28 Burst results for "Hinojosa"

"hinojosa" Discussed on Spanish Aquí Presents

Spanish Aquí Presents

08:40 min | 6 months ago

"hinojosa" Discussed on Spanish Aquí Presents

"Kat von d. At her house and that was that was just it was just kind of extraordinary and and now it was and now that i'm fully vaccinated and kind of getting back to things Wanna start doing more in person interviews. And you're right. We are very lucky on latino usa that except for someone like biden of the time. Well you know. There's one person i wanna speak to. Actually i might as well just put it. There's only there's one that people are like. So who would you wanna. Who the dream. One dream i. It's cardi b. to talk politics. God she would talk please. How do i know. I'm trying like me book for your podcast instead of and then if you get cardi b. m. gallo get. We need to get a party. We bite him like his party. A blunt to joe by passing blood and then him. I wanna see him like by landau soon as healthy working the floor. We'll let me tell you before. I see joe biden by london or doing anything radical. I needed to do something. Really radical about the issue of immigration. Let's see i. I'm not even ready to have a little party or to be invited to a single them. Another there is no look. I will take performative politics from joe biden at this point if it is him going down to the border And hugging the refugee children that this government is holding in dog cages. So i will take some performative stuff right there But other than that. No no no dancing. No singing no he right now. I'm sorry to say this. Joe biden is my doghouse until i get a chance to speak with him. I know that was really good. I think i'm going to have to say that. I your in my dog house until you with me. Houses for real. I mean throughout the bank on that. Yeah so other than obviously like you know you you deal with a lot of like you know hard core stuff that's going on in the world ally. Not only you know in your interviews and you know in interviews that you know you guessed on as well and everything else. You also have twitter where you're super active. You reply you engage you post things that like other people are thinking and just don't know if they can tweet or how to tweet it as you know sometimes eloquently as you How has twitter been for you the move into twitter like well. No but because like i just feel like it's it's it's so hard to some things. Just be good at writing tweet. I am so fast. I'm like really you think i'm good at twitter. I'm like really. When i. When i first engaged in twitter i was like what the hell is is all never find this. I can't even figure this out. I kinda hated you know. Look you wanna know how. I woke up today. Lever that I woke up later than usual. Which i had a little bit of a later day so i did spend about. I'm horrified to say about ten to fifteen minutes blocking people because of all the hate that i'm getting because i just interviewed aoc. And i posted a picture of be with her and so I'm that to me is like i'm not even having it. Because of course what happens. Is that a look. And i'll be like europe bot mind europe bought. Who knows where you're tweeting at me. From what country were there's a bought fam- bought three and i'm not having it so goodbye. Goodbye goodbye goodbye goodbye now. I find it interesting that you say that about me and twitter. Because i'm not on it all the time. I'm not i kind of poke a jumping. You know post something. But you're right. There are moments where i will just have like and i don't even think of it as zinger but now in hindsight i'm a little bit like that was a little bit of zinger. Yeah but i'm not doing it to like do that. It's more just like. I just thought this and i have to say it and i think to allow myself to kind of feel like wait if i just thought this and felt this. I'd bet the other people. Like joe biden gave his his very important speech to congress recently after his hundred days and i was like yeah totally. This is not trump. Okay this is not horror but please. Don't call me grateful when i want more and i said that the next morning and people completely responded to that so i try i. I don't know if. I often feel bad that i don't respond enough that you know if all i'm doing is just liking things but then i love it when people are like. Oh my god. Maria hinojosa tweet. I might of course if i if i like it. Well it's important to have a healthy relationship because a lot of people don't i see. I don't know like this morning again. I was like. I don't know how alexandria even continues to post on this case of your And i don't really for me to be honest with you. I don't get. I mean now is when i'm like. Oh god god what horrible people. These bonds are mostly. I'm having fun on twitter. I'm having a an okay time and people are like. Oh my god. She's saying something really silly or something really important or you know. I really love instagram. Even though it's owned by facebook which is my horror. But i really love instagram. Would you say her. facebook is in your house. I mean i. Just i don't know if i can see that it's more just like i never connected with facebook owned by seeking in the I'm like what is this. I still find it overwhelming. When i go into facebook honestly i just feel overwhelmed. I it's terrible people. Send me messages. I mean i probably have like several thousand messages. Probably some of them very important. And i just the whole facebook feeling is just buried by this whereas instagram. I can just kind of quickly. Just do a and i get really I get a lot of positive reinforcement. I'm a lot of i to me. Instagram is where the positive stuff comes. The visuals of the pro indigenous stuff. The pro latinas of The pro sex Stuff all of that stuff. The pro cannabis world. You know. that's where i'm like. Yeah i like living here and like you said like what are things that now like you know other than all you know everything that you're saying like Going on twitter and you know doing interviews about such that aggressive subjecting. the world is a wild. What is mattie. I like to do to have fun. Freeman namic or or during the pandemic of like you know what are what are things you like to to do to lake you know. Relax and have fun. You mentioned pro cannabis and like smoking a blunt and like i love your ford twenty friendly as well. 'cause i o very publicly very publicly because I i don't have any shame. I don't to have any secrets and i was always worried like. Oh my god one day. Somebody's gonna find out. I smoked pot. And i'm like how motherfuckers i you. I smoke pot because i am a legal marijuana patient. I really did not smoke a lot of pot until after nine. Eleven so i had. Ptsd and it really. I never thought that it would be something that could really help you. So i'm very like. Yeah and now i have a dispensary and i have my pharmacists. Who talked to so. I love them. They're amazing.

joe biden Maria hinojosa Kat von twitter Joe biden today facebook congress trump Instagram three instagram latino usa hundred days next morning mattie cardi london europe first
"hinojosa" Discussed on Spanish Aquí Presents

Spanish Aquí Presents

07:58 min | 6 months ago

"hinojosa" Discussed on Spanish Aquí Presents

"Ed were back. Slurp slurp there guys there's obviously this is a special episode It's a milestone episode and because it's such a milestone episode we have to go with a guest that's essentially a living legend Were kind of super honored to have her here. She has done at all I mean anything from npr. Two books to journalism. This a special guest has done it all in don a perfectly right now. She has a new book of an alcohol. Once i was you a memoir of love and hate in a tournament ladies and gentlemen we have maria hinojosa in the house. Thank you so much. I'm great thank you so much for having me. It's great to be with. All of you have mentioned that we were that i was nervous. I'm like like this context. Carlos interim like mess up the introduction. Right i always worry about people being like. Oh my god. She's like an icon. Oh she's won so many words. And i'm like i'm like stop please. I never wanna be perceived to be like. Oh she's because i'm seri-. I mean the title of my book once i was you like the message is always like we are each other like we can do this. Like i've been where you've been like gone is like no not that we is so. I always get worried when people because i'm like really i'm like especially now during the pandemic when we're not in our studios i mean i'm i'm at home. I mean my dina's so spiel before it would have been a much more. comfortable with. Hindsight is twenty twenty. Don't worry the same as you can see exactly Speaking of like you said you know you want. Are you saying you. I once was you. Once i was used. Sorry you started podcasting. You know at a at a different time than we started. Podcasting can you maybe You know give us a little insight on how that was when you start especially you know again as a latina woman. Because there's there's now so many more latinas on podcast and radio and things like that type of journalism or you know things like that but like when you started there really. Wasn't you that you were breaking mold. Like out yeah. It's really it's really interesting. Actually the first women who i heard on the radio before it was called podcasting it was actually in mexico. Let's build these us aiden. And i think that planted a seed there were they. Were not definitely in the united states like there were no women. No latina's definitely nod on on the radio. Not at all. When i get to columbia barnard college and i started doing radio in new york city in the nineteen eighties. It was like the wild west. It was twitter. It was instagram. It People don't understand that people are like radio and it's no skin yet. Was you know there was television and like reruns and then there was radio that there is the newspaper. But you're not interacting with the newspaper. You're not interacting with the television but with the radio you were interacting and so that was. That was the experience that allowed me to believe that. I had a voice that maybe i could do this on the radio. And that's where you know. My career basically has launched. And i become the first latina hired. Npr and etc. i think in terms of podcasting. It's funny because when i launched my company fulltime media in eleven years ago people were laughing at me. They were like you're gonna do podcasting you're gonna do radio. You're going to do audio like nobody. Listens nobody's going to get. There's no future there. And as you know now i mata casting is kind of everything. It's sure we many of us you know love to watch. It said that netflix television. And we can take it anywhere on our ipads. But you don't wanna do that. Twenty four seven. There are times when you want people talking to you on what is used to be the radio which is now asking. You want that vibe and many shows are starting in mud casting and then ending up on a different medium. So i like i love it to say. It was the wild west because people would call in and so it wasn't twitter. You actually have to respond to them. Then try to mix gave us we were. We were doing college radio so it was me and me and that it was me and my friends and then he was like the phone would ring and you had the little lights that would light up and they would light up because we were in the studio so it wasn't ringing and you push the little button Orlando whereby consumer the mass w c r. And they'd be like wait. You may stay this. spend your meal. Put me spaniel we're like but we're students and we're we're trying to learn our spanish. That's why we're doing it in spanish. Don't you want support us and they'd be like well okay but you really need to like speak spanish. Because it's bad it was. It was twitter. Exactly they were replying section audio form. Yeah well thank you for that okay. Cool color did you. Did you guys sign up for duolingo. Or what then. What did that like. You're getting nothing. I'm single like i'm getting but i like you know what i mean like it was that do you feel like i've made you want to do it more. Yes we were making i. I hope it's a similar era to what letting us and letting us are living now in the nineteen eighty s. We were being hailed as like you know the decade of the hispanic but the united states government was sending military bombing aid to salvador nicaragua when or to make a war against nicaragua. And what my line on dude us. So they were bombing us literally. We were coming as refugees. The same kind of conversation about you know what we stand these refugees and meanwhile you know here in new york city The south bronx was on fire on purpose You know so it was a very. It was a time of a lot of activism and awareness. And for me as a young latina in college. I was all about like well. I m owning my latinos cells motherfuckers late. I am showing up. And i am not just mexican. I am here from my puerto rican brothers and sisters. I'm here from dominican brothers and sisters. I'm here for my argentinean chilean. A colombian because there were many refugees at the time. Also from that part of the world and and so it was It was about solidarity it was about really defining ourselves. And i really do hope that that's where we are again. I hope that you know that. Tina's of every generation are doing a reality. Check on every level are homophobia are anti-muslim. Are.

ipads mexico Ed maria hinojosa netflix twitter nineteen eighties eleven years ago Tina new york city nineteen eighty s. instagram Two books first salvador nicaragua colombian latina dominican united states first women
"hinojosa" Discussed on Spanish Aquí Presents

Spanish Aquí Presents

08:03 min | 6 months ago

"hinojosa" Discussed on Spanish Aquí Presents

"That it didn't help. Podcast i but you are. You said that. And i remember. I remember the screenshot that i showed you. The my boyfriend's that me. Because i told i was. He was like out he landed on. My boyfriend was asking me he was like oh like what about like. When you don't know anything. Or i'm like i don't know oscars like oscar so that we'll have like an athlete and he lake has just like he knows exactly what he knows what to say. Whatever i said it in passing and then he listened to one of our episodes with somebody like when i think it was a i'm not and he was just like oskar had really great commentary like it just made everything flow so well you know like you would have never known that. He had no idea about stuff. No but i know but like 'cause you like so nice to hear that from someone again. He doesn't really listens gas so the fact that he listened to that and like pulled that out. I thought that was cool. Like yes. that's a good spot to an improv. That he does very well so he's just applying that to. It's a great gift interesting threatening that. The thing that i have realized from doing this podcast is because like you know i. I have had my. I think i've mentioned this a long time ago. But i've had a lot of sort of like trepidation about my latin tax identity. Especially like with my latino identity and like my immigrant identity is well. I've lived my entire life in in between these two worlds. And i felt so not american enough because i wasn't born here and you know i'm not really american but i definitely didn't feel myself like latin x enough to because i was born in a different country. I did come here later but like my grasp spanish is probably the weakest of all the so to me. I just didn't feel very comfortable with the language stuff so there was a lot walking into just the sap of being like. Oh my gosh. I feel like i'm the weak link here like i. I don't feel like. I'm really contributing a lot to like. I don't know the lat next movement or whatever but the thing that has completely changed everything around for me. Was that very very first episode about what it means to be. Let necks. And i was really candid about what it means to me. Why lennox is the identity that i choose you know and the response from people have been has continues to be so overwhelmingly positive and like that idea of like. You don't have to like be like the best lat next superhero of all time. You don't have to be like you don't have to know how to like. I don't know like speak perfect spanish or like know everything about lat next culture. Your identity is enough. And just hearing stories from people reaching out to me. And being like i feel i felt the same way. It's like that never grows old and it is so healing for me to hear to that. Like i don't know that weird thing of like i enough you know and the answer is of course you are but hearing other people's share that same story with you and it's like incredibly powerful that that's always kind of intermission mission statement right from the beginning young when brazil has famously went to pitch and i stood by as they're looking at making sure that everything was coming in you know came in miami. The miami gase when you know. I'm pierce anthony. I get real miami on you. Yeah that's always said. I miss ali. I but i think we were very clear and i and i'm just happy that it has been after all it's when it's good about looking back as to know like while we really felt this way about the movement about the the importance of our culture and how it's actually played out like we've seen with the live show and we've seen how people re- and just by what oscar saying the way people have reacted to Is is proof enough that we've kinda you know we stuck to our guns when it came to And not just letting x people. I mean i know that there's a bunch of white people that listen to our podcast. Sn and like the feedback has been incredible to that. It's not just Lat next podcasts. For latin x people. Which is like what i think we want you we like. That's that's pretty much our goal. Our motto is that it's like forest by us but the fact that like other people from all kinds of these Absorb it and digested and share similarities. I mean that's magical. That's so great for us by us. Fubu right. I mean to answer my question i will say i was nervous for pit bull because i didn't really just an excuse to talk about. Are y'all handle that. So that was my yeah. That was like we had a day to barely prep for it. And like i was like making calls and doing emails and just like figuring it out and i but i was nervous like again. That's the only one that i set up with. Dr set it before and i'll say it again. It's the best looking set by background. Never seen rises put together. Just go so well lit and my thoughts on. So i guess it's possible and then the rights to set up when she had there was like i don't know did you paint the wall. I don't even know my lavender myself. Oh i have a sign in my room says like when you have a sign in my research. I think new my morning mantra three. Oh five till i die darling. Check them out But you know. I was definitely nervous for them. But i don't like because i think back to our live shows and it's weird because like i never really got nervous doing the interviews. It's so weird. Because i feel like that would be the part that i should get the most nervous them but like i i got this tip wants from someone that i heard on a. I don't know who it was or something and they're like you just like flirt with your guests but not like creepy. You know what i mean. They're like you just. You're talking like you're learning with them. You want them to feel good. What and i'm like okay. Yeah and then. I feel like that's kind of like what i've always used in the background. You make you know seem and that's why you dating dating all of them. All are dated all all of eric confusing at the nfl guy. Yeah yeah right. Yeah we exchange linked numbers email at the private bang. Wow sharing location with all our desk. What guests are you going to be. Nervous for in the future droid dream. Guess i mean we all want claudia. We know my top three my top three gas my top three that i would be nervous. Uh-huh and ran. Guess yet why. I was gonna say no. No no i was gonna say. But i would throw in lebron james honorable mention the branching. Love ron janes. Well let's get a new space jam cubs out. I'll start working on going. You get lola bunny while at it. I'll dress no buzzer Are there any are there. Any dream gusts that you would want and moreno okay. I mean what. Yeah no yeah quick. We had his fatherly. Manuel stefan.

miami claudia lebron james Manuel stefan ron janes oskar first episode ali latino two worlds spanish one of our episodes top three latin five lennox lola oscar oscars brazil
"hinojosa" Discussed on Our Body Politic

Our Body Politic

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"hinojosa" Discussed on Our Body Politic

"She come.

