35 Burst results for "Himalayas"

Peter Daszak: The Man Behind Anthony Fauci

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:51 min | 2 months ago

Peter Daszak: The Man Behind Anthony Fauci

"We are governed by currently in this era of public health. Put that in quotes lockdowns and draconian drank draconian ism by a group of people that was largely unknown a couple of years ago but they have come to the forefront and have more power than any other people in the history of domestic american policy. One of those people is dr peter desk. Dr peter dasent is the villain behind the villain. Is the man behind foudy. Now many people ask the question. How is it that they spied on. Donald trump the same playbook that they used spy on donald trump. And go after lieutenant general. Michael flynn is precisely the same playbook that they use to launch this fraudulent campaign saying that the chinese corona virus came from the himalayas. It came from some bat soup. I'm reading from the daily mail dot com. It was revealed earlier last year. That peter desk a british scientists with longstanding links to the wuhan institute of variety had secretly orchestrated in landmark statement in the lancet in february two thousand twenty which attacked conspiracy theories suggesting the cove in one thousand nine does not have a natural origin. The now infamous letter signed by twenty-seven seven public health experts said they stood together to strongly condemn the theories that which they said quote do nothing but create fear rumours and prejudice. See that there. You have medical scientists telling us that it creates prejudice. They also lavished praise on chinese scientists. Who said they worked. Diligently and effectively to rapidly identified a pathogen behind this outbreak and share. Their results transparently the global health community. But now the lancet which is the top level of medical discourse and publication said near agreeing to publish an alternative commentary which discusses the possibility that laboratory research might have played a role in the emergence of the sars kobe to ouchi chinese corona virus. The scientists say quote. They need to evaluate all the hypotheses on a rational basis and away their likelihood based on facts evidence devoid speculation concerning potential and possible political impacts in february two thousand twenty. They even add that that statement in part of a silencing effect on the wider scientific debate. Yeah no kidding. Because peter dasent inserted themselves under orders from bouchier he is the pulp fiction equivalent of mr wolf.

Dr Peter Desk Dr Peter Dasent Foudy Donald Trump Peter Desk Wuhan Institute Of Variety Michael Flynn Peter Dasent Mr Wolf
"himalayas" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

Entrepreneur on FIRE

02:50 min | 2 months ago

"himalayas" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

"Lot of people have dreams like i have dreams. Kate has dreams. People listening to this podcast. They have dreams. But there's a difference between having dreams and actually feet on the grounds accomplishing dreams. So let's get specific like let's really talk this through. Because i think fire nation can maybe learn from the action that you're going to be taking about great ways. They can go forward accomplishing their dream. So how are you accomplishing your dream of building the next napa valley in the himalayas recognizing once again that had didn't start off as my dream to be involved. I just thought it would be super cool if they did it But then once. I once i became involved in realized i could be a piece of this and actually i think that bhutan is probably the last country in the world. That has the organic potential to grow. Amazing wine grapes. That doesn't already do it. Most places that can do it had been doing it for thousands of years and it was just to your point earlier. It's remote. And so you know marco polo and the roman army never got there with their handfuls grapes and so they ever planted in there. But what i'm doing is is we've taken a very collaborative approach with that. The country You know there's a. I don't know if you're familiar with with batons spent some time and and obviously the himalayas but they have a concept called gross domestic happiness instead of gross domestic product which is an amazing way to live. But they believe that. What's more important is the happiness of their citizens rather than any arbitrary economic success and so they have different pillars that that guide the gross domestic happiness for us. What we did is. We didn't approach the wine industry as like. Hey here's a way to make a few bucks it was. Here's a way that we think that this mashes extremely well with what you're trying to do with gross national happiness. And and then we went around and we got buy in from all of the various ministries of the government. You know that would have a say in this. The ministry of agriculture the ministry of economic affairs and so so on and so forth so we started with that then. Obviously you know. There's a enormous amount of logistics to try to get grapes up to the himalayas in vineyard plant. And but were. We've planted eight vineyard so far were up to about. We've got a hundred acres or so in total vineyard land but only about fifty acres are planted where we're still trying to experiment and see what's going to work there because no one knows it's never been done before and so you know back to your tactical what do you do. Well you do as much research as you can but eventually you just gotta grip it and rip it and and so we're doing that but we're doing it in a very mindful fail forward kind of way.

michael juergens napa valley Indio bhutan Michael
Building the Next Napa Valley In the HIMALAYAS With Wine Expert Michael Juergens

Entrepreneur on FIRE

02:50 min | 2 months ago

Building the Next Napa Valley In the HIMALAYAS With Wine Expert Michael Juergens

"Lot of people have dreams like i have dreams. Kate has dreams. People listening to this podcast. They have dreams. But there's a difference between having dreams and actually feet on the grounds accomplishing dreams. So let's get specific like let's really talk this through. Because i think fire nation can maybe learn from the action that you're going to be taking about great ways. They can go forward accomplishing their dream. So how are you accomplishing your dream of building the next napa valley in the himalayas recognizing once again that had didn't start off as my dream to be involved. I just thought it would be super cool if they did it But then once. I once i became involved in realized i could be a piece of this and actually i think that bhutan is probably the last country in the world. That has the organic potential to grow. Amazing wine grapes. That doesn't already do it. Most places that can do it had been doing it for thousands of years and it was just to your point earlier. It's remote. And so you know marco polo and the roman army never got there with their handfuls grapes and so they ever planted in there. But what i'm doing is is we've taken a very collaborative approach with that. The country You know there's a. I don't know if you're familiar with with batons spent some time and and obviously the himalayas but they have a concept called gross domestic happiness instead of gross domestic product which is an amazing way to live. But they believe that. What's more important is the happiness of their citizens rather than any arbitrary economic success and so they have different pillars that that guide the gross domestic happiness for us. What we did is. We didn't approach the wine industry as like. Hey here's a way to make a few bucks it was. Here's a way that we think that this mashes extremely well with what you're trying to do with gross national happiness. And and then we went around and we got buy in from all of the various ministries of the government. You know that would have a say in this. The ministry of agriculture the ministry of economic affairs and so so on and so forth so we started with that then. Obviously you know. There's a enormous amount of logistics to try to get grapes up to the himalayas in vineyard plant. And but were. We've planted eight vineyard so far were up to about. We've got a hundred acres or so in total vineyard land but only about fifty acres are planted where we're still trying to experiment and see what's going to work there because no one knows it's never been done before and so you know back to your tactical what do you do. Well you do as much research as you can but eventually you just gotta grip it and rip it and and so we're doing that but we're doing it in a very mindful fail forward kind of way.

Napa Valley Roman Army Kate Bhutan Marco Polo Ministry Of Agriculture The Mi Vineyard
"himalayas" Discussed on Everyday Talkies

Everyday Talkies

05:11 min | 3 months ago

"himalayas" Discussed on Everyday Talkies

"And since i'm working in the evening. I used to have all these calls. I used to take from the irs. Protect them from the heights. Like i was to get the calls going higher. Please do that. i get a place. I'm looking at river. I'm looking at the proceedings of the rt everything. And i take this call center. Yeah please do that this. The follow ups right a meal so think people can try. Try try that works to be honest radio music because while you mentioned names and we'll talk on can call and then you win something. I remember and but that you lived amongst himalayas. You learned about so many causes. You picked off the boxes that he wanted to live in delhi. And you did that. You didn't Bananas new so. I guess what next what next is a sword for you because not over known alon has not seen after So the is still on the list. It's belong back of my mind and got some sources. I got some people. So they're like okay. Let's go to not stand. Probably the northeast will happen next. There is an honorable mention of go up. Closing may but i i was offered actually was an offer like you can come and live in. Go off for elektra and seven point five like that's really cheaply chief everything included but that didn't happen actually because of lots down so i kind of miss that i that have happened like one month in goer who would not get so. The northeast is still on the plan. Let's see how that goes. And i don't know let's ask me another another two. Maybe i'll be somewhere. We can record a podcast with me here. We on the road probably will love to your attractions are dead but madison. But who want to paint state. We'll be balloonist thing. Getting jealous want to live amongst the in malaysia needs amongst these ideas and work or spend at art originated respect too much money and but they want to live all these experiences new places. I think it would be the right person. You can reach out to him. He can guide us lindan but needed. This is really music. Thank you for sharing with us. Your experiences and all the learnings bought in a specially just one pots where i love those sections said that you look scientists with different people you learned about the life and then another place learned about how nature human. We're living in a symbolic support. You do which happens. Things bannered but man. I think it's it's stored right that traveling's the best teacher meters wondering example. No thank you. Thank you for having me. Actually i love to share their experiences. And i hope i get more people going into the vocation partner justification because working is also.

alon irs delhi madison malaysia
"himalayas" Discussed on Everyday Talkies

Everyday Talkies

03:57 min | 3 months ago

"himalayas" Discussed on Everyday Talkies

"He was basically belong from the fashion and design clothes lines and everything and this spent most of his life in a bangalore and then he wanted to move back to lay out place or like a slow lifeless of the village so he bought a place and he started his own cafe again he but now like in recent times he got into the clothing. Business again So the government recently gave the permission to start making clothes from the marijuana leaves or the him basically him based clothing so he started making his own line. Here's some beautiful jackets. Designed the backpacks and everything from the him. Close and hemp is actually because it's organic and Past different protocols different texture of the fee to come to all other organic load. And i bought a jacket there. It's of all men. it's beautiful. I can't have any other words. Described that exciting these these wonderful people like himalayas. You just it's not chilling out per but you just start leaving the low-life life. I spent in casado v. When i was working saw in the morning who were three days at least spent three hours stating at all these a beautiful himalayan peaks racial devean and everything and just doing nothing just staring at then straight for two or three hours and i think that slow life. The sword travel gordon to me and i stayed that as i said i stayed there for a beat now. We are almost a month. I guess basically died on me combined with patiently ninety dollars and then concluded with this mistake. Yok assad we the place. I i was there in the mountains the last place than i thought. I didn't have any plan. But i always wanted to stay in delhi for few days. So add move back to delhi for like another week and stayed with different places at different experiences in. Leah's well beli. I don't know this in music. Gallup's halloween old deliver szekely. That's an interesting thing. i found personally. It is a vein or the of me like when one and a half five two from likely to go inside though billion find the place the source about a month and then actually decided to move to bananas for a week. I didn't have any plan but what was the hostile friend. Was there actually. Two of them were there and he wasn't yacht. Come to another show you around. And let's see what can be done. And i moved to banaras for a week and i was glad i i moved there because then again i was working to hold name like i was lucky. Staying in a place called copied. Hr so gamecube chart they have all this musicians and all the classical artists living their basic. It's the place where foundation of the bananas godina. So they have all the musicians living on the one side and all died is the thought the players and harmonium player living on the other side and his place was just down bradley so every day i was to go to somebody's place you start them. Can i listen the whatever you're singing or whatever you're doing and they were quite happy so every i used to have my with food people i. I don't know much of classical music. But i used to enjoy it. I used to ask the questions like what you're playing. Whatever it dozen. That was just beautiful expedience. every day. i used to get to loan something new. Do something and get back to my work. Since i was working i didn't take any holidays year. Investing thing i would like to mention. Maybe i don't know if this will create something but i cook many calls from the carbonaro. A many people know even the artists famous. So i used to go for the rt..

