27 Burst results for "Himalayan Mountains"

"himalayan mountains" Discussed on Something You Should Know

Something You Should Know

02:11 min | 2 months ago

"himalayan mountains" Discussed on Something You Should Know

"We're going to start today talking about salt. Have you noticed that salt has gotten pretty trendy. I ve received gifts of salt. I have a himalayan pink. Salt that i got as a gift at which i guess is salt mined from the himalayan mountains and recently got some black lava salt from hawaii. I'm not really sure why it's black or what's in it but again. There are lots of new kinds of salts popping up on store shelves so the question is are these gourmet salts really any better or any healthier than later table salt well whether it sea salt or table salt or any kind of salt. They all have the same basic nutritional value. They mostly consist of two minerals. Sodium and chloride however sea salt is often marketed as a more natural and healthier alternative. But it isn't really the real difference between sea salt and table salt are in the taste texture and processing not their chemical makeup sea. Salt is produced through evaporation of seawater usually with very little processing which leaves behind some trace minerals and elements depending on the water source. These insignificant amounts of minerals do add flavor and color to sea. Salt which also comes in a variety of coarseness levels table salt is mined from underground salt deposits table. Salt is more heavily process to eliminate trace minerals and usually contains an additive to prevent clumping. But that's pretty much the only difference and that is something. You should know something. Cool that i wanted to mention. There's this podcast app called cast box. I actually use. It is pretty cool. It has a lot of features. It works with apple carplay in the apple. Watch it works on android phones in apple phones. It has a lot of cool features. And i opened it up this morning. And they're in their category called staff. Favorites is something you should know so not not only is cashbox a cool app but they have very good taste.

himalayan mountains hawaii apple
"himalayan mountains" Discussed on Something You Should Know

Something You Should Know

02:11 min | 2 months ago

"himalayan mountains" Discussed on Something You Should Know

"We're going to start today talking about salt. Have you noticed that. Salt has gotten pretty trendy. I received gifts of salt. I have a himalayan pink. Salt that i got as a gift at which i guess is salt mined from the himalayan mountains and recently got some black lava salt from hawaii. I'm not really sure why it's black or what's in it but again. There are lots of new kinds of salts popping up on store shelves so the question is are these gourmet salts really any better or any healthier than later table. Salt will whether it sea salt or table salt or any kind of salt. They all have the same basic nutritional value they mostly consist of two minerals sodium and chloride however sea salt is often marketed as a more natural and healthier alternative. But it isn't really the real difference between sea salt and table salt are in the taste texture and processing not their chemical makeup sea. Salt is produced through evaporation of seawater usually with very little processing which leaves behind some trace minerals and elements depending on the water source. These insignificant amounts of minerals do add flavor and color to sea. Salt which also comes in a variety of coarseness levels table salt is mined from underground salt deposits table. Salt is more heavily process to eliminate trace minerals and usually contains an additive to prevent clumping. But that's pretty much the only difference and that is something. You should know something. Cool that i wanted to mention. There's this podcast app called cast box. I actually use. It is pretty cool. It has a lot of features. It works with apple carplay in the apple. Watch it works on android phones in apple phones. It has a lot of cool features. And i opened it up this morning. And they're in their category called staff. Favorites is something you should know so not not only is cashbox a cool app but they have very good taste.

himalayan mountains hawaii apple
Dr. Fauci's Emails Prove He Knew of Wuhan Gain of Function Research

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:22 min | 3 months ago

Dr. Fauci's Emails Prove He Knew of Wuhan Gain of Function Research

"Today is the emails now. I'm going to take a different approach at first novel. Go into the more conventional. Take here it seems as if the washington post has decided to actually do a rare form of journalism. They filled out a freedom of information. Requests that foia a freedom of information act in fact. We talked about this at length on our podcast yesterday. That filling out a freedom of information act is one of the few ways to actually hold these tyrants these despots accountable so the washington post has now published thousands and thousands of private emails from dr anthony fauci. Some of them are rather boring and answering questions to celebrities and producers how he has time to do that not exactly sure thousands of emails. Just saying thanks then. There are some groundbreaking emails. Now before i get into these emails. I do not believe that this is all a coincidence. I don't believe the washington post would do this that some sort of a wink a nod a gesture. A point from ron clain. You see. I think that somebody wants dr anthony out she removed. I believe that and this is reflected in the emails. We're gonna get into it toys. Always the emails isn't it so funny how that works. I believe that the evidence is now overwhelming that the chinese corona virus was manufacturing in a laboratory. I believe dr anthony. Fauci was more involved than people realize. I believe that he was intimately into the wuhan institute of technology because of that and because of now the sudden interest and finding out where the virus came from. And how the evidence is showing this the not come from a bat. This did not come from the himalayan mountains. This did not come from a wet market. This came from a biolab that dr fauci very well might have visited himself but we do know that. The national institute of health funded the wuhan institute of technology through gain of function research.

Washington Post Dr Anthony Dr Anthony Fauci Ron Clain Wuhan Institute Of Technology Fauci Dr Fauci Himalayan Mountains National Institute Of Health Wuhan Institute Of Technology
"himalayan mountains" Discussed on The Dave Chang Show