"hinojosa" Discussed on Our Body Politic

Our Body Politic

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"hinojosa" Discussed on Our Body Politic

"This country accountable because as journalists of color and journalists have conscience and. You don't have to be a journalist of colored to be a journalist of conscience. We understand what our role is in the united states of america and today that role is so essential awry because all of us are living in fear of our democracy disappearing. I wanted just end on talking about your radio. Dock today a revisited. Which to me really embodies this idea of being journalistically. Excellent and emotionally intimate. So can you tell us who today is how long you've been covering her. And what this latest part of her story is about just days after. Donald trump is inaugurated. She is the first person that we know of that is taken by in this case undercover immigration agents from courtroom. This story comes to light. Not because she was taken but because the immigration agents lied about being in that courtroom and that becomes the story but as they is mexican undocumented formerly deported with a criminal record of fraud so nothing violent and they thought a throwaway. Who's going to care about this trans mexican criminal. That's exactly who i care about then. This update is three as life behind bars as a trans undocumented person in a maximum security. Men's prison in texas. We spoke with his three hours. It was clear she knew what was going to happen because she reveals that she is raped. Um and we talk about this account of rape in prison i mean. Has anybody been charged. This is a criminal act. That is now a national news. How come the texas department of corrections has not called me or asked who did this to you. Why do i love is three and telling the story because she is the least powerful person in the country right now and to me. She is the person who gives me the most amount of hope for life for survival for joy as resistance and is three is like wow you know. Her voice is being heard around the country. The person who was to be the most invisible. And that's what we try to do is to make the invisible those who feel invisible. Make them super visible so that everybody understands that they are part of who we are maria. Thank you so much for spending some time with us for ri- thank you for also being a queen of never giving up we love you. That was maria hinojosa founder of the photo media group host of latino usa. An author of the memoir. Once i was you out now here on our body politic we want to hear from you we've been using a new platform called speak that gathers and analyzes. What's on your mind later this episode. You'll hear some of your responses to our current question. Imagine if women of color trusted the society around them and felt truly free. What would you do if you felt truly free and financially secure you can call us at nine two nine three five three seven zero zero six or go to farrah dot com slash. Ob scroll down to find a google form to responded writing. That's nine two nine. Three five three seven zero zero six or farai.

texas department of correction Donald trump united states of america maria hinojosa latino usa texas maria google
"hinojosa" Discussed on Our Body Politic

Our Body Politic

08:00 min | 1 year ago

"hinojosa" Discussed on Our Body Politic

"I'm farai today. And this is our body politic. We've been marching to the drumbeat of political news for the last two months but here at our body politic we've also been talking to authors and journalists about our present past and future. These are women who are writing the first draft of history and looking ahead to the evolution of america to arts and publishing race relations and climate. This week we're bringing you the insights of people including maria hosa so many sen gupta lisa lucas and sarah marsh keeping us food for thought in a world hungry for answers. My guest has spent decades as a journalist. Working at pbs. Npr and cnn is three years. Mother gave her an ultimatum. Either get married to a woman and live a heterosexual life or get out and moved to the united states. That's a clip from us today. Revisited partout of a documentary. Maria in hosa and her team produced. It stuck with me that. This is a specific story about the universal striving for freedom. And i ask maria why she chose to focus on today. She is the first person that we know of taken by in this case undercover immigration agents from a courtroom. This story comes to light. Not because she was taken but because the immigration agents lied about being in that courtroom and that becomes the story but is three is mexican undocumented formerly deported with criminal record of fraud so nothing violent and they thought a throwaway. Who's going to care about this trans mexican criminal. That's exactly who i care about. You know hosts. Latest book is once. I was you a memoir of love and hate in torn america. We've been friends and sisters in journalism for years. Here's a window into how both seeking to process what the art and business of truth telling means to us and to the world there has been this idea that journalism is a place where you have no body and no self hood and all of your personal experiences have to before you can write about anything and now the cracks. That facade are manifest and that whole construct is breaking down. How did it affect your life as a journalist in the early days of npr. And how did that lead to you. Creating your own company fu tutto. You're exactly right for i. It was like how do i become walter cronkite. How white men in this country have taken ownership of the notion of objectively right so we have to not just leave the body. We have to become like them. We have to see the world through their eyes. And it's like yo- week so i ki- like when did you all become the arbiters of objectivity. I mean it's been adorable farai. I've been interviewed by many latino journalists. Who are now seasoned journalists. They're just like we were really the first you were like the first. Npr like the first latina cnn. Like what and i understood. Like i was the first So there was no way to kind of blend in. I mean honestly. Npr was incredibly white and very privileged and very male. And you sort of talk about a moment where someone's like. Oh you must be afraid to go out there in them streets like i'm actually more afraid being right here in this office. Exacly the beautiful thing of what happened in that moment for i was i understood. Privilege and the privilege is what forced me to you know. Raise my hand up literally. I would push my elbow up and just be like okay. Keep it up because they understood like you can't be here having had all this privilege and not doing your job representing being up these stories you know. Lay people know that the whole world doesn't look like them or think like them and throughout my career. You'd come up with a story idea they'd be like oh that's weird why i've never heard about that so it must not be important so let's not report about it you know and going home and just like whoa okay. I can't believe that was said today or that that happened. You know whether it was the sexism or the undertow racism or outright racism so it could have completely kneecap me like my editor from npr. When i was a reporter already said to me camera. Everybody knows about your latino agenda. And i was like what. What are you taught us. Come on everybody knows. You have a latino agenda. And i was like really and thankfully i was on my toes that day and i said well it must mean that you have a white male agenda then and he said it's not the same thing and i said it's exactly the same thing so that moment could have ended it for me. I could have just been like. That's it and i fought back because of that privilege and i'm really glad i never went away. Not only did you not go away. You created tutto. Media will only grown and strengthened power with latino. Usa in the thick radio documentaries. How has your vision for a few tutto challenged overtime while for i. I mean you've been with me on this path of I mean you're the person who labeled meet my favorite label for me. Is the one that you gave me. Do you remember it. The queen of never giving up while when you said that to me i was like yeah man. That's it you know. The creation of doodo media was born out of frustration. Actually and fear my dream job. As i write in the book i mean i watch sixty minutes as a little girl. That was where i wanted to work. It was like where do you go to next after you've done documentary work and won an emmy for you know long form investigate like you go there and they said. Can you wait until one of these white men get sicker dies i was like. Is this a joke and people had said you know. Maybe you should do your own thing. Maybe you should create your own thing and it's just like what. I'm so glad that out of that. Fear i created for tutor and the vision it i. Somebody asked me what division i was like. Well i had a vision. I knew i wanted to be create the newsroom. That i had always dreamed that i have as a young journalist. We're actually moving with ethics and love is possible. I was like the vision was to get to three years. If you made it two three years then maybe you could make it to five and if you made it to five then you know so now. That vision is real. We have a newsroom that is diverse which includes white men because yes the two we are. We include and we're always working on doing even better but we are newsroom. That is creating this content where our numbers are. Exploding variety know we just left. Npr we are now being distributed by pr x. I just got an email like a week ago. That said now grown by another twenty five stations while amazing. It's because we have done this work with so much love and authenticity and with understanding that we don't do what npr does. Which is you know looking at latinos like with benach yours. Like oh my god. Wow those hispanics. What's the matter with them. They don't vote. That's not how we approach these stories. We are all part of this continuum of holding.

farai Npr maria hosa sen gupta lisa lucas sarah marsh america cnn pbs walter cronkite Maria maria npr emmy
Latino's role in the presidential election

WNYC Programming

01:12 min | 1 year ago

Latino's role in the presidential election

"Welcome to letyou know Yusa. I'm Maria Hinojosa. 32 million Latinos are eligible to vote this election. That's a record, but research suggests that in battleground states 57% of them Are not going to cast ballots. Historically, the Noron Latina turn up has always been lower than that of white African Americans and Asians. Many had hoped that things would be different this time around. During the primaries, Senator Bernie Sanders made like Latinas of focus of his campaign. Many of them called him deal, Bernie. We call someone a deal. The column is basically uncle family, his family and it's an environment. We know that when the old Bernie gets elected isn't a fight every inch possible to get all the progressive policies that he's been fighting for these that feel that But then came covert 19th. Then Bernie Sanders dropped out of the race and Latino and Latino voters, It seemed that once again they became a low priority.

Senator Bernie Sanders Yusa Maria Hinojosa. Family
Central Market gives $1 Million to the Dallas Education Foundation to benefit Dallas ISD schools damaged by the 2019 tornado

Chris Krok

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Central Market gives $1 Million to the Dallas Education Foundation to benefit Dallas ISD schools damaged by the 2019 tornado

"The eve of the one year anniversary of the Dallas North Dallas tornadoes, Ella sayest, he has received a $1 million gift from central market. The money will be used to rebuild the schools that were destroyed by the 2019 tornadoes in north Dallas. Dallas I, Asti superintendent, Dr Michael Lena host says says central market was there from the beginning and they didn't expect such a large donation. We just found that it was a man dollars that he knows of million dollars, so now we get to dream. We've got to get our kids and our staff involved in the dream so they could really own it, Hinojosa says. They will deliver on this promise. A vision is a dream with the deadline and they will get it done. Cat

Dallas Dr Michael Lena Ella Hinojosa Superintendent
"hinojosa" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

07:10 min | 1 year ago

"hinojosa" Discussed on Latino USA

"I'm in the virtual studio today with producer Ginny Moon Hey Jeannie I'm waving to you all the way from Harlem, , Hey Maria, , I'm in Queens. . So Jeannie were talking about our favorite topic today parenting, , right? ? Yeah and parenting in twenty twenty is a whole new level parenting. . You know what I have adult children now. . So honestly, , I am so thankful that I do not have to be raising little kids during this time I just can't imagine. . So what have you been doing because how old is your little boy now Medina's turning three it's been an adventure I don't know how else to put it. . But in this adventure, , you're not really going anywhere, right? , ? No, , it's an adventure within the four walls of our apartment. . So what's it been like like? ? How do you even manage it I don't some days and some days I do. . I had to cut back to part time. . So when everything shut down I, , just tried to manage the best I could. . But it became too much I. was . burnt out I was trying to work at night I was trying to work in his nap times and also like switching gears from mom to try and. . Write an email or work I can't multitask again if I have a toddler running around in the background running my life like he's the boss, , I can hear my in the background saying Mommy's. . But yeah, , you just Kinda deal with it. . Yeah. . I have to say in the beginning the only way I made it through, , was my coffee in the morning and passing the torch to the wine that I would have to the day. . I know you're tired genie as a parent but the thing is, , is that when people are tired, , they're like, , oh, , my God the last thing I want to do is go to work but for you, , you're like I'm tired I really WanNa go to work yeah. . Because I just WANNA. . Work without distractions like how many times a day do I have seen running in here and being like me and like L. And he wants to play and like. . Hangman. . And it's nice. . I had review. . On some level, , but I really just want to focus for an eight. . Hour Day Without a distraction and it's because it's really hard to switch gears feel like women are good at multitasking. . But this is not one of those scenarios I wanNA parent when I need to parent and I wanna work when I need to work I can't do both at the same time. . So. . This whole thing about the schools being closed down like New York City like they try to never close the schools down, , right? ? Yeah. . So the fact that they did shut down and they shut down all around the country poses a really big challenge because. . Not, everybody , can set up for remote learning I mean not everybody has Internet. . Some kids only get their meals if they're going to school so. . It really has been a challenge on a lot of different levels. . So you decided that you like all parents you're like, okay , I need to talk to other parents and commiserate and think and see how other people are doing it. . So you didn't gather a group of parents I guess virtually right? ? Yeah I did because there's been a slew of articles about the mental load that everybody is dealing with as parents because you're not meant to do both things at once like you can't parent and work full-time that's why childcare exists and none of this was meant to be a long term solution. . But I do want to say before we start that even though we have all been affected by the pandemic, , all of us participating in today's roundtable have been fortunate enough to still be working in some format. . So we're all healthy and we're all grateful for that but we're barely hanging on by threat. . So here we go. . I want to welcome <hes> from Dallas Texas we have. . dinty Cabanas. . Hi. . How are you? ? Thank you for having me. . So glad you're here I have Joe Marvin Tura from Richmond California. . For having me and I have to Haida Alencastro from Orlando Florida. . Hey thank you. . Teeny. . Thanks for having me and just the disclaimer everyone knows to hide it and I have actually known each other for like twenty years. . So no surprises there little bit. . All right. . So I just want to quickly go around the virtual room. . And tell me about your kids what you do. . This is our Sia I am in Dallas. As . you said, , I have two little girls wind will be ten in three weeks. . The other one will be four in two weeks. . And I for fulltime digital marketing manager for. . Mary. . Kay Corporate here in Dallas Great Jomar. . Hi I'm Joanna and I'm in Richmond. . That's you know the bay area and my little one is turning three months and I teach elementary school. . So juggling the new definition of a teacher and first time parent has been very, , very interesting adventure. . Into Haida. . I have two kids. . My son is ten years old and my daughter is about to be eight and a few weeks and I am a systems engineer for Lockheed. . Martin but I work from home. . So I've been A. . Since two thousand and five. . Okay. . So we're going to start from the beginning. . I think I mean I don't know about the rest of you but I think we all were kind of like Oh. . This is going to be a few weeks we can do this. . No big deal, , but walk me through personally what? ? Each of you guys had to go through and like what kind of plan you came up with to get by for the end of the school year. . Well for us like all of you we've had to adjust we did not work from home originally <hes>. . We were released for spring break and never came back. . We were told we were going to stay. . And do you learning and so it was a shock I'm not gonNA live my husband and I freaked out a little bit. . But then we had to pivot really quickly. Right . what are we going to do? ? Do we have the right equipment to we have the right setup at the House <hes>? ? Both of our kids are in the same school. . So that was one good thing because it was need to everybody. So . the school they know what they were doing. We . know what we're doing the girls were like what's going on? ? So the ambiguity of it all was really challenging for all of us. . But we just started getting a routine down our dining room became our command center. . So I would say the first two weeks were horrible I'm not GonNa lie but I think we've all pivoted. . Can and so I was pivoting at home I was pivoting at work. . And even with myself like how am I going to take time for myself and you know lose it But I'm not allowed I'm sure I'm not a lot. . Of. . This