casado devean Yok assad bangalore delhi beli Gallup gordon Leah bradley
"himalayas" Discussed on Everyday Talkies

Everyday Talkies

03:22 min | 3 months ago

"himalayas" Discussed on Everyday Talkies

"The pinewood and the basically the awkward so pinewood is useless and the government in the name of the greek government planted basically the british government planted and our government Kept the tradition going. Instead of the old candid they've they planted the pinewood and is not useful in because it gets burdened very quickly and if us doubt on the heat would for cooking purposes are even for the generate heat. You'll get the cold and you can keep the calls to get the next morning started. Whatever you have. Iran have to start all over again so these are the small things i learned in between them. So i and because of the issues. I learned that if you use the data teakwood not define would. I wasn't for six seven days and from be part. Let's move to a place called casado. Casado is the place where the mystical experiences of the thing. I honestly well-known the basically be a type and it was a part of a movement as well I lived in hostile there for six days. Kasai debbie's through. It's basically eight kilometers from amora but it's based on a ridge so you have like the palley down on the board sides and from the one side of the valley you get to view almost seventy degree view of himalayas. See you you see. Reassure you see you can see dot and dot potently specially the so you get to see like a huge number of himalayan peaks from a single place. So that's a very beautiful place to go to one just to stay there. Basically you'd get your laptop this again. I went back to the more. The work vacation Five the hostile. I was living in. It's called hot hostile and They have a good hundred bs. Line fiber connection. And i was walking from the so every day. I wake up. Get by things done Let's go with the coffee and get on small tiger and at one o'clock or something. I used to start work. Because i work in the second shift so that's how it to start working and it turned out beautifully. Because you're looking at the himalayas. I used to make people jealous. Basically i think if you look at some of my voters people will like okay. This is not good. This is everyday sustained some places. And i used to get a better view of himalayas. I don't my laptop. There used to start work from started working from that okay. I'll start working from here. I start working from their post. They're very expedience than they're just great like i met some wonderful people There is a person called baba's cafe basically so that guy was baba basically back in the day and he met a gentleman woman somewhere in himalayas. So they got married. This became back to the cause side. They started the cafe. They have some of bakery products of european and indian beckley products. I don't remember all but they have other delicacies. You can have then. There is another guy. I met key was basically a retired fashion stylist baby. Either i remember..

greek government casado Casado Kasai debbie himalayan peaks british government Iran baba himalayas
"himalayas" Discussed on Everyday Talkies

Everyday Talkies

03:00 min | 3 months ago

"himalayas" Discussed on Everyday Talkies

"You're to look after them. That's how the structure is basically so. The interaction remains constant. Like take something from the jungles. And you take care of them as well so they give you something you give them the safety in return. That's how the interaction wasn't it was going until the government step in recent times they had issues with no go because of the government made the jungle these jungles into reserve for this by law. It's illegal to take anything from the jungles basically in many of these people depend on the jimbo's their livelihoods depend on the jim. Because you take the woods and everything. I understand that important as presenting niches. And i'm all for that but obviously you depending on the locality. Is you taken some items. Somebody's because you're that is how you go there right but the idea that culture came up with that you have to provide better than each and every day would you are planting more trees and that seems an awesome way because that way the forest will keep on growing. Keep up providing you so it doesn't by relationship but we're both benefit so the idea making it at his off hottest but not using any fits benefit and not growing more. Crops defeats the purpose right. This martin were getting something back and giving something but what for hundreds of years. That's the government. Is that in saying illegal to take something from jungles. And that's not good because when i was There is a place in one charity. Basically the valley they The hot water springs and the vendor and we were just bathing panel discussing with obey again interacting with people. Because that's what we like like. What are your stories what you're doing and many people were icon from village which is like who is your from here or journey from harare overnight. Run out hike from your because even a getting something. The livelihood is solve not so battle even getting the from the general are if we are not allowed to get the from the jungle. You are not a privileged enough to the word and get the hot water going basically so you can't are basically bathe in hot water. That's why people use this hot water springs much more than they should be using it. I i don't know. I'm something properly but like that's the striking irony i saw. I can't imagine like there is no hard worker. There is a problem of hot water because there are so many things in what you have to get the word from the fall it is the after budnick to get the water or you can just go to the hot water springs and get get started. Basically you'll live this. I'm sure that they in itself You learn all of these things. So how did you manage us because since you know. These accusations came in late. So obviously must be difficult for you. Also do conductor daily livelihood takes up many. Because i was doing on the edge like not exactly in the forest but i didn't face any issues but the people i was living with telling me about all the issues i learned about the different words as we're like.

jimbo jim harare martin budnick
"himalayas" Discussed on Everyday Talkies

Everyday Talkies

03:47 min | 3 months ago

"himalayas" Discussed on Everyday Talkies

"I've heard from unisource offense which i did. They went to resorts. Are they went into this small places nearby. And they've worked there. I have some events. Will you distracted from. And the book resort book a few days to work just to get out of the but again. Just working maybe. It's some kind of relaxation. I can understand that but the kind of life that you let in those days when you right between each other with people you were learning that you are enjoying as you were looking very quiet. This brings different concept of the location. So tell us when you reach was started. Beaks what happened up. There is a great historian between the the whole journey. So i was going to win saturday. i i was in a reality. When of my friend called me he wasn't gonna public mid very going said. I'm going to win sherry. There's like whereas it said it's two thousand kilometers away from cola. I haven't raised area is like tell me i'll come. I said bro. it's two thousand columbus of okay. He's like you. Tell me you just flat and i will come. I said okay. Gotcha plane from here to here. Get out from hawaii To any taxi guy who sorry long story short. He was there after two days. Well you have some very good friends who take impetuses. Take your biggest. His name was right now. He's selling in somewhere. I think he just left. Iran is going to australia basically. He's a sailor. So i think that was a bit normal for him. I don't know doing kind of journalists he reached and then we started planning different things in wounds saturday vision. Like what can we do so rag for a bit There is a place copper. The sixteen kilometers strike. Normally people do it in days. People tend to mundane visit in one. Bill you climb from twenty three hundred meters to thirty seven hundred meters. That's eight kilometers. And you just done back in the day we did that. We visited a place called mani again. A different story. Like i love story so i just went on with people. Interacting them There is a woman called me kaji. She's a starting point and she's been living there for thirty years and she works with the people rural empowerment women empowerment and. She started this journey as would have gone the homestay village so she got some ten to women from the religion she said why not create a homestay. This makes sense in the story because the sun will leave. Your home stays That's the model for the home. Stays where i stayed the bus. Odi homes are based on the martin. So i wanted to meet the person when i got to know that. This is the person so i went ahead and i had a great interaction with all the woman. I attempted attempted their grounds aleka. What they discuss. How discuss the giant ripping issues with a gunman interactions with basically. There is something one hundred i. I'm i think i'm not boring you with really saw yeah so that is basically a one. That's exclusive to that are considered that game. Back into effect into nineteen twenties of bend. The british government was the so They had different laws like nominee around has lost but they have different when. You're impacting with the jungles. So if you take something from this angle to give it back if you're using maybe a three from general to build your house or do something you have to get two or three smaller trees going. You have to plan them..

unisource kaji cola sherry columbus hawaii mani Iran aleka australia martin british government
"himalayas" Discussed on Everyday Talkies

Everyday Talkies

04:32 min | 3 months ago

"himalayas" Discussed on Everyday Talkies

"Because you under you basically you estimate distances when you are on the planes or when you're on highways through if he does yeah we can do it in one day so in the mountains. That's not possible. Spirits have like the thirty kilometers jernigan. One two maybe three hours you know. I couldn't make it boom saturday that day. I up to halfway that. There is a place called reality ben. Basically the place named after ben basically there is a u. shaped tone and there is another road that comes to meet from the ordering so the three roads meet. That's how the place called the band. Basically the yuban. That's how the quality. That's where i stayed for one night and There is a place near or show. Cory sorta could use the next big thing or it's an upcoming his station. In notre karnataka's our government is actively looking because when the toronto airport becomes completely operational. You can just go to petrograd and gabbard bus from there to joe. Corey and joe has beautiful of looks for the peaks and the biggest issue. Lend extra from there I travel to pull basically from Not burr taxi. And i think i started on eat o'clock and the distance of ordinary twenty kilometers. I reached in the evening. Basically four o'clock in the evening afternoon because in the winter's evenings happen at four o'clock and at five o'clock it's pitch black because of the mountains and who you up north. You are so interesting story. about muncie. i didn't lord this before i read that. There is a museum about this as well. People can visit tool. I'm seventy there was no road. Shady and the people were disconnected from india until seventy one wealth and these people that are basically so until six ward of these people used to deal with knee and event and most of the play.

Cory sorta ben jernigan gabbard joe karnataka Corey toronto muncie india
"himalayas" Discussed on Everyday Talkies

Everyday Talkies

05:35 min | 3 months ago

"himalayas" Discussed on Everyday Talkies

"No didn't your office have any problem that you are traveling on the road. Traveling and working didn't have any interest. Even i don't know It's actually need to know basis so people knew and and If somebody asked me. I repel them and if the information is not needed to that people in the work is getting the fine with so. I don't know how many how many people in my office. No i wasn't able vacation for three days. This podcast reaches out to them and they'll get to the kind of thing that they would have to. Hopefully i definitely hope so. This village a briefly about the interesting part about this is because of economic conditions are not so good the mountain. Because you can't grow anything you don't have many of these posters the meant most of your incomes by the reason Maybe most of the people in condo working in the army because of this so this organization cpa a dp day stack this project. The possibilities that i reject the first village they contacted three of the women in the village and they asked if you can spare a room knocked roomba said but allowing people to let into your home. They're you and they will live with you. They'll have you had experiences. And that's what i did. I actually had a great conversation with them. And i got lucky. Basically because when i was i didn't have anyone else living with them. I said i wanna live five days with each woman's family. So i'll get to know them. The culture better. I have different stories to tell the first one was a new ben. I i stayed with metaphor filed as she has a different story. she she was i think. V o six of pasta than she got married and like typical village story missed so she was afraid to converse with me or anything and basically notre kundi even face bit off language. They speak in the butter. The preferred language bindi again. Another expedience like not all the people speak in. After that she started opening up like her issues in the village as well and What other issues facing family got separated and that sort of stuff then. She used to cook different food. I started Loving the mottaki. Rotea and gillette was my favorite. She basically asked me. If you wanna have some fun stuff no. I said no. It's your food. Whatever you have it. I would have that for all the people and even if you go to tara and if you go to maui jim do us for punky techni. That's madonna's technique that the delicacies. There it's fight of their life. It's part of the culture. They eat it and you know disclaimer. It does not get you high. And that's a good disclaimer for everybody but still guys. Notre dame's mature a little. Gus but for the entire fifty two days. Did you stay in that same location visit. Mcdonald's and stayed with each identify. What's this how the case led to that not defense story so i stayed there for fifteen days..

roomba mottaki Rotea army gillette tara madonna jim Notre dame Gus Mcdonald
"himalayas" Discussed on Everyday Talkies

