24 Burst results for "Hillbilly"

Power, equality, nationalism: how the pandemic will reshape the U.S.

Morning Edition

05:42 min | 5 months ago

Power, equality, nationalism: how the pandemic will reshape the U.S.

"This pandemic could permanently change the way we live there will almost certainly be more hand washing and more telework in the future but could also cause lasting political and policy changes national political correspondent Mara license has some answers there are a lot of people who think the pandemic could reshape politics in profound ways this crisis is a time machine to the future Anne Marie slaughter CEO of the new America think tank was the former director of policy planning at the Obama state department I think we'll look back and see that this was like the Great Depression or a war and that created political space to make big policy change that seem just too hard even two months ago big policy changes that could rearrange traditional political divisions now that Republicans in the Senate have voted unanimously for policies they have opposed in the past like paid sick leave a guaranteed minimum income student debt relief protections for renters and for gig economy workers of course this massive package of federal help for ordinary people is only temporary but slaughter says it has the potential to permanently change the political debate suddenly in a crisis like this people realize across the political spectrum that unless we can provide a floor the whole economy can crash that paid sick leave is not about coddling workers it's about making sure that sick workers don't come to work and infect others people are equally realizing if workers have no money to spend the economy can't function Democrats have advocated many of these policies for decades but now that Congress has approved the largest federal intervention in the economy since the creation of Medicare they see a new opportunity to push for big investments in modern digital infrastructure like five G. a better public health system universal health insurance that doesn't disappear when you lose your job and a stronger social safety net as he endorsed Joe Biden last week former president Barack Obama was making this argument the vast inequalities created by the new economy are easier to see now the big sister long before this pandemic health professionals teachers delivery drivers grocery clerks cleaners the people who truly make our economy run they've always been essential in for years to many of the people who do the essential work of this country have been underpaid financially stressed and given to local support Democrats aren't the only ones who see a political opportunity in the pandemic the nationalist populist wing of the Republican Party that's been warning about the dangers of globalization has also gotten a boost says conservative JD Vance the author of hillbilly elegy one of the core arguments of the trunk twenty sixteen campaign is that in our supply chains in our manufacturing economy we become too dependent on a globalized world especially China it turns out that if you want to have an economy that could weather crisis you actually have to be able to make some core things yourself whether it's wireless technology whether it's pharmaceutical products whether it's been a leaders and hospital masks and that's exactly the argument that you're hearing from Peter Navarro president trump's pandemic equipments are if there is any indication of the presence by American secure borders and a strong manufacturing base philosophy strategy and believe it is this crisis on trade the pandemic gives a clear advantage to the anti globalists and the GOP led by president trump but on domestic policies and the role of the federal government while Democrats know what they want Republicans aren't so sure says Henry Olsen a fellow at the ethics and public policy center in Washington I think the debate within the Republican Party over what it stands for has been heating up and the pandemic is going to kick it into overdrive that you've got the people who are holding on to the neo libertarian version of the past but there you've seen more and more calls for reform which is moving more in the direction of engaging the Democrats on their core issue which is how do we help people rather than saying the government can't help people there are already lots of splits conservative freshman senator Joe Holly for instance wants to beef up the social safety net he's advocating a European style unemployment backstop where the federal government would pay companies eighty percent of wages to prevent layoffs but other Republicans support nothing more than the current temporary emergency measures and in addition to tea party style protests against the stay at home orders there's also conservative pushback to the exponential increases in federal spending even temporarily but despite those Republican tensions JD Vance says it will be hard for the president and his party to continue to argue that popular programs like obamacare should be eliminated lock stock and barrel I think the appetite for small government everyone is on their own approach to the welfare state frankly was always pretty small and it's going to be even smaller I think over the next couple of years especially since vans when there are at least twenty two million people who applied for unemployment benefits how this debate resolves itself depends on how long the pandemic recession lasts and how popular the government rescue programs turn out to be but until then the pandemic is given both parties an opportunity to appeal to the vast number of Americans who will need help from the federal government for some time to

