35 Burst results for "Himalayas"

Dozens dead and many missing after glacier collapse in India

PBS NewsHour

00:42 sec | 2 weeks ago

Dozens dead and many missing after glacier collapse in India

"Toll from a disaster in India's Himalayas rose to 26 today with 165 people missing. Glacier broke apart in the country's north on Sunday, sending a wall of water down a mountainside rescue teams work today to find more than three dozen workers trapped in a power plant tunnel. One man described the moment that the deluge hit That's a human eye witness something that looked like a scene from a Bollywood film about 50 to 100. People were running for their lives but could not be saved and they were engulfed by the river. Officials said. The potential causes of the disaster range from climate change to earthquakes

Himalayas India Bollywood Earthquakes
UN stands ready to support relief, in aftermath of deadly India flash floods

UN News

00:44 sec | 2 weeks ago

UN stands ready to support relief, in aftermath of deadly India flash floods

"Un secretary general antonio guitarist said that he's been deeply saddened at the loss of life inflicted by deadly flooding from glacier in the indian himalayas at the weekend at least fourteen people reportedly died and over one hundred and seventy missing after the tragedy in uttarakhand province on sunday which also fifteen people rescued. Initially the united nations stands ready to contribute to ongoing rescue and assistance efforts. Mister gutierrez said in a statement according to reports a torrent of water rock and debris from the glossy cascaded into communities living downstream also damaging damn blasio bursts and the flash floods that they cause are extremely destructive natural hazards the himalayan region particularly vulnerable to such disasters which have been made more likely by climate change and temperature rise

Antonio Guitarist UN Indian Himalayas Mister Gutierrez Uttarakhand Blasio Himalayan
140 are missing after glacier breaks in India's Himalayas

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:31 sec | 2 weeks ago

140 are missing after glacier breaks in India's Himalayas

"At least nine people are dead. 140 are missing in India after part of a glacier in the Himalayas broke off releasing a crush of water and debris that slammed into two hydro electric plants. Experts say the disaster today appears to be 2.2 global warming as cause video from India's northern states showed a muddy concrete glitch. Great flood waters tumbling through a valley surging into a damn breaking it into pieces with little resistance before roaring downstream. The disaster flooded the countryside with what looked like an ash colored

India Himalayas
Scores Are Feared Dead In India After Himalayan Glacier Breaks Away

Reveal

00:55 sec | 3 weeks ago

Scores Are Feared Dead In India After Himalayan Glacier Breaks Away

"Massive search and rescue operation is underway in northern India after part of a Himalayan mountain glacier broke off and triggered landslides and flooding. NPR's Lauren Frayer reports at least 125 people are missing. It started when part of the Nanda Davey Glacier broke off. Blasting through a hydro electric dam. Video recorded by witnesses shows an avalanche of mud, water and debris rushing through a ravine in India's Tera con state. Many of those missing are believed to be workers at that Damn, one local resident says. It happened so fast. There was no time to alert anyone. The military has been called in to help villages are being evacuated downstream. Prime Minister Narendra Modi tweeted that he's praying for everyone's safety. This is an area of the Himalayas, where environmental experts have cautioned against building such dams and

Himalayan Mountain Glacier Lauren Frayer Nanda Davey Glacier India NPR Prime Minister Narendra Modi Himalayas
"himalayas" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

02:57 min | 3 weeks ago

"himalayas" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"You mean.

"himalayas" Discussed on Camden Boyd's The Happiness Question

Camden Boyd's The Happiness Question

05:39 min | 3 weeks ago

"himalayas" Discussed on Camden Boyd's The Happiness Question

"About jeff. Welcome to the show. Thank you camping. Glad to be here happy. Have you tell us a little bit more about yourself well. I grew up in a small town in northern indiana gauchan. Indiana and i was all set to go off to college when it was time and i ended up dropping out after two days and just didn't feel like that was what i really wanted to do. After having spent my whole long life of eighteen years in school so i went to work in a factory saved up some money and then mom reluctantly drove me to the edge of town. I stuck out my son and he tried to cross country. But i did end up going back to college after my parents told me if i didn't they were going to kill me and i thought okay choices college death. I'll take college and ended up. Really loving academics. At a serious level went to the university of chicago than went to law. School eventually went to seminary so ended up spending a lot of time in the classroom. I'd even taught a few college classes practiced law for thirty years retired. And i suppose what's really brought us together is that i written ten books. Several of which are about what. I call philanthropy trekking in nepal himalayas grew so but is that exactly. What is philanthropy attracting. Yeah it it. Means a combination of fee lows. Which is greek for love and anthropologists philanthropy. Means love of humanity in. So i combine that with tracking. And so i've been to nepal fourteen times in started a foundation over there so i combined tracking with philanthropy led an organiz many groups of truckers and many of which have been involved with the mission of the foundation started which is called the possibility foundation. What exactly does the bassett village foundation do well. It's concentrated in a remote area of eastern nepal. Which is not on any of the popular trekking trails. A set of the first time. I was there which was in two thousand eight. My little group of truckers were only the second group of people from the outside world that had ever visited abilities which was an amazing experience because they were living basically the same way they had for the last five hundred years but anyway the foundation does is. I developed this relationship. Was that village. And we have helped to build a school hydroelectric system water system. Our most recent effort was little health clinic and we also help to rebuild the village which was partially destroyed from two major earthquakes. Back in twenty fifteen the same earthquakes that sarah safari was in when she was tracking mount everest in the last episode so our mission goal is to work with the local people to finance the projects that they would like to bring up their standard of living in terms of education sanitation healthcare those sorts of efforts but all of those projects have been requested by the village not suggested by us the outsiders the funders donors to the foundation members. And the reason for that is. I think it's very important for this. Kind of development work really to be primarily in controlled by the people at supposed to benefit so that we don't develop a kind of dependency mentality so the school the water system the electrical system the villagers build it themselves with their own hands and they own they run it and we just provide financial assistance and expertise. When it's ask for school cool. i was talking to somebody else as well. Today that happened to be working with foundations that affected the same area. About empowering nepali women roller. You should connect us. Sarah safari yeah. She's really cool. Where did you grow up. Like i said in the small town of gauchan. Indiana doesn't seem like there'd be much there in indiana as far as mountains. There are not. I had never climbed a mountain or done. Any sort of high-altitude tracking. Before the first time i went to nepal back in nineteen ninety five and my first experience there was directing the mount everest base camp trail.

indiana Indiana ten books thirty years eighteen years Sarah safari northern indiana gauchan nepal two thousand two major earthquakes Today eastern nepal gauchan second group fourteen times first experience first time nepal himalayas twenty fifteen chicago
Back to the Himalayas with Jeff Rasley

Camden Boyd's The Happiness Question

05:39 min | 3 weeks ago

Back to the Himalayas with Jeff Rasley

"About jeff. Welcome to the show. Thank you camping. Glad to be here happy. Have you tell us a little bit more about yourself well. I grew up in a small town in northern indiana gauchan. Indiana and i was all set to go off to college when it was time and i ended up dropping out after two days and just didn't feel like that was what i really wanted to do. After having spent my whole long life of eighteen years in school so i went to work in a factory saved up some money and then mom reluctantly drove me to the edge of town. I stuck out my son and he tried to cross country. But i did end up going back to college after my parents told me if i didn't they were going to kill me and i thought okay choices college death. I'll take college and ended up. Really loving academics. At a serious level went to the university of chicago than went to law. School eventually went to seminary so ended up spending a lot of time in the classroom. I'd even taught a few college classes practiced law for thirty years retired. And i suppose what's really brought us together is that i written ten books. Several of which are about what. I call philanthropy trekking in nepal himalayas grew so but is that exactly. What is philanthropy attracting. Yeah it it. Means a combination of fee lows. Which is greek for love and anthropologists philanthropy. Means love of humanity in. So i combine that with tracking. And so i've been to nepal fourteen times in started a foundation over there so i combined tracking with philanthropy led an organiz many groups of truckers and many of which have been involved with the mission of the foundation started which is called the possibility foundation. What exactly does the bassett village foundation do well. It's concentrated in a remote area of eastern nepal. Which is not on any of the popular trekking trails. A set of the first time. I was there which was in two thousand eight. My little group of truckers were only the second group of people from the outside world that had ever visited abilities which was an amazing experience because they were living basically the same way they had for the last five hundred years but anyway the foundation does is. I developed this relationship. Was that village. And we have helped to build a school hydroelectric system water system. Our most recent effort was little health clinic and we also help to rebuild the village which was partially destroyed from two major earthquakes. Back in twenty fifteen the same earthquakes that sarah safari was in when she was tracking mount everest in the last episode so our mission goal is to work with the local people to finance the projects that they would like to bring up their standard of living in terms of education sanitation healthcare those sorts of efforts but all of those projects have been requested by the village not suggested by us the outsiders the funders donors to the foundation members. And the reason for that is. I think it's very important for this. Kind of development work really to be primarily in controlled by the people at supposed to benefit so that we don't develop a kind of dependency mentality so the school the water system the electrical system the villagers build it themselves with their own hands and they own they run it and we just provide financial assistance and expertise. When it's ask for school cool. i was talking to somebody else as well. Today that happened to be working with foundations that affected the same area. About empowering nepali women roller. You should connect us. Sarah safari yeah. She's really cool. Where did you grow up. Like i said in the small town of gauchan. Indiana doesn't seem like there'd be much there in indiana as far as mountains. There are not. I had never climbed a mountain or done. Any sort of high-altitude tracking. Before the first time i went to nepal back in nineteen ninety five and my first experience there was directing the mount everest base camp trail.

Nepal Bassett Village Foundation University Of Chicago Indiana Sarah Safari Himalayas Jeff Gauchan Mount Everest Base Camp Trail
"himalayas" Discussed on Camden Boyd's The Happiness Question

Camden Boyd's The Happiness Question

01:53 min | 3 weeks ago

"himalayas" Discussed on Camden Boyd's The Happiness Question

Nepali team first to top world's 2nd tallest peak in winter

America First

00:37 sec | Last month

Nepali team first to top world's 2nd tallest peak in winter

"Paul that comes first to top the world's second tallest peak and winner. Pakistan's Alpine club, says the team of 10 Nepalese climbers made history scaling the world's second highest peak Que Tu in the winter season, reaching the summit late Saturday afternoon. Renowned mountain stands at 28,251 ft and has never been scaled in the winter before where winds can blow more than 125 miles an hour and temperatures can drop to minus 76 F. Que Tu is located in Pakistan's Cara Coram range along the Chinese border that leads into the Himalayas.