Everyday Talkies

05:52 min | 3 months ago

"himalayas" Discussed on Everyday Talkies

"Of everyday dot. I think foot the boston results have been listening to me. And puska talk about inability. Ucd's berkeley on confidence in st and started a new cds. Psychology where you got. I think some of the criminals psychologists and you'll hurt aboard from egypt. So with all of that i thought you know i didn't take a break and introduce you. Somebody whom you've already heard before if attention to all episodes but will be discussing mode about his life and what has been going on for the boss twenty because it's been very interesting dynamic jealous of what he's doing so good to know him. I have a low so for people who have forgotten who you are guys. Just go back with episode. Which i think released or don't early to see it on early. I don't i think. I think your bag because i think it's somewhere in delay that episode of the bum moon landing. I think that's above so that was a fifty four to the of man. Scores landing on celebrated back via had. I think i'm six seven guests. Mead was of them where of discusses.

puska Ucd's berkeley on confidence boston st egypt Mead
The History of Cannabis

Gastropod

02:12 min | 4 months ago

The History of Cannabis

"Turns out we have geology to thank for cannabis. At least for cannabis's psychoactive properties. The ancient ancestors of the cannabis plant started growing tens of millions of years ago around. What is now central asia like pakistan northern india nepal. And then something dramatic happened the entire subcontinent. That is now. India drifted north crashed into asia. The crumple zone is what we now call. The himalayas and the cannabis plants that were growing in that zone. Got really really high and the ones that were stuck down low the plains near the himalayas. Well they didn't get quite so high is difference is both topographical and literal the cannabis. The grew in the mountainous region started producing thc. Which or the uninitiated is the chemical in cannabis. That gets you high. We don't know for certain. Why the plant produces it. It appears serve kind of sunscreen. Chris duval is a professor at the university of new mexico and author of two books on the topic. The african roots of marijuana and cannabis kris told us that the cannabis that stayed down low and temperate plains. Those plans did not produce. thc they became. What we know is hemp source of cloth rope and disgusting. Health foods cannabis grew really easily and a lot of different environments especially ones. We disturbed to build settlements. It was literally a weed. That's why we call it weed. And so there was probably a lot of cannabis just growing in central and east asia both the high mountainous regions and the low parts and so a really longtime ago as long as maybe twelve thousand years ago people figured out ways to use it. It appears for both populations. Initially people used it for the seeds which are edible You know you can buy them in. Eat them nowadays. Emcees are often founded natural food stores. Today they're full of wonderful nutrients but they taste terrible. And before you all right in and tell me i'm wrong. not only to. Cynthia agree with me. The historical record does to kris told us that in china hemp seeds were at one point considered a staple food but it was kind of slowly replaced as people in that region in china. You know kind of domesticated and started using other plants more calmly so types of militans organ kind of displaced at

Chris Duval Asia India Nepal Himalayas Pakistan University Of New Mexico Kris East Asia Cynthia China
Aurora: Man Dead After Shooting at Police

KOA Programming

00:28 sec | 4 months ago

Aurora: Man Dead After Shooting at Police

"After an incident in which the man allegedly shot at police officers arrived at a home on South Jericho Street near Himalayas. Last night, A fight had occurred between two men there When police arrived, one man barricaded himself in the home's garage and fired shots at police. Nearby neighbors were evacuated and a shelter in place order given for those farther away. When it's watching entered the garage, they found the suspect dead. No officers were hurt. Flash flooding in

Himalayas
Analyst: Didi's IPO Was a Disaster. Here's Why

BTV Simulcast

02:10 min | 5 months ago

Analyst: Didi's IPO Was a Disaster. Here's Why

"Calls the DD IPO a disaster with more on that and what China's crackdown means for more tech companies in his Edith Yeung of Race Capital is a China expert. And we're so glad to have you here because Once again dd feeling the pain share price. I mean, now, like 11 bucks well below where the IPO price was. And the question marks surrounding who knew? And when? Why was it such a disaster in your own minds? I Is such a disaster because there's a lot of rumors, speculation that maybe the founder and CEO both ignore about the request and the change and make sure that they need to comply with the data security and compliance before they go public. Regardless and there's a lot. This costs a lot of action lawsuit going on now, and there's a lot of hatred for the founders and also for the for the president, and it's just really unfortunate to see what's going on. Which in my mind, I think you know, companies send of really chilling effect for many, many Chinese companies that with the goal to get listed in In the U. S recently, including companies like Kid Keep, and Himalayas recently wanted to go IPO in the U. S. I heard that both call it off because of what's going on with the D. Link Doc as well, postponing its IPO. The ramifications there that is this to your mind's eye, Edith. What China wants. Does it want to prevent make it harder, more difficult for companies to go to the capital source that is the United States? I think you know what's really, really interesting to me is that in the past, a lot of people say data is the new oil data now really is the most important things in terms of infrastructure. I think China the most. Some of the most important Internet company of China, including Alibaba, Baidu, Tencent music are all listed in the U. S. Says over 248. Companies from China is listening to US. U. S stock market is really, really important to China and Chinese company. But having

Edith Yeung Race Capital China U. Himalayas Edith United States Alibaba Tencent Baidu
Dozens dead and many missing after glacier collapse in India

PBS NewsHour

00:42 sec | 10 months ago

Dozens dead and many missing after glacier collapse in India

"Toll from a disaster in India's Himalayas rose to 26 today with 165 people missing. Glacier broke apart in the country's north on Sunday, sending a wall of water down a mountainside rescue teams work today to find more than three dozen workers trapped in a power plant tunnel. One man described the moment that the deluge hit That's a human eye witness something that looked like a scene from a Bollywood film about 50 to 100. People were running for their lives but could not be saved and they were engulfed by the river. Officials said. The potential causes of the disaster range from climate change to earthquakes

Himalayas India Bollywood Earthquakes
UN stands ready to support relief, in aftermath of deadly India flash floods

UN News

00:44 sec | 10 months ago

UN stands ready to support relief, in aftermath of deadly India flash floods

"Un secretary general antonio guitarist said that he's been deeply saddened at the loss of life inflicted by deadly flooding from glacier in the indian himalayas at the weekend at least fourteen people reportedly died and over one hundred and seventy missing after the tragedy in uttarakhand province on sunday which also fifteen people rescued. Initially the united nations stands ready to contribute to ongoing rescue and assistance efforts. Mister gutierrez said in a statement according to reports a torrent of water rock and debris from the glossy cascaded into communities living downstream also damaging damn blasio bursts and the flash floods that they cause are extremely destructive natural hazards the himalayan region particularly vulnerable to such disasters which have been made more likely by climate change and temperature rise

Antonio Guitarist UN Indian Himalayas Mister Gutierrez Uttarakhand Blasio Himalayan
140 are missing after glacier breaks in India's Himalayas

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:31 sec | 10 months ago

140 are missing after glacier breaks in India's Himalayas

"At least nine people are dead. 140 are missing in India after part of a glacier in the Himalayas broke off releasing a crush of water and debris that slammed into two hydro electric plants. Experts say the disaster today appears to be 2.2 global warming as cause video from India's northern states showed a muddy concrete glitch. Great flood waters tumbling through a valley surging into a damn breaking it into pieces with little resistance before roaring downstream. The disaster flooded the countryside with what looked like an ash colored

India Himalayas
Scores Are Feared Dead In India After Himalayan Glacier Breaks Away

Reveal

00:55 sec | 10 months ago

Scores Are Feared Dead In India After Himalayan Glacier Breaks Away

"Massive search and rescue operation is underway in northern India after part of a Himalayan mountain glacier broke off and triggered landslides and flooding. NPR's Lauren Frayer reports at least 125 people are missing. It started when part of the Nanda Davey Glacier broke off. Blasting through a hydro electric dam. Video recorded by witnesses shows an avalanche of mud, water and debris rushing through a ravine in India's Tera con state. Many of those missing are believed to be workers at that Damn, one local resident says. It happened so fast. There was no time to alert anyone. The military has been called in to help villages are being evacuated downstream. Prime Minister Narendra Modi tweeted that he's praying for everyone's safety. This is an area of the Himalayas, where environmental experts have cautioned against building such dams and

Himalayan Mountain Glacier Lauren Frayer Nanda Davey Glacier India NPR Prime Minister Narendra Modi Himalayas
"himalayas" Discussed on Camden Boyd's The Happiness Question

Camden Boyd's The Happiness Question

06:39 min | 10 months ago

"himalayas" Discussed on Camden Boyd's The Happiness Question

"What got you started into writing. I've been a writer all my life. When i was a teenager wrote bad poetry but i then wrote all sorts of different particles brin legal articles travel articles philosophical articles and theological articles in so eventually as mer as i was winding down from practicing law. I had enough time. That i could write my first book in. That first book was the one i mentioned bringing progress to paradise in. Then i've been able to put out about one book every year. Three other lex then. They're really a wide. Variety of topics have written three books about adventures in nepal written one book about adventures on islands. I've done some kayaking in group kayaking. Expeditions in pacific and caribbean islands. Senators look about that. I wrote a book about a guy who was the golden boy negotions indiana. He was the greatest athlete. Who just seemed perfect straight a student and who was drafted in the nba and ended up becoming a homeless drunk and happens to people who were put on pedestal as he rose at a young age and the the pressure that is and looked into other examples of famous people. I wrote a book to novels am working on my third novel right now but i wrote a humorous one about playing on a really lousy football team which is based on my experience playing on my college football team which people magazine called the worst team in college ball because we hadn't won a game in two years nother book. It's a legal thriller. Kind of a john grisham book based on a case i had which is a mystery her mystery and so wide variety of top but particular field of study. Then will i had a very general practice. I did a lot of litigation but in our for we just whatever our clients needed we try to handle their cases so just about any sort of normal type of legal work we did it. And why did you leave it. I think doing anything for thirty years is plenty long enough and i was thankfully financially successful enough. I could afford to quit working fulltime and then freed me up to spend time doing things. I'd rather do like travel and right. So what do you think we can do to be happier. I think we can concentrate more of our life energy on responding to the needs of other people in other words just being generous and finding ways to be helpful. So that the since. I've already talked about out. Giving of yourself increases your happiness quotient but i also think it's involved with community being involved in community having really good positive personal relationships and then i think a third component is taking care of yourself and i think that's essential to you should be physically fit. We need to exercise need to eat properly. in america. we have a terrible obesity problem. We have a terrible addiction. Problem for being the wealthiest nation in history of the world were really unhealthy and eat too much. It donate the right foods. It don't exercise enough. And i think that contributes to unhappiness so i would say it in a way if you have three pillars here so the stool with three legs. I would say what's important to have that stable foundation is to take care of yourself look will be healthy be involved in a community and be and giving thank you now jack. It's been great having you on the show. How can we find more viewable first of all. Thank you camden for having me on the show it's been nice talking to you. I have a website which is my full name so. www dot. jeffrey. J. e. f. f. r. e. y. Raise -ly are a s. l. wine that has links to all my books to the boss a foundation to connections with tracking in the himalayas. The company. i work with adventure. gio tracts. there's a link to their site on it so really. Many of the things we've talked about can be found on my website. Jeffrey raise dot com. Jeff we hope that you have a great. Thank your camden wish. You a good day to thanks. Jeff thank you take care bye bye. We hope you enjoyed this episode of happiness question. If you did please consider reviewing subscribing to our show on apple podcasts spotify or wherever you listen. The happiness question questions hosted researched written and recorded by camden. Boyd edited by camden void. Our theme song happier was both written and recorded by specially for the happiness question. Special thanks to today's guest jeff. Raise -ly for joining us on this episode. You can visit jeff at his website jeffrey. Raise -ly dot com. You can find more of us at the happiness question dot com and can get in touch with us at contact at the happiness question dot com. You'll have a fantastic day by..