Jeannie Maria Hinojosa Harlem Medina Queens New York City
"hinojosa" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

Latino Rebels Radio

06:11 min | 1 year ago

"hinojosa" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

"So as you know, , Latino rebels is part of Food Doodo Media, which , is the nonprofit independent media company founded by Marina Hosa, , and if you've been following what Matia has been sharing the last couple of weeks, , she has a new book. . It's called once I was you it to memoir and I've seen Muddy A- work on the book talk about the book worry about the book. . Love, , the book hate the book. . To seeing her the whole creative process. . and. . Now, the , book is out and everyone loves the book and she's been on every other podcast. . Since we worked together I I said, , you need to be back on Latino rebels radio. . Not. . Only because. . You know we work at full Doodo media. . OR WE CO host an in the thick podcast. . But. . Because we're friends and we're family so. . Here's money a wholesale on Latino rebels radio talking about. . Book. . Once I. . was you. . Maria. . This is the fifth fourth or fifth time I've had you on some form of Latino rebels whether it's radio or streaming. So. . . You're quickly becoming quickly becoming enough Latino rebel. . He knew I knew I. Knew . About Latino rebels before I knew about you know crazy. . No but listen I, , know it's been. . It's been such a historic week for you. . With the book launch, , and then you're on Lulu Garcia now audio and we're doing it in the thick, , and then the Lou Garcia now laterals interview shows up on Latino USA and you're doing all this promotion. . AT OPRAH DOT COM YEAH OPRAH DOT com, , and then you got these amazing reviews and and it's I'm an you know you're like. . It's crazy what's happening but I wanted to just have a conversation you and I with no like the book will come out of this conversation but I'm not going to be like Maria tell me about your book you know what I mean. . Like I, , want I want us to be like just you and me. . TO GIVE PEOPLE SORT OF A. . I don't know like a feel of what we do behind the scenes a little bit I mean there's a little bit of crazy that has to happen when you're like I'm in a launch, , my own company or I'm GonNa Launch, , you know something like letting rebels and I'm just going to do it and I'm Elliot died. . So there's a of you know. . For one way or another for one reason or another jumping off a cliff and just being like but we got this in one and so I feel like food thorough and Latino rebels and everything that you know in the fake and everything that has come as a result is really because we have nothing to lose Indian this you know that we had. . People are like what am I ain't got none your so it's like I. . Mean I have a lot but I'm just saying like A. . doodle I didn't have. . My own company and I was like. . How scary was that house like we've talked about this but how scary was that moment for you because you talk about it in the book but you. . Know I talk about it in the book because there's it's a very important moment because what you gotta get the book to really get all the juicy details but they. . Don't reveal too much. . Basically I'm told by a very important network show. . That that I should like, , take a hike <hes> and comeback. . When some of the white guys had died and I was an I get into the subway and I'm crying Hulu I'm crying in the subway I'm alone I think that there's a real understanding of you know. . We are psychic psychically and in many ways tied to our family but we're also very deeply existential. . Alone I'm sorry. . I go there. . You know it's just like we stomas Finale Quintas sister solo or <unk> in says, , I got home I called my sister and I said Britain. . I said, , I cannot go on unemployment. . I've never gone on unemployment and I don't have a job. . And very immigrant t very Mexican. . The I was like I can't. . I cannot tell my father that I went on unemployment and so people. . Who See your brightness your star, , your shot they see it from afar. . You have a hard time seeing it yourself. . You know this often happens to us and people had said why don't you do your own thing deepa Sunday that you're of our board was like do your own thing I was like this look what are you talking about? ? What my own thing and at that point you know somebody else had said I'll help you and so then I just said. All . right. . Well, , let's do this and we had no assurance. . We had no funding. . We had nothing we drew up some paperwork. . and. . You start it in your in your in your apartment in my apartment. . In Harley, , actually I ended up I. . my first office was exactly in the area of the apartment where I ended up finishing writing the book because we had to rearrange the apartment. . You know we live in New York we don't. . We don't have like a huge apartment so. . GotTa move some things are actually the altar had to be moved the friend had. . And the kids were still I mean, , your kids were still kids I. . Mean I know they're older now but you're talking we're talking ten years ago. . Yeah yeah, , Yeah Yeah they earn motherhood you were in the well, , you know we'll. . Yes. . Although I think that's an ongoing conversation honestly, , and the book is in inspiring these conversations in my own family, , right? which ? is so where was mom? ? Where was she was she here where she present? ? Did she feel present? ? Did she give us what we need? ? So those are ongoing conversations especially because right now while I'm getting a lot of attention for the book this time also when I have to be giving attention to my family, , there's always that balance and I think that's part of what the message of the book is. Is . a psycho Saddiqi. . Oh, , you have it all you can have many things, , but you're going to have to work at them and it's going to mean sacrifice and risk anyway to answer your question will you he was a very scary time I was so scared, , I had no idea what to expect. .

Maria Lulu Garcia White Castle Elliot Hama afar Julio A. Britain Bronx New York nick Fukuda Harlem
Interview with Maria Hinojosa

Latino Rebels Radio

06:11 min | 1 year ago

Interview with Maria Hinojosa

"So as you know, Latino rebels is part of Food Doodo Media, which is the nonprofit independent media company founded by Marina Hosa, and if you've been following what Matia has been sharing the last couple of weeks, she has a new book. It's called once I was you it to memoir and I've seen Muddy A- work on the book talk about the book worry about the book. Love, the book hate the book. To seeing her the whole creative process. and. Now, the book is out and everyone loves the book and she's been on every other podcast. Since we worked together I I said, you need to be back on Latino rebels radio. Not. Only because. You know we work at full Doodo media. OR WE CO host an in the thick podcast. But. Because we're friends and we're family so. Here's money a wholesale on Latino rebels radio talking about. Book. Once I. was you. Maria. This is the fifth fourth or fifth time I've had you on some form of Latino rebels whether it's radio or streaming. So. You're quickly becoming quickly becoming enough Latino rebel. He knew I knew I. Knew About Latino rebels before I knew about you know crazy. No but listen I, know it's been. It's been such a historic week for you. With the book launch, and then you're on Lulu Garcia now audio and we're doing it in the thick, and then the Lou Garcia now laterals interview shows up on Latino USA and you're doing all this promotion. AT OPRAH DOT COM YEAH OPRAH DOT com, and then you got these amazing reviews and and it's I'm an you know you're like. It's crazy what's happening but I wanted to just have a conversation you and I with no like the book will come out of this conversation but I'm not going to be like Maria tell me about your book you know what I mean. Like I, want I want us to be like just you and me. TO GIVE PEOPLE SORT OF A. I don't know like a feel of what we do behind the scenes a little bit I mean there's a little bit of crazy that has to happen when you're like I'm in a launch, my own company or I'm GonNa Launch, you know something like letting rebels and I'm just going to do it and I'm Elliot died. So there's a of you know. For one way or another for one reason or another jumping off a cliff and just being like but we got this in one and so I feel like food thorough and Latino rebels and everything that you know in the fake and everything that has come as a result is really because we have nothing to lose Indian this you know that we had. People are like what am I ain't got none your so it's like I. Mean I have a lot but I'm just saying like A. doodle I didn't have. My own company and I was like. How scary was that house like we've talked about this but how scary was that moment for you because you talk about it in the book but you. Know I talk about it in the book because there's it's a very important moment because what you gotta get the book to really get all the juicy details but they. Don't reveal too much. Basically I'm told by a very important network show. That that I should like, take a hike and comeback. When some of the white guys had died and I was an I get into the subway and I'm crying Hulu I'm crying in the subway I'm alone I think that there's a real understanding of you know. We are psychic psychically and in many ways tied to our family but we're also very deeply existential. Alone I'm sorry. I go there. You know it's just like we stomas Finale Quintas sister solo or in says, I got home I called my sister and I said Britain. I said, I cannot go on unemployment. I've never gone on unemployment and I don't have a job. And very immigrant t very Mexican. The I was like I can't. I cannot tell my father that I went on unemployment and so people. Who See your brightness your star, your shot they see it from afar. You have a hard time seeing it yourself. You know this often happens to us and people had said why don't you do your own thing deepa Sunday that you're of our board was like do your own thing I was like this look what are you talking about? What my own thing and at that point you know somebody else had said I'll help you and so then I just said. All right. Well, let's do this and we had no assurance. We had no funding. We had nothing we drew up some paperwork. and. You start it in your in your in your apartment in my apartment. In Harley, actually I ended up I. my first office was exactly in the area of the apartment where I ended up finishing writing the book because we had to rearrange the apartment. You know we live in New York we don't. We don't have like a huge apartment so. GotTa move some things are actually the altar had to be moved the friend had. And the kids were still I mean, your kids were still kids I. Mean I know they're older now but you're talking we're talking ten years ago. Yeah yeah, Yeah Yeah they earn motherhood you were in the well, you know we'll. Yes. Although I think that's an ongoing conversation honestly, and the book is in inspiring these conversations in my own family, right? which is so where was mom? Where was she was she here where she present? Did she feel present? Did she give us what we need? So those are ongoing conversations especially because right now while I'm getting a lot of attention for the book this time also when I have to be giving attention to my family, there's always that balance and I think that's part of what the message of the book is. Is a psycho Saddiqi. Oh, you have it all you can have many things, but you're going to have to work at them and it's going to mean sacrifice and risk anyway to answer your question will you he was a very scary time I was so scared, I had no idea what to expect.

Maria Lulu Garcia Food Doodo Media Marina Hosa Matia Elliot Afar A. Britain New York
"hinojosa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"hinojosa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Welcome back to Latino Yusa, Maria Hinojosa. And today we're listening to the story of hysteria. Gonzalez on undocumented trans woman serving a nine year sentence at the James VI Allred unit. Maximum security men's prison in Texas. Hysteria says she was sexually assaulted by her cell mate inside the prison. A few weeks after the assault history. I called me to tell me that she had news to share she had been moved to a new unit, and she said she was meeting other undocumented people just like her. The most powerful Astrea says. Things are a bit more calm here. The other undocumented people in her unit are on their best behavior because they like us. They are hoping to apply to stay in the United States. Hysteria is applying for a U visa. It's also known as a victim visa. It's reserved for people who are victims of crimes in the United States who can help in the prosecution of the person who committed that crime. In his day as case that would be her abusive ex boyfriend. If approved, hysteria could one day hope to become a U. S citizen? It's not like it's unofficial undocumented unit in the prison, but there just happened to be a lot of undocumented people altogether. And they share something else, which is that in the Texas prison system. These people don't have the same access as other prisoners to the very few rehabilitative programs at already. No school no another the glasses, But that is not. For example, they can't go to class to get their g e D or participate in any of the college programs. Hysteria says she was told. She couldn't even go to the English language learning programs are the only thing undocumented immigrants held in this prison are allowed to do. His work..

James VI Allred unit United States Texas Maria Hinojosa Gonzalez assault Astrea U. S
"hinojosa" Discussed on Tamarindo