The Dave Chang Show

06:09 min | 4 months ago

"himalayan mountains" Discussed on The Dave Chang Show

"Defecate tank show before we move on can we. Can i back up actually not to talk about poop. I meant to ask you this cooking with apple juice. Pear juice pineapple juice meat. Mayonnaise weather uses. Are you putting parents. Who are you throw in pair and pear juice into other things. Mostly meat embraces on embrace. Oh into praises. Yeah yeah that's basically end marinades but mostly raises. The marinate thing is so underrated though. That's so good for she she Sorry sorry sorry. Pink leeann sulked overrated underrated. An address. this one okay. Why precisely why first of all that actually come from. Himalayas probably not versa verification that it came from the greatest mountain in the world. what makes it himalayan. what yeah. What is the deal with him in the lane salt. I don't even have no idea or is it just a marketing term. I think this is what i'm trying to say. Somebody just made something up like pair skin. It was just a marketing stuff. He's like pink salts. Can we say it's pink salt now. Pink mount rainier salt. No pink kilimanjaro salts. No pink himalayan seesaw. There we go. Let's let's just start printing the money the money meant on. What does the history and origin of it. I'm honestly donau finding nothing. That's why i think it's i think it's stupid. It says that it's been minds. It's usually minds in pakistan by the punjab people. Listening to you can use to cure food or make a lamp. It's got to be underrated. You can make a lamp out of an ingredient. Then it's gotta be great so also even if it actually comes from people that like need benefits local people from himalayan mountains than yeah. I'm so jaded. I think that this comes from you know actual punjab walk estan like someplace in wisconsin. Oh you oh you think this is just. It's just pink salt just being so okay okay. Well on that very depressing note. I will say overrated overrated is not flor- florida cells overrated to me. I mean maldon is also on a cell. Green is my. I'd like salary. I just think the kernels can be a little bit smaller. I think mauldin is chew salty. All of it is overrated. I think my preferred choice would be something like. I don't know the names of the japanese salts. I want crystals to be smaller. I don't like the big textures. The only time. I like self florida's sell a big sort of grain of it is when i'm biting into a slice of Hot flogger oh variou-various specific thing because it's like a starburst assault fat That's it it's too salty in to it. Takes away textually from too many other things while i use mall. I think mauldin is chew salty. If there such a thing. Well i was just gonna say understand the idea that like some salt can be saltier than other salt. No i don't think people are like why would they know to make a significant difference like the kind of salt you use. And i'm not. I'm not like assault freak though. Are you assault weirdo. Like really a a ton of attention to which saw the recipe salt. I don't give a shit about his. I deny salt. I thought i don't use i. Don't give a fucking shit about diamond kosher crystal or fits morton's or whatever the arc as long as it's not that crappy salt iii denies salt. I don't give a shit Know why because. I can cook all kimmy this recipe. Because it's not the saudi shut the fuck up just curly fries. Overrated underrated. david. Aruna come down on opposite sides of this one. I think okay you want to say at once. I'd rather not eat french fries. It has to be curly. Never mind firmly anti shit. I really saw it really is so stupid. The worse thing all truly fry is the dumbest thing out there. One of us things out there or one of the things that make a french fry. Great is that it's straight and at fry's in a certain way curly ruins all of the benefits of fry service areas possible to make it crunchy. And it's like basically buy a candy bar but you just poured melted chocolate in my hand. It's like okay like i. I'd rather have that not melted in a candy bar for but you're just pouring into me giving it to me softened melted. That's how i feel about a curly french. Fronton again. what you're doing. It's the same thing but it's not so don't do it. Here's where we may become down on different sides. i don't like seasoned fries generally. Do you like fries. Have some kind of whatever holding on that and they get out of my face. Ah in the make believe of despot chang. That's getting straight no choice. That's banned in a world. I believe in diversity but not that kind of diversity right so siberia is populated by eaters and curly.

pakistan wisconsin david Himalayas siberia Aruna japanese florida Pink leeann himalayan mountains one of things One of us flogger variou french
"himalayan mountains" Discussed on Buddhist Society of Western Australia

Buddhist Society of Western Australia

06:46 min | 5 months ago

"himalayan mountains" Discussed on Buddhist Society of Western Australia

"Learned from that from observing that natural part of australia. The what will beauty is real. Beauty has another meaning that Understanding of perfection. And in the same way. If i look at all the monks which i've lived with all living with now. Not one of those monks is perfect. But that's why they're all beautiful all their little idiosyncrasies the stupidities the little things which could drive you crazy if you did not understand what beauty really was. Imagine to trees sitting next standing next to each other three. Look at you over there. You're all and now but look at you. You missed so many branches. But of course what i'm talking about is human beings a husband and wife to tree standing next to each other seeing all their force rather than understanding the beauty truly is by learning. What real beauty is by watching the trees in the forest you understand. The beauty is nothing to do with our idea of perfection. The beauty is actually embraces perfect imperfection beauty embraces the force in people and if a person was perfect there would not be beautiful tour. They'd be plastic. not real. They would be natural so if any of you have a girlfriend or boyfriend you have a partner husband or wife a child of a parent or even a monk. Don't expect them to be perfect if they were they would not be beautiful now. Understanding that makes you more tolerance and able to live with other people and see their beauty and the more important are same last week. More able to live with yourself because we understand that beauty of you understand the beauty of yourself. You don't have to be perfect to be beautiful and in fact the more perfect you are the boy likely you are looking at it. That's actually what maters like the more perfect a mountainous. I know that they have these mountains. Not supposed to be like mount fuji supposed to be the most perfect mountain world. But i don't like that it's just as it was a may by sort of some engineer but real mountains just all cranky. You can never design them. It's just been eroded by nature and that gives them a sort of beauty and the other thing about beauties you just can't capture it. You try and take a photograph of the forest. Got photographs of burton. Yada monessen totally difference of the place. You live now seen those photographs which were the newsletter. And i look at the place where i live and it's not the same. You can't capture beauty and keep it forever. It is always changing. I remember a time you know. It must must've been just because pasteurized. But i was always fascinated just know with india and especially with the himalayan mountains and once i decided to go to india to go on a pilgrimage to try and find a few the put his holiday prices as a buddhist. This time i was. I was i twenty. Twenty one twenty two to go off to india. See these holy places. But i also one of my goals was to see the himalayan mountains and of course i was stupid. Never did any research. Because when i got to india it was monsoon season and once soon season meant. There were clouds covering the sky. They after day after day and after about a month in india i realized north india. No way we're going to see these mountains. So actually gave up. And i remember one day. I was in nepal. And the used to be no staying with other travis. There's this great opportunity to go in the post track. Which would go to the border to bet. Still belong into the people's republic of china congo over the border. Being disco next to bet is forbidden. Land this this magical price of tibetan monks. And i thought wow be really cool just to see it. So go on his post track just gave the driver and probably legal docs or something just to take us out there when he stopped fatih halfway up now to the debate in border he's taught for not as with a couple of americans and it was not a very high heel. This climb to the top. Nothing else to do. So we climb to the top and as we climb to the top michael moore coll- the crowds cleared for the first time. Now being about too much you can actually see the whole. Himalayan mountains and it was magical. It was amazing beauty. So what did i do. This is the third time. I call myself stupid today. Being really stupid. I ran down the hill. What four to get. My camera was a great experience as if it was done on purpose just to teach me a lesson because i ran up again and as soon as i got to the top literally no exaggeration. The crowds close and these two americans say. Where did you go. That was the so amazingly beautiful. And i i based it. I guess i tried to capture it and that taught me a wonderful lesson about nature about even happiness enjoy. You can't capture moments and if you do you miss them. So now. Whenever i have any happiness enjoy you. Don't try and catch him neither in a photograph nor taking notes or try to even describe it to yourself as saying buster member this muscle member. This i must remember this. Because everytime i try to remember it. I'm avoiding the experience i missing. How the action so for me. The beauty enjoys in life alert to be tasted it never to be captured because as soon as you try and capture these things you lose them immediately.

