacist and the second sure was an anti for crazy far leftist I succumb that will break down the the left and right for this one had a seven sixty KFMB whenever seven sixty five three six two and of course got to watch out for the asteroids it's always a from I always think about that is whenever I think of asteroids I think of asteroid fields like you know we were talking about life great point Eric like rat infestation and that's usually the word that comes after rat yeah and when I think of asteroid I think of an asteroid field now here's the thing no such thing as asteroid fields really so we're good well because I think there's one then there's multiple right now so come back with the number but each if there's an asteroid so it's all relative right I mean the universe big yeah so an asteroid field each asteroid trillions of light years of either name clothing I mean for ever distant so it's not like you're you're dodging shooting in Astoria yeah maybe we war see I hear about leaving your way through asteroids casted right and so it's not a problem you're worried about a barrage yeah for the now in there all my gosh the whole of the bar and there's stuff coming our way not a not a problem now this is the one who got to worry about all it takes is the only I know we'll all be dead instantly confirm but it's just this is the one who got to worry about one hundred seven six to care for me to have that line Sir we have breaking news out of tear Santa were a toddler's been found dead inside a car the mother called police saying she could not find her two year old by the time police responded to the navy housing on Leary street the mother and found the child in the car no further details are available but will follow this developing story throughout the afternoon stocks plunged on Wall Street today worries about how much president trump's escalating trade war with China will damage the economy major US indexes suffered their biggest drop since early last year as the Dow closed down seven hundred sixty seven points former president Barack Obama responded to the weekend Nash shootings in Ohio and Texas today with a plea to Americans to reject the language of hatred fear and intolerance from any of their leaders Obama's post on Twitter did not refer to president trump by name you're never more than fifteen minutes away from the top stories of.

Hiroshima three days fifteen minutes two year
"hiroshima" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

05:47 min | 2 years ago

"hiroshima" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"That is the sound of a huge fireball and several others. Coming down. The euro and earthquake. That explosion was pegged about thirty or forty times stronger. Tomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima Toyo caliber did not produce as much of a blast as the as the Tim Guscott meteoric that happened in about nine about nineteen o eight. But significant explosion flattened about eight hundred twenty five square miles of trees. Luckily, when we see these things they like to detonate or explode over the least populated places around the world. Tim goski was one of those places. No one has been killed or injured fatal. No fatal injuries. No, no, no. You know, being no one being killed not even with Chileans the event, however is the most powerful impact ever recorded in human history. According to a recent study, the beta Taurus, the beta tards, remember this. The beta tards we're to blame for the phenomenon back then and they're saying that the beta tires are coming back in June of two thousand nineteen. I'm not kidding. The beta tards the ones that produce the event are coming again in June of twenty nineteen the targets, of course, are meteoric shower happens twice a year in June and also in late October or early November. We start seeing the beta tards are called those June. Meteors beta tards, according to scientists physicists at Los Alamos, National laboratories, things Mark Boleslav. He says that the tree fall pattern at Tom Glasgow. Revealed that the event had been caused by an asteroid coming from the same region of the sky is the beta tards now in two thousand nineteen this year urge will travel through the densest cluster material in the stream that's out there, and that might increase the risks. Of events such as what we saw Chilean Chileans or Guscott. Scientists are saying that the tar is present a potentially potentialities for the richest batch of incoming material since nineteen seventy five now get this in one thousand nine hundred seventy five in the year when they had Atari coming through again in the material was coming in most of it hit the moon. I started seeing things hitting the mood so much like what we saw happened during the lunar eclipse on January twentieth. Something hit the moon with thinks that if the earth avoids an event that would be great but satellites is based platforms. Well, they also can see the damage. And this is something to think about because we were talking to the other night about grids going out GPS going out strange things happening. That's where we are. Right now the earth as seen a higher frequency. What could be called catastrophic events long before we came along. And is the earth is rocking roaring and moving to and fro. We're noticing the changes ourselves, we're we're sensing the first we got solar weather, that's affecting his biologically. We have the ultrasound subjects biologically. We have all the electric fog. That's bothering know. All of that, you know, bothering us. And of course, we have the winter storms right now. People losing power there a new threat assessment. There was evaluated say the biggest threat right now. Power failures due to either CPE's or CME's coronal mass ejections or coronal proton injections, those are devastating. No with the protons all the currents to geomagnetic storms all the currents leading to particles getting through the magnetic field. It's weakening. I mean, we're seeing some very interesting times. Regard to what's going on above us in space. And that's why once again, I'm saying, I'm pretty gun shy. When it comes to talk you about this because of my experience that. You know, my experience that I had with this Chilean been story. And you take a look at what is called the doomsday clock. There were doomsday clock. The other day saying it's two minutes to midnight. They wanted to. You know, remind us that, you know, here we are in this moment in time where you know, there's a there's a there's an index of bass human excitability that can be taken into consideration. And we look at countries that go through this mass human excitability in what happens and what we see is. We see wars rec- revolutions, we see riots or see, you know, expeditions where people want to leave one place to go to other. We're hearing about wanting to leave the planet and go to the moon. Go to Mars see this is the time. I mean, we've got significant events happening. And they're calling citing periods. And they are explained by acute change in the nervous and second character of humanity. And this takes place when things in the skies start to show show, their violent tendencies. Solar minimum solar solar maximum asteroids. Rocks from space UFO's all these things. Create a mass human excitability. And people start doing some strange things. It's it's kind of like, the psychological effects. We have things like blood moons and solar eclipses and all these other things and it's true. We start seeing these changes happen. We started seeing the effects. We start seeing the reactions. He started to wonder should I be prepared? Yes. You should be prepared. You should be prepared for anything. You should have food in the house. I mean, all of the winter storms were having right now. I hope people who listen to this program. Having a food on hand when we ask them. To go to prepare with ground zero dot com. Preparewithjoe dot com. Go there. You're seventy five bucks. You get your food. Oh, people did that. Because that way they have the food in the house. You don't have to leave in being the cold temperatures. But what if something like took out the.

Tim Guscott Tim goski Hiroshima Toyo Atari Tom Glasgow Los Alamos Mark Boleslav National laboratories eight hundred twenty five squa two minutes