Alpine Club Pakistan Paul Cara Coram Himalayas
"himalayas" Discussed on Future Tense

Future Tense

06:23 min | Last month

"himalayas" Discussed on Future Tense

"This is an abc podcast. It's a bit flippy. Still the recording that you're listening to is in delhi india on the banks of the river one of the most polluted waterways in the world and i'm with dr ruth gamble an environmental historian from latrobe university. So copy too bad given all this wildlife sanctuary. What have you can it. We didn't take you to the maybe should have taken you to with little farm coming up right. Okay sir. basically down the does the a barrage backs up the water. And when you go more water. Fakes it into thinking that it's a healthy type of river but if you went further upstream it'd be less water and you'd see more pollution right and there's another barrage like that at the north of delhi. So this is the south of delhi. And if you go to the water. That's when you see all that kind of mad firm. And i mean this isn't claim when it's up in the mountains state really is very clean and then it comes down and hits the plains. There's a massive irrigation system. There that almost takes almost all of the water out of the system. And then between the in the north of delhi and this one. That's just down here. Making the river look pretty is Twelve series outlets that nor international health organization thinks operating it. They right capacity. There's no drinkable water. Sources on the planes in india. It's either got agricultural pollution in it and then on top of that you've got over manufacturing in the city of thirty million plus people in delhi. So we'll the water that's gonna come from the himalayas to get down to here in delhi and all that's going on in between that sounds like they could be bid management for it to be in better condition more usable condition. I don't think it's ever going to get back to be in drinking water condition but you could use it for other things. Hello and welcome to future tense. I'm matt smith and today on the program a health check on the himalayas. A woman climate is changing. The himalayas faster than any other region in the world and the mountain glossies source of the rivers of asia are melting the drainage basin of these river support roughly six hundred million people across countries such as india china pakistan bangladesh nepal and bhutan and all of these countries compete to use the himalayas for territory water and natural resources. The very few towns settled along that river. People live on the radio but one of the first big projects insecure stage five. That came out by the place called the dam. The river that feeds into the at that spot so the village gets from there. It's kind of like a trading town. This is pamela dorji the consulting editor of sikkim newspaper summertimes. Bitcoin means the fast flowing or sprightly. The noisy liver. People offer prayers bank the hindus but this everyone does so if you drove in right so when you're driving in new cross the teesta over the bridge from one to the other. I found a monk with an entire family standing behind him on the bridge brain so they have this ritual in buddhism where you rescue animals which are destined to be killed for food. So fish picked up a bucket of fish or whatever from the fish market and they will release you get into the water now. They would do it by the riverbank then their family and the monk would deliver bank and they would pray and they would release the fish into the water so i said this too high dropping it from the bridge. The taxes the bank anymore. Because there's a reason why they're. There is no beach anymore to do it from the i. I don't think the face alive the fall. This family did it this year next. They'll probably not even bother. I think the human the environment the social costs have not really been addressed adequately enough to get a sense of the himalayas ruth gambling. I take a trip to chengdu lake. The lake is three thousand seven hundred and fifty three meters above sea level frozen during the winter months and his closest and foreign. It can get to the chinese border. How far away are we from from china from tibet. Here from here to like like nurse. International border fifteen. We can now we. Can this blessing god on the trip. He's from nepal. speaks six languages. Is there a lot of interaction between the kim side and tibet side. Through here is a is a trade going on his things like that like they haven't cratered desert one that data exchange the in china in india. So they've got a place where they pull up together and just like things. Out of the trucks do they. Yeah they have like like mark out the full senate on the chinese will come from tyneside and the engine go up and the us intellectually good comeback tell me about the watershed and how important this environment is to the south asian region with sitting in the eastern himalaya and served in the basin of the brahmaputra river so junge mountaineers actually the watershed between the ganga brahmaputra river and the snow that falls the rain and snow. That full around here descends down through and through the plain states of assam and west bengal in india. Down into bangaldesh in the whole baseness was to be six hundred and fifty million people dependent on this one river. And then you have the ganga which is just the other side of the country junge and then further away from that you have the indus river basin mesa water from there flowed into pakistan and pakistan gets sixty percent of its water from the himalaya. You've got the people over the china side. Yes sir behind us. Got all the mountains. Myanmar southeast asia laos and thailand. They all depend on water. That comes from the eastern himalaya arc that goes from beijing to karachi in pakistan. And it all depends on himalayan border qualified. How many people are we.

matt smith chengdu lake karachi pamela dorji sixty percent assam eastern himalaya delhi thailand beijing three thousand today ganga brahmaputra river six languages bangaldesh west bengal china asia bangladesh Myanmar southeast asia laos
Red Knots (?!) and Science with Spinach

Earth Rangers

05:23 min | 3 months ago

Red Knots (?!) and Science with Spinach

"Hello and welcome to earth rangers podcast. I'm ruth ranger. Emma and i hope you scurry ready because today we're going to learn all about not free a hearty yes. I am a few different pieces of rope here. And i've been practicing all morning. Oh hands on deck scalawags. Are you ready to learn about knots. Old is gonna get your shipshape. The no time. Shogo nods radna acknowledgments. Big nods overhand. Handmaid's the anchor hitched. The these not. Oh that kind of red. Not oh well you know that makes a lot more sense as an episode topic. Do i know what a red nod is Ya i certainly do. I mean the real question is do our listeners. Know what a red not is. It's a type of bird right right. Hey let's see what else you know about this creature. It's time to false or fall off. Okay earth rangers. Here's one for the experts out there. Sure false red knots born in brazil and they are so into their habitat that they never fly further away than five kilometers from their nests. What do you think Well if you said fulls you're right. The red not in fact born in the arctic this colorful hand piper is a striking bird with terra. Cotta orange gold and black feathers. Retinoid start their lives. Eggs and nests building. Rocky creeks old mother and father. Birds incubate their eggs for about three weeks and after the chicks are able to fly. The family moves to lake shores and meadows to eat a lot bigger a really long trip ahead of them and they need to fill up before they leave the prefer seafood. Mussels clams shrimp ben horseshoe. Crab legs are all favorites. After they're all fueled up right not out on an long journey set up to fifteen thousand kilometer. These spend the winter in south america before heading back to their northern home. Now right not. Aren't the only birds that migrate a really long way. In fact there are lots of birds that can make a terrifically long trip. You i think this calls for a top five countdown top five migrating birds number five. Have you ever wanted to fly. High like really high. If that sounds like your idea of good time you'd love being a bar headed goose. They're the highest flying migratory birds. How can they find over eight kilometers in the air. These birds are native to asia and have even been known to fly over the himalayas number. Four we could hardly have a top five list with that. Our old friend the red nine when the red not goes on. Its epic flight. It needs to stop over to rest. And where do they stop. A one of the places is here to san antonio a protected area in argentina earth rangers is working with the international conservation fund of canada and the argentinian researcher patricia gonzalez to keep this area safe from human interference number. Three have you ever heard of a northern we talk. It's a strange name for a tiny songbird with a really cool ability. These little songbirds are only about sixteen centimeters long and only way about twenty five gramps but despite their diminutive size they can fly for over fourteen thousand kilometers each way between the arctic and africa huckabee long distance traveler number two. Just because they can't fly doesn't mean they don't travel heavily. Penguins travel all around and up to thirteen thousand kilometers. These adorable penguins. Follow the sun north from the ross sea and stick close to the edge of the ice of expanse so the easy access to their favorite fishing foods and finally number one. Okay what if i told you that. There's a bird that makes eighty thousand kilometer trip every single year meet. The arctic tern heard the bird with the world's longest migration all the way from the arctic to the antibiotic and back again an arctic tern. Does this trip every year. For thirty years they will have flown equivalent of three trips to the moon and back

Ruth Ranger Shogo Nods Radna Rocky Creeks Arctic Lake Shores Emma International Conservation Fun Patricia Gonzalez Brazil South America Asia San Antonio Argentina
Should I get interns to work for my startup?

The $100 MBA Show

08:45 min | 3 months ago

Should I get interns to work for my startup?

"Interns are often college grads or even college students looking to get experience so they can put in their resumes and put it in there and be able to get a job eventually sometimes interns do so well at the company they are interning at and they actually got a job there so on the surface a lot of people think. Oh this is a great idea. Because i don't have to pay them or maybe have to pay them very little. And i get people that are hungry. I give people energetic that. Come here and helped my business grow. But many people forget many different aspects of bringing on interns to your company first of all the reason why is because they have no experience in and sometimes they don't have many skills so you're not getting the best talent to work on your company okay. So you're actually getting somebody who's learning on the job now. Some interns will come with skills. They learned Before they went to university or maybe it's their interests maybe they like web development and this is something that they do on the side and they can in turn as a web developer for your company but even somebody like that is not gonna be skill wise and experience wise as good as somebody who you would hire an pay them a salary because they will get what they deserve and they'll give you deserve that salary right so just keep that in mind. Okay so my personal opinion when it comes to hiring interns that the nature of an intern is. They're looking for a brief stint somewhere to learn. some skills gained some experiences in my experience and from the experience of the different Entrepreneurs i've coached and helped along the way a small fraction of actually stay in becoming police in the company. They're looking usually for six months to year of experience and in my experience it takes about three months to ramp anybody. Noon your business to Get them used to your culture to train them so they know exactly what to do and how to do and how to fulfil their job role and it takes even longer for interns because hey they're not coming with any experience or they're not coming With any job experience in your realm. So they're gonna take a little bit more time to ramp up so if they're around for six months experience You really only gonna get three solid months outta them before they move on and you invested a lot of time effort. Somebody's got train them. Somebody's got to show them how to do the job. The show them had a perform well and then they leave. One of the biggest costs and business is turnover employee turnover. You want to keep your as long as possible because it's costly to find new talent to hire new talent and train them. You want to keep people for at least two to three years to get the most value out of him. Anything over that is gravy and it'd be awesome. You can keep them for longer but anything under two years really. You're losing a lot of money and time and effort in training hiring and all that stuff. So that's even more true with an intern now. I know that you're not paying them paying them very little. But again the expectation that you have in terms of put from an intern is much lower from the new employee. That has you know. Keep your eyes and it's going to be held accountable and all that kind of stuff now. Cows in the tech space. You need to grow you need to sprint unique to really Get moving fast in your business and get your product out there so you can't be wasting time on turnover on entrance leaving on people coming and going in and does affect the culture when you have new. Employees renew teammates every so often you wanna have a core group of people that are in the team and of course people were leaving. Come and go. But not the ray of an intern now. There is an exception. If you're going to be doing something that's more of an investment in your business They you can keep after they leave. Let's say they are Documenting standing operating procedures or. Sap's how do you do everything in your business. The documenting your systems in your play books so that when you do make a higher that can just pick up the playbook and know exactly how to fulfil every task. Another example is content there writing content like blog posts. If they're good writers than those posts will stand the test of time. And we'll serve your business while after they leave but in my experience if they are a good writer if they are good writer and the running amazing blog posts they can get paid for it. They freelance and they will in turn says a bit of a difficult situation. Of course you find great talented people and train them and then leads me to my next point if you wanna take on interns and you found great talent. That is willing to intern for a company then stipulate that they have to be an intern for a period of time. I would say at least twelve months now. In my opinion you should compensate them in some way. Even if it's minimum wage but compensation matters. Okay giving them money for their time now that you invested a year. Also stipulate that you'll they'll have an evaluation at the end of the year and they'll be offered a position if they pass the evaluation this gives them some sort of upward. Mobility gives them something to shoot for. Okay i like working here. I like the work. I'm doing here. I'm learning a lot. I wonder how much i can learn if i was a full time employee. So if you have a path for them it makes it a whole lot easier for you to sell the idea of graduating into becoming an employee and hey starting your career at this company get a few years under bill and then move on to greener pastures. I got more on today's guinea wednesday's episode before that let me give to today sponsor support for today show comes from start your first online business might all new ten part audio course on himalayan learning this is of course is going to get you from one. That's gonna get you from thinking about your business to actually launching that business getting it out of your head and into the real world. Recover things like validating your idea creating your first product pricing it marketing finance in your business even creating your business website and more check it out and himalayas deep calm. Nba and use code nba to get a fourteen day free trial again. That's himalayas dot com slash. Nba promo code nba updates cuny wednesdays question from cow. Should i hire interns for my startup. This was a tough one for me to deliver. But it's the truth if you're in the tech space cal. You need to grow fast quick. You can't afford having to train. And retrain retrain intern so if you need content if any procedures lock them into year with You know A chance to become a fulltime police. They pass evaluation. If that's not an option. Just keep moving forward. Do not worry about hiring interns. See if you can hire one experienced player on your team won. Experienced player can equal five inexperienced people or ten interns. I'm serious. I've had in police on my taint team. I have employees on my team that are gold. They are worth You know five or six hires. And they're expensive okay so You go you pay for but sometimes you actually save money by hiring somebody. That's worth their value again. This is my personal opinion. This is my personal advice. From my own experiences experience of the people i've coached the build their own businesses and and the stories i've seen with the soon as i've seen at one hundred dollars i wish you all the best cow with your startup goal. Get them that wraps up. Today's episode. thank you so much for listening. If you have a question you want ask is just email me over at omar at one zero zero mba dot net. And i will make sure answer right here on kuni wednesday. Don't forget a hit. That subscribe gun on whatever app. You used to listen to podcasts. Spotify or situa radio for apple podcasts. Were on every platform. It's absolutely free to hit. Subscribe to do that right now before we go. I want to leave you with this. When the stakes are low the result is not something really special. This just in general life. If i'm in a position or a job or whatever where you know it's not a big deal fired. It's not a big deal. If i lose his job. You know. there's less pressure for me to perform. This is just human nature okay. Not everybody's going act this way but in general people will okay if you wanna use a rule of thumb but if the stakes are high and they really wanna stay there and they really think this is a good position. They're getting paid in there They don't wanna lose this job. They're going to have incentive to keep it. It's really hard to fight human nature so keep that in. Mind when you're making decisions like this.