australia india nepal north india last week today third time two first time twenty one three mount fuji Twenty one bet china congo buddhist Himalayan mountains moore coll twenty two
Scores Are Feared Dead In India After Himalayan Glacier Breaks Away

Reveal

00:55 sec | 8 months ago

Scores Are Feared Dead In India After Himalayan Glacier Breaks Away

"Massive search and rescue operation is underway in northern India after part of a Himalayan mountain glacier broke off and triggered landslides and flooding. NPR's Lauren Frayer reports at least 125 people are missing. It started when part of the Nanda Davey Glacier broke off. Blasting through a hydro electric dam. Video recorded by witnesses shows an avalanche of mud, water and debris rushing through a ravine in India's Tera con state. Many of those missing are believed to be workers at that Damn, one local resident says. It happened so fast. There was no time to alert anyone. The military has been called in to help villages are being evacuated downstream. Prime Minister Narendra Modi tweeted that he's praying for everyone's safety. This is an area of the Himalayas, where environmental experts have cautioned against building such dams and

Himalayan Mountain Glacier Lauren Frayer Nanda Davey Glacier India NPR Prime Minister Narendra Modi Himalayas
How Zoom might stay relevant post-pandemic

OC Talk Radio

05:58 min | 8 months ago

How Zoom might stay relevant post-pandemic

"Back to our listeners. And welcome back to work place perspective. Julie mccoy thank you to recite a happy new year. And thank you for having me back again. Sorry excited. I love that. We've with scientific arthur time. We've had to kick off our new year. I think it's a great way to do it. Twenty twenty one. Can you believe it. thank goodness right. Never so happy to see a year in the rear view mirror ever well. This is a great topic today. We're gonna be talking about lessons from twenty twenty one that we can take forward with us into this new year. What we could use to improve ourselves improve our lines and provide quality of lives and leaving behind everything. That doesn't serve us. So i am so excited to talk about this list. Jump right into it. Well thank you theresa sought. I've done a lot of reflecting on your twenty eight twenty as we leave it in the rear view mirror. Thank goodness but i. I think it's really important for your listeners. To before they russ not normalcy and twenty twenty one whenever that takes place. I think it's really important to reflect upon things that they undoubtedly learned in the what i call the roussel of twenty twenty because it was that or many of us and some of us bar more than others but You know there's a seeing among the coaching community that there's no comfort in the growth zone and no growth in the comfort zone and we've all been terribly uncomfortable to varying degrees where the past year and we now see the light. The end of the tunnel return to our normal are were teens and had dick schedules. And and i think it's really important to tag out or the experience of twenty twenty uncomfortable experience the lessons that we all learned and in a city. Here right now. Sort of your listeners may be dismissing that Because you know it they were mostly more focused on the pain and how to get through it and what was going to happen next year that accompanied all of his nyan certainty of it but invariably we. I am certain that we all learned things. Maybe we learned a new skill for example. I know a lot of people Might i'll take myself as an example. I wasn't really much of a cook. Started this process. Why us man. I ate out a lot. We got to take now snatch And all of a sudden is down than i had. Actually prepare a week's worth of menus. Arkansas and prepare food and i became a much better cook because i had to learn how to do things like substitute ingredients. And before i was just following the recipe rigidly. Because that's all i knew how to do. I had no idea. I'm substitute well. If you can't just run out and store to get one item because that's too dangerous right to your hell. I figure that out. So there's there was real learning around that For me i. I know of other people who had to learn how to be alone. Alana people just really can't stand thought of being alone and on the isolation of this pandemic inspires ties into that You know i would say that as we need this year last year behind us it's important to take a moment to reflect on what we gained on and there were a lot of positives. They came out of twenty twenty on on a broader scale For example the images of the clear skies in los angeles on this beautiful days when there was no pollution the images of the himalayan mountain one which you never see right because it's always obscured and smog the fact that a lot of us learned that our lives were so much more hectic when we were running around in our cars going back and forth to meetings there was so much easier just to sit down at our desk in have a really productive. Absolutely you know. I find that amazing now and that was one of the first things i noticed was how much time i saved by. Not having to and i still get ready. The i get up. I put my hair up close make module around and everything but still. It's so awesome. How much time you save right. And you're saving the environment at time. And you arrive at meetings not so frazzled. Especially in southern california when you're driving in traffic all of the time I you know. I just woke that going forward. Some of us will remember value of hadden's in meetings which they seem very awkward in the beginning and some people tatum so much they just signed off and reviews combat. But were those of us who had to stick it out. There were these we had to accomplish. I think we learned how to work through the awkwardness of winners. It might've speedy and ocean the conduct brisson's talking and once we did that we download it was really productive platform for getting things done and could sit down calmly in our desk with a cup of coffee or glass of water and proceed to our meeting without the rush of. Oh i just got the freeway. I'm laid i gotta find parking place. A russian take an elevator. So i i just hope that some of us will from time to time and undoubtedly in person meetings organic resume as soon as nike And i hope that some of the small may be take her pause in every now and then say you know. This meeting doesn't have to be. We're solidity in the comfort of our own homes or on offices and students via sumer via conference call.

Julie Mccoy Arthur Time Theresa Russ Himalayan Mountain Dick Alana Arkansas Brisson Los Angeles Hadden Tatum California Nike
"himalayan mountains" Discussed on Buddhist Society of Western Australia

Buddhist Society of Western Australia

02:35 min | 9 months ago

"himalayan mountains" Discussed on Buddhist Society of Western Australia

"All your work finished. Sit-in just use imagination. Visualize a sitting on a soft cushion of grass under the shade of leafy tree in a park by the banks of the river. New ranchera flowing down from the himalayan mountains sitting peace. No health concerns no family problems. No work no work to do no worries about your finances or accommodation in lights and one free piece. Do you imagine you can get a taste of what it must be like to have no chain not needed nothing to run after because you have everything and nothing. Imagine what it must be like to be an enlightened to sitting under a tree. Just watching the press come in go out nothing to achieve mussina to get rid of peace deep peace forever. How does that feel. I'm going to disappear. ceo lunch..

himalayan mountains mussina
"himalayan mountains" Discussed on Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

01:58 min | 10 months ago

"himalayan mountains" Discussed on Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