Tamarindo

06:51 min | 1 year ago

"hinojosa" Discussed on Tamarindo

"Hey everyone we're back from. . From the last time, , you heard us well I. . We want to acknowledge that we are recording this episode hours after receiving the News Supreme Court Justice Ruth. . Bader GINSBURG has passed. . So this is a couple of hours now. . So we're we're past the shock and sadness, , but we have to acknowledge it and he all her episode. . We talked about how important the Supreme Court is in. . This is another reason why we're we're excited to over by didn't Harris because how important the courts are and we have to watch out for say hypocrisy because my Ceuta Republican senators supple failed McConnell is already hours after she's best already promising to just bulldoze a Republican nominated. . person. . To the Supreme Court. . Yeah, , literally to add salt to the wound Brendan I. . been feeling all the things we poured some rose. . Am honor of her that we both shut some tears. It's . it's it's a hard hard evening. . Yes. . We've shared some tears for doing a toast Rosa for BG. . So I think many of us have have dreaded this day for a long time we knew it was coming. . Not only because it obviously mark the passing of champion of women's rights but also because of what it can mean for the future of our country but it's you know we're we're trying to use this as fuel to keep doubling down on the things that we're doing. . So wanted to share a quick thing that we're working on. . We're co hosting a phone banking session October third at Twelve PM PS virtual, , of course, , check out the Lincoln the notes how you can sign up it is a bilingual phone banks. . We're especially looking for Spanish speakers <hes> and it. . It's really easy if you haven't had any experience phone banking, , the point is that it's really an easy way to get involved in. . You'll get all the instruction during the during the actual phone banking. . So Cool I love that the. . NFL is leading this. . I love. It . does really taking true to what she said in the last episode like every week you commit to doing something more for this election and that's great. . So thanks for leading that and Y'all sign up. . So despite that sad news by that by the time you're hearing this it's been a few days and we've all hopefully had some time collectively grieving and continue her legacy but we do want to celebrate a lot of things as well. . This is our first episode happening during lat next heritage months. . So let's give them a racket to all of us from carshield. . Cares to. . Makes Heritage Month. . So why don't we give that at? ? Yes actually one thing I was really thinking about recently I was thinking I wanted to give them a threat to being by cultural. . To, Brennan , as. . To most of our our listeners. . Reflecting on this and how much broader our perspective is because we're bicultural and I and I know I I remember growing up I used to think that being like eating was like something that was bad and I always wanted to be more Mexican and then I wanted to be more American I just never feeling like I fit in but now I really started to think about how that's really a strength because we can. . Really look at kind of what values from our that upper upbringing do we want to carry with us and some of them are problematic and toxic shit. . But then some of them are I think are great and same thing from some of the values American valley some of them are very toxic and some of them I think are great. . It's a week to kind of see from the outside what we like in what we. . Create our own values in redefines new identity I love that. . Part of the secret to the success of this podcast is that can we talk about the beauty of our identity as imperfect as some view it like you're not Mexican enough and American now guess what we're both in Los Angeles. . Awesome. . Just keep. . Being yourselves and then don't look at it as a negative to celebrate exactly who you are. . And someone else who celebrates exactly who she is and who I think is a very perfect example of being bicultural is mighty. . Ena Hosa. . She is a dream guest for combating or were so excited to have her on this show. . You. . All probably know who she is but just as a reminder, , she is the anchor and executive producer of the peabody award winning show Latina say as well as co host of in the thick media's political podcast. . You know Hosa has in for millions about changing cultural and political landscape in America and abroad she's here to talk all about her new book once I was you which this week was listed as five hot books by the National Book Review Let's give them my. . Talk About Latina power. . So share that you got to hear this interview, , what did you think Oh my God I am so jealous that you got to interview her I. . Absolutely fucking Love This interview Madina Hosa I feel like she's doing exactly what she's supposed to be doing because as she's she's meant to be a journalist actually sounds so soothing and powerful in also relatable at all at the same time, , she honestly is goals on goals and <hes>. . You know one part of the interview that's I mean so many parts stood out but one part of this sit out because it referenced something that has coming has been coming up with a lot of our listeners and are followers. . There's a part where she talks about her she. . She leaves I think a very high paying job, , and then her dad expresses some concern. . You know she says, , well, , how Gomez, , how are you going to make money and then she says bobby like I don't know. . But she you know she felt like she wasn't making her happy and I think there was a you remember the quote or would dress she says I was a success but I didn't feel proud which was so powerful because. . Yeah like you want to be proud of your work, , and maybe that's the way she learned to define success versus traditional notions of success, , which is the Nice House a nice car and the you know the Nice 401k package all those things, , right? Right. ? . Right. . So really think rethinking about like what actually makes you happy and what actually success mean to you there is a one thing that. . She said that kind of goes along with with that we're the drivers of what society is going to look like in the future we can determine what matters how we go goes the market, , and for me that was thinking about how like as Latinos especially, , during something we can think about like how much more powerful we are than we even were like you know I don't know five ten. . Powerful. . that. . We can actually redefine not only would this what looks like for us but what are what values are important for this country? ? So we we have power and I think growing up I didn't most of us I definitely didn't feel very powerful I felt like I was living in a system that was created by white people and led by white people when I was just trying to fit in. . So just really thinking about how. . People were really finding our voice more than ever before and. . I know hoses book is a great example about the power of voice and how we really right now as demographics change I really stepping into that power and we can define our own our own business success in our own values in this country.

McConnell Supreme Court Bader GINSBURG News Supreme Court America Justice Ruth American valley Brendan I. carshield Harris NFL Brennan
Reflecting on RBG and Redefining Success

Tamarindo

06:51 min | 1 year ago

Reflecting on RBG and Redefining Success

"Hey everyone we're back from. From the last time, you heard us well I. We want to acknowledge that we are recording this episode hours after receiving the News Supreme Court Justice Ruth. Bader GINSBURG has passed. So this is a couple of hours now. So we're we're past the shock and sadness, but we have to acknowledge it and he all her episode. We talked about how important the Supreme Court is in. This is another reason why we're we're excited to over by didn't Harris because how important the courts are and we have to watch out for say hypocrisy because my Ceuta Republican senators supple failed McConnell is already hours after she's best already promising to just bulldoze a Republican nominated. person. To the Supreme Court. Yeah, literally to add salt to the wound Brendan I. been feeling all the things we poured some rose. Am honor of her that we both shut some tears. It's it's it's a hard hard evening. Yes. We've shared some tears for doing a toast Rosa for BG. So I think many of us have have dreaded this day for a long time we knew it was coming. Not only because it obviously mark the passing of champion of women's rights but also because of what it can mean for the future of our country but it's you know we're we're trying to use this as fuel to keep doubling down on the things that we're doing. So wanted to share a quick thing that we're working on. We're co hosting a phone banking session October third at Twelve PM PS virtual, of course, check out the Lincoln the notes how you can sign up it is a bilingual phone banks. We're especially looking for Spanish speakers and it. It's really easy if you haven't had any experience phone banking, the point is that it's really an easy way to get involved in. You'll get all the instruction during the during the actual phone banking. So Cool I love that the. NFL is leading this. I love. It does really taking true to what she said in the last episode like every week you commit to doing something more for this election and that's great. So thanks for leading that and Y'all sign up. So despite that sad news by that by the time you're hearing this it's been a few days and we've all hopefully had some time collectively grieving and continue her legacy but we do want to celebrate a lot of things as well. This is our first episode happening during lat next heritage months. So let's give them a racket to all of us from carshield. Cares to. Makes Heritage Month. So why don't we give that at? Yes actually one thing I was really thinking about recently I was thinking I wanted to give them a threat to being by cultural. To, Brennan as. To most of our our listeners. Reflecting on this and how much broader our perspective is because we're bicultural and I and I know I I remember growing up I used to think that being like eating was like something that was bad and I always wanted to be more Mexican and then I wanted to be more American I just never feeling like I fit in but now I really started to think about how that's really a strength because we can. Really look at kind of what values from our that upper upbringing do we want to carry with us and some of them are problematic and toxic shit. But then some of them are I think are great and same thing from some of the values American valley some of them are very toxic and some of them I think are great. It's a week to kind of see from the outside what we like in what we. Create our own values in redefines new identity I love that. Part of the secret to the success of this podcast is that can we talk about the beauty of our identity as imperfect as some view it like you're not Mexican enough and American now guess what we're both in Los Angeles. Awesome. Just keep. Being yourselves and then don't look at it as a negative to celebrate exactly who you are. And someone else who celebrates exactly who she is and who I think is a very perfect example of being bicultural is mighty. Ena Hosa. She is a dream guest for combating or were so excited to have her on this show. You. All probably know who she is but just as a reminder, she is the anchor and executive producer of the peabody award winning show Latina say as well as co host of in the thick media's political podcast. You know Hosa has in for millions about changing cultural and political landscape in America and abroad she's here to talk all about her new book once I was you which this week was listed as five hot books by the National Book Review Let's give them my. Talk About Latina power. So share that you got to hear this interview, what did you think Oh my God I am so jealous that you got to interview her I. Absolutely fucking Love This interview Madina Hosa I feel like she's doing exactly what she's supposed to be doing because as she's she's meant to be a journalist actually sounds so soothing and powerful in also relatable at all at the same time, she honestly is goals on goals and You know one part of the interview that's I mean so many parts stood out but one part of this sit out because it referenced something that has coming has been coming up with a lot of our listeners and are followers. There's a part where she talks about her she. She leaves I think a very high paying job, and then her dad expresses some concern. You know she says, well, how Gomez, how are you going to make money and then she says bobby like I don't know. But she you know she felt like she wasn't making her happy and I think there was a you remember the quote or would dress she says I was a success but I didn't feel proud which was so powerful because. Yeah like you want to be proud of your work, and maybe that's the way she learned to define success versus traditional notions of success, which is the Nice House a nice car and the you know the Nice 401k package all those things, right? Right. Right. So really think rethinking about like what actually makes you happy and what actually success mean to you there is a one thing that. She said that kind of goes along with with that we're the drivers of what society is going to look like in the future we can determine what matters how we go goes the market, and for me that was thinking about how like as Latinos especially, during something we can think about like how much more powerful we are than we even were like you know I don't know five ten. Powerful. that. We can actually redefine not only would this what looks like for us but what are what values are important for this country? So we we have power and I think growing up I didn't most of us I definitely didn't feel very powerful I felt like I was living in a system that was created by white people and led by white people when I was just trying to fit in. So just really thinking about how. People were really finding our voice more than ever before and. I know hoses book is a great example about the power of voice and how we really right now as demographics change I really stepping into that power and we can define our own our own business success in our own values in this country.

Supreme Court News Supreme Court Bader Ginsburg Ena Hosa Madina Hosa Hosa Harris Justice Ruth Mcconnell Nice House Peabody Award Brendan I. Los Angeles American Valley NFL Carshield Brennan Executive Producer Gomez
"hinojosa" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

06:02 min | 1 year ago

"hinojosa" Discussed on Latino USA

"The one and only Monday. . Joins, , me now welcome Lulu. . It's it's such a pleasure. . I. . It is such a pleasure to have you on and to read this book it's called once I was you and it is based around the story. . Of how you came to the United States for the first time, , tell us that story. . Yeah. . Well, , it's an interesting story. . I didn't actually know it like a lot of us. . We don't actually ask our parents. . So how exactly did I know that you came for example, , my whole family we were born in Mexico my dad MPC go of us in Mexico City and dad gets hired by the University of Chicago. He's . a medical doctor dedicated to research and long story short he helps to create the cochlear implant. . He was an amazing human being. . May He rest in peace? ? <hes>. . So that was in Chicago and my mom, , and the four of us kids I was the baby in her arms get on a plane. . It's the early nineteen. . Sixty's we fly from Mexico City to Dallas and change planes in Dallas, , and then we're GONNA fly onto Chicago and. . When I finally found out the story when I wrote raising, , which is a Motherhood Memoir that I wrote like twenty years ago. . You know I found out that there was this whole thing that happened at the airport and that an immigration agent was like you know saying that had some weird skin thing and you know maybe had to put me in quarantine and my mom was like Nah and then I came and I saved the no she didn't say it like this but basically, , it was like me Ma Ma Ma you know. . She's five feet tall by the way, , but stood up and. . Know had this kind of moment with immigration agent and and it was a story that I told. . Kind of like saying, , wow, , my mom is such a cool woman like I understand where I get my powerful voice even though she's tiny, , she spoke back to an immigration agent. . and. . Then in the writing of this book, , blue is really what happens is that I really understand what was happening there. . There were trying to separate you from your mother. . They basically told your mom that they were GonNa, , take you away and put you in quarantine quote unquote and that she was free to go with her other children but that you would have to stay behind I mean. . Can you imagine like? ? When my mom called me in the midst of and you know Lou that I've been covering this story, the , entirety, , my career immigration writ. Large. . . And my mom calls me at the airport. . I was flying from one back when we were flying around and in the midst of the height of babies being put into cages, , we were hearing the voices. . You know we knew this was happening. . This is not. . This not begin with the trump administration but anyway. . Mom. . Calls me and she's crying she's like is Gay It could have been me. . If I'm a your she was like that was I could have been one of those moms and I swear to Lulu that. . By heart dropped I was like Oh. . My God. . So it's not a story of like my mom. . Eh, , you know speaking back it's a realized now a story of trauma and that. . Wouldn't have happened I think had I not written the book and had the horror of <hes> immigration policies becomes so. . Crystal. . Clear. . So <hes> inhumane so hurtful and frankly now finally so public <hes>. . You. . As you mentioned what brought to Chicago, , which is where you grew up, , but you always maintained your connection to Mexico and your roots you'd go back and forth. . You came here on a green card. . When did you become a citizen? ? I asked this simply because that transition of becoming. . An American you said was difficult for you. . You. . You found it hard to sort of occupy these two spaces. . So, , it was great because in the writing of the book, , I actually had to like do the time line and and then I had to go back and find my citizenship. . It was a actually I had just come back from a reporting trip with Scott Simon Scott and I were down inside whether it was December of Nineteen eighty-nine Lau Offensive Little Trenton Webb the FMLN offensive the guerilla warfare was happening inside word and <hes> I went down to produce Scott. . And I came back and <hes> just a few days later I took the oath. . Look the reason why it was complicated was because way back then maybe now I am beginning to understand maybe it was because of that traumatic experience in Airport in Dallas I, , always kind of new. . Like this isn't a certain thing for you. . This thing about you being able to come in and out of the United States you've done your whole life. . Now. . You're a woman you're a journalist you've been to Cuba. . You've got you've been tool Salvador you. . You know. . There may be a time when they say you can't come back and I understood that and so I have to be honest as I am the memoir he was motivated in large part by fear that that my green card could be taken away and that I could not be allowed and this was before this whole conversation of like what's happening now you know this was way before it was a different time but I think I kind of I, , kind of knew it. . So the thing that happens when you become a citizen in this country is you have to raise your right hand and you have to swear that you will bear arms for this country. . And people who are born in this country like my own kids haven't had to do that. . When you have to do that you take this thing really seriously you know like the Constitution and the bill of rights and you know all like you take it really seriously, , and I think that's why because the book is certainly it's about immigration, , but it's also about like my. . My struggle for democracy and being seen as a journalist taken seriously to be that's all a part of democracy and it just becomes I mean I was living with a green card I was I was definitely understanding my role as a participant. . But when you raise that right hand, , it's at a whole

Chicago Dallas Mexico City United States Mexico Ma Ma Ma Scott Simon Scott University of Chicago Lou Cuba Lau Trenton Webb
A Conversation With Maria Hinojosa And Lulu Garcia-Navarro