NBA Sprint Himalayan Guinea Himalayas Apple
Trump plans to withdraw thousands of troops from Iraq, Afghanistan before leaving office

Up First

03:16 min | 3 months ago

Trump plans to withdraw thousands of troops from Iraq, Afghanistan before leaving office

"American troops are coming home. President trump said so yesterday. He promised to withdraw. Us troops from afghanistan as well as a rock and himalaya in the next couple of months. That is all the time that he has left. The outgoing president leaves office in exactly sixty four days. Noon january twentieth. Two thousand twenty one under his orders the troop presence in iraq would drop a little and in afghanistan by lot from forty five hundred twenty five hundred now. Trump is often promised to bring troops home but his move here drew criticism from a powerful ally. Senate majority leader mitch. Mcconnell are retreat would embolden the taliban especially the deadly connie wing and risked plunging afghan women and girls back into what they experience back in the nineteen ninety s. What had weakened and scattered al-qaeda a big do propaganda victory and renewed safe haven for plotting attacks against america. So how does all this look from the region. Npr's hadeed is based in islamabad. She's on the line. good morning. good morning so the. Us had already pledged to withdraw its forces from afghanistan by this spring. This came a promise under an agreement. It signed with the taliban course. The afghan government was not party to that agreement but what are afghan government officials saying now about this accelerated. Us time line for withdrawal. Well actually that we're expecting it because it's something fat. President trump has long signalled most recently last week when he pointed a senior adviser to the pentagon who calls for an immediate withdrawal at this point. They're actually eyeing the military equipment that american forces might leave behind As they rush to the exit. But there's also a sense of anger. I spoke to a senior official javard face all and he told me this poems. Do not want the to stay here. Whatever we one we draw to be responsible one and we don't expect our ally to burn. The house wants it leaves. They don't expect their ally to burn down the house as they leave. They worried a hasty withdrawal emboldened the taliban because it would signal to them that they don't have to abide by commitments for foreign forces to go echoing. Quite what mitch. Mcconnell said well is the talamante doing that are the upholding the commitments they made when it signed this agreement with the trump administration yes annoy the taliban are abiding by two key commitments. They're not attacking foreign forces and they are engaging in peace talks with the afghan government even though they've been at a stalemate since they begun but it's understood that the taliban also promised to reduce their violence but in reality they've stepped up their attacks against security forces across the country and they believed to be behind a series of unclear murders. Most recently they may have killed an afghan journalist in helmand. What are ordinary afghans citizens telling you educated afghans appear to be worried especially women they worry withdrawal will allow the taliban to seize power and that their rights might be swept away others. Tie it like a nurse. i spoke to a merger. Larry ellison's the fighting getting worse. So maybe it doesn't matter if they stay ago.

Afghan Government Taliban Afghanistan Hadeed Donald Trump America Mcconnell Mitch Javard Connie Islamabad Qaeda NPR Iraq Senate Trump Administration AL Pentagon
The Dalai Lama Offers A Warning On Climate Change

Environment: NPR

04:02 min | 3 months ago

The Dalai Lama Offers A Warning On Climate Change

"Tibet's spiritual leader. The dalai lama is eighty five and he wants to warn us about something. I talked to him recently. He was at his home in dharamsala india wearing his red and orange robes sitting in front of the big tv screen so across continents. We could see each other. Hello your holiness. our you thank you. Thank you for being here this. He's just written a book about climate. Change called our only home. Well 'cause this planet is only a home now information. I hurt on moon. Also some water but try to settle their impossible so doubtful. Now we have to take care of our own planet. Logical trees are sacred in buddhism. They sheltered buddha his birth his enlightenment and his death and the mountains the himalayas whose backdrop the dalai lama lives there. Glaciers are melting and billions of people in china and india depend on them for water. I asked him what's one step any ordinary person could take and he said we eat a lot of meat. Not only question of the censo- low these animal itself. You civility bent for ecology so invest too. Much eat meat. Of course we also a nonvege- stadion so the be pham. Ideally feels very uncomfortable. Laws double and only four foot. We should promote vegetarians as much as two he can. He doesn't see the world in terms of countries and he wishes we wouldn't either. Our mother earth he says is teaching us a lesson in universal responsibility and so he'd probably be pleased that president elect joe biden has promised to re enter the paris climate accord three years ago. When the trump administration withdrew from that agreement. The dalai lama was stunned. When i heard that if you really said you see i did some mistake. Designed from the beginning then the president of america. He mentioned a miracle. I i feel disagreement. America the leading nation of free world so america if she should tink not just america first america have greater potentially making contribution for happier world. Some of this might seem so urgent because he's not young anymore. He's aware of this. It's been on his mind in buddhist tradition. He would pick the next doll. I lama and then reincarnate into that body but china also wants to pick the leader. China of course occupies tibet and so he wonders whether a dalai lama is necessary at the time of death to buddhist leaders should have is a serious discussion. Better though is you should continue or not if country you then individual tradition dissimilarity is some leader not why nation but the airedale one. Good scholar could practitioner. Is it become the head. So that's not wind business. My business could take care myself. Yes indeed your holiness. Thank you for taking the time to do this. I really appreciate it. thank you take. Good care bye-bye tibet spiritual leader. The dalai lama speaking to us from dharamsala

Dalai Lama Censo Dharamsala India America Trump Administration Tibet Himalayas China Joe Biden Paris
Kingship Belongs to the Lord (Psalm 22:27-28)

Pray the Word with David Platt

05:20 min | 5 months ago

Kingship Belongs to the Lord (Psalm 22:27-28)

"So we're GONNA. Start. Today with Psalm Twenty Two verses twenty seven and twenty eight. This is the word of God. All the ends of the Earth shall remember and turn to the Lord. And all the families of the nation's shall worship before you. For kingship belongs to the Lord and he rules over the nations. I remember vividly reading this chapter, these verses. On. The. Side of a mountain in the Himalayas. In the middle of unreached people's. Attention. Groups in a nation where there is so little access to the Gospel. And getting to verse twenty seven and just. Falling on my face on that mountainside as we see this promise, all the ends of the Earth shall remember and turn it a Lord and all the families of the nation. So worship for you to pray for all nations. To know Jesus as. And then to read Verse Twenty Eight for Kingship. So here's the declaration kingship belongs to the Lord and he rules over the nations. So as we think about a presidential election electing someone to lead a country, it is so good to know that. The ultimate? King. The sovereign ruler is not up for election. He rains today, he will reign a month from now he will reign a year from now and ten trillion years from now he'll still be raining and he is good. He is the Lord. He is perfect. His holy he is just he is righteous. He is loving. He is a merciful. So. Let this song lead us to praise God as the king over. Any nation wherein and specifically for those of us who are living United States kingship belongs to the Lord God praise you as King Overall Genesis, we praise you as Lord Overall, all authority in Heaven and on Earth belongs to you. And one day every knee will bow and every tongue confess that you are lord to the glory of God, the Father we exalt you are king, Our Lord, our ruler, the one who reigns over our lives, and this is where our hope is. Oh God. We put all our hope in you all our trust in you know who's going to get elected. We don't put our hope trust and who's going to get elected as the leader of our country. We trust in you as the leader of all things not just our country, the leader of our lives. Later of our families, the leader of the Church leader of the nation's we praise you and re you that you are the leader we need. New perfectly just. You're perfectly righteous. You Are Holy Holy Holy. You know world country of very imperfect. Candidates and imperfect leaders. There is no one compares with you Oh God. There is no one who compares with you Jesus in we are so thankful we find such refuge in your rain and your rule over all things we praise you that kingship belongs to you and you rule over the nation's you rule our nation gallery pray. I pray that you would bring many people. To, know you as king even during these days, you'd help us to proclaim you as king to have far more conversations during these days about you as the king we need. Then even the conversations we're having about who might vote for. God We. Pray the help us to point to you as king. We pray for that in the United. States we pray for that among all nations go re pray for the Aroma Gary People in Kenya. This molly people group about a million people. In Kenya got so few of them just a handful of them who may be followers Jesus God we pray that they would come to know Jesus is king. You would cause the gospel to spread to them. Oh God we praise you. GotTa help is to Make Your glory as king known in our nation in all nations as we pray like you taught us to pray Jesus our Father in heaven. Hallowed, be your name. Your kingdom come your will be done on earth as it is in heaven we praise you king. Over our nation and Omniscience in Jesus name we pray.