jeff Jeff america thirty years john grisham first book third novel two years one book camden void camden pacific three books nepal today caribbean islands three pillars both spotify Boyd
"himalayas" Discussed on Camden Boyd's The Happiness Question

Camden Boyd's The Happiness Question

07:58 min | 10 months ago

"himalayas" Discussed on Camden Boyd's The Happiness Question

"College after my parents told me if i didn't they were going to kill me and i thought okay choices college death. I'll take college and ended up. Really loving academics. At a serious level went to the university of chicago than went to law. School eventually went to seminary so ended up spending a lot of time in the classroom. I'd even taught a few college classes practiced law for thirty years retired. And i suppose what's really brought us together is that i written ten books. Several of which are about what. I call philanthropy trekking in nepal himalayas grew so but is that exactly. What is philanthropy attracting. Yeah it it. Means a combination of fee lows. Which is greek for love and anthropologists philanthropy. Means love of humanity in. So i combine that with tracking. And so i've been to nepal fourteen times in started a foundation over there so i combined tracking with philanthropy led an organiz many groups of truckers and many of which have been involved with the mission of the foundation started which is called the possibility foundation. What exactly does the bassett village foundation do well. It's concentrated in a remote area of eastern nepal. Which is not on any of the popular trekking trails. A set of the first time. I was there which was in two thousand eight. My little group of truckers were only the second group of people from the outside world that had ever visited abilities which was an amazing experience because they were living basically the same way they had for the last five hundred years but anyway the foundation does is. I developed this relationship. Was that village. And we have helped to build a school hydroelectric system water system. Our most recent effort was little health clinic and we also help to rebuild the village which was partially destroyed from two major earthquakes. Back in twenty fifteen the same earthquakes that sarah safari was in when she was tracking mount everest in the last episode so our mission goal is to work with the local people to finance the projects that they would like to bring up their standard of living in terms of education sanitation healthcare those sorts of efforts but all of those projects have been requested by the village not suggested by us the outsiders the funders donors to the foundation members. And the reason for that is. I think it's very important for this. Kind of development work really to be primarily in controlled by the people at supposed to benefit so that we don't develop a kind of dependency mentality so the school the water system the electrical system the villagers build it themselves with their own hands and they own they run it and we just provide financial assistance and expertise. When it's ask for school cool. i was talking to somebody else as well. Today that happened to be working with foundations that affected the same area. About empowering nepali women roller. You should connect us. Sarah safari yeah. She's really cool. Where did you grow up. Like i said in the small town of gauchan. Indiana doesn't seem like there'd be much there in indiana as far as mountains. There are not. I had never climbed a mountain or done. Any sort of high-altitude tracking. Before the first time i went to nepal back in nineteen ninety five and my first experience there was directing the mount everest base camp trail. I ever was now. I didn't climate listen. I would highly suggest climbing mount everest as your first ever mountain. The death rates for mount everest is about one half percent while it doesn't seem like much that rate would be much higher for someone that has never done that before. So please choose something small and thank you for choosing the happiness. I just with the group hike the trail to get to the base camp. But that's quite an experience. The campus eighteen thousand feet high so a base camp is higher than any mountain in the continental united states. Ever would be pretty big mountain to climb for your first climate. Yeah in fact. I would say. Ninety percent of the people who attempt to climb. Mount everest have no business being there because it is such a challenge. Really i think. Only elite climbers should be attempting it and very interesting statistic for every ten people that attempt to climb wrist only one makes it and for every one hundred people who summit mount everest. One person dies. Statistic is has stood for many years. So it's it's dangerous. it's not it's not something that just anybody off the street onto attempt. So if you didn't have access to mountains in indiana how did you get into checking well. It's kind of an odd story. But when i turn forty by while i was manifesting midlife crisis symptoms and i was kind of ropy and just it was labeled song. Is that all there is it. Just i find myself questioning is this other is to lie if it there ought to be more. I suppose i wanted to grow up to be a famous rock star or statesmen instead of just a lawyer with a family in indianapolis which seems kind of silly. Because i really had a great life but anyway i came home from the office. One day my wife. Slapdown down this brochure in front of me and said why don't you go do this. And it was a brochure about tracking the mount everest base camp trail. So i did and then just kept going back so it's one of those things. It was just a complete. I mean completely surprising. Detour that my life my life took and it's all my wife's fall but she she just recognized. I needed to get out of my ordinary life. Do something completely different. And she was right. It was.

indianapolis Ninety percent indiana forty ten books thirty years eighteen thousand feet Today Indiana nepal two major earthquakes One person gauchan two thousand eastern nepal twenty fifteen second group Sarah safari first time first climate
"himalayas" Discussed on Camden Boyd's The Happiness Question

Camden Boyd's The Happiness Question

05:42 min | 10 months ago

"himalayas" Discussed on Camden Boyd's The Happiness Question

"A small town in northern indiana gauchan. Indiana and i was all set to go off to college when it was time and i ended up dropping out after two days and just didn't feel like that was what i really wanted to do. After having spent my whole long life of eighteen years in school so i went to work in a factory saved up some money and then mom reluctantly drove me to the edge of town. I stuck out my son and he tried to cross country. But i did end up going back to college after my parents told me if i didn't they were going to kill me and i thought okay choices college death. I'll take college and ended up. Really loving academics. At a serious level went to the university of chicago than went to law. School eventually went to seminary so ended up spending a lot of time in the classroom. I'd even taught a few college classes practiced law for thirty years retired. And i suppose what's really brought us together is that i written ten books. Several of which are about what. I call philanthropy trekking in nepal himalayas grew so but is that exactly. What is philanthropy attracting. Yeah it it. Means a combination of fee lows. Which is greek for love and anthropologists philanthropy. Means love of humanity in. So i combine that with tracking. And so i've been to nepal fourteen times in started a foundation over there so i combined tracking with philanthropy led an organiz many groups of truckers and many of which have been involved with the mission of the foundation started which is called the possibility foundation. What exactly does the bassett village foundation do well. It's concentrated in a remote area of eastern nepal. Which is not on any of the popular trekking trails. A set of the first time. I was there which was in two thousand eight. My little group of truckers were only the second group of people from the outside world that had ever visited abilities which was an amazing experience because they were living basically the same way they had for the last five hundred years but anyway the foundation does is. I developed this relationship. Was that village. And we have helped to build a school hydroelectric system water system. Our most recent effort was little health clinic and we also help to rebuild the village which was partially destroyed from two major earthquakes. Back in twenty fifteen the same earthquakes that sarah safari was in when she was tracking mount everest in the last episode so our mission goal is to work with the local people to finance the projects that they would like to bring up their standard of living in terms of education sanitation healthcare those sorts of efforts but all of those projects have been requested by the village not suggested by us the outsiders the funders donors to the foundation members. And the reason for that is. I think it's very important for this. Kind of development work really to be primarily in controlled by the people at supposed to benefit so that we don't develop a kind of dependency mentality so the school the water system the electrical system the villagers build it themselves with their own hands and they own they run it and we just provide financial assistance and expertise. When it's ask for school cool. i was talking to somebody else as well. Today that happened to be working with foundations that affected the same area. About empowering nepali women roller. You should connect us. Sarah safari yeah. She's really cool. Where did you grow up. Like i said in the small town of gauchan. Indiana doesn't seem like there'd be much there in indiana as far as mountains. There are not. I had never climbed a mountain or done. Any sort of high-altitude tracking. Before the first time i went to nepal back in nineteen ninety five and my first experience there was directing the mount everest base camp trail. I ever was now. I didn't climate listen. I would highly suggest climbing mount everest as your first ever mountain. The death rates for mount.

indiana Indiana ten books thirty years eighteen years Sarah safari northern indiana gauchan nepal two thousand two major earthquakes Today eastern nepal gauchan second group fourteen times first experience first time nepal himalayas twenty fifteen chicago
"himalayas" Discussed on Camden Boyd's The Happiness Question

Camden Boyd's The Happiness Question

05:39 min | 10 months ago

"himalayas" Discussed on Camden Boyd's The Happiness Question

"About jeff. Welcome to the show. Thank you camping. Glad to be here happy. Have you tell us a little bit more about yourself well. I grew up in a small town in northern indiana gauchan. Indiana and i was all set to go off to college when it was time and i ended up dropping out after two days and just didn't feel like that was what i really wanted to do. After having spent my whole long life of eighteen years in school so i went to work in a factory saved up some money and then mom reluctantly drove me to the edge of town. I stuck out my son and he tried to cross country. But i did end up going back to college after my parents told me if i didn't they were going to kill me and i thought okay choices college death. I'll take college and ended up. Really loving academics. At a serious level went to the university of chicago than went to law. School eventually went to seminary so ended up spending a lot of time in the classroom. I'd even taught a few college classes practiced law for thirty years retired. And i suppose what's really brought us together is that i written ten books. Several of which are about what. I call philanthropy trekking in nepal himalayas grew so but is that exactly. What is philanthropy attracting. Yeah it it. Means a combination of fee lows. Which is greek for love and anthropologists philanthropy. Means love of humanity in. So i combine that with tracking. And so i've been to nepal fourteen times in started a foundation over there so i combined tracking with philanthropy led an organiz many groups of truckers and many of which have been involved with the mission of the foundation started which is called the possibility foundation. What exactly does the bassett village foundation do well. It's concentrated in a remote area of eastern nepal. Which is not on any of the popular trekking trails. A set of the first time. I was there which was in two thousand eight. My little group of truckers were only the second group of people from the outside world that had ever visited abilities which was an amazing experience because they were living basically the same way they had for the last five hundred years but anyway the foundation does is. I developed this relationship. Was that village. And we have helped to build a school hydroelectric system water system. Our most recent effort was little health clinic and we also help to rebuild the village which was partially destroyed from two major earthquakes. Back in twenty fifteen the same earthquakes that sarah safari was in when she was tracking mount everest in the last episode so our mission goal is to work with the local people to finance the projects that they would like to bring up their standard of living in terms of education sanitation healthcare those sorts of efforts but all of those projects have been requested by the village not suggested by us the outsiders the funders donors to the foundation members. And the reason for that is. I think it's very important for this. Kind of development work really to be primarily in controlled by the people at supposed to benefit so that we don't develop a kind of dependency mentality so the school the water system the electrical system the villagers build it themselves with their own hands and they own they run it and we just provide financial assistance and expertise. When it's ask for school cool. i was talking to somebody else as well. Today that happened to be working with foundations that affected the same area. About empowering nepali women roller. You should connect us. Sarah safari yeah. She's really cool. Where did you grow up. Like i said in the small town of gauchan. Indiana doesn't seem like there'd be much there in indiana as far as mountains. There are not. I had never climbed a mountain or done. Any sort of high-altitude tracking. Before the first time i went to nepal back in nineteen ninety five and my first experience there was directing the mount everest base camp trail.

indiana Indiana ten books thirty years eighteen years Sarah safari northern indiana gauchan nepal two thousand two major earthquakes Today eastern nepal gauchan second group fourteen times first experience first time nepal himalayas twenty fifteen chicago
Back to the Himalayas with Jeff Rasley