"Thanks for pressing play. In april of twenty nineteen michael juergens in his team planted the very first vineyards in the kingdom of bhutan. Now if you've never heard of the bhutan google it and click on the images. It's spelt b. H. u. t. a. n. and what you'll see is a magical landscape the legendary himalayan mountains and some of the most amazing architecture on planet earth. Bhutan is a small country in south asia. It's sandwiched between china and india nepal. And when you travel there you actually fly by mount everest. Bhutan has been called things like the holy grail of travel destinations and the most unique travel destination in the world and amongst other things. Bhutan is also famous for pioneering. An idea a concept they call gross national happiness it turns out that measuring the happiness of the people in the country is as important as measuring the economy and interestingly enough part of gross national happiness is conservation of the environment another thing. Bhutan is known as being a world leader in now our guest today michael jergens. He's a senior partner at deloitte. And he's also a super wine geek of the highest order and on a trip to the bhutan in two thousand sixteen to his amazement he discovered. There was no wine. There and that was in spite of the vast range of extraordinary micro micro climates Wonderful land and soil and farming in the country. Which you're about to listen to. Is the real story of how michael by accident connected with government leaders in this magic little country to become the founder of new industry and.

Bhutan michael juergens himalayan mountains south asia michael jergens nepal google china india deloitte michael
India blocks TikTok and 58 other Chinese apps citing national security concerns

WSJ Tech News Briefing

02:04 min | 1 year ago

India blocks TikTok and 58 other Chinese apps citing national security concerns

"India is banning dozens of Chinese APPS, including Tiktok some say it's retaliation. The move comes after twenty. Indian soldiers died in a clash with Chinese soldiers at a contentious border in the Himalayan mountains, but a senior Indian official told The Wall Street Journal that the APPS may have been used to harm the country's Defence Sector Wall Street Journal reporter Sean Lee has more. It's a huge deal. Because India is a very large market for tech companies in general and also specifically for Chinese tech companies for many of them, for example by Dan's, which is the owner of the very popular short video APP. Talk India is the biggest market for talk after. A lot of Chinese. Tech companies have found a lot of success in India. A lot of them invest in Indian startups, and they've accelerated that in the last few years, speaking of national security concerns and China the National Security Council and a number of other us. Agencies are lobbying European allies to oppose new tech, a Chinese company that makes security screening equipment a reporter Cato. KIEF has more the first. First concern is on national security grounds, because obviously this type of equipment can have access to a lot of both personal and business data, and so the US is concerned that with Chinese state-backed entity potentially having access to all that data that they could feed that back to the Chinese government, and that could create a national security concern, and the second issue is more on a commercial basis new tech. Tech has been winning tons of contracts because their prices are super low. The US says that's because they're heavy subsidies from the Chinese government, and along the way there, then driving a bunch of US competitors to the brink, because they're unable to to compete on price, you know it's a commercial concern that really you know new tackle be the only company left providing this equipment

India Chinese Government United States National Security Council Reporter The Wall Street Journal China Sean Lee Tiktok Official DAN
"himalayan mountains" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"himalayan mountains" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"The glaciers in the Himalayan mountains are melting what they found is notable but what's also notable how they found it here's NPR spin one it starts with spy satellites these satellites for of course put up to essentially peer over the Iron Curtain summer repair from the university of Utah says that high resolution spy satellites were launched during the Cold War to take pictures of hard to reach places on earth somebody that has been declassified in the last decade and so Ripper and her colleagues are using those images to figure out what glaciers and the Himalayas looks like back in the nineteen seventies and eighties Joshua Marder at Columbia University is lead author on the new study in science advances he's having a historical record is super useful glaciers making respond to climb it over time scales that are fairly long and so the fact that we can look back further in time several decades ago really helps us in down how they are responding to the climate compare the spy satellite data with images taken in the last twenty years and they found that the glaciers in the Himalayas have been losing twenty inches of ice a year that means the melting twice as fast now as they were in the eighties and nineties the Himalayas glaciers supply fresh water for billions of people in South Asia more than half of those glaciers are projected to melt in the next eighty years because of climate change Ripper says that she's glad the state is out there and available to researchers it's a treasure trove for scientists to what we're doing is catching changes in the train so you could do this for a landslide you could do it for mechanic corruptions we focus on glaciers but these images are useful for any sort of land surface changes that people might be interested in overtime other researchers have used spy satellite images to look at ice cover in the arctic streams in the Antarctic and meet your path thing long and peonies and I am not gonna lie one of my very favorite duties at all things considered is our annual holiday cocktail chat today we are ringing out twenty nineteen and ringing in the new year with a new cocktail expressly invented to set the tone for twenty twenty when the inventor is self described bartender at large Eddie camera contender by the way for best title ever he is also co host of the shift drink a podcast and he came by our studio to mix me his drink for the new year which he has christened truth.

Joshua Marder Columbia University Himalayas South Asia Antarctic NPR Iron Curtain university of Utah twenty twenty
"himalayan mountains" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"himalayan mountains" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And crisis zones providing emergency aid in over seventy countries learn more at doctors without borders dot org tonight those clouds are rolling out to make way for the ball drop and the fireworks all around town he should have clear skies and lows in the mid thirties tomorrow we can expect a sunny and clear new year's day temperatures in the mid forties and looking ahead to go Thursday more sunshine and warmer temperatures with highs near fifty degrees to round out the week on Friday rain is unlikely but warm temperatures still with highs near fifty degrees again currently at forty four degrees still partly cloudy at Times Square from NPR news this is All Things Considered I merry this is Kelly and I'm Elsa Chang scientists have figured out how fast the glaciers in the Himalayan mountains are melting what they found is notable but what's also notable how they found it here's NPR's ping one it starts with spy satellites these satellites for of course put up to essentially peer over the Iron Curtain summer repair from the university of Utah says that high resolution spy satellites were launched during the Cold War to take pictures of hard to reach places on earth somebody that has been declassified in the last decade and the river and her colleagues are using those images to figure out what glaciers and the Himalayas looks.

Times Square Kelly NPR Himalayas Elsa Chang Iron Curtain university of Utah
NFL Week 16 scores, highlights, and updates

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

NFL Week 16 scores, highlights, and updates

"The packers Akers became the kings of the north after defeating her cousins and the Vikings Twenty three to ten on Monday night football cousins. Now all one nine on Monday night football for his career about the Texans. Jj Awadh expected to return a practice today sources tell ESPN Corsi tourist pectoral muscle in week eight was placed on irs. was to be a three to four months injury But it's only been eight weeks so we'll see see the Seattle seahawks agree to a deal with marshawn lynch on Monday night they face the niners for the NFC West Division title on Sunday night. And Mike Tannenbaum because we've been tracking him all day. Hey according to Santa Tracker Santa is currently in Bhutan. Which of course is a small landlocked nation in Asia located in the eastern Himalayan mountains? Just south China

Mike Tannenbaum Akers Seahawks Santa Packers Jj Awadh Football Marshawn Lynch Vikings NFC Asia Bhutan Espn China Seattle Irs.
How Could Artificial Glaciers Hydrate the Himalayas?