"hillbilly" Discussed on The Bitter Southerner Podcast

The Bitter Southerner Podcast

01:33 min | 8 months ago

"hillbilly" Discussed on The Bitter Southerner Podcast

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> nerve <Music> bad hitter <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> elster <Music> <Music> <Music> future <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> or other music today <Speech_Music_Male> is Ridge <Speech_Music_Male> in all and composed <Speech_Male> for this episode <Speech_Music_Male> by Fi- musician <Speech_Music_Male> from my hometown <Speech_Music_Male> of Eljay Georgia. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Eric <Speech_Music_Male> sales <Speech_Male> my mountain brother <Speech_Music_Male> for a long long <Speech_Music_Male> time <Speech_Music_Male> we heard additional <Speech_Music_Male> music from de Wolfe <Speech_Music_Male> Music. And if <Speech_Music_Male> you like the bitter southern <Speech_Music_Male> podcast we <Speech_Music_Male> would appreciate <Speech_Male> it so much if he <Speech_Male> would review it and write <Speech_Male> it on apple podcasts. <Speech_Male> Even if you listen <Speech_Male> somewhere else <Speech_Male> our show <Speech_Male> is a CO production of <Speech_Music_Male> Georgia public broadcasting <Speech_Music_Male> and the bitter Southerner <Speech_Music_Male> magazine. <Speech_Music_Male> You can access <Speech_Music_Male> more from each <Speech_Music_Male> episode two. Pp <Speech_Music_Male> DOT org <Speech_Music_Male> slash podcast <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> once again. I'm chuck <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> reaves and <Speech_Music_Male> my three. Instructions <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> remained constant <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> more necks. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Bad No <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> did <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> spend your <Speech_Music_Male> time doing what you <Speech_Music_Male> love with. Who <Speech_Music_Male> You love. <Speech_Male> And if a hillbilly <Speech_Male> happens to be <Speech_Music_Male> among those you love. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> I'm so glad <Speech_Music_Male> to hear it. So <Speech_Music_Male> y'all on the next <Music> steps.