Camden Boyd's The Happiness Question

05:39 min | 10 months ago

Back to the Himalayas with Jeff Rasley

"About jeff. Welcome to the show. Thank you camping. Glad to be here happy. Have you tell us a little bit more about yourself well. I grew up in a small town in northern indiana gauchan. Indiana and i was all set to go off to college when it was time and i ended up dropping out after two days and just didn't feel like that was what i really wanted to do. After having spent my whole long life of eighteen years in school so i went to work in a factory saved up some money and then mom reluctantly drove me to the edge of town. I stuck out my son and he tried to cross country. But i did end up going back to college after my parents told me if i didn't they were going to kill me and i thought okay choices college death. I'll take college and ended up. Really loving academics. At a serious level went to the university of chicago than went to law. School eventually went to seminary so ended up spending a lot of time in the classroom. I'd even taught a few college classes practiced law for thirty years retired. And i suppose what's really brought us together is that i written ten books. Several of which are about what. I call philanthropy trekking in nepal himalayas grew so but is that exactly. What is philanthropy attracting. Yeah it it. Means a combination of fee lows. Which is greek for love and anthropologists philanthropy. Means love of humanity in. So i combine that with tracking. And so i've been to nepal fourteen times in started a foundation over there so i combined tracking with philanthropy led an organiz many groups of truckers and many of which have been involved with the mission of the foundation started which is called the possibility foundation. What exactly does the bassett village foundation do well. It's concentrated in a remote area of eastern nepal. Which is not on any of the popular trekking trails. A set of the first time. I was there which was in two thousand eight. My little group of truckers were only the second group of people from the outside world that had ever visited abilities which was an amazing experience because they were living basically the same way they had for the last five hundred years but anyway the foundation does is. I developed this relationship. Was that village. And we have helped to build a school hydroelectric system water system. Our most recent effort was little health clinic and we also help to rebuild the village which was partially destroyed from two major earthquakes. Back in twenty fifteen the same earthquakes that sarah safari was in when she was tracking mount everest in the last episode so our mission goal is to work with the local people to finance the projects that they would like to bring up their standard of living in terms of education sanitation healthcare those sorts of efforts but all of those projects have been requested by the village not suggested by us the outsiders the funders donors to the foundation members. And the reason for that is. I think it's very important for this. Kind of development work really to be primarily in controlled by the people at supposed to benefit so that we don't develop a kind of dependency mentality so the school the water system the electrical system the villagers build it themselves with their own hands and they own they run it and we just provide financial assistance and expertise. When it's ask for school cool. i was talking to somebody else as well. Today that happened to be working with foundations that affected the same area. About empowering nepali women roller. You should connect us. Sarah safari yeah. She's really cool. Where did you grow up. Like i said in the small town of gauchan. Indiana doesn't seem like there'd be much there in indiana as far as mountains. There are not. I had never climbed a mountain or done. Any sort of high-altitude tracking. Before the first time i went to nepal back in nineteen ninety five and my first experience there was directing the mount everest base camp trail.

Nepal Bassett Village Foundation University Of Chicago Indiana Sarah Safari Himalayas Jeff Gauchan Mount Everest Base Camp Trail
"himalayas" Discussed on Camden Boyd's The Happiness Question

Camden Boyd's The Happiness Question

01:53 min | 10 months ago

"himalayas" Discussed on Camden Boyd's The Happiness Question

Nepali team first to top world's 2nd tallest peak in winter

America First

00:37 sec | 11 months ago

Nepali team first to top world's 2nd tallest peak in winter

"Paul that comes first to top the world's second tallest peak and winner. Pakistan's Alpine club, says the team of 10 Nepalese climbers made history scaling the world's second highest peak Que Tu in the winter season, reaching the summit late Saturday afternoon. Renowned mountain stands at 28,251 ft and has never been scaled in the winter before where winds can blow more than 125 miles an hour and temperatures can drop to minus 76 F. Que Tu is located in Pakistan's Cara Coram range along the Chinese border that leads into the Himalayas.

Alpine Club Pakistan Paul Cara Coram Himalayas
Red Knots (?!) and Science with Spinach

Earth Rangers

05:23 min | 1 year ago

Red Knots (?!) and Science with Spinach

"Hello and welcome to earth rangers podcast. I'm ruth ranger. Emma and i hope you scurry ready because today we're going to learn all about not free a hearty yes. I am a few different pieces of rope here. And i've been practicing all morning. Oh hands on deck scalawags. Are you ready to learn about knots. Old is gonna get your shipshape. The no time. Shogo nods radna acknowledgments. Big nods overhand. Handmaid's the anchor hitched. The these not. Oh that kind of red. Not oh well you know that makes a lot more sense as an episode topic. Do i know what a red nod is Ya i certainly do. I mean the real question is do our listeners. Know what a red not is. It's a type of bird right right. Hey let's see what else you know about this creature. It's time to false or fall off. Okay earth rangers. Here's one for the experts out there. Sure false red knots born in brazil and they are so into their habitat that they never fly further away than five kilometers from their nests. What do you think Well if you said fulls you're right. The red not in fact born in the arctic this colorful hand piper is a striking bird with terra. Cotta orange gold and black feathers. Retinoid start their lives. Eggs and nests building. Rocky creeks old mother and father. Birds incubate their eggs for about three weeks and after the chicks are able to fly. The family moves to lake shores and meadows to eat a lot bigger a really long trip ahead of them and they need to fill up before they leave the prefer seafood. Mussels clams shrimp ben horseshoe. Crab legs are all favorites. After they're all fueled up right not out on an long journey set up to fifteen thousand kilometer. These spend the winter in south america before heading back to their northern home. Now right not. Aren't the only birds that migrate a really long way. In fact there are lots of birds that can make a terrifically long trip. You i think this calls for a top five countdown top five migrating birds number five. Have you ever wanted to fly. High like really high. If that sounds like your idea of good time you'd love being a bar headed goose. They're the highest flying migratory birds. How can they find over eight kilometers in the air. These birds are native to asia and have even been known to fly over the himalayas number. Four we could hardly have a top five list with that. Our old friend the red nine when the red not goes on. Its epic flight. It needs to stop over to rest. And where do they stop. A one of the places is here to san antonio a protected area in argentina earth rangers is working with the international conservation fund of canada and the argentinian researcher patricia gonzalez to keep this area safe from human interference number. Three have you ever heard of a northern we talk. It's a strange name for a tiny songbird with a really cool ability. These little songbirds are only about sixteen centimeters long and only way about twenty five gramps but despite their diminutive size they can fly for over fourteen thousand kilometers each way between the arctic and africa huckabee long distance traveler number two. Just because they can't fly doesn't mean they don't travel heavily. Penguins travel all around and up to thirteen thousand kilometers. These adorable penguins. Follow the sun north from the ross sea and stick close to the edge of the ice of expanse so the easy access to their favorite fishing foods and finally number one. Okay what if i told you that. There's a bird that makes eighty thousand kilometer trip every single year meet. The arctic tern heard the bird with the world's longest migration all the way from the arctic to the antibiotic and back again an arctic tern. Does this trip every year. For thirty years they will have flown equivalent of three trips to the moon and back

Ruth Ranger Shogo Nods Radna Rocky Creeks Arctic Lake Shores Emma International Conservation Fun Patricia Gonzalez Brazil South America Asia San Antonio Argentina
Should I get interns to work for my startup?

The $100 MBA Show

08:45 min | 1 year ago

Should I get interns to work for my startup?

"Interns are often college grads or even college students looking to get experience so they can put in their resumes and put it in there and be able to get a job eventually sometimes interns do so well at the company they are interning at and they actually got a job there so on the surface a lot of people think. Oh this is a great idea. Because i don't have to pay them or maybe have to pay them very little. And i get people that are hungry. I give people energetic that. Come here and helped my business grow. But many people forget many different aspects of bringing on interns to your company first of all the reason why is because they have no experience in and sometimes they don't have many skills so you're not getting the best talent to work on your company okay. So you're actually getting somebody who's learning on the job now. Some interns will come with skills. They learned Before they went to university or maybe it's their interests maybe they like web development and this is something that they do on the side and they can in turn as a web developer for your company but even somebody like that is not gonna be skill wise and experience wise as good as somebody who you would hire an pay them a salary because they will get what they deserve and they'll give you deserve that salary right so just keep that in mind. Okay so my personal opinion when it comes to hiring interns that the nature of an intern is. They're looking for a brief stint somewhere to learn. some skills gained some experiences in my experience and from the experience of the different Entrepreneurs i've coached and helped along the way a small fraction of actually stay in becoming police in the company. They're looking usually for six months to year of experience and in my experience it takes about three months to ramp anybody. Noon your business to Get them used to your culture to train them so they know exactly what to do and how to do and how to fulfil their job role and it takes even longer for interns because hey they're not coming with any experience or they're not coming With any job experience in your realm. So they're gonna take a little bit more time to ramp up so if they're around for six months experience You really only gonna get three solid months outta them before they move on and you invested a lot of time effort. Somebody's got train them. Somebody's got to show them how to do the job. The show them had a perform well and then they leave. One of the biggest costs and business is turnover employee turnover. You want to keep your as long as possible because it's costly to find new talent to hire new talent and train them. You want to keep people for at least two to three years to get the most value out of him. Anything over that is gravy and it'd be awesome. You can keep them for longer but anything under two years really. You're losing a lot of money and time and effort in training hiring and all that stuff. So that's even more true with an intern now. I know that you're not paying them paying them very little. But again the expectation that you have in terms of put from an intern is much lower from the new employee. That has you know. Keep your eyes and it's going to be held accountable and all that kind of stuff now. Cows in the tech space. You need to grow you need to sprint unique to really Get moving fast in your business and get your product out there so you can't be wasting time on turnover on entrance leaving on people coming and going in and does affect the culture when you have new. Employees renew teammates every so often you wanna have a core group of people that are in the team and of course people were leaving. Come and go. But not the ray of an intern now. There is an exception. If you're going to be doing something that's more of an investment in your business They you can keep after they leave. Let's say they are Documenting standing operating procedures or. Sap's how do you do everything in your business. The documenting your systems in your play books so that when you do make a higher that can just pick up the playbook and know exactly how to fulfil every task. Another example is content there writing content like blog posts. If they're good writers than those posts will stand the test of time. And we'll serve your business while after they leave but in my experience if they are a good writer if they are good writer and the running amazing blog posts they can get paid for it. They freelance and they will in turn says a bit of a difficult situation. Of course you find great talented people and train them and then leads me to my next point if you wanna take on interns and you found great talent. That is willing to intern for a company then stipulate that they have to be an intern for a period of time. I would say at least twelve months now. In my opinion you should compensate them in some way. Even if it's minimum wage but compensation matters. Okay giving them money for their time now that you invested a year. Also stipulate that you'll they'll have an evaluation at the end of the year and they'll be offered a position if they pass the evaluation this gives them some sort of upward. Mobility gives them something to shoot for. Okay i like working here. I like the work. I'm doing here. I'm learning a lot. I wonder how much i can learn if i was a full time employee. So if you have a path for them it makes it a whole lot easier for you to sell the idea of graduating into becoming an employee and hey starting your career at this company get a few years under bill and then move on to greener pastures. I got more on today's guinea wednesday's episode before that let me give to today sponsor support for today show comes from start your first online business might all new ten part audio course on himalayan learning this is of course is going to get you from one. That's gonna get you from thinking about your business to actually launching that business getting it out of your head and into the real world. Recover things like validating your idea creating your first product pricing it marketing finance in your business even creating your business website and more check it out and himalayas deep calm. Nba and use code nba to get a fourteen day free trial again. That's himalayas dot com slash. Nba promo code nba updates cuny wednesdays question from cow. Should i hire interns for my startup. This was a tough one for me to deliver. But it's the truth if you're in the tech space cal. You need to grow fast quick. You can't afford having to train. And retrain retrain intern so if you need content if any procedures lock them into year with You know A chance to become a fulltime police. They pass evaluation. If that's not an option. Just keep moving forward. Do not worry about hiring interns. See if you can hire one experienced player on your team won. Experienced player can equal five inexperienced people or ten interns. I'm serious. I've had in police on my taint team. I have employees on my team that are gold. They are worth You know five or six hires. And they're expensive okay so You go you pay for but sometimes you actually save money by hiring somebody. That's worth their value again. This is my personal opinion. This is my personal advice. From my own experiences experience of the people i've coached the build their own businesses and and the stories i've seen with the soon as i've seen at one hundred dollars i wish you all the best cow with your startup goal. Get them that wraps up. Today's episode. thank you so much for listening. If you have a question you want ask is just email me over at omar at one zero zero mba dot net. And i will make sure answer right here on kuni wednesday. Don't forget a hit. That subscribe gun on whatever app. You used to listen to podcasts. Spotify or situa radio for apple podcasts. Were on every platform. It's absolutely free to hit. Subscribe to do that right now before we go. I want to leave you with this. When the stakes are low the result is not something really special. This just in general life. If i'm in a position or a job or whatever where you know it's not a big deal fired. It's not a big deal. If i lose his job. You know. there's less pressure for me to perform. This is just human nature okay. Not everybody's going act this way but in general people will okay if you wanna use a rule of thumb but if the stakes are high and they really wanna stay there and they really think this is a good position. They're getting paid in there They don't wanna lose this job. They're going to have incentive to keep it. It's really hard to fight human nature so keep that in. Mind when you're making decisions like this.