Jesus Kenya Himalayas United States
Dr. Abigail Marsh on changing your relationship with fear

10% Happier with Dan Harris

07:13 min | 5 months ago

Dr. Abigail Marsh on changing your relationship with fear

"Hey guys. There is sadly no shortage of fear these days fear of the virus. Climate change racial injustice, political ties. I could go on, but here's the question. Can you change the way your brain reacts to fear. Moreover can you train courage Abigail Marsh says, yes overcoming fear is a trainable skill. She's an associate professor in the Department of Psychology and the interdisciplinary neuroscience program at Georgetown University. She's also the author of the book fear factor how one emotion connects altruistic. Paths and everyone in between. This is in my opinion, a classic T. P. H. podcast conversation and Ace scientist whose area of expertise illuminates key aspects of the human condition I really enjoyed this. Hope you will to go. Abigail Marsh. Nice to meet you. Thanks for doing this. Absolutely it's a pleasure. So how did you get interested in fear? That's a great question. So my initial interest in social psychology, which is the discipline I have my degree in was because I'm interested in facial expressions and nonverbal communication in general, but how people communicate with one another And a little research had been done over the years about why facial expressions look the way they do. And I find that a particular interesting topic because they do look remarkably consistent across cultures, which just said there's something evolved and at least partly eight about them. And that's really amazing. Right I mean. It's one of the key piece of evidence that broke the back of radical behaviorisms decades ago. That emotional expressions are interpreted across cultures. It must be really important of that's true. and. Some people had spent a lot of time looking at. The reason that angry expressions look a particular way or happy expressions but nobody touched fear fear such fundamental emotion. It seems really important to know why we would communicate to each other and how people interpret it in other people. And it really was a flash bulb moment it was based on the combination of courses I was taking as Undergrad where it occurred to me that the reason that fearful expressions look the way they do is to elicit support and care from people who see them because they mimic the appearance of infantile face. Big Is. High Big is the very surrounded appearance lower face and they make you look infantile and that. Particular connection can help us understand so much about our nature as a social species what emotions are for what kinds of social behavior we can expect from other people around us that one observation really has a lot of implications. So I was kind of expecting you to say that you had some lifelong struggle with fear. But in fact, it sounds more like a academic interests well. I mean, you know the saying research is research I'm sure I mean I wouldn't have had lifelong struggle with fear but I would sam probably above average in terms of capacity for anxiety and I've certainly had experiences where I was frightened for my life. and. Had the good fortune to be helped by other people around me and so I'm one hundred percent certain that that made me interested in this topic to begin with. Are those things you're comfortable discussing Oh sure I. Mean it's not only one thing but certainly, the most important relevant event is the event that happened when I was nineteen when I was in a car accident on a big freeway in Washington state interstate five. And as I was driving over a bridge to get back to my hometown late at night. I swerved to avoid a little dog that ran in front of my car and the combination of swerving unfortunately hitting the anyways semi car into these fish tails and eventually donuts across the freeway. And wound up stranded in the fast lane of the freeway on the overpass with no way of escaping a no phone and cars and semis winning by me so fast, they were making my car shake. I was sure I'm GonNa die I mean I was one of those things you know they tell you time slows down when you're feeling intense fear. That's true. I know why I didn't know I then four and I really didn't know what to do. I was going to die tell stranger appeared next to my car having as I later figured out run across the freeway again in the dark to rescue somebody never met before. Key got my car. He figured out why? I. Couldn't get my car back on he threatened his way through the barrage of oncoming traffic to get us back across the freeway and then he just disappeared. He's like you know do you need me to follow you look so good I'm like, no no, all the okay. I'll be okay and he said Okay you carry yourself them an off. Into night I still to this day don't think. Thank you. I. Don't know anything about who he is and I know that. I owe Himalayas and really inexorably changed the way that I think about people and social behavior. Well, it's a dramatic story and actually connects to the thesis to the extent that I understand it of your book. Let me just repeat the title which I will have. Stated in the introduction the fear factor how one emotion connects altruism psychopaths and everyone in between. This is an example of extreme altruism that you just shared with us without a doubt He absolutely risked his life to save me. He deserved a medal for what he did at the very least. And what's so interesting about people like him as there is a really common tendency to assume that people who have things to help others are fearless. You hear that board used all the time but the reference to heroes and. But my research has shown is that that's absolutely not true that actually there's a really much more interesting relationship between fear and courage and altruism. So, what is it? So what seems to be the case is that truly fearless people tend not to help other people. For example, people who were psychopathic are one of the key features of psychopathy is a fearless disposition as failure to respond to threats or punishments or the potential for harm. And certainly people who are psychopathic do dangerous things. But they're very unlikely to do heroic things because that requires picking up on the fact that somebody else's afraid if you are doing something heroic, you're usually saving somebody else from danger somebody else's afraid in you're acting to help them. And what seems to be the case if you don't experience fear strongly yourself, you also don't pick up on that emotion and other people you have trouble detecting while other people are feeling it. You certainly don't appreciate why that state is bad and why you'd want to alleviate it, and so you're very unlikely to do anything to help when other people are afraid and so people. who were very altruistic turned out to be the opposite. They're people who are acutely aware of what it means to be afraid, and so they can empathize with that state and other people and when they encounter people who are in extreme distress, they're much more likely to help and so rather than being fearless, they're truly brave. They have courage which virtue whereas fearlessness is really not

Abigail Marsh Georgetown University Associate Professor Department Of Psychology Ace Scientist Washington
How long should my YouTube videos be?

The $100 MBA Show

09:55 min | 5 months ago

How long should my YouTube videos be?

"I've studied a lot when it comes to video marketing. Especially when it comes to search engine optimization and optimizing your exposure on Youtube, the lot experts out there. But my personal favorite expert on this topic is Brian Deane from back Linko dot com you can check out his blog back link dot com. There's a ton of resources when it comes to maximizing your exposure on Youtube he's only an expert when it comes to Seo marketing on Google but also on Youtube so I want to share with you some things I learned from him as well as others that have confirmed his strategies and what I like about Brian's approach to youtube marketing is he actually tests Out His theories and see if they work in the real world and his own youtube channel, which is huge for this niche of Seo. It's a very dry kind of topic. It's not a you know anything that's entertaining or funny or makeup tutorials or car reviews which kind of caters to a big market very niche and yet he's got a huge following three hundred and seventy three thousand subscribers on his youtube channel. Pretty impressive. Let's address the direct question of how long should videos on Youtube. In order to give you the right advice. Let me back up a little bit and talk about. What does Youtube. Well Youtube really wants people to stay on the platform as long as possible. Their big metric is view time total view time how long people watch videos on their channel? Don't confuse this with retention time. Let me tell you the difference if a former video on average people watch of to the three minute mark. My retention time is seventy five percent pretty impressive right? Let's say I have a ten minute video and people watch only half five minute mark. You would think that the first video would be more optimized would be more preferred by you would get more exposure because the retention time or percentage is higher at seventy, five percent versus fifty but the total watch time I video is three minutes versus the second video, which is five minutes and really. Cares about is that you actually keeping people on the platform for longer they're watching videos for longer more minutes is most important to them, and this is why the ten minute mark is seen as the holy grail in Youtube because ten minutes allows you to get lots of viewing time even if they just watch half the video and it's also not too long where it's like a two hour video and no one even attempts to click on it because they have to hours. So Brian Deane your video should be at least ten minutes long. You should try to aim for that. You know nine minutes eight and a half. Okay. But ten is really what you should aim for to maximize your viewing time and also obviously have a concise and valuable video. So your channel will get more juice will get more preference from Youtube. Viewers to watch more time of your videos, they will suggest your videos as recommended videos at the end of videos. Or they'll suggests it in the right hand column. And if you get enough mental, you might even be trending on their homepage. Now I don't want you to take my word for it. Take a look at some of the best youtubers out. They're the ones that are trending the ones that maybe you follow somebody maybe that you look up to even if they're not as active as they used to before like Casey Nice to take a look at the length of their videos, you're going to see their around the ten minute, Mark Ten twelve, fifteen minutes very few of these big time youtubers are doing you know three minute form videos, even people that review. Gadgets software cars they make sure that it's you know eight, nine, ten minutes at least now I want to give a couple more piece of advice that I learned from Brian. But my real genuine advice is to subscribe to back link. Oh, you know he's not paying me for this. I'm genuinely saying he's a great source of knowledge because I've learned so much from him if he ever offers the I know he has a course on youtube if you ever offers it. Opens it up for enrollment. Then he closes it really quick by that course it's a very, very good if you're serious about growing your youtube channel because you're GONNA learn a ton to maximize a results is really going to get you faster results in shorter time. But here are a few things I learned along the way from him number one. Understand the key words you're trying to target when you are shooting a video. So when you have video four, your youtube channel, you have a video idea, a title what are the key words are trying to target what kind of things that you're going to be searching for that they're going to you know stumble upon her find your video with understand your Seki words and they could be eight to ten keywords you're looking for, and you need to make sure you use these words throughout the video now, only in the description as. Much as possible in the title, even in your, you know close captioning or subtitles, but also say these keywords in the video actually speak them into the camera why? Because you actually can pick up what is being said, and it's actually picking up your audio and using it in their search engine algorithm to find people those videos that match the keywords typing in. So obviously, you just want to say these words randomly you want to put them in context in the video, but be mindful that you need to mention these key a few times. Brine recommends at least three times. So they're picked up by the algorithm maximizing your opportunity to rank for those keywords. Thing teaches of course you need to make sure your video engaging if your values are not good, they're not gonNA do well period you want to make sure that they're engaging you have really crisp cuts you have different angles even if you just change the framing even if you just have one video camera a Webcam or your phone in the post production in the edit you know zoom into your face then back up to a wide shot and switch these kind of shots every time you're changing The point or moving onto different part of video us bureau US things on your screen or images or video from stock images. You know one of our sponsors this story blocks, which is fantastic. You can get unlimited stock video images with our all access plan. Go story blocks, DOT COM SLASH MBA so change it up to make sure it's engaging. People are going to listen and watch that video for as long as possible guys got more on today's cuny Wednesday before that. Let me give love the today sponsor. Support today show comes from access bank. Won't banking that moves your small business forward, you can get it with access bank. Their basic business checking account is crafted for busy business owners with solutions to suit your needs. It's simple convenient and hassle free, and they're so confident that you'll love it. They'll give you a hundred dollars to try it out just use Promo code a ex. Mba and visit access bank dot com slash NBA Today to get started access is one hundred percent digital with much lower overhead costs than traditional banks. So they pass on those savings onto their customers. This means no maintenance fees and no minimum bounce requirements unlimited domestic ATM fee reimbursements. Up to two hundred free transactions per month on their basic business checking account enjoy managing your money. Your way access also gives you the ease of accessing your money anytime anywhere there time-saving digital tools including quickbooks compatibility allow you to check your accounts, make deposits and pay bills wherever you are stay ahead of the challenges of modern business with a bank that works for you. visit. ACCESS BANK DOT COM SLASH NBA today to learn more and earn your hundred dollars. That's A. X. O. S. BANK DOT COM SLASH NBA with Promo Code A. X. O. S. NBA, access bank small business banking simplified. To wrap up today's cuny question from. Darren. How long should is youtube videos be won't the golden rule is a minimum of ten minutes shoe for the ten minute mark aim to keep your viewers as engages possible because the longer they watch in terms of minutes, the better and a last piece of advice youtube loves consistency. So if you publish weekly one video, every single week like clockwork youtube recognizes that you are consistent publisher you're a good source of information and that your channel should be promoted. Don't skip stay on schedule stay consistent. Thank you so much for listening to the show. If you love today's format Cuny Wednesday and you have a question, you wanna ask go ahead and ask me that question just email me over at Omar at one zero, zero NBA. Don KNAPP I'll make sure to answer right here on Wednesday also wall you have your phone handy all you have your device handy. Go ahead and subscribe to our podcast using whatever app you use the podcast with US apple podcasts singer radio, spotify Himalayas on them all. Why should you subscribe well a subscribing Things a whole lot easier for number one. It allows you to get the latest episode as soon as it drops. It's right on your device nothing to search for number two it gives you access to all our archive episodes. You can go back in our library of episodes and learn away and get better at business and number three. It's completely free. So go ahead and smash that subscribe right now.