BrainStuff

06:06 min | 2 years ago

How Could Artificial Glaciers Hydrate the Himalayas?

"Discussions about climate change tend to focus on low lying areas like coastal cities yet people who live at higher elevations also feel it's negative effects including fresh water shortages to help these folks get by the duckie inventor named Sonum one Schuch has created a line of artificial glaciers called called. I stoop as their restoring frozen water so it can be used hydrate crops in the driest stretch of the year. Glacial meltwater is a necessity for most villages judges in Lubbock a region of northern India. The DOC sits on the debt and plateau between the Karakoram and the Himalayan mountain ranges this elevated terrain is is world famous for its is supply Abedin Plateau and surrounding mountains contain more ice than any other non polar area on earth. Much of this is stored up in glaciers. His will help feed vital Asian waterways the young Zee the Mekong and Indus rivers. Unfortunately those glaciers are receding because of climate change between two thousand and three in two thousand fourteen the ones located near the Brahmaputra River source lost six point nine billion cubic miles of ice. That's twenty eight point. Eight billion in cubic kilometers with glaciers some seasonal melting is expected but normally winter snowfall allows glaciers to replace the melted ice. They lose during the springtime however across the plateau. Glaciers are no longer getting enough annual snowfall to offset their lost water and so many of them have been dwindling in size as a cold desert. The dock area sees very little rainfall receiving an average of two to three inches per year. That's about fifty to seventy millimeters meters. The summer months of June through August. Do get a modest amount of precipitation however that's also when a large quantity of melted water from neighbouring mountain. Glaciers enters the streams teams. That depends on a steady water flow fills the streams during the winter as well yet because of the frozen ground and low air temperatures. The farmers can't hint grow crops during the coldest months of the year. According to an Chook winter water gets under utilized as a result demand for meltwater grows exponentially in April April in May when the life-sustaining crops of wheat buckwheat and barley need to be sown and hydrated. But in the springtime before the glacial water arrives enforce the streams often run dry. Climate Change has worsened. The problem a twenty seventeen study found that over the past six decades about twenty percent of the permanent ice ice preserves and the Docs home state have disappeared that translates to less meltwater for the locals hoping to solve these water woes. A civil engineer by the the name of Chihuahua North L. devised an innovative reservoir system in the nineteen eighties and I hope I'm saying his name correctly I couldn't find a pronunciation using dams and channels nor fell L. diverted large volumes of glacial water into Manmade Lakes on the shady sides of mountains where it froze into blocks come springtime. The ice would melt and be sent downhill the farms and villages eligible by way of canal. But this ice melted to quickly so the water tended to run out before the summer rains arrived in two thousand thirteen Wangchuk deduced I ice in Norfolk dams melted so fast because too much of it was exposed to direct sunlight. When chook figured that if he could somehow freeze the ice into a conical tower with the narrow oh end aimed skyward much less surface area would be exposed to make his frozen stalagmites when Chook devised an irrigation system? That's brilliant in its simplicity. implicity the major component is a long pipeline most of this is buried deep underground with one end tapping into a glacial stream or naturally occurring reservoir high high in the mountains through the tube the water rushes in the direction of populated areas at lower altitudes. No moving parts are electrical gizmos are needed to keep the liquid water flowing. Gravity does the trick it also pushes the water into the final stage of its journey downhill. The pipeline connects at a sharp angle to another narrower pipe. That rises soil standing vertically like a telephone pole as the saying goes water seeks its own level gravity pretty and pressure gained by flow through the narrowing pipe together naturally propel the liquid straight up that pipe until it flies out of a sprinkler on the pipes raised tip high in the air. The spray encounters atmospheric temperatures in the ballpark of negative four degrees Fahrenheit. That's about negative twenty Celsius or lower before landing it freezes. He's a solid forming a large cone of ice around the vertical pipe. The cones distinctive shape resembles that Stupa which are traditional Buddhist prayer monuments that have graced creased look for thousands of years. Hence when Chook and his associates have taken to calling the new glacier like structures I status the ducks ice Tubas meltdown meltdown in late spring. Right when the need for liquid water is greatest. The prototypical stupa erected in the winter of two thousand thirteen contained about forty thousand gallons. That's about one hundred hundred and fifty thousand liters of frozen water and lasted until may eighteenth of two thousand fourteen. Since then numerous others have been constructed. Single Stupa has is watered as many as five thousand newly planted trees standing at sixty feet eighteen meters tall. It held a breathtaking five hundred and thirty thousand gallons. That's two million liters a frozen water. Others may someday exceed one hundred feet about thirty meters in height and hold two point six million gallons or ten million liters of water outside India. The stupas have spread to countries like Switzerland in two thousand sixteen. When tooks icy brainchild earned him a coveted Rolex award for enterprise But I- stupid are not without their critics. went to in companies legal right to divert. Glacial meltwater has been challenged by a group of the duckie villagers furthermore anymore although the stupas are meant to help sustain human life they won't reverse the Tibetan Plateau's worrisome climate trends but if Homo sapiens is to survive on a changing Jin planet will need to reevaluate the ways. We use an store water. Projects like this can kick start those

Chook India Abedin Plateau Lubbock Karakoram Schuch Tibetan Plateau Single Stupa Brahmaputra River Switzerland Engineer Wangchuk Manmade Lakes Norfolk Four Degrees Fahrenheit Thirty Thousand Gallons Forty Thousand Gallons Fifty Thousand Liters
Lake Roop, Skeleton Skeleton Lake And Roop Kanwar Lake discussed on This Week in Science

This Week in Science

01:21 min | 2 years ago

Lake Roop, Skeleton Skeleton Lake And Roop Kanwar Lake discussed on This Week in Science

"High in the himalayan mountains. There's a lake roop. Oop condoms lake also known as mystery lake. It's a lovely lake. Actually it's a frozen lake all year long covered in ice and snow surrounded by frozen rocky each rain in a very uninhabitable area is this we start singing that led zeppelin song almost and just as the ice and and the snow melter way in the summer sun it gets a new name and instead of mystery laker go start referring it to refer to it as skeleton skeleton lake because the lake bottom is covered in thousands and thousands of bones and they happened happen to be human bones large scale study conducted by an international team of scientists has revealed that the mysterious skeletons relatives of roop kanwar lake belong to a wildly genetically distinct group of people that died at very different times so there's a lot of stories about who these people were it was the king and queen and their entourage it was this <hes> this army that was passing this gap in and they got stuck in all of these stories. He's about this being one group that that had an ill-fated end what it turns out.