"hillbilly" Discussed on The Bitter Southerner Podcast

The Bitter Southerner Podcast

06:37 min | 8 months ago

"hillbilly" Discussed on The Bitter Southerner Podcast

"Welcome back on this episode. We're talking about perceptions of APPALACHIA and I wanNA introduce you to another contributor to the Book Appalachian Reckoning that. We've been talking about her name is Ivy Brochure and for ten generations. Obvious family has lived down the left fork of Mace's creek. That's in Perry County Kentucky. County seat hazard now. She's the Appalachian Transition Director at something called the Mountain Association for Community Economic Development in Berea Kentucky. She's also rider whose work has appeared. Not only in the bitter southerner but also in the Huffington Post and other outlets ivy is in her early Thirties. And she says she seen way too. Many over-simplified stereotypical images about the mountain people. She loves I've made it my entire life actually to combat those narratives Which are oftentimes false. And misleading about Who Lives in this place Who gets to claim it as their own and who gets to tell the stories about the place and so when I was asked to be a part of this Part of this book I I was glad to do it and was glad to share some stories of my people. My family and my place as a way to further complicate the narrative of Appalachia FRAPP Appalachian Reckoning Ivy contributed an essay called. Keep your allergy Appalachia. I knows very much alive. We publish that in the Bidder Southerner magazine too and she opens up piece by talking about her granny della who absolutely never backed down from a fight especially when it came to defending her home and her family della combs brashear had had enough. She backed her cadillac long ways across the one lane road in front of her house with the Virginia. Slim in her mouth pulled her thirty eight pistol from her purse and waited stone faced and determined for the next culture to come along. The trucks have been running day. Not Up and down the head of the lift work of Mesa's creek in front of her house every day for weeks. They were coating every bit of furniture in an outside her home with a thick layer of coal dust. Her kitchen counter the rocking chair. She said in while watching the process rot in the morning and wheel of fortune in the evening the porch swing the hanging ferns that encased her porch nothing escaped the intrusive insidious dust kicked up from the road. By the trucks. They barrelled back and forth to the Strip man on the overlooking mountain. The dust swirled in thick grey clouds around the house sweeping in under the front door and closed windows. It buried everything no matter dillas efforts to keep the todd's at bay coldest soon nominees were inescapable. There's only so many times a woman bound to the code of CLOROX. Pledge and WINDEX can clean up after someone else's miss before the time comes to act. She wasn't afraid of jail. They'll give me three hot meals a day and a place to sleep. She proclaimed to my dad when he tried to persuade her to remove her. One woman barricade and she wasn't really making a political stand against an oppressive thieving industry. She was more interested in defending her home from unwanted unclean intrusions. That was Obvi- bushier reading portion of her essay. Keep your allergy. She says our beloved granny. Delo is very much the fierce mountain woman an archetype that those of us in Appalachia know and revere Granny Della was never more fierce than when it came to protecting her family when it came to standing up for her family and her place but also she was very joyful The joy that she had was really infectious And the joy for laugh that she had was really infectious. And I think that's also something that we need to tell these stories because appalachian joy is not really featured in these negative stories that we see for Avi telling the stories of Appalachia helps keep memories like the one that she has of her granny. Del Alive honestly. I'd look for any opportunity to bring her back Back to laugh in back to me and share with the world. When I read in the story about Della I thought about an even more complex thing. The true civil rights moment of my mother. Now that last voice you heard belongs to Marie Cochran. Murray was born and raised in southern Appalachia specifically and to Coa Georgia which is in Stevens County about ninety miles east of where I grew up and that means that my home town is named after Alexander Stevens. Who's the vice president of the confederacy and it also has a Cherokee named for the city and so? It's like a walking contradiction. Marie and I met because she runs a most amazing organization. It's called the Appalachian Arts Project. And then yes. You heard that right. After election he gathers work of black artists from the mountains and art exhibitions and they travel to steamed venues like the most recent at the August Wilson Cultural Center in Pittsburgh and going back to her mother. Marie Remembers Living Into Cohen. The nineteen seventies long after schools in her community were desegregated and she says her mom did something pretty amazing that lives in her memory. She had been told okay. This is the bus that your children catch and she noticed that okay. We'll just happens to be you know all the black cat kids in the community but one day I think one of us was sick or something and she saw another bus. Come by. We had to walk down the street to the corner to this. I bust the bus. And then she saw this other bus comebacker house and she said wait a minute. My kids don't have to walk down to the corner. There's another bus. So she stood in the middle of the road and stopped the bus.

Marie Cochran APPALACHIA Granny Della Appalachia Perry County Kentucky Mountain Association for Commu Huffington Post Appalachian Arts Project Berea Kentucky CLOROX Director brashear Virginia cadillac Mesa todd Alexander Stevens
"hillbilly" Discussed on The Bitter Southerner Podcast