Youtube Brian Deane NBA United States Google Himalayas Casey Nice Don Knapp Spotify Omar Brine Apple Darren Publisher
At a Crossroads? China-India Nuclear Relations After the Border Clash

Monocle 24: The Globalist

09:49 min | 6 months ago

At a Crossroads? China-India Nuclear Relations After the Border Clash

"We start the program tracking one of the most potentially SA- serious spot points globally the ongoing hostilities between the nuclear-armed countries, India and China earlier this week they discharged weapons that each other for the first time in forty five years as a four month standoff between their armed forces escalated into warning shots in the western Himalayas. The skirmishes worryingly reminiscent of the circumstances surrounding the beginning of a war between the two in one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, two. Yesterday. The foreign ministers of the two countries met in Russia in a bid to defuse the military standoff Jonah Slater New Delhi Bureau chief for The Washington Post and Isabel Hilton China dialogue join me on the line now. Thanks both for for joining us is about what was behind this most recent exchange of shots. That rather depends who you believe I mean one. Of the meeting that has taken place in Moscow, which has been some extent. Calming is that neither side will acknowledge any wrongdoing and indeed continue to blame the other. There is a very in general terms there isn't defined line of actual, control? The seem to be signs that the past three or four months across quite a a a length of it. So not just in one sector, China has been a pushing the actual you know situation on the ground by crossing the line of Control China, accuse his India doing the same thing in this most recent incidents and says that it had to fire shots in the ad to deter what was Indian aggression India has said over the repeated incidents over the past few months that China has advanced and then has not on a promises to retreat. So we now have quite an extended standoff which began in the in the West and sector. But has now extended to the eastern sector to what in your Natural Pradesh which to southern. Tibet. So it's a sustained standoff still during the what more do we know about the outcome of the meeting between the two men yesterday Well we know that they met for two and a half hours a lengthy meeting their first in person meetings since the crisis began Jason Curve India's foreign minister is a is a former ambassador to China. He has deep experience there. But in terms of outcomes, what we basically have is an agreement to continue talking it's not nothing but it's definitely not a breakthrough I mean Isabel do you think there's any real appetite for compromise and given China's current aggressive stance globally will one be trying to dial it down I think that I don't see very much appetite for compromise on either side we all you have is highly nationals governments which both. Set great store on territorial integrity and and then of course, you come to the sensitive point where the territories real defined and then you have a you know constant potential for confrontation. But if you add to that I mean what one thing that is very different from in in this border confrontation with other areas of conflict China like the South China Sea for example, where were you have because it's accessible and and territory marine territory that's used by lots of different kinds of people in people from from different countries, you can enact a conflict at a lower level if you like using fishing boats or or customs boats, and you don't actually have to use your main forces. But this is highly inaccessible territory. The only people who are out there really are our armed forces and they have increased. Both sides have increased the presence of their forces really dramatically in the last few months, and in the last few years, they have increased access to the border by building infrastructure building roads and railway building roads rather So you have the potential to mobilize both heavy weaponry and larger numbers of troops When you have a moment like this, do strategically, I would say that China is trying to discourage India from. Joining in a mall full blooded way any anti-chinese coalition organized by the United States so the has been quite a warm relationship between Modiin trump as we know, and and the question is how far India will take this because that could be a Catholic. And during this meeting, come about because the to happened to be in Moscow anyway or is Russia playing the piece Burqa. Well. Both of them would have been at this meeting, but it does seem that Russia is playing a little bit of a role of convener here as a country that. Ostensibly would like to see tensions reduce. It has constructive relationships with both countries there have been reports in the Indian media suggesting that I'm sorry that Russia was doing some quiet diplomacy behind the scenes earlier in this crisis but I think the these these two men obviously would have been there anyway just comes at a very. Sensitive, sensitive, and important time. It's about what's in it for? Would I guess it's less less difficulty in the neighborhood they do as we've heard have rush the Russians do have constructive relations Russia likes to be seen as a broker these days I mean the whole trajectory of Putin's kind of outward posture has been to assert Russia's important so to be able to mediate between a traditional friend India and. country. Rival with whom relations little complicate it China would greatly enhanced prestige. One of the difficulties is that what we know from the reorganization, for example, the Chinese military which is put sheeting. Very firmly, inconspicuously in command, we need to assume I think that decision is made about deployment of troops and our posture go very much to the top So you know without a signal from the tall, the foreign ministers of my decide couldn't actually resolve this. Yeah. How do you think this fits in with the the general foreign policy aims of India. I don't think expected crisis with China I. think that was not part of its. Foreign Policy Goals as Isabelle was speaking about no, India is. Wary of China's rise, it has been drawing closer to the United States and also to this grouping called the Quad, which includes the United States Japan and Australia this one of the interesting aspects about this crisis with China along the line of actual control is that India says at least that it's at a loss to understand why China is doing this it repeated that again today that. Shot, the tiny side has not provided a credible explanation for this deployment. Jay Shankar, the foreign minister a few days ago said repeated that India's is a little bit flummoxed here, and so if China is sending a message that it doesn't want India to draw closer to the United States, India's not really getting the message quite clearly So I think that's one of the strange parts about this entire episode, which is we don't India claims at least not really understand what China's motivations are for this. Quite significant deployment along the line of actual control which began in April and then Burst into actual skirmishes, skirmishes in May, and then the deadliest violence between the two countries and more than fifty years in June. I mean Isabel attorneys right WH- one can't really see what's in it for China I. Mean as you say, this is an area where there's really not very much. It's inaccessible the only people there are the soldiers. What's the point? I think the point is is partly to shore up she gene pins reputation at home is a vigorous defender of China's global position and Chinese sovereignty, and you might well argue that that sovereignty over a few miles of inaccessible mountain compass matter but they matter symbolically domestically in China. It also might be I mean, we've seen a passion of a very assertive behavior. Put it no more strongly from China pretty much since the coronavirus outbreak and a lot of you know if you look across the piece it what's been going on there had been provocations in around Taiwan with you with Chinese. Military flights crossing into Taiwanese airspace very recently and and we have you know I, think for the first time that I can recall in. Since the sixties we have on this board, we have confrontations in both the important western sector and the equally important eastern sector. Now, that's that's kind of unusual that does signal a much more firm intent to send a message even if it's not a message that India understand. So it may be a message that's being directed to the Chinese public that you know we can do this because we are bigger and stronger than India and we will continue to defend. China's position in the world.

China India Isabel Hilton China South China Sea United States Russia Jason Curve India Moscow Isabel Delhi Bureau Jonah Slater Natural Pradesh The Washington Post Tibet Taiwan
PUBG ditches Tencent to avoid India's ban on Chinese apps

Daily Tech News Show

02:53 min | 6 months ago

PUBG ditches Tencent to avoid India's ban on Chinese apps

"India. China. Have a border dispute. In the Himalayas dispute that has seen more than one shot fired. So as a result, India has been ordering Chinese APPS to be blocked from APPs stores in India last week India, the game pub Geeta the less now poetry itself is Korean, but it is distributed by. Chinese. Company tencent. So pudgy has announced it will take distribution of its own game and India in order to avoid the block India has been Jeez biggest market, with Cintra, tower estimating one hundred, seventy, five, million installs today. That's about twenty four percent of global downloads just one. Ten cents at its relationship with G and other markets would remain the same. I was shocked at this. I didn't realize that that I mean I I know a popular game I don't play myself but first of all that the mobile game was that popular. The Mobile version of and twenty, four percent of the world just in India like they really love to fall from from from planes and drop down to you know. Other People do it touchy not. In the real world because no one gets on a plane anymore. Yay I. I think this tells us a few things. One is if tencent very easily said like, yeah. When neither one of us are making money off this and we're not for a while it means they think this block is GonNa last this is not a temporary thing otherwise ten cents would probably be encouraging Pudgy to just hold on this'll pass so it seems like this is going to stick and it certainly doesn't seem like India and China are going to resolve their dispute anytime soon. So I guess it makes sense for ten cents to say if you keep us onboard everywhere else where you can we'll. We'll change the terms of our agreement to let you go and pub and Pudgy obviously wants to do this in. India because of one hundred, seventy, five, million installs, right Yeah. It's a It's a huge market for them and I know that safe from a little bit of research into it and from my own playing perspective as somebody who has played pudgy. It's much more. Vulnerable to people since it is available on mobile and you can play this on budget phone. So it makes sense that so many people in India are playing this game on android and IOS phones or at least they were. So given the fact that we already heard about all of these APPs being banned in India. There were one hundred and seventeen I believe. It was expected from the perspective as somebody who knows about the popularity of Pudgy that they were going to reply in some way, but it did come as kind of surprise that they decided to. Cut those ties with tencent and just decided, okay. We're going to deal with the entire publication and everything ourselves which is an interesting way to go about it but it totally makes sense

India Tencent Himalayas Cintra China
The World's Highest-Dwelling Mammal Lives Atop a Volcano

60-Second Science

02:38 min | 7 months ago

The World's Highest-Dwelling Mammal Lives Atop a Volcano

"In twenty thirteen to mountaineers were nearing the top of Vulcan Judy Jayco a twenty two thousand foot tall volcano on the border of Chile and Argentina. When they saw something unexpected, just two thousand feet below the summit climbers spotted a mouse scurrying across the snow. It's really a remarkable citing his known expected wild mammals to be living at an elevation of over twenty thousand feet. At that elevations that the scarcity of oxygen oxygen that makes it really a challenging. Place to to survive in function. But then also just the extreme cold, it's an extremely inhospitable environment J. Starts and evolutionary biologist at the University of Nebraska. The climbers reached out to starts because he studies how animals adapt to high altitudes and he was so intrigued that he decided to make his own trip to survey the area starts and his colleagues spent a month that Jews Zhigo earlier this year where they confirmed with the climber saw they found mice everywhere including on the summit officially setting a new record for the world's highest dwelling. Mammal. Start says, the summit citing was fortuitous, his climbing partner Mario Perez, Mamani saw the mouse dive under a rock just starts made it to the top exhausted and groggy from the thin air. It took starts a minute together his wits, but he eventually managed to catch the mouse with his hands starts collected that mouse and others as museum specimens that will enable future scientific analysis. They also their encounter on video. The report is in the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences now that he's home starts wants to understand how these mice can survive in such harsh conditions, and conversely what prevents other animals from venturing. So high clearly the the device that are living these extreme altitudes. Have physiological capacities that are very different from your typical rodent. He and his colleagues are comparing the genomes of the mice from Judea Jayco to their lowland relatives to see if they can identify the animals high altitude adaptations. He's curious whether they have evolved some of the same strategies as mice that live at high elevations, in north, America in the Himalayas. Starts also wants to know how mice are finding food on top of a barren rocky volcano thousands of feet above the highest green plants. On his next trip, he plans to analyze the stomach contents of the animals, the capture. It's really an open question to whether most species are whether they're elevation limit is set by physiological tolerance or just the lack of ecological opportunity. It's probably a combination of both whenever the answer starts suspects, there may be more high altitude animals out there than scientists thought, it's just a matter of climbing high enough to find them

Mamani Judy Jayco Chile Argentina National Academy Of Sciences Himalayas Judea University Of Nebraska Partner Mario Perez America
Longevity Secrets Of The Himalayan Yogis With Aditya Jaykumar Iyer