Lake Roop Skeleton Skeleton Lake Roop Kanwar Lake Lake Bottom OOP Zeppelin
I Spy, Via Spy Satellite: Melting Himalayan Glaciers

Morning Edition

01:54 min | 2 years ago

I Spy, Via Spy Satellite: Melting Himalayan Glaciers

"Scientists have figured out how fast the glaciers in the Himalayan mountains are melting will, they found his interesting, but it's also interesting how they found it out. Here's NPR's ping pong. It starts with spy satellites. These satellites were, of course, put up to essentially pure over the iron curtain summer refer from the university of Utah says that high resolution spy satellites were launched during the Cold War to take pictures of hard to reach places on earth. Some of that data has been declassified in the last decade, and so- reaper, and enter colleagues are using those images to figure out what glaciers in the Himalayas looked like back in the nineteen seventies and eighties Joshua, mar of Columbia, University is the lead author on their new study in science advances. He says it having a historical record is super useful glaciers, they can respond to climate over timescales that are fairly long. And so the fact that we can look back further in time. Several decades ago really helps us in down how they are responding to the climate. They compare the spy satellite data with images taken in the last twenty years, and they found that the glaciers in the Himalayas have been losing twenty inches of ice a year. That means they're melting twice as fast now as they were in the eighties, nineties, the Himalayas glaciers supply freshwater for billions of people in South Asia, more than half of this glaciers are projected to melt in the next eight years, because of climate change Rupert says she's glad the state is out there and available to researchers. It's a treasure trove for scientists, essentially what we're doing is catching changes in the terrain. So you could do this for landslides. You could do it for volcanic eruptions. We've focused on glaciers, but these images are useful for any sort of land surface changes that people might be interested in overtime. Other researchers have used spy satellite images to look at ice. Cover in the Arctic streams in the Antarctic and meteor

Himalayas NPR University Of Utah Columbia South Asia Joshua Arctic Rupert Antarctic Twenty Inches Twenty Years Eight Years
I Spy, Via Spy Satellite: Melting Himalayan Glaciers

Morning Edition

01:55 min | 2 years ago

I Spy, Via Spy Satellite: Melting Himalayan Glaciers

"Scientists have figured out how fast the glaciers in the Himalayan mountains are melting. Will they found his interesting, but it's also interesting how they found it out. Here's NPR's ping pong. It starts with spy satellites, these satellites, for of course, put up to essentially pure over the iron curtain summer refer from the university of Utah says that high resolution spy satellites were launched during the Cold War to take pictures of hard to reach places on earth. Some of that data has been declassified in the last decade, and so- reaper, enter colleagues are using those images to figure out what glaciers in the Himalayas looked like back in the nineteen seventies and eighties Joshua, mar of Columbia, University is the lead author on their new study in science advances. He says it having a historical record is super useful glaciers, they can respond to climate over timescales that are fairly long. And so the fact that we can look back further in time. several decades ago really helps us in down how they are bonding to the climate they compare the spy satellite data with images taken in the last twenty years and they found that the glaciers in the himalayas have been losing twenty inches of ice a year that means they're melting twice as fast now as they were in the eighties nineties the himalayas glaciers supply freshwater for billions of people in south asia more than half of those glaciers are projected to melt in the next eight years because of climate change rupert says that she's glad the state is out there and available to researchers it's a treasure trove for scientists essentially what we're doing is catching the changes in the terrain so you could do this for landslides you could do it for volcanic eruptions we focused on glaciers but these images are useful for any sort of land surface changes that people might be interested in overtime other v searchers have used spy satellite images to look at ice cover in the arctic streams in the antarctic and meteor path ping hong

Himalayas University Of Utah NPR South Asia Columbia Rupert Antarctic Joshua Twenty Inches Twenty Years Eight Years
I Spy, Via Spy Satellite: Melting Himalayan Glaciers

Morning Edition

01:56 min | 2 years ago

I Spy, Via Spy Satellite: Melting Himalayan Glaciers

"Scientists have figured out how fast the glaciers in the Himalayan mountains are melting with a found his interesting, but it's also interesting how they found it out. Here's NPR's ping pong. It starts with spice at alight. S- satellites, for of course, put up to essentially pure over the iron curtain summer refer from the university of Utah, says that high resolution spy-satellites were launched during the Cold War to take pictures of hard to reach places on earth. Some of data has been declassified in the last decade. And so reported our colleagues are using those images to figure out what glaciers in the Himalayas looked like back in the nineteen seventies and eighties Joshua, mar of Columbia, University is the lead author on their new study in science advances. He says that having a historical record is super useful glaciers, making respond to climate over time scales that are fairly long. And so the fact that we can look back further in time. Several decades ago really helps us in down how they are responding to the climate. They compare the spy satellite data with images taken in the last twenty years, and they found that the glaciers in the Himalayas have been losing twenty inches of ice year. That means they're melting twice as fast now as they were in the eighties, nineties, the Himalayas glaciers supply freshwater for billions of people in South Asia, more than half of glaciers are projected to melt in the next eight years, because of climate change Rupert says that she's glad the state is out there and available to researchers. It's a treasure trove for scientists, essentially, what we're doing is catching changes in terrain, so you could do this for landslides. You could do it for volcanic eruptions, we've focused on glaciers, but he's images are useful for any sort of land surface changes that people might be interested in overtime other v searchers have used spy-satellite images to look at ice. Cover in the Arctic streams in the Antarctic and meteor path ping. Hong NPR