The Bitter Southerner Podcast

07:39 min | 8 months ago

"hillbilly" Discussed on The Bitter Southerner Podcast

"Now when Appalachian reckoning came out I was asked to interview Meredith and Tony in front of an audience when they're booked who were brought them to Atlanta. What's your about here. Right now. Was recorded in front of a live audience that Manuel's tavern and Atlanta institution of sorts. I'm Tony hearkens I am not from APPALACHIA. But I've been writing about Appalachia for quite some time. Mostly about the image of Appalachia the representations of it and Tony Harkin said he was surprised by how frequently the word Hillbilly comes up in the media constantly. Comes up again and again and again. And he'll billy elegy is just the latest rendition of that. In a way that Reinforces many of the stereotypes. That really go back a century or more but get reframed each time and a new in the new style. Hi I'm Meredith mccarroll. And as we were to have so many people say oh. I read Hillbilly Allergy. I get where you're from now. I was like Oh. No you don't Mirta says Appalachia's much larger diverse region and how it's depicted in hillbilly elegy thirteen state region. And it's it's an incredibly diverse place. And what most people in the region were frustrated by Was the audacity of JD. Vance to make these claims about his own experience speaking for others. If you've that is the crux of the problem with hillbilly eligible because brother. Jd what you did was. You turned your story into our story. And that's why Meredith. Anthony felt compelled in their book to collect the voices of meaning. Different kinds of Appalachian Peop- the single story that JD Vance offers is not the only story that there are many Appalachian experiences. There are many Appalachian people. This is a diverse place and we wanted to make sure that that that complexity was being was being made clear it's pretty rare to see a book published specifically in response to another book but Meredith mccarroll one of Appalachian reckonings editors says she sees those forty voices a chorus that pushes back against the stereotypes that follow them. There is radical activism that has been going on in Appalachia for a very long time because this this idea of people of outsiders coming in or I guess. In this case it's insiders going out but people writing about and talking about Appalachian Particular Way. That's really damaging and holds onto these stereotypes of a place that is That is of another time and it's really backwards. Those are really damaging stereotype. And there's nothing new about it and so that's led to a ferocity among Appalachian people and it's led to incredibly rich and beautiful storytelling and writing and photography and film. May myrtos mccarroll. Herself is one of those Appalachians who's written richly and beautifully about her experience. And that night when we recorded meredith and Tony she read from one of her own contributions to Appalachian reckoning an essay called on and on Appalachian accent an academic power. Here she is reading a little bit of it. We studied the foxfire magazines like those that line the bookshelves in my childhood living room. We practice churning butter. We read about quilting and some of this resonated with me because it was familiar my granny painstakingly taught me to quilt one summer. Which mostly met that? I spent my time watching her. Pull out all of my sloppy handwork. My GRANDPA who next door grew and canned tomatoes and green beans. I knew the differences between half runners and blue lakes and know of no sound more satisfying than the top of the ceiling on the kitchen counter in the late afternoon. But there are plenty about blockchain traditions that I did not know and there was nothing markedly appalachian that we did because we had to. It is true that I had eaten groundhog on a camping trip and kidney most of the local peaks by site. But it's also true that I bought incense and SPIRULINA health food stores in Asheville. I more Tim Pay Than I did. Fat Back and I loved on Eighty Franko Doc Watson equally after graduation. I moved to Boston and became for the first time. An outsider. Like so many before me. It took leaving home to understand it while I was proud of my home. I was also learning. The powerful. Stereotypes about APPALACHIA had arrived in places like Boston. Well before me and influenced the way. The even the most considerate people thought about me so actively tried to talk right to be correct to hide my accent. There was this one. Lingering linguistic marker that caused me the most panic when I slipped long after I attach. Jeez to Maj Aaron's bleached out the local color from my language. I stumbled over. The word in my mom told me to put my coat on and those words and she told me to call her when. I was on the road and those words run to my Appalachian Tongue. O W N and we're pronounced exactly the same way but not for the rest of the world. I learned this reminder that I was not from around here meant to me that I might not belong in a Boston graduate school so I learned to always use adverbs. I took my groceries from a buggy and put them in a cart. I nearly stopped calling my hat Toboggan. I forced my thousand to shape and it worked. I got into Graduate School. I got a PhD. I learned to pass. But I'd lost my voice and it wasn't until a decade later that my own repressed voice echoed back to me West Virginia as writer and activist. Silas House spoke at a conference addressing the theme of New Appalachia urging his audience to bring civil rights issues for. Lgbtq people into our classrooms are scholarship in our conversations in order to make appalachia safer place in one moment. His voice cracked as he was overcome with emotion remembering the violence acted upon Queer Youth In. Appalachia throats tightened across the rim. He paused and then said quietly. And that will go on and on and own until we the teachers and writers and students in this room commit to change now to an outsider. It might have sounded like he was saying. Oh W N over and over but when I heard Silence House repeat this word in this context I felt the ground shift beneath me because while he talked about justice I heard the timbre of my hall and is he read his own poetry. I heard the cadence of my aunt betsy is. He addressed his audience. I heard my mom talking. I heard established scholars speaking accents and it did not change the content of what they were saying it. It did not change the power of their intellect. Then I stood up to deliver my paper about the politics of representation and Appalachian Film. And my g's were intact. My vow stood up straight. My on was not my own and I felt a powerful loss of my own voice and my own accent..