Latino USA

06:03 min | 1 year ago

A Conversation With Maria Hinojosa And Lulu Garcia-Navarro

"The one and only Monday. Joins, me now welcome Lulu. It's it's such a pleasure. I. It is such a pleasure to have you on and to read this book it's called once I was you and it is based around the story. Of how you came to the United States for the first time, tell us that story. Yeah. Well, it's an interesting story. I didn't actually know it like a lot of us. We don't actually ask our parents. So how exactly did I know that you came for example, my whole family we were born in Mexico my dad MPC go of us in Mexico City and dad gets hired by the University of Chicago. He's a medical doctor dedicated to research and long story short he helps to create the cochlear implant. He was an amazing human being. May He rest in peace? So that was in Chicago and my mom, and the four of us kids I was the baby in her arms get on a plane. It's the early nineteen. Sixty's we fly from Mexico City to Dallas and change planes in Dallas, and then we're GONNA fly onto Chicago and. When I finally found out the story when I wrote raising, which is a Motherhood Memoir that I wrote like twenty years ago. You know I found out that there was this whole thing that happened at the airport and that an immigration agent was like you know saying that had some weird skin thing and you know maybe had to put me in quarantine and my mom was like Nah and then I came and I saved the no she didn't say it like this but basically, it was like me Ma Ma Ma you know. She's five feet tall by the way, but stood up and. Know had this kind of moment with immigration agent and and it was a story that I told. Kind of like saying, wow, my mom is such a cool woman like I understand where I get my powerful voice even though she's tiny, she spoke back to an immigration agent. and. Then in the writing of this book, blue is really what happens is that I really understand what was happening there. There were trying to separate you from your mother. They basically told your mom that they were GonNa, take you away and put you in quarantine quote unquote and that she was free to go with her other children but that you would have to stay behind I mean. Can you imagine like? When my mom called me in the midst of and you know Lou that I've been covering this story, the entirety, my career immigration writ. Large. And my mom calls me at the airport. I was flying from one back when we were flying around and in the midst of the height of babies being put into cages, we were hearing the voices. You know we knew this was happening. This is not. This not begin with the trump administration but anyway. Mom. Calls me and she's crying she's like is Gay It could have been me. If I'm a your she was like that was I could have been one of those moms and I swear to Lulu that. By heart dropped I was like Oh. My God. So it's not a story of like my mom. Eh, you know speaking back it's a realized now a story of trauma and that. Wouldn't have happened I think had I not written the book and had the horror of immigration policies becomes so. Crystal. Clear. So inhumane so hurtful and frankly now finally so public You. As you mentioned what brought to Chicago, which is where you grew up, but you always maintained your connection to Mexico and your roots you'd go back and forth. You came here on a green card. When did you become a citizen? I asked this simply because that transition of becoming. An American you said was difficult for you. You. You found it hard to sort of occupy these two spaces. So, it was great because in the writing of the book, I actually had to like do the time line and and then I had to go back and find my citizenship. It was a actually I had just come back from a reporting trip with Scott Simon Scott and I were down inside whether it was December of Nineteen eighty-nine Lau Offensive Little Trenton Webb the FMLN offensive the guerilla warfare was happening inside word and I went down to produce Scott. And I came back and just a few days later I took the oath. Look the reason why it was complicated was because way back then maybe now I am beginning to understand maybe it was because of that traumatic experience in Airport in Dallas I, always kind of new. Like this isn't a certain thing for you. This thing about you being able to come in and out of the United States you've done your whole life. Now. You're a woman you're a journalist you've been to Cuba. You've got you've been tool Salvador you. You know. There may be a time when they say you can't come back and I understood that and so I have to be honest as I am the memoir he was motivated in large part by fear that that my green card could be taken away and that I could not be allowed and this was before this whole conversation of like what's happening now you know this was way before it was a different time but I think I kind of I, kind of knew it. So the thing that happens when you become a citizen in this country is you have to raise your right hand and you have to swear that you will bear arms for this country. And people who are born in this country like my own kids haven't had to do that. When you have to do that you take this thing really seriously you know like the Constitution and the bill of rights and you know all like you take it really seriously, and I think that's why because the book is certainly it's about immigration, but it's also about like my. My struggle for democracy and being seen as a journalist taken seriously to be that's all a part of democracy and it just becomes I mean I was living with a green card I was I was definitely understanding my role as a participant. But when you raise that right hand, it's at a whole

Chicago Dallas Mexico City United States Mexico Ma Ma Ma Scott Simon Scott University Of Chicago LOU Cuba LAU Trenton Webb
Why Pioneering Journalist Maria Hinojosa Put Herself in the Story

Latina to Latina

05:42 min | 1 year ago

Why Pioneering Journalist Maria Hinojosa Put Herself in the Story

"Maria I loved the Book A. So, good I told you. I was texting with you I devoured it and I want to jump in in the middle. You tell a story about writing a television script for Walter Cronkite what was the assignment? It's a juicy story. So I love 'cause nobody's asked me about this one yet short story is that I am the first Latina hired NPR. And then very quickly I'm like. This feels weird and I go and work for a Latino public radio in Spanish and San Diego and I experienced. Deep my cheese more there, and so I end up working kind of miraculously back in New York at CBS News in the Radio Department. And, I was doing fill in work the summer, and then I was asked to stay on through the end of December to produce a segment from Walter cronkite they asked me to write his end of the year commentary. And so. I was terribly nervous as a Latina journalism in the mainstream and being the first I was terrified most of the time. I write this piece and I go in I, show it to my boss Norman and Norman Light Me Norman hired me. But he saw this piece he said, Walter Cronkite is not going to read this and I was like no, he's like because it sounds like you wrote it. And I can't remember if he said and you're a little bit of an angry Latina I, don't think we talked in that way but it was almost like as he didn't have to say it he was like because it sounds like you wrote. and. I said well. Let's take it down to the FISHBOWL and have one of the evening news writer writers, read it and see what they think. Something just said. Stand up for yourself. You really hard. You actually worked on this you talk to other journalists. This shit is good. and. You're angry in this piece because every American should be angry at what is happening in the United States of America in the year nineteen, eighty seven. and. So I said, let's onto the fishbowl the people who edit the evening news with Dan Rather. We walk toward the writers who did not know me and he's again this is good. Yeah he'll read it. Yeah change this one word. and My boss had to eat his words eat pro as it were and I was like damn and so the point of the story is that as journalists of color as journalists conscience. When we are the first or one of the few in many newsrooms. We have to battle for ourselves. The way we see the world as journalists is as valid as Walter cronkite sway of seeing the world or Katie couric or Dan Rather we're journalists just like them. There are so many pivot points on your journey from intern to staff producer to on air from Spanish English. Is there one moment that stands out to you as the moment where your career to turn and where you really started to set out on your journey as a journalist? Well, look to decide basically that you're going to walk away from a steady Gig because you want to become a correspondent, you want to try to become on air that was pretty risky move and I feel like I did that in one of those moments where I was like you just have to do this. Like there are no Latinas. There are no Latina voices out there. And you have done radio, you have a voice, you know how to use it Noah. So that was a turning point. I think when CNN recruited me, that was another moment. It was very scary because I had never done television much less live television. But to answer your question, I feel like it really like. Like really came to fruition once I moved into doing now on PBS, which was long form investigative close to sixty minutes in terms of its style and production and deep investigative, and that led me to then doing documentaries and led to the front line which happened at the same time that I created my own company football media and I just WANNA shout out. The book. News for all the people which is was written by Juan Gonzalez and Joe Tories once I read that book I was like, okay. All of this suffering of being a journalist, a Latina you know woman of Color Immigrant. All of this is there is a reason why and it is because you have a responsibility to be part of this long arc. Of Responsible Journalism in the United States. You right I had heard rumblings at NPR some folks that I got too close to stories. I know all about you and your agenda one of my editors a nice middle aged white guy said to me agenda I said, what are you talking about? Maria come on you and you're Latino agenda. How did you respond in that moment? I said so does that mean that you've got a white guys agenda and he was like, no, it's not the same thing and I was like the same thing I'm able to tell you those moments because they were few and far between when I was just like ski is. Key you know like the same in Mexico is style plateau. SAMANCOR will plateau no one mass when I would just like suddenly rip something out and just be like that. But a lot of the times as you know, you're mostly just like dodging dodging you're doing a we've you're doing another we've and then sometimes you're just like a skin nope Wilma's I'm GonNa answer back. I hope that a lot of journalists read this book journalists because. You do have to be incredibly strong willed, and I would hope that they understand that this is not a job it is in fact, a mission that we're lucky enough to love. We need them.

Walter Cronkite Maria I United States NPR DAN Norman New York Mexico Cbs News Radio Department CNN San Diego Katie Couric SKI Writer America Intern Juan Gonzalez
Dallas ISD decides on virtual classes only for the first month of school

The Dallas Morning News

01:39 min | 1 year ago

Dallas ISD decides on virtual classes only for the first month of school

"Thousands of Dallas ISD. Students won't be returning to classes in person on September eighth as Superintendent Michael Hosa, his decision to only offer virtual instruction for at least the first month of school. Hinojosa. Made. The announcement yesterday a little more than two weeks before the first day of classes were to begin in DISD. The delay was based on guidance from the Dallas County Health, authority which convened a group of pediatric specialists and educators in late. June to provide rigorous look at how to best start this upcoming school year. Hinojosa said that while things were improving significantly in the county, the medical professionals were unanimous in their recommendation that there should be no impersonal. Learning on September eighth not everybody is going to be happy with that decision Hinojosa said, but it is what it is given. The context that were in in a related story Dallas ISD schools will have to wait at least two to three more weeks to resume athletic activities putting them even further behind schools statewide. Especially, those in the states lower classifications has reported disd will open with one hundred percent distance learning when school starts September eighth and will. Continue that through at least October sixth the resumption of strength and conditioning workouts was slated for August twenty fourth. But that will be pushed back to an unknown date said Hinojosa. It was just very hard to rationalize it and justify that it's not okay to come to school, but it's okay to participate in extracurricular activities. Hinojosa said that superintendents from school districts in Dallas County had a call yesterday morning and others in the county besides disd made delay.

Hinojosa Dallas County Dallas Dallas County Health Superintendent Michael Hosa Disd
Democratic Convention: Democrats make their case for Joe Biden

KSFO Morning Show with Brian Sussman with Katie Green

05:43 min | 1 year ago

Democratic Convention: Democrats make their case for Joe Biden

"Are making their together defeat Donald Trump and elect Joe Biden and Kamala Harris as our next president and vice president. Former first lady Michelle Obama, in a taped address, offered her emotional reasons for supporting Joe Biden. If we have any hope of ending this chaos, we have got to vote for Joe Biden, like our lives depend on it. Still this Invention is unlike anyone before no big arenas that take on a rock concert vibe. I'm speaking to you from a small radio studio in Washington, not the Fiserv Forum in Milwaukee, where convention organizers that once playing the host this event and that has presented bill challenges and opportunities So Ji Hinojosa, this senior advisor and the communications director for the Democratic National Committee. She joined me and Fox News radio political analyst Josh Cross Our after the curtain dropped or, more appropriately, the video conference ended on the convention's first night. So cheese. We were watching this and in listening along this evening, it seemed to me that that the strategy for this first night was trying to maybe build a big tent sort of explained to me. How this evening came together with having a virtual state shared by by somebody like Bernie Sanders, who represents certainly that more progressive wing of the Democratic Party. And former Ohio Governor John Kasich, who is not a Democrat at all. Well, absolutely. I think tonight just showed unity, which is it kicked off the first day of our convention of Uniting America. And I think that whether it was John case are Bernie Sanders or Michelle Obama. It just shows A broad coalition that we're building. Then there are also the stories of Americans all across this country. You had a a dreamer who is on the front lines of this pandemic on DH who is a first responder. You had a woman. I think this was one of the main moments of the night that everyone keeps pointing Tio Kristin from Arizona, who lost her father to Kobe. My dad was a healthy 65 year old. His Onley preexisting condition was trusting Donald Trump, and for that he paid with his life. And so that was just one of those gut wrenching moments when you realize listen, look at what this man has done to our country on DH. Yet you have leaders from all across this country, regardless of who they voted for in 2016 come together and make their voices heard. He's part of the strategy here to try and win over. Maybe those who had supported President Trump previously over to the Democratic side. Is this trying to make sure that those who supported somebody in the primary other than Joe Biden? Support him. Now is that sort of the big sort of strategy here that's underway trying to bring like everybody together. We absolutely want to reach out to everyone. That's the only way that we win. We want to make sure that those who are registered to vote that didn't turn out in 2016 turnout because they understand the stakes in the election regardless of political affiliation. We want people to know who if they voted for Donald Trump in 2016, that they can come over and vote for Joe Biden and that he will be studying leadership. We also want people to know those who are first time voters and registered to vote for the first time because they're angry. What's happening in this country? Well untenable for Joe Biden and this is making sure that if that we have the broadest coalition possible, because that is the only way that we win. But how do you govern that way? How does a John Kasich Republican and Bernie Sanders, Democrat Find their way in a governing structure. Well, what you have seen and from Joe Biden is that he can work across the aisle. He's done this to rot his entire career. And he wants to get things done. And he wants to make sure that I think that what you saw tonight were these three crises. Ray and Joe Biden wants to tackle them, and that is the pandemic. That is the economic downturn. And that is the racial inequalities that face our country right now, and what we were trying to showcase tonight is that Joe Biden Steady leadership could get us through this, and it's going to take a broad coalition to do that. And to work across party lines in order to get us out of this mess, and so you can govern this way, Frank, you have to reach out. To various parts of not only our party, but you know all Americans in order to do this, and Joe Biden will stick by his values, as he always has.

Joe Biden Donald Trump Bernie Sanders Governor John Kasich Michelle Obama President Trump Democratic Party Democratic National Committee Fiserv Ji Hinojosa Washington Kamala Harris Vice President Uniting America Fox News Ohio Tio Kristin Milwaukee Senior Advisor
"hinojosa" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"hinojosa" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Maria Hinojosa. And before the break we were hearing from Elena and, yes, Enya to immigrants, who on the day of the largest single state immigration raid in U. S history. We're working at two of the seven chicken processing plants rated Me and Mascius picks up the story with me Now the rates happened on a single day that for those who were there August 7th, which is the beginning of a long process, the Metro makes all those Summer lovin Mama made it but me. No, no, I mean Helena told us that she was traumatized after the raid. She was depressed and couldn't sleep. She would not even look out of the window, she says. Send again say ends and take a estaban minion to try it. No, sir. I felt they were chasing me and she says She went on lock down for weeks. Come on, Simon. I'm able locally should settle. What am I going to do now? She asked herself, okay. Sena has very similar feelings. She now lives with the fear that she could be taken away at any moment. The immigration authorities that deep feeling of insecurity that made them flee their countries to begin with. Is now hunting them and their Children in this country. So you have American kids.