NBA Sprint Himalayan Guinea Himalayas Apple
Trump plans to withdraw thousands of troops from Iraq, Afghanistan before leaving office

Up First

03:16 min | 1 year ago

Trump plans to withdraw thousands of troops from Iraq, Afghanistan before leaving office

"American troops are coming home. President trump said so yesterday. He promised to withdraw. Us troops from afghanistan as well as a rock and himalaya in the next couple of months. That is all the time that he has left. The outgoing president leaves office in exactly sixty four days. Noon january twentieth. Two thousand twenty one under his orders the troop presence in iraq would drop a little and in afghanistan by lot from forty five hundred twenty five hundred now. Trump is often promised to bring troops home but his move here drew criticism from a powerful ally. Senate majority leader mitch. Mcconnell are retreat would embolden the taliban especially the deadly connie wing and risked plunging afghan women and girls back into what they experience back in the nineteen ninety s. What had weakened and scattered al-qaeda a big do propaganda victory and renewed safe haven for plotting attacks against america. So how does all this look from the region. Npr's hadeed is based in islamabad. She's on the line. good morning. good morning so the. Us had already pledged to withdraw its forces from afghanistan by this spring. This came a promise under an agreement. It signed with the taliban course. The afghan government was not party to that agreement but what are afghan government officials saying now about this accelerated. Us time line for withdrawal. Well actually that we're expecting it because it's something fat. President trump has long signalled most recently last week when he pointed a senior adviser to the pentagon who calls for an immediate withdrawal at this point. They're actually eyeing the military equipment that american forces might leave behind As they rush to the exit. But there's also a sense of anger. I spoke to a senior official javard face all and he told me this poems. Do not want the to stay here. Whatever we one we draw to be responsible one and we don't expect our ally to burn. The house wants it leaves. They don't expect their ally to burn down the house as they leave. They worried a hasty withdrawal emboldened the taliban because it would signal to them that they don't have to abide by commitments for foreign forces to go echoing. Quite what mitch. Mcconnell said well is the talamante doing that are the upholding the commitments they made when it signed this agreement with the trump administration yes annoy the taliban are abiding by two key commitments. They're not attacking foreign forces and they are engaging in peace talks with the afghan government even though they've been at a stalemate since they begun but it's understood that the taliban also promised to reduce their violence but in reality they've stepped up their attacks against security forces across the country and they believed to be behind a series of unclear murders. Most recently they may have killed an afghan journalist in helmand. What are ordinary afghans citizens telling you educated afghans appear to be worried especially women they worry withdrawal will allow the taliban to seize power and that their rights might be swept away others. Tie it like a nurse. i spoke to a merger. Larry ellison's the fighting getting worse. So maybe it doesn't matter if they stay ago.

Afghan Government Taliban Afghanistan Hadeed Donald Trump America Mcconnell Mitch Javard Connie Islamabad Qaeda NPR Iraq Senate Trump Administration AL Pentagon
The Dalai Lama Offers A Warning On Climate Change

Environment: NPR

04:02 min | 1 year ago

The Dalai Lama Offers A Warning On Climate Change

"Tibet's spiritual leader. The dalai lama is eighty five and he wants to warn us about something. I talked to him recently. He was at his home in dharamsala india wearing his red and orange robes sitting in front of the big tv screen so across continents. We could see each other. Hello your holiness. our you thank you. Thank you for being here this. He's just written a book about climate. Change called our only home. Well 'cause this planet is only a home now information. I hurt on moon. Also some water but try to settle their impossible so doubtful. Now we have to take care of our own planet. Logical trees are sacred in buddhism. They sheltered buddha his birth his enlightenment and his death and the mountains the himalayas whose backdrop the dalai lama lives there. Glaciers are melting and billions of people in china and india depend on them for water. I asked him what's one step any ordinary person could take and he said we eat a lot of meat. Not only question of the censo- low these animal itself. You civility bent for ecology so invest too. Much eat meat. Of course we also a nonvege- stadion so the be pham. Ideally feels very uncomfortable. Laws double and only four foot. We should promote vegetarians as much as two he can. He doesn't see the world in terms of countries and he wishes we wouldn't either. Our mother earth he says is teaching us a lesson in universal responsibility and so he'd probably be pleased that president elect joe biden has promised to re enter the paris climate accord three years ago. When the trump administration withdrew from that agreement. The dalai lama was stunned. When i heard that if you really said you see i did some mistake. Designed from the beginning then the president of america. He mentioned a miracle. I i feel disagreement. America the leading nation of free world so america if she should tink not just america first america have greater potentially making contribution for happier world. Some of this might seem so urgent because he's not young anymore. He's aware of this. It's been on his mind in buddhist tradition. He would pick the next doll. I lama and then reincarnate into that body but china also wants to pick the leader. China of course occupies tibet and so he wonders whether a dalai lama is necessary at the time of death to buddhist leaders should have is a serious discussion. Better though is you should continue or not if country you then individual tradition dissimilarity is some leader not why nation but the airedale one. Good scholar could practitioner. Is it become the head. So that's not wind business. My business could take care myself. Yes indeed your holiness. Thank you for taking the time to do this. I really appreciate it. thank you take. Good care bye-bye tibet spiritual leader. The dalai lama speaking to us from dharamsala

Dalai Lama Censo Dharamsala India America Trump Administration Tibet Himalayas China Joe Biden Paris
Kingship Belongs to the Lord (Psalm 22:27-28)

Pray the Word with David Platt

05:20 min | 1 year ago

Kingship Belongs to the Lord (Psalm 22:27-28)

"So we're GONNA. Start. Today with Psalm Twenty Two verses twenty seven and twenty eight. This is the word of God. All the ends of the Earth shall remember and turn to the Lord. And all the families of the nation's shall worship before you. For kingship belongs to the Lord and he rules over the nations. I remember vividly reading this chapter, these verses. On. The. Side of a mountain in the Himalayas. In the middle of unreached people's. Attention. Groups in a nation where there is so little access to the Gospel. And getting to verse twenty seven and just. Falling on my face on that mountainside as we see this promise, all the ends of the Earth shall remember and turn it a Lord and all the families of the nation. So worship for you to pray for all nations. To know Jesus as. And then to read Verse Twenty Eight for Kingship. So here's the declaration kingship belongs to the Lord and he rules over the nations. So as we think about a presidential election electing someone to lead a country, it is so good to know that. The ultimate? King. The sovereign ruler is not up for election. He rains today, he will reign a month from now he will reign a year from now and ten trillion years from now he'll still be raining and he is good. He is the Lord. He is perfect. His holy he is just he is righteous. He is loving. He is a merciful. So. Let this song lead us to praise God as the king over. Any nation wherein and specifically for those of us who are living United States kingship belongs to the Lord God praise you as King Overall Genesis, we praise you as Lord Overall, all authority in Heaven and on Earth belongs to you. And one day every knee will bow and every tongue confess that you are lord to the glory of God, the Father we exalt you are king, Our Lord, our ruler, the one who reigns over our lives, and this is where our hope is. Oh God. We put all our hope in you all our trust in you know who's going to get elected. We don't put our hope trust and who's going to get elected as the leader of our country. We trust in you as the leader of all things not just our country, the leader of our lives. Later of our families, the leader of the Church leader of the nation's we praise you and re you that you are the leader we need. New perfectly just. You're perfectly righteous. You Are Holy Holy Holy. You know world country of very imperfect. Candidates and imperfect leaders. There is no one compares with you Oh God. There is no one who compares with you Jesus in we are so thankful we find such refuge in your rain and your rule over all things we praise you that kingship belongs to you and you rule over the nation's you rule our nation gallery pray. I pray that you would bring many people. To, know you as king even during these days, you'd help us to proclaim you as king to have far more conversations during these days about you as the king we need. Then even the conversations we're having about who might vote for. God We. Pray the help us to point to you as king. We pray for that in the United. States we pray for that among all nations go re pray for the Aroma Gary People in Kenya. This molly people group about a million people. In Kenya got so few of them just a handful of them who may be followers Jesus God we pray that they would come to know Jesus is king. You would cause the gospel to spread to them. Oh God we praise you. GotTa help is to Make Your glory as king known in our nation in all nations as we pray like you taught us to pray Jesus our Father in heaven. Hallowed, be your name. Your kingdom come your will be done on earth as it is in heaven we praise you king. Over our nation and Omniscience in Jesus name we pray.