Appalachia Meredith mccarroll Tony Harkin Boston APPALACHIA Appalachian Film New Appalachia Atlanta Jd hillbilly JD Vance Manuel Vance Asheville Mirta Franko Doc Watson West Virginia Silas House Anthony
"hillbilly" Discussed on The Bitter Southerner Podcast

The Bitter Southerner Podcast

02:00 min | 8 months ago

"hillbilly" Discussed on The Bitter Southerner Podcast

"The haulers of APPALACHIA ARE TEEMING WITH PEOPLE. Who Don't look like and don't live like those stereotypes. Hollywood is just never been much interested in hearing their stories and when Appalachian folks of the sort I describe read Hillbilly Elegy. They're hurt when we did the first episode of this season the one about the southern accent. One of our listeners commented on Apple podcasts that and I quote I'm from Appalachia. I wanted to hide that when my family migrated to Michigan to survive listening to this podcast brought me home again. In a way that reminds me that we don't have to be like J. D. advance in Hillbilly. Elegy IS IT TURNS OUT. That person was not alone in the months. When Hillbilly allergy set firmly atop all the bestseller lists conversations began among many native appalachians among some academics who were fascinated by the region. Even though they didn't grow up two of these people were Meredith mccarroll a North Carolina Mountain woman. Who is now the director of the writing and rhetoric program at Bowdoin College in Maine and Anthony Hopkins a Non Appalachian steeped deeply in the region through his work as a history professor at Western Kentucky University in their conversations led them to assemble book called Appalachian reckoning the region response to Hillbilly Elegy Appalachian reckoning includes forty voices White Puerto Rican Black Queer Straight Trans activist teachers preachers artists sociologists historians legal scholars literary scholars and organizers about half of them are women and every damn one of them is Appalachian..

Appalachian APPALACHIA Meredith mccarroll Appalachia White Puerto Rican Anthony Hopkins Western Kentucky University North Carolina Mountain Bowdoin College Hollywood Michigan Apple Maine director professor J. D.
Designing Anticancer Drugs with Reinforcement Learning