Helena Maria Hinojosa Elena Sena U. S Simon
"hinojosa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"hinojosa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Maria Hinojosa. And before the break we were hearing from Elena and, yes, Enya to immigrants, who on the day of the largest single state immigration raid in U. S history. We're working at two of the seven chicken processing plants raided Me and Mascius picks up the story with me now. The rates happened on a single day. But for those who were there August 7th, which is the beginning of a long process, the Metro make a Melo stress Samana. Summer Lovin Pama made it but me. No, no, no, no. Mia Jelena told us that she was traumatized after the raid. She was depressed and couldn't sleep. You could not even look out of the window, she says. Send their game in CNN's indicate a stamen minion to tire me. No sense in surgery. I felt they were chasing me and she says. She went to look down for weeks, then said. Come on, Dr Simon, I'm able to look like a well settled. What am I going to do now? She asked herself. Boys. Forget moment to put the apostle also say no, incluso en el trabajo. OK for the most we cannot see and the yummy Yes, Sena has very similar feelings. She now lives with the fear that she could be taken away at any moment by immigration authorities element. They also Want a more remarkable young man. That deep feeling of insecurity that made them flee their countries to begin with. Is now hunting them and their Children in this country is not some of these photos. They're Kenya. So you have American kids.

Mia Jelena Maria Hinojosa Elena Kenya CNN Melo Dr Simon Sena U. S
"hinojosa" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"hinojosa" Discussed on KTRH

"Southern Texas and in the northeastern Mexico later on Sunday, and of course, ah, are Governor. Text Texas governor Greg Abbott has declared a list of 32 counties as disaster areas and you can see that list of 32 counties at our website. Katie r h dot com Tensions between the U. S and China have risen over recent Embassy closures as well as some of their consular closures, all due to spying. The Chinese government ordered the U. S consulate in Chengdu in China to close on Saturday. Staff inside appear to be preparing to leave the building amid a Chinese media reports. They have 72 hours to get out. China had bean threatening to respond to the closure of its continent in Houston on this appears to be a direct reaction to that. Resident. Trump had ordered the hist unconfident to shut by late Friday afternoon. Soon after that deadline, a door was forced open by U. S law enforcement officials. The US government says this building was being used for espionage. It's alleged Chinese agents were trying to steal medical research in Texas. Nearly 16,000 restaurants have permanently closed since the Corona virus pandemic began. He helped released its local impact Study Economic Impact study, saying 60% of the restaurants that were forced to close temporarily are not going to reopen. It may get worse, Yelp says. As Corona virus cases continue to rise Likely states will continue to shut down restaurants again, Economists say restaurants Already operate on thin margins and can't afford another shutdown. Will the new head of the Texas GOP is issued a challenger to his counterpart in the Democratic Party days after being elected chairman of the Republican Party of Texas Colonel Allen West, is requesting a Siri's of debates with state Democratic Party chair Gilbert Hinojosa, in a letter to Hinojosa, West proposes Lincoln Douglas.

Texas China Democratic Party Gilbert Hinojosa Texas GOP Greg Abbott Colonel Allen West Chinese government Republican Party Yelp U. S Mexico Chengdu Trump Katie US chairman Siri
Dallas School District Board Prepares To Vote On Extending The School Calendar Year

The Dallas Morning News

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

Dallas School District Board Prepares To Vote On Extending The School Calendar Year

"Superintendent Michael. Muhoza is anticipating that his district. We'll welcome students back for in person instruction by September eighth, unless the situation keeps getting worse in an interview with The Dallas Morning News editorial board yesterday. Hinojosa said that the district was planning for campus to be opened right after Labor Day and that in person instruction with his preference, officials expect the district's ten thousand. Thousand teachers to return to campuses wants classes begin even if they are providing virtual instruction, school board will hold a special meeting tomorrow to discuss potential alterations to Dallas. School calendar also tomorrow DISD is expected to release its return to school guidelines with detailed instructions on how the district plans to manage teachers and students on campuses in related

The Dallas Morning News Superintendent Michael Dallas Editorial Board Hinojosa Muhoza Disd
Journalists of Color