My Seven Chakras

05:05 min | 7 months ago

Longevity Secrets Of The Himalayan Yogis With Aditya Jaykumar Iyer

"If you're on the part of spirituality, you've probably come across the Book Autobiography for Yogi and Other Yogurt books. They talk about these mystical Himalayan yogis would live for a hundred and ten honored and twenty, one, hundred, thirty years or even beyond that what are the secrets? How are they able to live deal such an ordeal and more importantly power they were retain their youthful glow in the air vigour and energy. Even at such an orphanage are all those stories just mitts and rumors are is there some truth to what they're saying today I'm going to attempt to tell you at least one secret that might be key to living longer and I'm going to tell you how you can apply these secrets. Into your life to live longer once I've action tribe Asia here, host and founder of my seven chuckers my seven chuck dot com the place where we help you expedience healing awakening and abundance. While what are you? It has been right. So many changes corona wireless masks, social distancing staying at home, and of course, the implications of all of this on our mental health, our jobs, our relationships, and the entire word and this phase. Has Allowed a lot of us to really go inwards and find out what we're truly passionate about and how we can align with our life's book, and for me this is really affirm to me that Mike Calling lies in helping you heal yourself Gombe yo mind and relax your diabetes and I've been meaning to do more of these solo episodes but you know what? I just don't WanNA create episodes for the sake of it. Which is why I took the time to go inwards, get more clarity and alignment on exactly. I'm here to do and be a sponge and really dive into the stories into the practices dealt out experimented on myself and research all of the stuff that will help you my friend lead a better quality life and I feel that I'm ready to share because I have honestly missed connecting one with you. I do the interviews but this thing that we have here. That especial so I appreciate you listening and I want to do more of this but the question for today's what is the longevity secret of the Himalayan. Yoga. So to attempt to answer this question, let's I stand the a lifestyle. Most of these Yogis were live high up in the mountains inside kids where there was record and with less oxygen at that elevation what would they eat? They would mostly various and fruits and food available out in nature, and they would have bath in the cool cool waters of the rivers Gord explosion, and of course, they will also do. Yoga. And they would also do. Dancing practices to align themselves to purify their energy and to connect with the universe. But have you noticed something about people living high up in the mountains whether it's mountains in Tibet or Himalayas are Switzerland or the Andes? These people they seem happy. This seem youthful they seem radiant. They seem fit. So can there be something about the oxygen. Our lack of oxygen there might be factor in this three words action tribe brief. Intermittent hype boxer I'm going to explain more but hold onto these words. Brief intermittent hypoc show you somewhere in the nineteen thirties. Russian scientists discovered that when you reduce the desired level of oxygen in your blood for a brief period of time that are many positive outcomes outcome such as increased level of haemoglobin production. Production of nitric oxide, which defends the body and especially the tissues against oxidative damage and prevents erectile dysfunction in men, and also another benefit is the increase assocation of stem cells which have the unique capacity to differentiate into worship. Any kind of cell in your body, which has major implications for healing and longevity. So these Russian scientists discover amazing benefits of brief intimate hype box. Here I know it's a lawful, but they were busy trying to replicate this in their elite athletes and perform us, and they will literally Dick these high-performance athletes on helicopters to high altitudes where there is less oxygen they created these hypo Barak. Chambers to systematically reduce oxygen levels and gas mixtures that contained ten percent oxygen, even less than that to induce intimated HYPOC boxy conditions in the body.

Mike Calling Yogi Gord Explosion Hypoc Founder Asia Andes Chambers Switzerland Himalayas
How live coding can level up your development (Jesse Weigel)

CodeNewbie

06:31 min | 7 months ago

How live coding can level up your development (Jesse Weigel)

"So I, want to switch gears and talk about live coding, which is something that you do. You are a youtube live coding streamer for free coat cab, which sounds terrifying. How did you get into voting? So when I was at this job, it was at a university I. decided that I wanted to collaborate more with the computer science department. I wanted to help the computer science students start to build a resume before they graduated and I thought it would be cool to get some of their ideas because I knew my own gaps in my learning, not having a computer science degree. So I thought we can kind of help each other out in the maybe they would have a lot of knowledge that I didn't, and I would have more practical not. That, they hadn't yet acquired about just like getting things done in making live in applications. So I decided to record myself doing some work and then put a link to it in the the facebook group for the Computer Science Club. And My boss thought that was a good idea and you said, yeah, let's let's do that and I had always been developing everything I. Could Open source on get hope anyway. So that wasn't really an issue and I did some live streams and I didn't I'd never livestream anything before like I really didn't know what I was doing the first live streams were. You couldn't see the code even the the the video quality was terrible the phone I had two small. So it was, it was pretty bad So I went on the Free Co Camp Forum and I a post saying. Just. Here's what I'm trying to do, and I don't know what I'm doing. If anyone has some time, please check out one of my live streams and at appreciate any advice that you have. And I ended up getting a bunch of people watching and giving advice. But probably, the most important view that I had was from Bo Corns who's in charge of the Youtube Channel for Free Code. camp. Alcohol. had asked if I would be interested in doing. Some live coating on the Free Co Camp Channel and I. You know, of course, 'cause my channel, add maybe three subscribers at the time in the Free Co. camp. Channel at the time had maybe somewhere between fifty thousand, one, hundred, thousand subscribers gone up significantly since then we're over a million. Maybe three years ago. So after I did that Quincy who's the head of recode camp also, ill, he watched the stream and he said I really like this and new said, you know you could do this? You know however many times a week you one. So I started live coding for at least an hour a day five days a week. Monday through Friday. How? Is a lot of time that is dedication yet in would really helped was I lies streamed my work. So it wasn't prepared beforehand or rehearse. It was whatever I had to work on that day. I would try to pick whatever I thought would be the most exciting in helpful for other people to see. And I would lie stream that portion of my work. And they were real projects that I was working on, and thankfully you know my boss was just super excited about it and saw this as a great opportunity for publicity for the university. which it really was for a tiny university in Ohio, the logo of the university was seen by people all over the world. So we definitely got some publicity and we also got a lot of people contributing code. So since it was open source. We had a nice community of developers from all over the world that would contribute code. Actually, add a developer. Believe was fourteen years old when he started watching the show from the Himalayas was one of the top contributors on most of the projects and he was so good. He's fine. The Best Coder I've ever worked with. He was so good. I would be in the middle of a livestream talking through a problem of. So here's what, I'm trying to do and I would look over the live chat and there would be five or six messages in all caps saying check my request. And I would look. In, he would have already solved the problem in submitted requests. Yeah It was so. He would often call me out on things. I was doing wrong and I tell you I. I kept in mind all the time. How young he was. I if it were an older person, I may not have taken it so well. A. Little Bit. Yeah. It it did. But I just imagined that he was young. US very excited about what he was doing us very skilled. With it and to be honest, I love what up so much during the live streaming so much more than I ever thought I mean, well. I never thought anybody would really watch it maybe a few computer science. So like. Like maybe one or two people watching to now having hundreds of people you're watching, live all typing and contributing code, and then my work day changed dramatically. It went from me coding most of the day on my own to me spending my mornings, reviewing pool requests in merging them, and then spending my afternoons live coding. And that was like my daily work, we would regularly have you know maybe. Somewhere between like five and a dozen contributors to each one of the projects that I was working on and I, I'd like to think that it was a pretty fair exchange that I would. I would give a shoutout to everybody that contributed in review their pool requests on on air just to let people know what they had done. So I kinda helped. These people who were volunteering their code, build up their portfolios and get some exposure on the Free Code Camp Channel, and then in turn they helped make my projects better. And and I learned so much because I couldn't merge

Computer Science Club Developer Facebook Himalayas Youtube Ohio Bo Corns Quincy
"himalayas" Discussed on Future Tense

Future Tense

05:43 min | 10 months ago

"himalayas" Discussed on Future Tense

"High. Are you going good? Now that we're back on a low altitude. Yes a month later ruth. Rejoins me in a pod booth in Melbourne to discuss some of the possible solutions for the Himalayas bike on Monday? Sort of topics. We were the top of Msa Kim but we got to the point where there was cloud cover and it was getting so late in the day that the military essentially followed us down and say get out. Yes you've had enough on closed that right off certain point you're only allowed to go up and down another yeah. We didn't get the chance to talk about possible. Solutions and what the different countries of the Himalayas could be doing and what they are doing supposed site in order to better handle the environment. How do the thing about the Himalaya is? It's very varied as you go across it from one valley to another the big paycheck. Perspectives can be problematic so you don't get consistency and how they managing these environments. Well they try and be consistent. But you can't be consistent if you make a rule that's consistent across the entire region Then one valley that's north facing will have lower temperatures and south facing. We'll have a woman temperature right and you don't have coordination between all these different people who are working in different areas so they're being ineffective that why so. What you need is local knowledge in order to be at a reactive very different local environments. What you've got is lodge states. Who Don't have local knowledge of the mountains running these place and treating it as Bodoland. As opposed to getting local indigenous knowledge and implement policies and approaches that will be gentler and more sustainable in the mountains fraud so the decisions being made in the room plies these decisions being made in the wrong places and why the Romans structures being made by states interested in security and militarization of local groups when you do have local groups you get a different perspective. Such as for example is is the International Center for Integrated Mountain Development. And so they're an interesting group because they are sponsored by international agencies have linked to the United Nations they sponsored by the governments of the region but they work between those governments and local groups and scientists. So it's it's actually a really good model. It works between the different spaces across international borders. So sounds like a good sort of model but it didn't need a bit of clout. So what's actually doing is acting as a transnational information supply. Say You know these people over here in western Tibet. They have figured out a way to adapt to climate change by Moving vegetables up the hill more right and then they take that idea and they take it down to Nepal against the consensus for the waters of the Western world is this is between those countries India China Bhutan etc and apoe Pakistan etc is quiet. This is your problem to solve and you need us but what could institutions like the UN? Be doing differently. Because they're giving a lot of funding for these green. I think even the general state of the world you have to recognize a couple of things first of all these nations claiming sovereignty over this region and according to international norms. Respect right That's the first thing and then I mean I'd say even above that her putting an inch trouble for saying this but even about that he would respect the local groups connection to the land And knowledge of those places in the generational wisdom that they have in in regards to how to leave in those spaces. What happens in the Himalaya doesn't stay in the Amalia anything that happens? There affects everybody downstream because half of humanity leaves downstream. It affects the world right so the the world needs to Think about the implications of things that they set up for other places being played out in the Himalaya. One of the biggest of these is the clean development mechanism which is being set up so that rich countries can pay for poor countries to develop clean energy. Mainly the way that it's being used and being twisted is particularly in the Himalayas. Is they funneled it all into hydropower projects? The thing is that's paying off clean energy against ecological destruction. Dan You have the more wreck. The rivers get the less. The ecosystems work the hydrological systems start working. The silt doesn't make it down to the farmers on the planes. It's almost as if there's like. An unintended consequence is a lot of people in the world. That don't Hydropower Power. So with everything going on in the. Himalayas they in a you. Are you worried about how it might be in the future? The thing is when you think about the Himalayas. You gotta think about time right. It's only existed for sixty million years youngest mountains on the planet. That's why they're so high but sixty million years is long enough so I think they. Malia is GONNA outlive humans. We're not doing to the mountains themselves. It's like how we can leaving in. How many or how we can live to continuously with those mountains. And the two things that we basically need is water and food is pretty basic. The Chinese use the expression the water tells of Asia. Most of the time you protect your watersheds you protect what you get water from. It's it's like basic human survival strategy. The only problem in the Himalayas it so big and if we wreck them. We're not going to have it right so we will disappear and the Himalaya will go on. Ruth Gamble from latrobe university with the message that if we want to keep using the Himalayas. Then it's our responsibility to take care of it but for US psych. No it's that's it this week for future tents and my thanks to Antony Fennell and Cairns of innovates the leading me keep the seat warm. I met Smith. You've been fantastic.