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

10:24 min | 8 months ago

Designing Anticancer Drugs with Reinforcement Learning

"Having a background in cognitive science and computational neuroscience and so I've been like focusing focusing on brain research for my pastor five years of education and now recently I've been doing more work on computational tation assistance biology and specifically on cancer and cancer trying to understand mechanisms of how cancer work and how we can find new treatments against cancer specifically quickly and in this work. I've been using mostly deep learning techniques and this will be part of like my presentation here at this conference. It's also and so yeah. So how do those things go together. So I think like many people think it's in a way weird if you come from brain scientists and then you go into machine running right and this is something I would say. It's like it's a very obvious thing to do in a way because if you look back into the history of machine she learning where it all came from like McCulloch and Pitts the first artificial neuron and then a few years later Frank Rosen ballot the perception. And so these were all computational neuroscientists and they were in the end really trying to understand how the brain works and they basically develop the The fundamental of the field of machine learning and so at some point this community and in a way it split up into groups and one group was more trying to and actually understanding the brain works and the other group was more interested in solving the problems. Right right and from this from this community. The machine learning learning community evolved into but whereas computation neuroscience right. Now it's it. It's still a field. It's still out there. It's has been separating more and more from the machine community what's there and originally it has been one like one big community. Yeah and so therefore I think it's quite natural to to have the process. Yeah Yeah you know I think Particularly here at Noor ups I have opportunity to speak with many folks that are kind of working on on that edge of cognitive sciences brain sciences and both using that to inform the way we think about machine learning using machine learning to validate you know some of the biological theories it was maybe more novel is coming from Cognitive Science and brain science and applying machine gene learning to developing cancer pharmaceuticals out in that. Come about yeah. How did that come about a good question? So like if you look at brain scientists this really this problem of seeing the brain which is arguably the most complex thing we have in the universe and and seeing like observing this brain and trying to understand his brain from at different scales at different spatial scales so to speak. So you can think about about the brain in the very abstract and cognitive ways thinking about cognitive phenomena like language and memory those things and you can think about it more from from neural perspective like how do act like what is the most fundamental unit of information processing. How do these units interact? How does information arise? And so like these two fundamentally different approaches and so I like in the first three years of my studies focused on cognitive science which has more top down approach unlike thinking from the big concepts and then down towards the implementation level whereas competition neuro science. They have more like the spot. Him Perspective They in the end and they're trying to solve the same problems but they start first with the basic building blocks like having a biologically plausible neural network model will that imitates basic behavior of neurons. And then they try to scale it up in order to understand more complex cognitive phenomenon and so like these field they really deep. They help each other and they need to work together in order to better understand how the brain works and so after after Android area defeating. Okay I need something a more solid and I really wanted to have this bottom up perspective from competition neuroscience which then I got my masters and so afterwards I I I mean I have to say that I was keen to explore and applications of machine learning because while studying the brain I got really interested more and more into the whole field of data signs and machine learning but and I wanted to apply those techniques but at the same time I wanted to I wanted to still somehow how work with the human body and with humans in general so this is how you how I came about him doing cancer Consume drunk modeling and so the poster is titled Pacman. Tell us about yeah Eh. So pacman is a frame. I mean it's an acronym so spelled with a double double and so it's an acronym. We came up during in my like about a year ago. During my master's thesis for prediction of anticancer compound sensitivity with multimodal attention based neural networks. And and so like when my supervisor came about with this acronym one of very long nights we spend in the lab. We like okay. There's no discussion. This is GonNa be the name for the project. Ah So quite funny how this came about so and we what we're doing in this work at that was the first step step off of the project and presenting at the conference. We were trying to basically forecast the effect the inhibitory effect of emol against a specific type of cancer and so we are treating this problem of predicting cancer drug sensitivity. Not really as the property of a pair and the pair is con- like composed of Itself the chemical the drug that you give to the patient and then the particular to more sell that you want to target because cancer is really like A. It's a family of diseases and the SORTA verse I. I mean there has probably never been two types of cancer that have been exactly alike because the Medicaid of mutations you have they vary like hillbilly inbetween of every individual patients. So it's really unfeasible to try to investigate whether molecule has some onto cancer effects in general. So you really need to treat this problem as the property of pair. So is this drug like hesitant. inhibitory effect against this specific type of cancer patient individually one of the questions. That comes up I is one of the techniques. You're applying here reinforcement learning. How does that play into Into achieving that goal so it comes about in the second step first that was really just trying to predict the sensitivity so the efficacy of Audrey and so what we what we did in consecutive step after we had built this model what we asked ourselves was like. Wow wouldn't it be amazing to have a model that can generate rate new drugs at can like come up and propose new anti-cancer candidate rex. Because in the old pharmaceutical industry there's a huge uh-huh productivity decline in the last few decades and the estimated costs that you have pulled new truck there Estimated to be two three billion Indian USD and most of these drugs that are like FDA approved and approved on the market. So they're really specific only for like very few types of diseases sort of even one disease only so the cost in our indeed that go are like spent in this business. It's just huge and and so we I mean we came up with this framework reinforcement. Learning is really core component. Where we're trying to design anti-cancer cancer drugs specifically for individual patients or groups of patients so we tried to envision the precision medicine perspective here where we're really We're not trying to generically. Come up with new cat. anti-cancer candidate drugs. But we try to like in the design process itself. Both we try to tailor the Monaco the drug specifically to the need of the patient himself or herself and so forth for this framework we use. We're using reinforcement Okay you also mentioned in the title of the poster transcript domain data. What is transcript Tomac data? You're right so you can think about transplant. Tomic data as basically The the expression of every single gene that you have in your body like you do you know about the human genome and so part of the human genome and code for specific proteins and these expression of these proteins. You can measure in the cell. That's different techniques techniques to do that so the most commonly used technique and the technique that was used to measure the data we work with is called are on a sequencing thing. Data we are you measure basically the M. A. Snippets in the cell. And so from this. You can infer basically which genes are expressed to what extent so so you end up if you if you do the sequencing step you end up with a vector of about twenty thousand genes and for each gene you would have an expression value view. This is usually just an integer. Like how many times did you find these Slip it in the sample. And then so this this vector Tori you can really think of it as like a fingerprint of the cell. So it's like it's a proper characterization of the cell there's different types of of comics data. So this is true. Tomic's data right. There's like also genomics data which directly directly measuring gene data and there's also also appropriate mix data actively measuring the the proteins