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

37:15 min | 1 year ago

Journalists of Color

"Before the interviews I wanNA share my theory. For why all of this exploded for journalists of Color Right now? It goes back a few years. So many of us went from covering the first black president to covering Donald Trump. And ever, since trump came down that escalator, announcing his campaign back in Twenty fifteen, when he denounced Mexicans as drug traffickers rapist. When he was that he would build a wall at the border and that Mexico will pay for it. Those journalists were told to avoid using words like racist or lie to describe some of trump's worse behavior. That kind of self censorship, especially on race for a lot of us, it became untenable after we had to cover the death of George Floyd and report on that video of a black man, being choked to death for eight minutes. On top of that we are now dealing with the coronavirus pandemic, which is laying bare racial inequities across this country. And Corinthian has given a lot of us time to sit and think. Notice what's going on in the world and in our lives and in our newsrooms? You have black journalists and other journalists of color who think of themselves as truth seekers in the same way that their white colleagues, too, but very often when they tell the truth about racism when they tell the truth about. Bright, white supremacy. They're labeled as activist. Highs! They dared to bring their blackness across the newsroom threshold. PSORIATIC McDonald's has been thinking a lot about race and the news. So I asked her as a black journalist in this moment. What does she want to see change so I would say what I want is actual structural change within newsroom leadership? I do not want the equivalent of painting black lives matter on a street in yellow letters, but in a newsroom. It's visible. By that doesn't really solve anything when it comes to pay discrepancies between. White male journalists and black female journalist who do the same job have the same level of experience and one is making thirty thousand dollars a year more than the other. The other thing is that. You cannot have. Newsroom leadership that is completely made up of six Cheddar straight white men. Even. Under straight white women. Zicklin or gender straight Whiteman that power needs to be distributed more equitably. You know the other thing died. I want to see I wanNA see US cover. Race honestly. right? Race isn't just something that black people, experience or something that non white experience, attempting that everyone experience and says and so. There needs to be a baseline of literacy rate when it comes to how we talk about race with an America how it operates within American history, and how that informs. President and what world. News media has played in that way. We have to consider that. The last time that we had a pandemic, the nineteen eighteen flu pandemic. We need to recognize that. The paper of record in Chicago the Chicago Tribune. Is Basically scapegoating black people who are fleeing the American south, basically saying Oh half a million darkies are basically invading Chicago. If that's objectivity as not the kind of objectivity that I want to participate in them. Yeah, yeah, I WANNA get personal a little bit You ended up being quoted in New York Times. Article about this reckoning talking about how you didn't have a great time at the Washington Post. You've tweeted about your experience as a black woman in newsrooms. What does this reckoning meant for you? And what have you been trying to get off your chest and this moment about your experience? In some of the newsroom's that we've been talking about my hope for this reckoning. is that. There is not one more class of you know young. Ernest! Twenty two year old coming out of journalism school I'm who basically have to go through this really damaging gauntlet. We're constantly sort of questioning yourself and your own worth and I think there are a lot of really talented journalists who have been driven from the field. Because at some point, they feel like they have to make a choice between their own mental health. Or being journalist. And they just self-preservation and I cannot blame them. and that is really a shame, because think about the people that those journalists now think about the stories that they could have told. The access they could have had picked the access to walk into certain spaces at their white colleagues cannot exactly and you know one of the ways, and this is not the only way that this is important, but one of the ways that this is important is. We need them to trust us. Our job is to tell their stories and to tell them accurately and to tell them fairly. And if people are are always getting pushed out the folks who might actually be able to empathize with them who know where they're coming from right I? There's a quote from their lake when I fall where she basically expresses the you know, she's probably the only person who covered public housing who's actually lived in public housing? That, yeah, that is. Expertise right that is. Valuable knowledge so I just I want us to be able to practice our profession with humanity. Yeah, and also it's like in this moment where it seems like more than ever before. At least in my lifetime, there is such a deficit of trust. Americans don't trust institutions. They don't trust journalism. They don't trust facts. Worst argument about whether or not mask can prevent the spread of Corona virus like in this environment if newsrooms don't act in fix some of this stuff. is going to create more mistrust in the media and these news outlets will become less relevant in a moment in which I would argue. They are needed more than ever before. Yes, and you know the thing is is and I've said this repeatedly at that American journalism does have a credibility crisis. The the credibility crisis that we have I think. Actually bears a lot of similarities to. Our current sort of Voter disenfranchisement problem. Being. In Journalism, we have not spent enough time. with the very same folks who are often disenfranchised when it comes to media coverage as well right. And when we think about the press and freedom of the press is an instrument of democracy we have to think about. enfranchising everyone, we have to think about making sure that they do find us credible. The folks. If they look at the newspaper, even look at a website or they listen to the radio and their conclusion is. That these entities are not telling the truth about them in their lives and held their lives are. For them yeah for them. That's a credibility issue for us. Yeah we can fix. It failed them. That means that. We have to develop far better relationships with folks who have historically been shunned or shut out of district of media coverage are only allowed to participate in very limited ways. You know I still very much believe in that adage, the journalism exist to comfort the afflicted and afflict comfortable. Thanks again to riot, not at McDonald's the culture writer for the undefeated and also this year. She was nominated a pilot sir. My mind. I wanted to hear from other journalists of color about their newsroom experiences. And they wrote in. Here if you, my name is Lavi Cima Guy side. I'm a naturalized citizen who came to this country as a young child. I worked at a bare he a newspaper for a long time and have fond memories of my time there. I had mostly white editors, and in fact, I've only had one non white supervisor in my over two decades in journalism. My name is John. Sepulvado, I mixed. I have Mexican Irish indigenous and Black Ancestry I worked in public media for fifteen years. There are tons of horror stories. There was the white woman editor who asked me if I like dog-fighting because she quote hurt. Might People like dogfighting? There was another white woman editor told me to smile more around the office because I quote have dark features and those dark features, scared herself and other white women around the office. One time a headline I, wrote for one of my own stories, led to a newsroom wide, meeting an emotional one, where a bunch of US had to persuade top editors to let us call the president's racism what it is! The most frustrating part was that I and others had to explain to our colleagues. Why our voices were important. And partly because they reflected the communities we covered. argued. Repeat, a thousand more stories like that. But at. A point I realized. That no matter what I did no matter how good I was no matter how hard I worked. I would always be seen. As something that is not. White. And my mobile was the leave the industry. All right time for a break. When we come back, we will hear from Latina, trailblazer who refused to leave the news business. Instead. She started her own media company to tell the stories that she wanted to tell. Hey another reminder asking you all to fill out that survey for us. Okay, it is anonymous. It is short and the link for it is NPR DOT org slash I B. A. M. Survey. All one word I BAM SURVEY NPR DOT Org. Slash IBM. Filled out I'll be really happy if he do thanks. This message comes from NPR sponsor discover. Sometimes, food is more than just food. It's an integral part of the community so this year discoveries, giving five million dollars to support black owned restaurants to places like Rodney Scott Barbecue in Charleston post office spies Birmingham back in the day bakery, and Savannah and hundreds more places in your local community all across the country. Learn how you can show your support at discover dot com. Whenever you face a choice. It helps to think like an economist and this week on Planet Lenny Summer. School will start off our course in economics within workout for your brain how to decide what something newly costs for? Planet money from, NPR. People still find it really interesting salmon like I'm like no. No I. I was the first Latina in the newsroom at NPR ever to step foot. WHO WASN'T CLEANING IT? That was me right that that was that. Was this Latina? That is Maria. She's had a long career in media, not just here NPR but also at CNN NPS in two thousand ten. She founded her own company for total media. And she has a memoir. It's called once. I was you that comes out in September, but most of you probably know Maria. As the host of a very long running public radio show turned podcast from NPR and through media. It's like new USA mighty. Hossack Latino USA has been around since the early nineties. It is attributed by NPR. which is why you hear NPR in the credits, but that will be changing USA is moving. As distributor. It means nothing's GonNa Change for you. Our listener that our audience is going to get way way way bigger. We're very excited. Announcement might have been confusing for listeners, but don't worry like. She said you'll still be able to hear the show. But the Journal of Color, especially in public radio that move meant that NPR was losing a hugely influential show dedicated to covering Latino stories in the US. And from its founding NPR has been well bad on race. More than seventy percent of NPR's newsroom is white and of the sources you here on NPR's air, those voices they are more than eighty percent white. People of Color who work in public media? We have been saying for years. Fix this including Maria Hosa. We're asking the question. Are you listening? Are you hearing? And that his own ready a power dynamic that is wrong. This notion is the assumption that they the they will always have the power I. Ask Maria what Latino USA leaving NPR means for this network, but I I asked her about blazing trails. One could see your path to be one of color who found her own company as a shining success, but one could also see your path as proving that the conventional spaces in media can accommodate of voice like you the way they should you know like. I'm so proud of what you're doing, but also the fact that you have to make your own production company shows at the NPR's and the PBS's and the CNN in many ways. Don't get it and can't help people like you tell the stories that you need to tell. I was thinking about that as I was thinking about our interview Sam because. My husband calls me Aguirre, a warrior, and then as I was thinking about our conversation, Sam. I was like well. That's great i. like that, but you know what I don't want. Journalists of color to have to be warriors at into order to be able to work as To work as journalists of Contians, who can bring their entire cells into the news room? Who are going to be seen who are going to not only be seen and heard but actually. Put into positions of power to be the ones who are listening and making the decisions about. Yeah, we want that story on the front page and the headline is going to say that exactly. I want you you know everyone has been using it. Everyone's been going to twitter sharing their reckoning story, the slight the knocked in that promotion. The being told you can't do this do that. Give me one of your reckoning stories from your career when I when I come to this country, I'm born in Mexico. My whole family's born in Mexico. We're raised on south side of Chicago. You know sixties and seventies, but as Mexican immigrants we also understood the essential nature of journalism and American independent journalism and so. My father was watching. Meet the press every Sunday and we were watching the today show and we watched sixty minutes, and because of the fact that it was so American in holding people accountable and I was like that's what journalism is so long. Story Short is many years later actually a decade ago go to sixty minutes when I'm out of work and needed a job actually and. They basically like look, can you Can you come back and talk to us? When one of the old white guys get secret is really and I, said and I just remember like. Like am I supposed to laugh? It's funny. Is that a joke as being? and. As we do in the media's people of Color, 'cause we're really good at laughing things off. Like. Yeah. Banter you know the the the the the we're so smart. On. Exactly Racism! Exactly. And I got into the subway at fifty ninth street onto my apartment in Harlem and I cried on the train. and. I was just like, but I am not. You know I'm knocking to let this take me down. And that was the moment that I decided to create food. Media Winds Rams history. Takes over Latino, USA. And Expands Latino USA grows the show and let the USA's audience twenty seven years in. Is in a continual upward trajectory. You love to see it. As I. Want to ask more about what needs to happen. We are in this moment now. Where so many journalists coming forward with their stories? But it's still unclear what newsroom leaders will actually do to fix this stuff you have been on all sides of media for profit nonprofit. Give me like a checklist of the big three or four things that mass media should do right now to effectively respond to the issues raised in this reckoning. Feel like this is a moment to be having that difficult conversation, which is pushing this reckoning that we're talking about to another level. I'm going. Give you an example, Sam it brings me joy, it brings me no joy to have to ask white men in senior editorial positions how they consider my role as a Mexican immigrant woman journalist. In relation to a president who insults every single one of those things that I do? And and And basis a lot of that on his white supremacy. Which is very challenging word to even use in our newsrooms right, but yeah. I don't feel comfortable saying it. I want you to feel uncomfortable having to answer that question. Because his white supremacy does not impact you in the way, it impacts me, and I am a journalist just like you. I am an equal journalist just like you so now. You helped me to figure out. Harmon handle that because that that impacts our might quote unquote objectively, you have to be able to recognize that you do not have an ownership of activity or an ownership of the media or an ownership of public media, or it's not yours to share yeah. Did any of the issues we've discussed about. In diversity and Unfair situations that journals of have to deal within this industry. Did those factor into your business decision. To leave NPR ex. Look I've had you know NPR's my family? IF NPR calls I'm going to say when you I was absolutely and Bureau Sam he's my family. You know we hung out once, but he's. He's my brother. Because we're digesting PR so NPR's my family Mi. Familia was my first job. But You know I started a company. And I have a team of very savvy business and media executives journalists. And when they said look, we have an opportunity here in in a competitive marketplace A. Somebody PR X.. Who wants to really go big? Yeah, I will say you know they are all of these. Underground email channels and slack channels and discussion boards were journalists of color are coming together to talk about all these issues and there's been a lot of chatter about your show. What says about NPR yeah? Why am I so disconnected? Oh my God. I thought I. Thought I was like connected because I'm on twitter and I got a fat. And what folks have been saying? People who love your show Oh my goodness. They're saying well. This speaks to the larger problems. NPR has always had with content may for people of Color. They don't market it enough. They don't support it enough. You have these program. Directors at various stations put a show like yours on at not great hours. This is the stuff that people are saying. Do you I mean like to the extent that you can elaborate on it, you know. Did you feel like NPR? Neglected or didn't promote enough your type of show. So of these issues at play with the race and diversity in space like NPR. Again. Let New USA right now is growing an audience at kind of extraordinary numbers I think we're one of the few public radio programs or previously distributed by NPR. That is growing an audience at these numbers. And so the fact that. We made this decision. Says everything about. WHAT NPR. Kind of thinks. About letting USA. Now having said that I don't know you know I. Don't know the internal finances at NPR. Maybe NPR's is is really facing a a real financial challenges that I'm not privy to. And so you know, but but when you're thinking about AH, show, that has this kind of. Audience Commitment There was a point not long ago. When one of your colleagues called me up, actually she works in. She's a Latina colleague at NPR in the newsroom, and she called me up and she said. Do you think that Latino USA has been this incredibly successful because of NPR or despite NPR. And no one had asked me that and I kind of like. ooh And I said well actually despite. Despite NPR, do you think you know 'cause? There are a lot of shows not produced by NPR. Distributed by NPR. Do, you think other shows like that in your same boat that were hosted by white people or felt to maybe India leadership more mainstream. Do you think they got more support than your show did pound for pound? Yeah How does that make you feel? Like I said, that's why. I didn't. See I've been feeling this for a long time, my love. News, so Gimme a word for the emotion. Well right now I'm glad that I'm with a partnership with Pr X.. That's not gonNA units not on the table so I'm like I'm looking to the future. That's why I'm like yeah I'm all about like? It's all about the dodge this morning, boxing teacher. was making us do the we've the. We've the constant, which by the way is really really hard, and that's just how I feel is a journalist of color in a survivor Mexican immigrant woman in this like it's always like whoo. Okay well and so. That stuff that you're saying like. How does it make me? That's rolled off me a long time ago, and it is a central part of what has moved me as a journalist as a woman of color in this country is that. Is like. Oh, you're going to try to silence me or tell me that I'm not objective or tell me that I have an agenda or tell me that is not going to be successful or tell me. Okay I might go home and cry. But I'm not GONNA give up. Thanks, again to Maria Hinojosa. She's the host of the Tino USA. We asked NPR for a response to what Maria told us and they gave us this statement. We have the highest respect and admiration for the Latino USA team and from Maria Hinojosa. We are proud. That Latino USA originated at NPR member station, K. U. T., and that since nineteen, ninety-four NPR has been the program's national distribution partner today, hundreds of NPR member stations bring the show to their listening communities. We are grateful. Maria entertain who are produced a consistently wonderful show and nurtured journalist who have gone on to work all over the public radio system. We are glad public radio listeners will continue to hear Latino. USA on their public radio stations across the nation. All right now. We're going to have a chat with someone who just began working with NPR Kelly. McBride NPR's newest public editor. I WanNa talk with her. About one particular part of this entire debate, the way in which we've been taught as journalists to do our jobs that most fundamental level leads to systemically racist outcomes. I am talking specifically about the idea of journalistic objectivity. This idea that reporters only report the facts. They keep themselves out of the story, and they eliminate all biased in their coverage. A lot of folks say well. That only works if you're man and straight. And White. I wanted to find out. Why are journalism so entrenched in objectivity and whether or not this standard is fair, so I went to one of the top journalism at experts in the country I am the senior vice president at the POYNTER institute. I am the chair of the Craig Newmark Center Ethics in leadership at the Poynter Institute and I am also the public editor for NPR that Kelly McBride. Kelly has advised newsrooms about difficult journalism ethics problems for years, so it made. Made, sense to begin by asking Kelly for her definition of objectivity in journalism, it really means that you will objectively pursue the facts in order to determine the truth, and there's all sorts of things that go into that right like there's how you frame the story how you identify who you're going to interview, and then really important is who else is involved in the story. So who edits it because that the the safety nets that are created in newsrooms are meant. To help an individual program against her own bias now the problem is if all the safety nets have the same biases that that doesn't happen right and that's. That's exactly what's been happier. Also objectivity has come to mean certain different things for different journalists. There are some. Who say well objectivity means that you have to. Pretend! That kind of you don't exist, and you have to just simply say what these powerful people are saying doing. You don't provide context you don't provide analysis. It's a kind of. Totally taking yourself all the way out of it to the point where you won't even tell people if you vote or not. And I think. This is the thing for me like there's so many different interpretations of what objectivity means, yet you know that's actually kind of a confederation of two different principals in journalism, so one is the principle of objectivity in this idea that that we are pursuing the truth in spite of our own biases, and that that we actually promised, swear to God that we're going to get it right because we have all these safeguards in place, even though they've failed numerous times in the past. But the other thing is is that in American journalism in particular? It was built on this business principle of aggregating A. Politically diverse audience, and then selling that audience to advertisers, so in in Europe you see much more you see much more of the journalism coming through a political lens because that's just how the business model grew up over there, but over here especially as in different markets, you went from multiple newspapers to a single newspaper. There was this motive that was really a business motive that you would bring in the entire political spectrum and if you were going to do that, you needed to convince that audience that you in the newsroom didn't have. Any particular biases it is refreshing to hear you as a leader in the industry acknowledged that some of this is about the principles and bedrocks of our journalism, and some of it's about business, and at the end of the day for whatever reason we have ended up with a definition of objectivity. That is as much about business as it is about telling the truth and I think what frustrates so many journalists, somebody younger journalists, journalists of color or women require journalists as at newsroom leaders are resistant to acknowledge that I read NPR's social media policy, and it's couched in terms of ethics and morality and idealism. But I also know that part of it is the bottom line is. Not Do anything of the public facing person at NPR. That would possibly damage NPR's revenue streams. And I mad. They don't just say that. Yeah? They don't mean to say that they. Don't I mean that's the thing is they? Don't. They really do believe, and I actually believe also that there is. That there is a line somewhere that we shouldn't cross, and maybe it is way up the continuum on just. If you're a political reporter. You can't help people who you're voting for. Maybe the line is all the way over there. Right, because of imagine that like if you were a political reporter in you were covering. Trump's campaign and you again. I'm voting for Biden though I was that guy. Did you tell people out loud. I didn't tell folks voting for in two thousand sixteen, and I wouldn't but I think gets. Those are the ones where I think everyone can agree, but there's there's there's other things like how much of me do I. Bring to a story when I'm covering police violence against black men. Am I allowed to say that's racist. Because I know what racism is experienced, it trust me and don't make me say racially tinged. Like those, and that's where it gets murkier well. You know you know where I. I experienced this. Yeah, so when gay marriage was was a hot hot issue, right? They were different cities or states that were making gay marriage legal. The Supreme Court hadn't yet decided in San Francisco the mayor of San Francisco. made it legal and a reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle on a Saturday after weeks of covering it, the City Hall reporter went down and got a marriage license, and she was taken off the beat. Wow, and as in as an ethicist, right is a journalism ethicist. I was like wait a second. That can't be right. because. She was exercising in San Francisco. What was a legal right? You don't mean you didn't tell people who'd been divorced. They couldn't cover this issue because they'd you know somehow. Defiled the sanctity of marriage by? Getting divorced. So that was, that was where realized that you cannot penalize people for who they are. That's not fair. Yeah, because you end up with the only people that are untainted enough to do all the work are people who are only straight are people who are only men are people who have only gone to college and has a certain pedigree people who are an the deaths a problem, so bias is to right. It's just that we don't well. That's the thing, but these leaders aren't seeing those. Yeah, because they look just like them. I think now what is required to speak to the Syria. Systemic issues being raised in this reckoning. Going to have to be an acknowledgement that the movement toward writing these wrongs. It's going to be in some ways painful and you should do it anyway. From your conversations with newsroom leaders across the country. Do you think they're ready to accept that idea that this might hurt that? It might not just be. A statement and everyone shakes hands, and says sure good now now I mean nobody wants to voluntarily sign up for something painful. You do it because you know that what comes on the other side is worth head. There's individuals in every single newsroom who are part of the problem. Then somebody has to tell those people that if they want to keep their jobs, they have to stop being part of the problem, and that means that they're either going to have to be quiet. Or they're going to have to change or leave. Just leave well. That's I mean if they want to keep their job right like. Yeah and I've seen people. Who are these problem, people? I don't think I've ever seen any of them. Actually chain, but I've seen some of them. Learn to be quiet and let other people lead. And then they actually become the beneficiary. Of what comes after yeah. And then I. Think also so many lessons of me too I. Think are applicable to this meteoroid. Me To kind of work. Because a lot of folks were just literally canceled and they had to go, they were shamed. They were fired. And you said you can't be here anymore. And it was painful for them, and probably all the folks that liked them in love them but like. Sometimes, it's just that yeah. So my last question for you back to these two ideals that butt heads this idea of objectivity. But also this business idea of needing to be somewhat neutral to appeal to a large audience. And reworking probably reassessing, what objectively means a newsroom? What advice would you give to newsroom leaders? Writing up that next ethics guideline for their journalist about quote, Unquote Objectivity Post reckoning. Yeah, so this is where I'm supposed to come through with something really profound and I mean I. I am I. Am humble enough to say. That I don't have the answer yet. But I'm also arrogant enough to say that I believe after working through lots of really really hard ethics problems with newsrooms that I think we are going to find the answer and I think it's going to start by. Recognizing that there is a difference between. Revealing political bias. and. Revealing lived experience. And we need to start there and say your lived. Experience should not count as political bias. Thanks again to Kelly McBride joining us and thanks to everyone who, over the last week or so shared very very personal stories about life as a person of color in the newsroom. I heard from colleagues as well. And one thing one of those colleagues told me about all of this. She said so much of this work is convincing journalist. who think they've been doing it right for so long that maybe in some ways they've been doing it wrong. And then she said to me. This phrase really stuck with me, she said. How do you argue with the fish about the water there's. I. Don't know just yet how to do that. It's pretty difficult. It seems frustrating,

NPR United States President Trump Maria Chicago Donald Trump Mexico Mcbride Npr George Floyd Washington Post New York Times Kelly Mcbride FLU Bureau Sam Chicago Tribune Scapegoating Mcdonald
#DignidadLiteraria Was Never About Just One Book