Himalayas Ruth Gamble United Nations Melbourne Kim Dan You International Center for Integ US fraud Antony Fennell Asia latrobe university Tibet Nepal Pakistan India China Bhutan Smith Malia
"himalayas" Discussed on Future Tense

Future Tense

04:52 min | 10 months ago

"himalayas" Discussed on Future Tense

"Don't think India China or Pakistan would tight kindly to the United Nations or the US or the European Union. Australia advocating for this. It needs to come from the people who they're the people who live near. The ice pack are the ones who know the most about it and how to manage it. A lot of them are concerned about the environment. We need to say some kind of structure come from the region from the states and the sort of local administrations in the region towards sustainable management of the back so environmental governance needs to incorporate indigenous voices and scientific expertise as well. And that's what you see in the Arctic Antarctic and the governance structures. My name is charisma. Liebscher I am an assistant. Professor Teaching the Department of Anthropology Sikkim University Lectures are the indigenous people believe in their imagined homeland as something which is now found in territories of Sikkim Darjeeling eastern Nepal and Bhutan. In two thousand and seven loved. Jazz started this indefinite hunger strike because the government of Sikkim was a lot to twenty six dams and off that six of them were supposed to be built in the lecture reserve. The reserve area is actually set. Aside for the lecture community not succumb when these dams were set up. It was the young people who had had their education in gun talk or Kolkata. Saving their homeland. The ancestor land and government still goes ahead so four dams people were very divided. Because if you are anti-dam meant you're anti securities so that's how the government frame-they're narrative as even the gun talk love just. Nobody actually initially spoke against the damn so it was just a handful of youth that was leading this nonviolent resistance movement. There were two guys who started off as protesters. This one is a football player and one's a filmmaker. They were in hunger strike until about sixty four days or so. They were not eating anything so they had worn dry almost incomes. They were fed with riles. Dupe this just water and for about sixty four days also no one from the government had even come in this whole process of about nine hundred days of indefinite strike. Four of them get scrapped. Fourth of Dan's fate. The rest of the dams are still there. These dams are inside. Dong and that has again caused a lot of flash floods a lot of landslides. It should have been a security issue but the government made it a lecture issue so the ones be dancer. Controversial with the damages caused on a local level and the power generated flows across the plains to the city's Ruth Gamble. The Himalayan rivers full very fast and hydropower works. On the idea that you can make water. Full fast and turbines the turbines make `electricity basic physics behind it. There is hydropower potential. Over the Himalaya Ole of the nation states in the region have not been really able to exploit it to its greatest extent. Because they didn't have the technology and they think they have the technology at the moment. But I would argue. They aren't have it. They don't have technology that sustainable or they're not using the technology. That's available sustainable. In some ways it's different levels of competition between the different states of the Himalaya about dam-building one of those is this idea of who can develop I and who can make things nicer for the people which doing without thinking about the consequences of China is super efficient damn building. They have massive dam-building industry and so they'd be cascading dams down the yellowstone river already in the building massive cascading infrastructure along the young see river and a Mekong upper reaches the Mekong which is affecting all of the downstream countries from the Indians. Probably better in that. They're not better if you know what I mean. They've struggled to build as many dams but one of the places in building. A lot of dams is Kim Bill. It doesn't work so I think they'll make it better by building others. If people from the region was there's lots of people can kick back to the rivers citizen incentive for locals to be involved in the building industry. Okay I feel like because this clouds coming up rather quickly. We should go down now because I don't know if ABC Radio National would like me fallen off the side of the mountain. Yeah we're at four thousand twenty meters of very. This is Matt Smith and you're listening to a future tense on. Abc.

government yellowstone river China Australia ABC Department of Anthropology Sik Sikkim Kolkata United Nations European Union US India Arctic Antarctic Pakistan Ruth Gamble Professor football Mekong Matt Smith Nepal
"himalayas" Discussed on Small Doses

Small Doses

22:09 min | 1 year ago

"himalayas" Discussed on Small Doses

"On Himalayas so you guys can all talk and we're going to figure out some fun stuff to do and you're GONNA get all that ad free it's Himalayas plus and you can go subscribe to never seen it on their this exciting if you go on and.

Himalayas
"himalayas" Discussed on The No Chill Podcast

The No Chill Podcast

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"himalayas" Discussed on The No Chill Podcast

"We got a lot of episodes coming in when they can't wait for the next episode of drop got just the place for you Himalayas APP as right be one of the first to listen to the no show podcast day early on Himalayas Himalayas a brand new podcast APP. We can find every single podcast you love in future favorites. If your podcast or a Fan Himalayas has your back are back you discover personally curated playlist and show your favorite podcasters like us some love with Himalayas tip jar. It's free it's the easiest to use in their adding cool new features every day. Go to the APP store Download Himalayas H. M. A. L. A. Y.. Don't forget to follow the show podcast when you get there and it keeps going down so but we're going up and before going on this episode of the no chill podcast we check back with Gill after his big three debut getting that first game behind you is a big step as we find out expectations were high but it comes down to preparation Russian and routine from there. It's building consistency and getting used to the strategy also with the barrage of free agency. We have to get into WHO's up WHO's down. After major movement with the warriors seeing major changes to the dynasty the West is absolutely wide open and for the bronze Lakers their thrones take over in the East Shakeups in Boston and Brooklyn give the sixers bucks and the defending champs some company. It's the no show podcast and you have a lot to get into. Stay tuned all summer wherever you may be remembered a check us out early on the Himalayas APP download wherever you get your podcast be sure to check out the no channel on Youtube Gil back..

Himalayas Himalayas Himalayas sixers Gill Boston H. M. A. L. Brooklyn
"himalayas" Discussed on Important, Not Important

Important, Not Important

03:13 min | 2 years ago

"himalayas" Discussed on Important, Not Important

"Of course, is that we're bleeding from thousand cuts, I think on a daily basis probably each one of us. We accept looks at the news and just wants to cry because it's like which issues should I feel pain about them. Fifty. But having said that ultimately, you know, being an American. I it it pains me to see what's happening with wilderness areas on what's happening in protected areas. And how those laws of being degraded or undermined or being turned around. Right. And so that's one issue that I feel really strong about and I hope that listeners do support God all the NGOs that work on it. I feel like if I name them I'll be here forever. But. Sure, of course, like WWF, obviously, Sierra Club major conservancy, right? And so on, but I also feel really strongly about protecting indigenous rights and protecting first nation rights, and in that sense. I'm not sure I can say that go to this one Gino there are several legal organizations that work on it. But I'm not sure I can see just go to one. But what I can say is when we are in America, no matter where we are. We have to recognize we are on first nations land, you know, we are on indigenous land, and the one thing we could do is learn about who was here first because the manage natural resources pretty darn well, much better. Let's start there with that recognition and with that respect. And then the second thing we do is we actually reach out and try and make reparations in any way, we can as indigenous person from the Himalayas this. You know, if obviously I feel really strongly about it. But also, he no we can say we are indigenous to the earth, and we Awan race in rea- one Keno one human species rate, but ultimately, we have really extracted knowledge from indigenous populations and treated them as if they are part of nature as if they are, you know, in some sense that that nameless. I don't know bucket of natural resources that we can draw and and basically use however, we like and throwback what we don't. And I think what's amazing to me is nature and indigenous cultures are so resilient and continue to give back, you know, the traditional ecological knowledge that exists in indigenous cultures that has actually. Been the basis of what is now what we think of as modern science, right? That just goes on unacknowledged. But also, our inability to to reach out and build partnerships with first nations, you know, I I have seen this again. And again, where scientists and NGOs basically will go so far and go no further because they are seen as activists or they are seen as rabble rousers. And I do think there is this very FM Merrill, guilt slash discomfort about having to enter conversations that people personally are not ready to have. And I think that does come back to the fact that conservation is primarily Caucasian, right? It's run by Caucasians. And so there is this real the white liberal guilt..

Sierra Club major conservancy Himalayas WWF Gino Merrill America
"himalayas" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

07:05 min | 2 years ago

"himalayas" Discussed on KTOK

"Gannon. Glad you're with us on this first Saturday of twenty nine Tino twenty nineteen. I remember being a kid thinking, oh, I'll be so old when it's two thousand. And that old. It's a privilege to be that old. So the planner of the week is evergreen coniferous. Wanna give me another clue? Okay. It is native to the Himalayas what the Himalayas to the Himalayas. And because I haven't get here. People brought over. No. You know, these got popular I I didn't know about them before I was a student. So I don't think they've been around for a really really long time. But they're beautiful and they're being used a lot lately. I think it's one of Julius favorites too. Is problem is probably my favorite evergreen for Oklahoma. Although no, actually magnolias my favorite ever, make noise. My favorite tree. That's because you're from the sat on the south. My grandmother had one grandma. That's right. Everybody mother has one. Yes. I have some little ones. I don't have the big southern gravy flow of the fort's underneath. Yes. All that. We'll keep some people don't like magnolias because those leave do not biodegrade. I mean, they'll be there forever. You actually you have to actually sweep them off because believes in my house, I just mow over and thrown back into the garden beds. But yeah, I mean the magnolia laser pretty hard. But because that's a negative, but it's a positive make res out of them because they don't break down. You could make magnolia leaf wreaths. Yes. Yes. Well, I need to give a shoutout to Ellen Graham because she says thank you for mentioning the amaranth. Yup. Globe amaranth? Yes. And how to dry it because she she gets hers from big, and then like stem do creative things with them. They're really really pretty and. It's it's shocking. How it holds a color? But I mean, I don't think that cupboard fade for about three years three years. Wow. Does it? Make you sneeze doesn't make me sneeze. I mean is it like a I don't think it's no Wildflower that would that would make love pollen. I'll think it's typically. Blamed for allergies. Right. Like like other stuff is. But to tell you the truth, I people think of flowers, methinks, allergies. But personally, I'm allergic to a lot more trees and grass pollen trees kill me. Yeah. Eight four zero one thousand star one thousand let's talk about zones because people are looking at the catalogs gosh. Happy know what zone. You are. All right. It may I got this question. Somebody on curious me on the crew. And she said what zone or we'd I'm like, you know, technically for seven a, but I've I can grow plants from zone eight if I find the micro-climate so pretty easy to grow things zone. Eight nine micro-climate. But this is the these zones are the USDA coldness, and the what the number refers to how what is the average coldest temperature that you get so zone. Seven would be from zero to ten degrees. So zone. A would be zero to five and seven B would be five to ten. And how did how did they come to make the main be versus just more numbers? They do have a of numbers because the numbers go from like one to twelve. Okay. So in the in the continental United States, I think the the the lowest are made the highest number would be like at the very tip of like, Florida and the keys, and I think that's that's a ten right? So Texas is mostly like, Dallas eight and still waters actually, seven six b. Yeah. And then you get five and six is like Kansas, which is crazy ten degree increments. Is what I understand. So we Oklahoma goes from six a sixty seven a seven b in an all those places is ten degrees different. Right. We used to laugh about the sunny side of the arbuckle. And how much warmer art war would be. Yes, the arbuckles aren't that tall, really know bits amazing? How much of a change that is? And when I went I went, I have a friend Marissa. He's living in Oregon. Now bet she lived in. Got the arbuckles are more mccosh. And I went there, and I was really shocked because a lot of the plants growing. There would be the same plants that were McAllister which is the same zone, right? So it's not so much about the arbuckles as it is about the longitude and latitude arbuckles help because our vehicles are. They will like break cold wind, and they will absorb Pete. Now, if you drive down there, you feel like you could reach out and touch those wind turbines. Go. It's really I had driven. I thirty five I guess a long long time, especially at night. We're coming back in those red lights are flashing thought. What in the world the UFO's taken over? I had the same reaction when I went when I drove it last time, I drove that way. And it was at night. And it was like, oh, oh they finally put lights on the mountains up for all these years. And it turns out it was all those wind turbines Jerry's okay? Eight four zero one thousand star one thousand we need one more clue for the plan to the week, Jamie. Alright. Native to the Himalayas. Some people say, yes, this is this is like an ID so ID tip when we were in school. And one of the ways that you can idea is the branches go out, and then at the at the very tips they arch upward woo branches out, which makes them really cute silhouette cars. Rush up. It makes it sort of like a decorative Christmas. Tree looks like. Yeah. Yeah. If you didn't. I bet your master gardener people will guess it now eight four zero one thousand star one thousand you're listening to the garden party, fifty five degrees in Oklahoma City. I'm good Falkiner Lippard the.