Himalayas NPR Hong Npr University Of Utah Columbia South Asia Joshua Arctic Rupert Antarctic Twenty Inches Twenty Years Eight Years
"himalayan mountains" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"himalayan mountains" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from frame bridge. They make custom framing easy and affordable frame. Your art in photos at frame bridge dot com or visit their new stores located on fourteenth street and Bethesda row. Get fifteen percent off your first frame bridge order with code NPR. Scientists have figured out how fast the glaciers in the Himalayan mountains or melting will they found his interesting, but it's also interesting how they found it out. Here's NPR's pong. It starts with spy satellites. These satellites, of course, put up to essentially pure over the iron curtain summer refer from the university of Utah says that high resolution spy satellites were launched during the Cold War to take pictures of hard to reach places on earth. Some of that data has been declassified in the last decade, and so- reprint her colleagues are using those images to figure out what glaciers in the Himalayas looked like back in the nineteen seventies and eighties Joshua mar of Columbia universe. City is the lead author on their new study in science advances. He says that having a historical record is super useful glaciers, they can respond to climate over timescales that are fairly long. And so the fact that we can look back further in time, several decades ago, really hope so pinned down how they are responding to the climate. They compare the spy satellite data with images taken in the last twenty years, and they found that the glaciers in the Himalayas have been losing twenty inches of ice a year. That means they're melting twice as fast now as they were in the eighties, nineties, the Himalayas glaciers supply freshwater for billions of people in South Asia, more than half of those glaciers are projected to melt in the next eighty years, because of climate change Rupert says that she's glad the state is out there and available to researchers. It's a treasure trove for scientists, essentially what we're doing is catching the changes in the terrain. So you could do this for landslides, you could do it for volcanic eruptions, we focused on glaciers, but these images. Are useful for any sort of land surface changes that people might be interested in overtime. Other researchers have used spy satellite images to look at ice. Cover in the Arctic streams in the Antarctic and Meteo paths ping, Hong NPR news.

Himalayas frame bridge NPR Hong NPR Joshua mar university of Utah South Asia Arctic Rupert Antarctic fifteen percent twenty inches eighty years twenty years
"himalayan mountains" Discussed on NPR's World Story of the Day

NPR's World Story of the Day

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"himalayan mountains" Discussed on NPR's World Story of the Day

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from discover with the discovery miles card. They automatically match the miles you earn at the end of your first year. Discover it miles. Limitations apply. Discover match for new card members only learn more at discover dot com slash travel. Scientists have figured out how fast the glaciers in the Himalayan mountains are melting will, they found his interesting, but it's also interesting how they found it out. Here's NPR's pong. It starts with spy satellites. These satellites, of course, put up to essentially pure over the iron curtain summer refer from the university of Utah says that high resolution spy satellites were launched during the Cold War to take pictures of hard to reach places on earth. Some of that data has been declassified in the last decade, and so- reprint our colleagues are using those images to figure out what glaciers in the Himalayas looked like back in the nineteen seventies and eighties Joshua, mar of Columbia, University is the lead author on there. New study in science advances. He says that having a historical record is super useful glaciers, they can respond to climate over timescales that are fairly long. And so the fact that we can look back further in time, several decades ago, really hope so pin down how they are responding to the climate. They compare the spy satellite data with images taken in the last twenty years, and they found that the glaciers in the Himalayas have been losing twenty inches of ice year. That means they're melting twice as fast now as they were in the eighties, nineties, the Himalayas glaciers supply freshwater for billions of people in South Asia, more than half of this glaciers are projected to melt in the next eighty years, because of climate change Rupert says she's glad the state is out there and available to researchers. It's a treasure trove for scientists, essentially what we're doing is catching the changes in the terrain. So you could do this for landslides, you could do it for volcanic eruptions, we focused on glaciers, but these images are useful for any sort of. Land surface changes that people might be interested in overtime. Other researchers have used spy-satellite images to lick it ice cover in the Arctic streams in the antibiotic and meteor pats ping, Hong NPR news.

Himalayas university of Utah NPR Hong NPR Columbia South Asia Arctic Joshua Rupert twenty inches eighty years twenty years
"himalayan mountains" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"himalayan mountains" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"It on freeway signs. An amber alert is in effect tonight, as police trying to find a baby boy, who was taken by his mother who police say has mental health issues. They're believed to be driving in a two thousand eight white Honda Accord license plate number C J, h five three three. Michael Schweik is two years old. He's white with Brown hair, and Brown eyes. Police against say his mother has mental health issues and apparently took Michael from his home in Belgrade, Montana. They may have been spotted in eastern Washington and could be heading to Seattle, Pierce county sheriff's detectives are hopeful, as they search for two missing hikers in mount Ranier, national park, experienced hiker. So we're hoping that they're okay? And they just cut themselves laws at this point, we will cancel the search as it gets dark, and it becomes too dangerous, but will resume the search in the morning detective Ed Troyer says the search includes. Airplanes. Drones and crews on the ground. The two men in the early forties were expected to return from their hike yesterday on the mother mountain trail. It has been a tragic climbing season in the Himalayas on one of India's highest peaks today. The search for a group of missing climbers ended with a grim discovery as we hear from CBS's Jonathan Vigliotti through search for survivors on Debbie mountain in the Himalayas has become a recovery mission. A local official confirming five bodies were found by chopper in the snow, tether together, they're empty tents discovered nearby of this group of eight professional climbers, three are still missing feared, buried by an avalanche Americans Ronald BiMAL, and Anthony Ceuta. Come are described as having a passion for adventure. It has been a deadly climbing season in the Himalayas eleven people have already died while trying to summit. Mount Everest and troubles continue to mount for Boeing tonight. The company is warning that some seven thirty sevens may have faulty wing parts and a CBS is David Begg. No reports Boeing is blaming the supplier, more than three hundred jets worldwide may need to be fixed that includes some of the seven thirty seven maxes that model is grounded worldwide for a software upgrade after two deadly crashes overseas. They're no longer. Call the sea cows, the Seahawks announced today. The teams dance, what will be called the Seahawks dancers and. For the first time ever, they're gonna clued men, the team says it's all part of a rebranding effort is the Seahawks. Continually to look to evolve their game day. Entertainment, the new Seahawks dancers, we'll have twenty two women and eight men. Let's check back in with Tracy Taylor now with our KIRO radio realtime traffic,.

Seahawks Himalayas Michael Schweik Boeing CBS mount Ranier Mount Everest Ed Troyer Belgrade David Begg Pierce county Brown Tracy Taylor Montana Washington India Seattle KIRO Ronald BiMAL
"himalayan mountains" Discussed on Stories Podcast

Stories Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"himalayan mountains" Discussed on Stories Podcast

"The narrow bridge. High up in the Himalayan mountains in the chilly place above the clouds. There was a wild world of winter animals. They came large and small they came strong and came slender mighty goats leapt from craggy ledge to craggy ledge ice, white leopards purred among the frozen stone. Great shaggy yaks plotted heads down up and up hoof smoothed trails musk deer and marmots and feathered weapon. Birds of prey and more together. They struggled against the cold and lived on the mountain the mountain was their home. But it was also their greatest challenge the trails were narrow the slopes icy and treacherous moved to loudly step wrong and send a stone tumbling. And you may cause an avalanche that buries you deep under a blanket of snow. Luckily, the animals. That made their home above the clouds were brave, and sure footed, non more. So than the goat. The goats could move from one razor thin ledge to the next needing next to nothing to find shore footing or in their case shore who've ING as excellent as they were at balancing. They were even better at being stubborn the old goats were a specially bad they refuse to help thought of sharing as a bad word and would rather sit outside in a blizzard than utter the word, please. So with that in mind, it's not surprising that two of the oldest. Most stubborn goats of all would eventually meet on the mountain one was the Brown grey of dirty snow. The other was the gray Brown of snowy dirt both were irritable and prone to loud, complaining they met on a cold after noon, just below the clouds where the greens were still fresh and delicious there in the valley..