Latino Rebels Radio

09:04 min | 1 year ago

#DignidadLiteraria Was Never About Just One Book

"Roberto Lovato welcome back to Latino rebels radio we Brian. How are you a Actually I think this is my first. I did it program once I remember. Yeah I had you on before yes I did. I've had you on before. Okay you're right you're right. I'm just so tired. What puts the pause button on the bus? who leads to an Latino rebels campaign? You know. We're good we're good. We are so good. I'm so happy to have you back. Listen for those people. That don't know what they need. That lead that idea is can. Can you just begin to break it down for people that may be have not been following. What's gone on in the literary world mostly New York World of the last last couple of weeks so tell us about? What is it about that idea that is that you guys are doing well? I'm a I'm a student of social movements. Yes and I try to be a practitioner every so often and so I think I can. We can legitimately say that we have a social movement because we have a victory in the victory came about after McMillan flat iron. Her books decided to publish along with people. In Hollywood and Oprah Winfrey to push the book called American dirt as what Sanders he's narrows caused not just the great great American novel. But the great novel of lasts America's right to that effect so would all that promotion that you gave the book that resembled a marvel comics launch. You know the way they do. These multi-platform launches with multimillion dollar budgets. On made it a big deal and so when Miriam Gerbo my colleague and Dini that Talia terrarium defacto kind of leader of US spiritual leader in this. This is an and other leader of us in his She wrote a scathing essay that was rejected by MS magazine and so she decided in her own unique way with their own unique unique voice to call out the novel for what it was which was a cartoon of of of a Latino experience trying to be so to us as a great work of Literature on power with gotta see a Marcus and Gabriela Mistral. Row after Lanyo I mean I just. I still have a hard time trying to put put the name. Janine comments next to that. Yeah so that really moves that when I saw Mary. I'm just say I I was moved in a lot of us. Were moved to action and it moved. W Bose as well who is on top of this and together. We came to form the united idea which talk about is about Nothing less than the insertion of the Latino voice in the national conversation of the United States right now. We're focused on you know in the inclusion of our voices in US literature as expressed in the number of books the number of writers the number of editors the number the people in the media ecology the number of right. You know critics all of which if you look at the numbers are are pathetically low abysmally hello and so So yeah we're about as our name says about our dignity and we have measures of dignity for corporations like Macmillan or flatiron books as well as for critics as well as our own people. What constitutes dignity and so for example? I've been using the the frame very consciously of the decline in Florida the Folkloric Industrial Complex of Latino Literature. ooh What does that mean it means is basically that the as constructed in US literature you get a book contract two degrees you dance. Mambo Salsa a Ranchera 's dress recipe over and and you start you know dancing wight gays right on event. Here in New York is called Tom is about Latinos in the white gays. And the way the whitegate shapes us through the publishing industry so some that have chosen to kind kinda throw on their colorful clothing and act in ways that are safely an expectedly Latino done. That's what I mean by the decline and fall of the Folkloric Co Industrial Complex of Latino Literature. So the question for us. You're in New York this week. You guys had a press conference anyone that wants to follow the American dirt issue We talked to medium good about two weeks ago. My colleague Maria Hinojosa Doodo media did a did a one hour. MPR Latino USA that everyone needs to listen to I actually wrote about the white gays for NBC News So you mentioned the white Gazeau what what happened. You said this is a victory. So what exactly happened this week for you to say that this was a victory. Well let me describe describe the campaign because one of my roles was very much involved in the design and implementation of the strategy that got us to you meet with one of the titans of US Global Publishing McMillan and it's an imprint flatiron. The publisher let me show American dirt so to get there. You have the explosion of energy around American people criticize the content and the writer and all. Aw Ridiculous and actually really racist marketing of it. When you have for example the now infamous? Barb wire centerpieces at a lobster ops to dinner to celebrate American Dirt Bran Janine comments from an organizing perspective. Did her part to be the gift that they kept on giving from an organizing perspective but that that that energy kind was focused on the book and on her and some of US realize well in we need to kind of pivot this and so our first pivot was to start questioning one of the Thai another Titan in US Latino US publishing and Literature Oprah Winfrey Honor Book Club which has spread definitive role in pumping this book up to be something of Steinbeck Ian of an epic. I mean. It's almost like they've been trying to make it to be homer's Iliad of our time for for Latinos when it was written by this woman who has friends who paint their fingernails with with barbed wire and stuff. So you know we always sort of realize we don't need to focus on her any more her book and she herself has done the damage and they're going to go do their thing but what came out of this explosion was the realization of the crisis in. US is publishing especially as it Threat as it relates to Latinos in the United States who have fewer than one hundred and fifty books about what is published by US per year when you have thousands of books published every year so so then we started many of his questioning Oprah Winfrey in her in her promotion of this. She didn't seem to listen to the beginning. And then little by little. We started catching her attention. was that of other. People like Salma Hayek who admitted publicly that a picture that she took and south that she put online with her promoting. The book was actually Fake News. Because she didn't even read the book right. That's right so you have this explosion of energy now. Starting to focus going on oprah going to oprah only to bring more attention and momentum to it because we had by this time we had already sent a letter to McMillan and flatiron books saying that. We wanted to meet with him to discuss how we were going to try to remedy this matter and take the conversation in a more productive a place for all of us right so they responded immediately they wanted to be with us and we agreed into an are meeting was last Monday. And after some back and forth An- Anna realization. That we weren't going anywhere and that we have a mass ask very incredible amount of power in our community. That's there for us to to to work with. They agreed along along with us to a plan that includes a very measurable into you know indicators of the numbers of employees is not just a flat iron but throughout the the Macmillan ecosystem marketers editors and other people involved in the decision fusion making process. That brings you literature in the United States. So this is this is a major victory in that

United States Oprah Winfrey New York Folkloric Co Industrial Comple Mcmillan Roberto Lovato MPR Maria Hinojosa Brian Janine Ms Magazine Macmillan Salma Hayek America Folkloric Industrial Complex Miriam Gerbo Mary Ranchera Hollywood
"hinojosa" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"hinojosa" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Announcing his presidential candidacy yesterday running on his sterling record of naming a post office was in a Senate race and getting busted for DUI. I think is that is that the have all those things there's a there. There are lots of other things. National review, but. To go into all of it. No. I do too soon. We'll keep litigating bettas life. But it is funny though, that nobody in his party can name an accomplishment of his because Nancy Pelosi couldn't name one Nellis. Try the Texas Democratic Party chairman Gilbert, oh, Hinojosa juice, say is better or rox top accomplishment that he brings to the table. I think with Beto O'Rourke has done for me and this last senatorial campaign, he ran eighteen is I think show the people of Texas. And now the people of America what it means to be an honest politician and honest person who's going to talk about the things that are important to important families all across this country. We don't always see that with politician. This guy's going to tell it like it is should be tell it like it is. Pardon me, Nancy Pelosi was asked today about as big as accomplishment, and she couldn't really name one. Even though he served in the house for a brief time, admittedly, but you're telling me, he's an honest politician. That's his biggest accomplishment. The the entire time that he served in the United States house of representatives, the Republicans control the house of representatives. They wouldn't allow anything to pass it with sponsored by a democrat. So the fact that he was unable to get something else..

Nancy Pelosi Texas Democratic Party Beto O'Rourke Gilbert Senate United States Texas chairman America Hinojosa
"hinojosa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:46 min | 3 years ago

"hinojosa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Maria Hinojosa next time on the USA we go west to Los Angeles. The home of the dodgers this story behind the complicated relationship between Dodger Stadium and Mexican American community in the nineteen fifties. That's next time on USA tonight at nine on ninety three point nine FM WNYC. You're listening all of it on WNYC. I'm Alison Stewart. My guests are the star of the show choir. Boy, Jeremy Pope, John clay, the third and Caleb. Eberhardt german. You come out on the stage. You're singing, I appel how do you prepare? How do I prepare? How does the actor? Actually, we as a cast. We gathered together right before places, and we all just check in. We all sing together. We go over some movement together. And I think that is so important with this show. We are dealing with an Capella musical where we gotta be in tune. We got we got a. Connected. You know? So it's so important for us to just kind of check in. We've all had different days and been doing all types of crazy things that we come in. And we're like everybody good you good. And we kind of love on each other. Because this play does take some highs and some lows, and you know, we kind of shed some blood for a little bit. But that is the one thing that I look forward to coming into work is this that moment that we get to sing through the songs together. So when I come out to sing tapa show. I feel very supported by my brothers. I know that we've gone over this. And were there were locked and loaded for the show that night. What were those early rehearsals? Like because awesome. I mean gonna get I think so. Yeah. Like our first rehearsal was a music rehearsal because we had to learn all the music before going to doing our table or even getting on our feet, and Jeremy, and I have done the play before us all the music sort of came back to us clay did the the workshop last like a year ago. So he knew all the music as well. So just gelled really fast. I think. It was it was easy. We got to just gel into the music. There was a day where we added are choreographer Camillo Brown, who was brilliant. But we were not prepared to dance the way she has his shoulders. Maybe she will help us with the transition. She came in with some beautiful steps she asked a lot of us. She asked us to come warm and be prepared to move in as much as it hurt. At the beginning. We realized the power in the movement and how we were bringing up our ancestors in this steps in these movements. So now that is something that we add to our, you know, our warm up is like we also seeing but just as importantly, we get our bodies warm, and we do the dances. So that when we get on stage we can dig in deeper for that. It's great. There's a lot of stepping anybody's been to black reach show. We're talking about. And it's it's it's you guys are so on point when you do it. What do you what do you think? I mean, I sorta no it's we all know it stepping means. But what does it mean in the context of this show is it about the unity of the brotherhood of the school that about the unity as friendship year? I think. But I think it is about the unity. It's about coming together for the one thing that we can all kind of agree on one exercise that we were able to do with Camille is she had us in certain moments. She would say go away and come back with you know, three movements of grief, or whatever that meant to us. So some people would raise their hands if he would hold their hearts and she incorporated our movements into the choreography. And I think what was beautiful about that. Is we the actor the person took ownership of the movement? And she wasn't a choreographer. That was like this is to step. It has to look that. She allowed us to bring variety to are stepping and the way we went to the ground, and we used our hands. So as you watch it looks like it's in unison, but every boy has their own story and trajectory of where they're trying to go with the steps. So it's it's loose. It's loose. But it's together. And I think that's what makes it look like it's all one unison is because everyone is so committed to their step for their character. It like push. She's the narratives further it isn't just oh, we're gonna dance like a Broadway musical where it's about the dancing somehow is so infused in whatever your character is going through your frustration. You're digging into the ground, you're stepping harder. Fierce is looking up. Some people are looking down like so that's the beautiful choreography that she was able to kind of put on us. But it's also things that we can take ownership of. And you know, like we can use it to help us in the scene work for sure how did it all for you, John really in the black culture when we are doing like we all have like these community dances and everybody does them differently. And yet we all praise in the same because they're feeling is what they bring behind the feeling, and I feel like that community is replicated on the stage because we all know the steps we all know these things. But like Jeremy was saying is that we all bring our own sort of like funk to it like our bodies are all different. So we're not going to be all trying to dance like a five seven like, you know, we're all different. So we're all approaching this differently. And at the same. Time. We're all trying to get the same goal in. It's just trying to get through the school year. Like, that's the main the has these kids we just trying to make it through the end. And it seems like it's never ending. But sometimes in that dance, we find unity, and we find the joy, and we're like, okay, we can do this. My guess, Jeremy Pope, John clay, the third and Caleb everhart their scrutiny starring in choirboy on Broadway. We did want to let you know that the newsroom is looking at the president apparently presents to make remarks in the rose garden at one thirty pm this could pertain to the government shutdown. We will go live when that happens. So stay with us. But until then really continue this conversation. It's interesting John because you went to Carnegie Mellon, you just I mean, you're fresh out of school right seventeen. Oh my gosh. Car is it today. Belt Felton from Benton Benton was in in the great common is now Elisa on Hamilton, Josh grove and went to garden Mellon. What did you learn there that that you're finding that you use every night? I mean freshman year the studio work in terms of just breaking down your own habits and just breaking down your personal walls. Like, I come from the west side of Chicago. So like my outlook on life and how I walked didn't really before school. Everything was about surviving in living. So my mentality was completely different. When I came as a freshman at school, and then survived me, you're not really accessing all the parts of yourself, and the classwork that they had us doing just like, hey, you got to break down this wall. You got to confront this stuff that you haven't dealt with in your past and in order for me to deal with those things the stuff that I was dealing with off off stage would sort of come on stage with me, and that doesn't work like people see. Through. So I had to basically come to terms with my past and come to terms with who I was in who I want to be. And I feel like that was the main thing that I took from CMU was that like they let me see that. I don't have to survive I can actually live. And that was the that's a that's deep. How about you going gonna say like I learned technique? Yes. Were acting acting is all about life, and how you live as a human being more off stage. Yeah, that's that's really is beautiful. You agree. I think. Yeah. I think you just. Yeah. He said it. I mean, Jeremy starting you you, you know. Yeah. I think that's beautiful. I think that's similar. I learned that from my conservatories just. Dealing with stuff in your life. So that you can be so present onstage with whoever you need to be in. The last word. So I'm going to performance our trust and obey. What does that mean for you? I think that it means I think in the context of the play I think it could be taken as a blind loyalty. Without really? In the context of the play. That's what I think. That's what I think is saying. Double edge near the double edged. The interesting thing about the play is I think I saw it in an audience that was fairly mixed. But there's a lot of subtleties that I think that African Americans recognize like Charles jury right away. If you don't go through it. There's a lot of discussion of spirituals. And it's a really interesting debate. That's had about what spirituals mean in current day. Would you share that? Has it an argument that he brings up where you know. We can I can attest to this is in the black community. You are taught that spirituals had coded messages that told slaves how to escape and Ferris's challenging that idea and saying rather than us putting the focus on it being a coded message kind of diagram. Let's talk about the way that these spirituals make you feel when we all collectively seeing them the faith that it gives us when we look to our brother and they say hold on. And we agree and we say hold on together. You know, these spirituals are sometimes very simple, very simple, and they repeat, and they repeat, and they repeat, and it's one of those things that the repetition of it gives you strength gives you faith to keep going to have faith to be strong. So that is the debate is fierce saying instead of saying what we don't know is true about them being these coded messages. That mean, hold on means go to the left, then take a step to the right? It's like it's not that. It's the feeling it's the stress. Think that these songs give us that make us feel like we can continue to move forward. And Bobby doesn't really agree with that. You know, he feels like again legacy. Like, how are you gonna tell us that what my daddy taught me? And my granddaddy Tommy, and what we believe as a community is wrong. You know, and he challenges that in a in a very beautiful tricky way. You know, I think you have the audience who is kind of weighing on both sides who doesn't know where to sit and I can hear bobby's side. But also was like what you're saying is true, especially if you grew up in the church in, you know, these spirituals, so I think it is something interesting that we kind of dissect, you know, you don't really hear about this too often. But the way that it's presented is kind of kind of real special. It was interesting to hear it that way. Oh, I see both sides. You know what I think me playing fares? I see both sides. You know, I just think in that moment fares can outwit Bobby a little bit. And I think if Bobby were to kind of sit in his thoughts and gathered them there would be a bigger conversation..

Jeremy Pope John clay Bobby Caleb everhart USA WNYC Alison Stewart Dodger Stadium Maria Hinojosa dodgers Los Angeles Carnegie Mellon Camillo Brown Chicago Camille president Tommy government CMU
"hinojosa" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"hinojosa" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Welcome back to new USA. I'm Maria Hinojosa. And when we left off immortal technique was telling us about how he got into rap. We're going to pick up now with his first album and the infamous song dance with the devil. Just a heads up in this section of the conversation. We're gonna be talking about rape and sexual violence. You released revolutionary volume one that was your first album in two thousand one and on that album is basically the song that launched your career dance with the devil hoof, which I was listening to it this morning in preparation. I just yeah. No. And I'm sitting here like. Who drove around a project slow weather with rain in Spokane plants drinking and Shokhin for entertainment until they saw woman on the street walking alone in the morning coming back from work on the way, home until they quietly got off the corn followed up walking through the projects the darkness swallowed. They've wrapped around the head and knocked raw to the floor. This is a kid. What was it about the dance with the devil that you think launched your career, essentially, I could give you a million different answers. But I'm going to give you the ugliest one. Everybody. Either knows someone has been sexually assaulted themselves. And I think the song came at a time when people were trying to kind of weed through. A new generation of hip hop during the two thousand era and looking for who had kind of substance in the music, we never had a son about rape ever in hip hop ever. We we've probably discussed that it's been thrown around. But a song in which we showed how that really means. You're raping yourself. You're destroying yourself. And in the underlying themes of its distant, which are that all human beings that are alive right now. Have to be related, and I wanted that point to resonate in the people's minds when they were out there listening to that music..

rape Maria Hinojosa Spokane USA. Shokhin