Himalayas arbuckle Oklahoma Tino USDA Gannon. Julius United States Ellen Graham Oklahoma City Kansas Oregon Texas Tree Florida Marissa McAllister Pete
"himalayas" Discussed on Myths, Legends, and Fairytales of India

Myths, Legends, and Fairytales of India

05:01 min | 2 years ago

"himalayas" Discussed on Myths, Legends, and Fairytales of India

"Once Amman a time in the lands near the Himalayas then lifted king who had many wives, but none of them could give him a child. Moaning and evening for eighteen yawns. He lent the file on the sacred auto and lead for the gift of children. Hainan e one d oh goddess, those from the flames. I am solving three. I am the daughter of the sun. I pleased with your plans. You will soon have a daughter. Within a your adult does Bonn in the king's vannice. It was the favorite Queen woolen him a child. He named Dr savage three after the goddess. Beauty and intelligence wore the Princess Salvi threes defining features, and she had is that show like the sun. So splendid was she that people thought she herself was a goddess. Yet when the time came for her to, Mattie, no man asked for her hand in manage. Her father told her. Wreak men tone away from radiance, like yours, go out and find a man worthy of you. Then I will arrange for the Matic. And so in the company of servants and counselors, Savi three traveled from lease to please. After many days, she came upon a homage by a river crossing. He are lived men and monks who had left the towns and cities for life of prayer and study solid, three entered the hall of worship and bowed to the eldest teacher as these spook a young man with shining eyes scheme in do the hall. He guided another man who was old and blind. Who is that young man ost Sabat three softly. This is prince sub him on set the d. Joel with a smiling. He guides his father, king whose realm was called God. It is not that something mom's need means son of truth for no man is richer in what you. When solving threes the tone home, she found her father city with the holy seal. None of. My daughter, my deal daughter. Sit the key. Have you found the man you wished to marry. Yes, Fargo. He's named sub feline. Nodded gas. Oh. Really says, no man could be more were the where do you must not marry him. What is going to happen? Boom, sub, theon minute by one yard from today. The king said. Do you heal my dear daughter shoes, a different man as your husband. Salween three trend wound, but said. I have chosen sub theme on, and I will not choose another. However, long or short is life. I wish to share it with him. Soon the king road with Savitri to arrange the marriage. Subbaraman was overjoyed to meet such a beautiful woman who would be is bright, but his father, the blind king ost sovereignty. Can you bear the hard life of the helmet 'age? Will you wear are simple robe and our code of matted ball. We eat only fruits and plans of the while..

Himalayas Hainan Princess Salvi Amman Bonn Savitri Mattie Dr savage Savi Subbaraman Joel Fargo one yard
"himalayas" Discussed on Bad Science

Bad Science

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"himalayas" Discussed on Bad Science

"Foot crossover episode but there seems to be a group of people that think that they were brought here by aliens wow i really love this i had not heard this and i think it's great solely for the purpose to affect our late eighties creature family movies and i the funny thing is like this this theory this the myth of bigfoot or big eight men is not unique to the united states it's all over the world there's them in australia there's the alley and australia you've got yeti of course in the himalayas the himalayas as some of the guys i'm ios i've seen the yati there too a lot about where you went to school or what kind of person you are behi pronounce out mountain range yeah himalayas yes molly is abominable snowman or abdominal snowman as i was for halloween once i just had a nice sweet apps but yeah there's all sorts of you know myths of surrounding this giant ape creature and of course you've got you know king kong in fact one of the reasons i became a primatology was recurring king kong nightmares so there's this idea this sort of obsession with recurring a still get them i still wait a minute are you the damsel in distress i usually get eaten every time oh yeah i very dark we'll usually my mom or my brother it's it's it's like my family so it's like family unit stuff but the first time i actually was able to knock down or be able to sort of get past this sort of fear of king kong was as by eight and i taught myself how to lucid dream and so i would hear what happens though would hear the footsteps and the distance and usually the heat come rip off the roof of my house and eat my family one by one and get to.

united states himalayas king kong australia
"himalayas" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

Mysterious Universe

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"himalayas" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

"And then disappears from szott what he'd like de material does this he does this we'd ninja roll backwards over the ledge when our into gets to what he was standing you can see a mile because it's a rookie plane and there's no on that you look down there gaza's how you it's fun to bulga but this vanished and as this happened he sold the the old woman the lady of the village is makes which he saw that she was watching all of this so he goes up to her and he's like did you see that man dressed in red walkman you know the the gods in radio pointing at the mountains she got you crazy so he eventually says look i know you've told me that there's no one up there and she also tells him by the way that if he goes up there there's bandits he's going to be dead he's an idiot he's crazy any basically says look lady i'm going up there she gives him some mumba spread and pack of bubble gum a yak yak any heads up the mountain now as he's up he makes it to the summit i can't eighteen the himalayas and he just hawks to the summit of about and it's like freezing wouldn't have any protective clothing the other thing that gets me immediately altitude sickness so no oxygen tank no oxygen he's just hawking to summits in the himalayas people die before they even reach some of the lowest levels of the summit it's not everest but it's still high it's still the he's just caught a plane from india to the himalayas and i just don't understand how he's expecting us to believe that he's i will do this anyway he's on the pick of the mountain on the wind he can heal a hawk in the distance and he thinks to himself that's a weird sounding hawk but eventually he realizes it's not a whole coal it's the mysterious flute.

gaza himalayas india
"himalayas" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

02:44 min | 3 years ago

"himalayas" Discussed on WEEI

"Himalayas with chefs graf food meantime other myself what are you doing your mom she die your dad that shannon jerry cassell for news yeah i did show before he'll cows just now there's some time summing asked where i can guy for charity don't do it i think i'm really nice twenty still do it tomorrow morning success as of now yes trillions do yes she is due she due november 18th gary till show me the pictures they're really that those are a little gary's filing at the gary junior what you my hammock song i know he did name of gary van and like why because i believe you should named your kids i don't believe in naming your kid after your kid i don't either what a jerry cower first act either i mean i have their own a guy i'm a guy i was fusing growing up every time my mother would yield jerry we both come running crepe should have your own identity i mean you could be used for middle name or something to avoid that but uh i don't my mother was named after her mother the old days he used to have women would like june uses well scrape nuts nuts looking to be able to do that and now finally have something to criticise when saudi arabia roads dr fools can be one thing one redeeming feature in saudi arabia rabii the guy made the argument against would you like us slow adult male drive a car no did you see that said it would you a child and i have a car like a 10yearold and olympic will be not why what do you think that women are better drivers have met her worse worse i agree with that is that sexist my wife is a driver than me anybody's better drive the yuma terrible driver i'm sorry universal amac gregg popovich america general as an entire gender money here but i mean let's be honest certain thing what sounds like you are women do will he asked me all things being equal who's a better who are better drivers i think miller how do you know that where the stats we only facts women are better at monte cleaning right right babies my my my mother my wife is better just what everything than.

shannon jerry cassell gary van saudi arabia gregg popovich miller car like yuma
"himalayas" Discussed on Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"himalayas" Discussed on Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

"Bliss and i lasted a month while it was not abiding it was abiding for him up and i would meditate for four hours and i just saw the only judge i would love to do that okay let's do it okay okay by seeing off to end the sitting in the himalayas month a month had a month of less i had a month of listen it continued when i might sheriffs were month of louis omegas okay so we can kill but i'd be so you don't have to kill of you own africa without so what does that feel like it feels like my having seen through the illusion of of my own ego in a vis dance in of the separatism this big big lie there's that word again this big lie that were disconnected and i i was doing it as much as anyone else was i was disconnected from the sense of god i was disconnected from my relationships disconnected in here everything is fragmented and so i was believing that that was what i was so how did you come to that through meditation i stepped away from all i had bigger un ashram where were you um i went i went hiking in the himalayas i did a bunch of exercises where i thought i remember hiking up into the mountains fourdays up noone around except for the yacht animal in the i'd kick asked village and i just remember thing i'm going to try to not talk about the future or anyone else only talk about now so there were exercises like that that i would try on i would meditate in in india every street corners an altar there's in offense i it's just i love india there you go i love yet if this grand invitation really yes and show was it the you know not a lotta people not everybody i know is going to have a chance to get to india but if you do go dow that you've been yes.

Bliss india africa four hours fourdays
"himalayas" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"himalayas" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"In addition to two dedicating people to schilling stuff india also did have its own sources of ice one with ice brought in from around the himalayas to further south in the subcontinent and the other was a novel way of manufacturing it people would cut pits into the ground and then fill the pits with straw and then place shallow earth and weird dishes onto them filled with a couple of inches of water as the water seeped through the earth and where vessels that acted as an evaporative cooler which left the water freeze even if the air temperature wasn't quite to the freezing point yet a some cool science at work right but this method didn't yield much ice and some of it was more like slush so the british population was incredibly here for a steady supply of tons of ice at a time the british population of calcutta raised money for ice houses under the understanding that some of the ice stored there would be reserved for medical use in years when the ice harvest was poor or ships were lost in transit the ice in india was strictly rationed and you had to have a doctor's note to get more the soon actually the first doctor's note that is an important role in the story clin william was trying to negotiate a license with the british government to sound the british colony's they thought that this idea was so farfetched that it must be a front for smuggling so he had to get a note for my doctor explaining how ice could be beneficial in in caribbean colonies.

india himalayas calcutta william british government schilling caribbean
"himalayas" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"himalayas" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"It's a bad very small piece of territory tabet 24 square miles in the himalayas a which was the subject of a treaty between imperial britain which at the time controlled neighboring seeking and itching dynasty signed in 1890s so this agreement is contested in that it appears to allot this very narrow bit of territory to both sides depending on which clues you read so to be fair each side has almost we know can argue that it has a legitimate claim that the strategic point of it is that it's next to a very narrow strip of corridor which is the only land strip between india and its northeastern states if you can imagine the map were looking at a very a patchwork of what used to be independent himalayan kingdoms you have two superpowers which are encroaching on each other and contesting for influence in these kingdoms bhutan was under indian influence is under indian influence it said essentially to baton cultural very small kingdom which has been very much under indian protection particularly after the chinese occupation of tibet in the fifties has baton expressed a preference can they decide his anyone care i know what that's a very good question part of being under the embrace of india is that bhutan is not really permitted to have darrak relations with any of the u n security council permanent members and the was a an earlier attempt by bhutan to have a foreign policy which india firmly disapproved of they're all voices however that say in this dispute the the the least dangerous option is to allow bhutan to have its own foreign policy since neither side at the moment seems able to back down but of course india's concern is that that is a step back from indian influence so it's likely to go in opposing that bhutan you may remember is this very smooth light you remind to size place which talks about gross national happiness draw than gdp.

himalayas india tibet bhutan foreign policy contesting 24 square miles