Jesus Kenya Himalayas United States
Dr. Abigail Marsh on changing your relationship with fear

10% Happier with Dan Harris

07:13 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Abigail Marsh on changing your relationship with fear

"Hey guys. There is sadly no shortage of fear these days fear of the virus. Climate change racial injustice, political ties. I could go on, but here's the question. Can you change the way your brain reacts to fear. Moreover can you train courage Abigail Marsh says, yes overcoming fear is a trainable skill. She's an associate professor in the Department of Psychology and the interdisciplinary neuroscience program at Georgetown University. She's also the author of the book fear factor how one emotion connects altruistic. Paths and everyone in between. This is in my opinion, a classic T. P. H. podcast conversation and Ace scientist whose area of expertise illuminates key aspects of the human condition I really enjoyed this. Hope you will to go. Abigail Marsh. Nice to meet you. Thanks for doing this. Absolutely it's a pleasure. So how did you get interested in fear? That's a great question. So my initial interest in social psychology, which is the discipline I have my degree in was because I'm interested in facial expressions and nonverbal communication in general, but how people communicate with one another And a little research had been done over the years about why facial expressions look the way they do. And I find that a particular interesting topic because they do look remarkably consistent across cultures, which just said there's something evolved and at least partly eight about them. And that's really amazing. Right I mean. It's one of the key piece of evidence that broke the back of radical behaviorisms decades ago. That emotional expressions are interpreted across cultures. It must be really important of that's true. and. Some people had spent a lot of time looking at. The reason that angry expressions look a particular way or happy expressions but nobody touched fear fear such fundamental emotion. It seems really important to know why we would communicate to each other and how people interpret it in other people. And it really was a flash bulb moment it was based on the combination of courses I was taking as Undergrad where it occurred to me that the reason that fearful expressions look the way they do is to elicit support and care from people who see them because they mimic the appearance of infantile face. Big Is. High Big is the very surrounded appearance lower face and they make you look infantile and that. Particular connection can help us understand so much about our nature as a social species what emotions are for what kinds of social behavior we can expect from other people around us that one observation really has a lot of implications. So I was kind of expecting you to say that you had some lifelong struggle with fear. But in fact, it sounds more like a academic interests well. I mean, you know the saying research is research I'm sure I mean I wouldn't have had lifelong struggle with fear but I would sam probably above average in terms of capacity for anxiety and I've certainly had experiences where I was frightened for my life. and. Had the good fortune to be helped by other people around me and so I'm one hundred percent certain that that made me interested in this topic to begin with. Are those things you're comfortable discussing Oh sure I. Mean it's not only one thing but certainly, the most important relevant event is the event that happened when I was nineteen when I was in a car accident on a big freeway in Washington state interstate five. And as I was driving over a bridge to get back to my hometown late at night. I swerved to avoid a little dog that ran in front of my car and the combination of swerving unfortunately hitting the anyways semi car into these fish tails and eventually donuts across the freeway. And wound up stranded in the fast lane of the freeway on the overpass with no way of escaping a no phone and cars and semis winning by me so fast, they were making my car shake. I was sure I'm GonNa die I mean I was one of those things you know they tell you time slows down when you're feeling intense fear. That's true. I know why I didn't know I then four and I really didn't know what to do. I was going to die tell stranger appeared next to my car having as I later figured out run across the freeway again in the dark to rescue somebody never met before. Key got my car. He figured out why? I. Couldn't get my car back on he threatened his way through the barrage of oncoming traffic to get us back across the freeway and then he just disappeared. He's like you know do you need me to follow you look so good I'm like, no no, all the okay. I'll be okay and he said Okay you carry yourself them an off. Into night I still to this day don't think. Thank you. I. Don't know anything about who he is and I know that. I owe Himalayas and really inexorably changed the way that I think about people and social behavior. Well, it's a dramatic story and actually connects to the thesis to the extent that I understand it of your book. Let me just repeat the title which I will have. Stated in the introduction the fear factor how one emotion connects altruism psychopaths and everyone in between. This is an example of extreme altruism that you just shared with us without a doubt He absolutely risked his life to save me. He deserved a medal for what he did at the very least. And what's so interesting about people like him as there is a really common tendency to assume that people who have things to help others are fearless. You hear that board used all the time but the reference to heroes and. But my research has shown is that that's absolutely not true that actually there's a really much more interesting relationship between fear and courage and altruism. So, what is it? So what seems to be the case is that truly fearless people tend not to help other people. For example, people who were psychopathic are one of the key features of psychopathy is a fearless disposition as failure to respond to threats or punishments or the potential for harm. And certainly people who are psychopathic do dangerous things. But they're very unlikely to do heroic things because that requires picking up on the fact that somebody else's afraid if you are doing something heroic, you're usually saving somebody else from danger somebody else's afraid in you're acting to help them. And what seems to be the case if you don't experience fear strongly yourself, you also don't pick up on that emotion and other people you have trouble detecting while other people are feeling it. You certainly don't appreciate why that state is bad and why you'd want to alleviate it, and so you're very unlikely to do anything to help when other people are afraid and so people. who were very altruistic turned out to be the opposite. They're people who are acutely aware of what it means to be afraid, and so they can empathize with that state and other people and when they encounter people who are in extreme distress, they're much more likely to help and so rather than being fearless, they're truly brave. They have courage which virtue whereas fearlessness is really not

Abigail Marsh Georgetown University Associate Professor Department Of Psychology Ace Scientist Washington
How long should my YouTube videos be?

The $100 MBA Show

09:55 min | 1 year ago

How long should my YouTube videos be?

"I've studied a lot when it comes to video marketing. Especially when it comes to search engine optimization and optimizing your exposure on Youtube, the lot experts out there. But my personal favorite expert on this topic is Brian Deane from back Linko dot com you can check out his blog back link dot com. There's a ton of resources when it comes to maximizing your exposure on Youtube he's only an expert when it comes to Seo marketing on Google but also on Youtube so I want to share with you some things I learned from him as well as others that have confirmed his strategies and what I like about Brian's approach to youtube marketing is he actually tests Out His theories and see if they work in the real world and his own youtube channel, which is huge for this niche of Seo. It's a very dry kind of topic. It's not a you know anything that's entertaining or funny or makeup tutorials or car reviews which kind of caters to a big market very niche and yet he's got a huge following three hundred and seventy three thousand subscribers on his youtube channel. Pretty impressive. Let's address the direct question of how long should videos on Youtube. In order to give you the right advice. Let me back up a little bit and talk about. What does Youtube. Well Youtube really wants people to stay on the platform as long as possible. Their big metric is view time total view time how long people watch videos on their channel? Don't confuse this with retention time. Let me tell you the difference if a former video on average people watch of to the three minute mark. My retention time is seventy five percent pretty impressive right? Let's say I have a ten minute video and people watch only half five minute mark. You would think that the first video would be more optimized would be more preferred by you would get more exposure because the retention time or percentage is higher at seventy, five percent versus fifty but the total watch time I video is three minutes versus the second video, which is five minutes and really. Cares about is that you actually keeping people on the platform for longer they're watching videos for longer more minutes is most important to them, and this is why the ten minute mark is seen as the holy grail in Youtube because ten minutes allows you to get lots of viewing time even if they just watch half the video and it's also not too long where it's like a two hour video and no one even attempts to click on it because they have to hours. So Brian Deane your video should be at least ten minutes long. You should try to aim for that. You know nine minutes eight and a half. Okay. But ten is really what you should aim for to maximize your viewing time and also obviously have a concise and valuable video. So your channel will get more juice will get more preference from Youtube. Viewers to watch more time of your videos, they will suggest your videos as recommended videos at the end of videos. Or they'll suggests it in the right hand column. And if you get enough mental, you might even be trending on their homepage. Now I don't want you to take my word for it. Take a look at some of the best youtubers out. They're the ones that are trending the ones that maybe you follow somebody maybe that you look up to even if they're not as active as they used to before like Casey Nice to take a look at the length of their videos, you're going to see their around the ten minute, Mark Ten twelve, fifteen minutes very few of these big time youtubers are doing you know three minute form videos, even people that review. Gadgets software cars they make sure that it's you know eight, nine, ten minutes at least now I want to give a couple more piece of advice that I learned from Brian. But my real genuine advice is to subscribe to back link. Oh, you know he's not paying me for this. I'm genuinely saying he's a great source of knowledge because I've learned so much from him if he ever offers the I know he has a course on youtube if you ever offers it. Opens it up for enrollment. Then he closes it really quick by that course it's a very, very good if you're serious about growing your youtube channel because you're GONNA learn a ton to maximize a results is really going to get you faster results in shorter time. But here are a few things I learned along the way from him number one. Understand the key words you're trying to target when you are shooting a video. So when you have video four, your youtube channel, you have a video idea, a title what are the key words are trying to target what kind of things that you're going to be searching for that they're going to you know stumble upon her find your video with understand your Seki words and they could be eight to ten keywords you're looking for, and you need to make sure you use these words throughout the video now, only in the description as. Much as possible in the title, even in your, you know close captioning or subtitles, but also say these keywords in the video actually speak them into the camera why? Because you actually can pick up what is being said, and it's actually picking up your audio and using it in their search engine algorithm to find people those videos that match the keywords typing in. So obviously, you just want to say these words randomly you want to put them in context in the video, but be mindful that you need to mention these key a few times. Brine recommends at least three times. So they're picked up by the algorithm maximizing your opportunity to rank for those keywords. Thing teaches of course you need to make sure your video engaging if your values are not good, they're not gonNA do well period you want to make sure that they're engaging you have really crisp cuts you have different angles even if you just change the framing even if you just have one video camera a Webcam or your phone in the post production in the edit you know zoom into your face then back up to a wide shot and switch these kind of shots every time you're changing The point or moving onto different part of video us bureau US things on your screen or images or video from stock images. You know one of our sponsors this story blocks, which is fantastic. You can get unlimited stock video images with our all access plan. Go story blocks, DOT COM SLASH MBA so change it up to make sure it's engaging. People are going to listen and watch that video for as long as possible guys got more on today's cuny Wednesday before that. Let me give love the today sponsor. Support today show comes from access bank. Won't banking that moves your small business forward, you can get it with access bank. Their basic business checking account is crafted for busy business owners with solutions to suit your needs. It's simple convenient and hassle free, and they're so confident that you'll love it. They'll give you a hundred dollars to try it out just use Promo code a ex. Mba and visit access bank dot com slash NBA Today to get started access is one hundred percent digital with much lower overhead costs than traditional banks. So they pass on those savings onto their customers. This means no maintenance fees and no minimum bounce requirements unlimited domestic ATM fee reimbursements. Up to two hundred free transactions per month on their basic business checking account enjoy managing your money. Your way access also gives you the ease of accessing your money anytime anywhere there time-saving digital tools including quickbooks compatibility allow you to check your accounts, make deposits and pay bills wherever you are stay ahead of the challenges of modern business with a bank that works for you. visit. ACCESS BANK DOT COM SLASH NBA today to learn more and earn your hundred dollars. That's A. X. O. S. BANK DOT COM SLASH NBA with Promo Code A. X. O. S. NBA, access bank small business banking simplified. To wrap up today's cuny question from. Darren. How long should is youtube videos be won't the golden rule is a minimum of ten minutes shoe for the ten minute mark aim to keep your viewers as engages possible because the longer they watch in terms of minutes, the better and a last piece of advice youtube loves consistency. So if you publish weekly one video, every single week like clockwork youtube recognizes that you are consistent publisher you're a good source of information and that your channel should be promoted. Don't skip stay on schedule stay consistent. Thank you so much for listening to the show. If you love today's format Cuny Wednesday and you have a question, you wanna ask go ahead and ask me that question just email me over at Omar at one zero, zero NBA. Don KNAPP I'll make sure to answer right here on Wednesday also wall you have your phone handy all you have your device handy. Go ahead and subscribe to our podcast using whatever app you use the podcast with US apple podcasts singer radio, spotify Himalayas on them all. Why should you subscribe well a subscribing Things a whole lot easier for number one. It allows you to get the latest episode as soon as it drops. It's right on your device nothing to search for number two it gives you access to all our archive episodes. You can go back in our library of episodes and learn away and get better at business and number three. It's completely free. So go ahead and smash that subscribe right now.