"himalayan mountains" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"himalayan mountains" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"One was an, these are very, very primitive groups who who hunt hunt wildlife for exchanging with the Chinese for salt. That's their trade that it's only the thebenz up in the very far north, they were Buddhist, and the monk wanted to to come with me in this area because he had never been and to convert. Not to convert per se, because that's not what these Buddhist monks do, but to live with the the people and and get them to accept Buddhism through through his example. I guess it is a kind of conversion, but through through example, rather than through any kind of active active activity. So really interesting. It was a very strange group of us walking up there into the far north and eventually after I think three weeks, it took us walking every day staying in these different villages of tribal groups. I had never read about or heard about groups called the the Rwandan the tallow groups. I've never seen written up in any kind of anthropological treatise or writings. We reached the last settlement of human habitation in northern Burma from there on it was pure rugged, snowy Himalayan mountains to the to the Tabet in border and over into China..

China Burma three weeks
"himalayan mountains" Discussed on Your Own Magic

Your Own Magic

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"himalayan mountains" Discussed on Your Own Magic

"Hello soul tribe ric hell here i am on such a high right now as i am relishing in what i just wanted for you this was the very first time i heard this guests speak for us while i was editing because i wasn't physically there and trust me your in for some delicious dessert alley did the most phenomenal job taking the wheel this episode on our very first ever in person your own magic interview well her first person interview i unfortunately was on a plane and have yet to have experience but that's okay this person was worth booking and honestly this person doesn't need either one of us to make this episode magical as he speaks for himself so yes i feel the omo the fear of missing out absolutely because he is one of my top choices that i have longed interview but more so to have on this show in that has manifested and i just can't wait for you to get a taste of in q who is one of my favorite contemporary spoken word poets actually no wait one of my favorite poets of all time who alley happen to introduce me to back in our india days a year ago we'll she introduced me to his poetry and meigs bums were as tall as the himalayan mountains that we were staying on seriously.

india meigs
"himalayan mountains" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

Quirks and Quarks

01:59 min | 4 years ago

"himalayan mountains" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

"So then way isolated dna from the samples and obviously we didn't know how to graded the dna was and whether we could really recover dna from me samples and then were looked at first bits of pieces of dna from the might of conrol genome which is the you know powell house of our sales found in high copy number anna pablo marker to look at in also one that previous study had been looking at but also there is a huge publicly available database off might have contral dna sequence data that and we had access to and we had also generated a lot of monaco no dna sequence data from bears from around the world so we could compare these samples to a large database of dna data from other bears around the world and that was important to us since we were working with animals of unknown identity a uneven in a also there is a lot of data not just from bears for from all kinds of all the animals in the database as well so that made it possible to identify these samples based on this okay so after you did your a genetic analysis and you compare to all these other animals and all the other bears what did you find we had nine samples that were sent to me and eight of them matched as local bears living today in the himalayan region so several of them matched tibetan round bear that's today living and the tibetan plateau at one of them matched a himalayan brown bear that's found in the himalayan mountains today and also won matched in ancient black bear that's found in the himalayan mountains so all these eight samples they match local bears that are today living on the tibetan plateau in the himalayan mountains that what about the notes yeah that's an interesting one that was a choose.

powell
"himalayan mountains" Discussed on Your Own Magic

Your Own Magic

01:53 min | 4 years ago

"himalayan mountains" Discussed on Your Own Magic

"Get over my shyness honestly all teaching and cold was inner voice and then in walks rick hell who i had no idea it would become lake my soul friend in life and she's like mermaid girl and she would come to my classes at six a m which like my best friends my sister didn't do that like an huda so it was pretty cool i can i say i mean you said i am t to in a six m class and honestly guys it's as much as i'd like to give myself props for entering the pick for him clause i am an early bird i wake up between like four thirty or five am so i can start ramona routine so to be on us a sick fam clause was so ideal for me but long story short i saw her we communicated where you're like all right i'm going to take your call us i did and then about and then i went off to bali a year later we were just deeming that's race let into my idea i slid into your dea you did which is at makes me feel so grateful because like just you can a lot of times i'm just saying elegant for good amount of dhea you know you stayed up at like pretty much all my friends at my life or through instagram later so people need to groom is the true like but is the tinder of just friendships it is the that is a great way to put it anyways so long story short after meeting are kalfa the first time i lived in la for another year i've grown up there my whole life and i had moved to a wall who hand and retela dion mees juicing mogo in hawaii and stay with me and then she response and she's like okay but i'm during a five hundred hour teacher training in the himalayan mountains for meditation.

instagram la hawaii rick bali five hundred hour six m
"himalayan mountains" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

01:38 min | 4 years ago

"himalayan mountains" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

"Your role was to shepherd judge gorsuch through the confirmation process when did you when we were first brought in what was that shepherd roll like well i was that so the day that uh than judge gorsuch was going to be nominated earlier in the day i was contacted by the white house and asked to be the socalled sherpa uh now sherpa's bring people up the himalayan mountains so i'm that's been the traditional term called someone who brings around the supreme court nominee to the senate so i um you know i thought about an they said i'd like to do it and especially for someone like now justice gorsuch because his background and qualifications her exceptional and um and it was really interesting to get to know a supreme court justice and to spend you know eight or ten hours a day for one hundred days with them so of so i appreciated opportunity and we put a lot of as the judge said to me the other day we put a lot of us steps and a lot of miles and are few 'cause we did almost 80 senate meetings together i imagine the nominees appreciate being likened to uh hikers rather than sheep exactly nodded she but did definitely i'll i'll think about as a hiker soon we pray we we ought we both like to compare the number of steps we've had verde galaxies various of worry us uh an perhaps deathdefying in in in ways you might not have considered let's right arm.

gorsuch white house senate justice gorsuch one hundred days ten hours