Youtube Brian Deane NBA United States Google Himalayas Casey Nice Don Knapp Spotify Omar Brine Apple Darren Publisher
"himalayas" Discussed on Altamar - Navigating the High Seas of Global Politics

Altamar - Navigating the High Seas of Global Politics

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"himalayas" Discussed on Altamar - Navigating the High Seas of Global Politics

"We're going to climb up to altitude and talk about the border dispute between India and China high on the Himalayas the world was reminded last June of long-standing dispute between these two countries on this mountain range where bloody troop standoff in the dock India resulted in twenty dead Indian soldiers and a reported however, yet unconfirmed forty casualties in their Chinese counterparts. Only the whole thing has a weird mysterious shroud, even three months after the incident there's incredibly little information about what happened and why it happened. The consequences however are really concerning because the relationship between India and China is at its. Lowest Point, in many years, and this isn't some remote problem that we're talking about. We're talking here about tool large nuclear powers that have heavy armaments and our regional leaders, and they're looking for worldwide influence and they're at odds with each other in this incredibly turbulent world. That's no small issue at particularly no small issue from a world security standpoint but also because of its inevitable political and economic implications Disa- Kerr's also had an interesting time in the US India relationship is the strongest. It's been in such a long time and we've seen Prime Minister Modi in President Trump revel in this mutual ration- society that they have going on and not to mention then. The trade disputes in the political rivalry with China. So Peter, let's try to understand today the causes, viladot crisis Chinese and Indian responses, and of course, the geopolitical fallout, and let's try to understand also how other countries react to the standoff and even take advantage of this ancient feuds. Revival later will be joined by Vijay Shankar Director of US initiative at the Observer Research. Foundation and a frequent analyst about Indian and Chinese Foreign Affairs and he will help us through the news and provide some insight about its consequences. Okay. Let's let's start with just some context we learned on June Fifteenth Twenty Twenty, a violence standoff occurred in the vicinity of a road project along the La See. Now, let me tell you what the L. stands for its. Guns for line of actual control, which is this weird name between what is now the Indian and Chinese border up high in the Himalayas and while several incidents have occurred here in the past vis one has ramifications beyond the act itself. It's true Peter would amplified this dispute as the widespread kind of fatigue and anger in Indian everywhere about China's very aggressive for policy. In the multiple examples of territorial greed and strong language technological passivity bully tactics, the VIN demonstrated in actions such as the new security. Law. In Hong Kong that we've discussed clashes in the south China. Sea and increasing pressure on Taiwan and South Asia. China has expanded its influence with massive financial aid to Pakistan and Sri Lanka. So there is no doubt India's feeling encroachment. Couple that with cyber attacks on the United States and all that means that tensions are riding high in Chinese assertiveness as it's now called has sharpened even under Kobe, and leaving experts to wonder whether response to as our guest..

south China India Himalayas Twenty Twenty Peter United States Chinese Foreign Affairs Prime Minister Modi Vijay Shankar Disa- Kerr South Asia La See Hong Kong Taiwan Director analyst Sri Lanka Kobe President
"himalayas" Discussed on The Fighter And The Kid

The Fighter And The Kid

04:04 min | 3 years ago

"himalayas" Discussed on The Fighter And The Kid

"He won't hear natural. It is pretty heavy. How much does Dalil away because he's about my height if not taller? He's one six seventy one sixteen but he puts on these ads at nine to one hundred sixteen what's on fake pads? Do people need to know that Christel. No does that he puts on fake pet weight pads to look to look bigger, and he has a airbrush guy come over to his house in airbrush. So it looks like muscle lines. Yeah. It's the saddest shit his the dogs somebody brings her rents every morning. Those dogs. Sad, dude. And you know, how they you know, how the movie sets have fake fronts to their house. And then you go inside. And there's nothing look at those are borrow dogs rentals. He's got to give those back up at one in the morning. He has to wake up I wanna ham just to get back on note. She does probably he somebody said that he drinks his openers blood that got Micheal the note, you translate. Oh, she's blood. Yeah. To stay young Birlik avail. And then also a lot of pictures on the notes from the waist down guys huge legs outdoors legs way outdoors like fucking, Dan. How much do you weigh? How much do you think? I know how much I'll tell you six to issue six three years. Okay. So you're to know he's who twenty seven to eighteen now he's two oh four to twenty seven. He's the closest to offensive closest to to house your guest you too. I did you date in that change it. I think we're not allowed to ask. Because you can't ask them. It's weight is that right? First of all, I don't really give hold On on. she answers. I'd wake him in our impossible to guess their way. Muscles pounds. I say ninety seven pounds. I don't know which way. I have no idea. She's so offended. Look it up Madge one hundred and thirty pounds a once healthy ninety seven what are you talking about? Hannibal's his dogs way. I don't know what dogs way idea. I told you about his Matt dude. I know drew a mountain in the middle of the country. Mountain ranges out there, you think because at the Himalayas how many states are in the United States. Sixty seven of the same map feels mom drew him. Um? So smart dude, women's weights fucking impossible to get idea. I don't think it matters. What women way I think it matters how they feel policy do expect that with those sweats on. But here's the thing. I'm telling you little twinkies that are back at home. You're not getting a girl or whatever if you want to change your life. Save up. Ten grand get a little see Raj installed all its, bro. But here's what I'm saying. Get that ten it costs me more than ten granted generous assignment over doesn't way. More. Look I've been watching away mexica. Now, do it's way more Mexico to go to Mexico. That's definitely where you don't want to go to get your dick cut off. No, you didn't get. Dick for knows instead of you idiot. They don't just it. You don't when you wake up in a bathtub with your organs missing. Yeah. Your dick one. Which is what does it take the other ones do an average? They need all those jobs. Oh hundred grand hundreds rain seeds. Okay. I am jazz on TLC tipplers alone. A typical Jenner Topaz yellow eighteen thousand is what that that's for those job you fucking Jinnah to-, plastic you think what is on your nose red says rhino rhino. That's four thousand three hundred and fourteen typical genital plastic cost eighteen grant during the toll plaza. These there's always exchange Djinnit oh plazas knee. By the way, always an up charge. That's like that's like when you go to the nuts is extra how much. Got to be more. Well, that's just taking that's like making more, and it costs more than what you leave with it in like, hey, it's like when you when you get an earn when someone dies. It's like do you want him in a nicer and a glass one or a box. I'm sure when you're king. It's way more expensive eighteen to start. You guys are not eighteen to knifes. I'll say this. I was cost seventeen grand male to female great. We just say the thousand dollars is better this conversation..

Dan Christel Dalil Matt dude Dick Himalayas Mexico Birlik Jenner Topaz Madge Micheal Hannibal United States Raj Jinnah ninety seven pounds thousand dollars six three years thirty pounds
"himalayas" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

07:05 min | 3 years ago

"himalayas" Discussed on KTOK

"Gannon. Glad you're with us on this first Saturday of twenty nine Tino twenty nineteen. I remember being a kid thinking, oh, I'll be so old when it's two thousand. And that old. It's a privilege to be that old. So the planner of the week is evergreen coniferous. Wanna give me another clue? Okay. It is native to the Himalayas what the Himalayas to the Himalayas. And because I haven't get here. People brought over. No. You know, these got popular I I didn't know about them before I was a student. So I don't think they've been around for a really really long time. But they're beautiful and they're being used a lot lately. I think it's one of Julius favorites too. Is problem is probably my favorite evergreen for Oklahoma. Although no, actually magnolias my favorite ever, make noise. My favorite tree. That's because you're from the sat on the south. My grandmother had one grandma. That's right. Everybody mother has one. Yes. I have some little ones. I don't have the big southern gravy flow of the fort's underneath. Yes. All that. We'll keep some people don't like magnolias because those leave do not biodegrade. I mean, they'll be there forever. You actually you have to actually sweep them off because believes in my house, I just mow over and thrown back into the garden beds. But yeah, I mean the magnolia laser pretty hard. But because that's a negative, but it's a positive make res out of them because they don't break down. You could make magnolia leaf wreaths. Yes. Yes. Well, I need to give a shoutout to Ellen Graham because she says thank you for mentioning the amaranth. Yup. Globe amaranth? Yes. And how to dry it because she she gets hers from big, and then like stem do creative things with them. They're really really pretty and. It's it's shocking. How it holds a color? But I mean, I don't think that cupboard fade for about three years three years. Wow. Does it? Make you sneeze doesn't make me sneeze. I mean is it like a I don't think it's no Wildflower that would that would make love pollen. I'll think it's typically. Blamed for allergies. Right. Like like other stuff is. But to tell you the truth, I people think of flowers, methinks, allergies. But personally, I'm allergic to a lot more trees and grass pollen trees kill me. Yeah. Eight four zero one thousand star one thousand let's talk about zones because people are looking at the catalogs gosh. Happy know what zone. You are. All right. It may I got this question. Somebody on curious me on the crew. And she said what zone or we'd I'm like, you know, technically for seven a, but I've I can grow plants from zone eight if I find the micro-climate so pretty easy to grow things zone. Eight nine micro-climate. But this is the these zones are the USDA coldness, and the what the number refers to how what is the average coldest temperature that you get so zone. Seven would be from zero to ten degrees. So zone. A would be zero to five and seven B would be five to ten. And how did how did they come to make the main be versus just more numbers? They do have a of numbers because the numbers go from like one to twelve. Okay. So in the in the continental United States, I think the the the lowest are made the highest number would be like at the very tip of like, Florida and the keys, and I think that's that's a ten right? So Texas is mostly like, Dallas eight and still waters actually, seven six b. Yeah. And then you get five and six is like Kansas, which is crazy ten degree increments. Is what I understand. So we Oklahoma goes from six a sixty seven a seven b in an all those places is ten degrees different. Right. We used to laugh about the sunny side of the arbuckle. And how much warmer art war would be. Yes, the arbuckles aren't that tall, really know bits amazing? How much of a change that is? And when I went I went, I have a friend Marissa. He's living in Oregon. Now bet she lived in. Got the arbuckles are more mccosh. And I went there, and I was really shocked because a lot of the plants growing. There would be the same plants that were McAllister which is the same zone, right? So it's not so much about the arbuckles as it is about the longitude and latitude arbuckles help because our vehicles are. They will like break cold wind, and they will absorb Pete. Now, if you drive down there, you feel like you could reach out and touch those wind turbines. Go. It's really I had driven. I thirty five I guess a long long time, especially at night. We're coming back in those red lights are flashing thought. What in the world the UFO's taken over? I had the same reaction when I went when I drove it last time, I drove that way. And it was at night. And it was like, oh, oh they finally put lights on the mountains up for all these years. And it turns out it was all those wind turbines Jerry's okay? Eight four zero one thousand star one thousand we need one more clue for the plan to the week, Jamie. Alright. Native to the Himalayas. Some people say, yes, this is this is like an ID so ID tip when we were in school. And one of the ways that you can idea is the branches go out, and then at the at the very tips they arch upward woo branches out, which makes them really cute silhouette cars. Rush up. It makes it sort of like a decorative Christmas. Tree looks like. Yeah. Yeah. If you didn't. I bet your master gardener people will guess it now eight four zero one thousand star one thousand you're listening to the garden party, fifty five degrees in Oklahoma City. I'm good Falkiner Lippard the.

Himalayas arbuckle Oklahoma Tino USDA Gannon. Julius United States Ellen Graham Oklahoma City Kansas Oregon Texas Tree Florida Marissa McAllister Pete