Cancer Cognitive Science Frank Rosen Mcculloch Supervisor Tomic FDA Pitts Audrey
Werk Force Brewing Does It The Wright Way

The Brit and Yankee Craft Beer Pubcast

04:19 min | 8 months ago

Werk Force Brewing Does It The Wright Way

"I'm very very pleased to say that we are at a tat room in Plainfield and the TAT room in Plainfield Infield is none other than workforce Bruin with an e work. We'll find out why when we'd workforce. I think we know but sitting across the table for May is the always amiable brandon right and the always lovely Amanda Right. Hi guys is a little hello guys and actually we have a special guest. But he'll be in the next segment sitting in the background is Mr Faezeh. Oh that's right. We hear them in the background it. We'll we'll bring him in. Commanders got lots of stuff to do so she said she joins us on the first segment. So thanks a lot guys for having us down here. I think you coming we. I've been trying to get down here for a long time. We did a fifty eighty five series where we did things live and I swore I'd never do another live one so we actually. We're going to end up with you guys but in the end it never happened happen for some reason. And I can't remember what it was but we'll blame Kevin Herbs because he was a lumper Joe's one hundred percent Kevin Hart. It was one hundred percent Kevin Herbs absolutely but what we are here today which is great because it is the whole tatt room to ourselves and we can just sit here and chat and as we always do. Can your drinking being a beer out of a pint glass. Because you're a man and you can do that. What are we going? I don't know what you have Hillbilly Haiku which is our our pre prohibition Pale lager. Wow Okay three fuller paola. So we used to blend of corn and rice ice with Pale Malt German lager yeast and in the hops we use actually lance shiner from Omega. He and his family have shared your brothers have so he used a Yakima gold. kind of the the thing. Behind a pre prohibition lager it was kind of sourced with local ingredients. It's usually a little bit happier so this is right around thirty. Ib Us but you still like that. Golden you know kind of like a struggled and color super for clear and very refreshing very tasty very tasty good all right and I. I bought everything. He said everything he said. And I'm drinking. Hang on these nice little handy readymade mats which. I'm I'm assuming you did this. Because these these little mats samples samples get thrown away right so Kabul with a stamp on it and I think is great because it soaks it up brilliantly and you can write on it and it's written on Here D. H. F. F K so I know that's double dry heart. What's the other one? Formerly known as formally known as in what was formerly known as used to be called Pineapple Express. ooh That was. We need that beer back in two thousand fourteen. The federal government didn't like that name. They said it sounded like we used some cannabis. The best in the beer so often cannabis strain. Yeah okay. I know that it was a it was a movie the movie. So it's a cannabis strain okay. You know what's another cannabis strain one that we brewed for The Harry and Meghan Wedding markle sparkle local member that we need to go now and then one of the her narrative well relations from down the south said. I'm going to do a cannabis. Strain of go markle sparkle so we had done that one all right so this is delicious by the way Very very unlike what I would call the citrusy I it's it's kind of very pleasant. I mean you know it's not over talk we've got a little citrus in there. I don't get any pineapple but yeah no it's kind of has a little bit more of that kind of like Dank readiness it's west coast style. so it's around sixty five us Some point two percent due to dry conditions on it. But it's sitter Amarillo. So but you get a lot of that kind of little bit a little touch of grapefruit but a lot of pine resin behind it.

Cannabis Amanda Right Plainfield Infield Kevin Herbs Lance Shiner Mr Faezeh Plainfield Brandon Pale Malt German Bruin Amarillo Federal Government Kevin Hart Yakima Kabul JOE Meghan Wedding Harry
Deep inconsistencies over how States treat terror suspects families: UN rights expert

UN News

08:13 min | 11 months ago

Deep inconsistencies over how States treat terror suspects families: UN rights expert

"Some countries are defining whomever they like as terrorists and exhibiting deep and problematic inconsistency of a how they treat family members of suspected extremists in places like northeast Syria and Iraq that's according to phenomena Nia loin the UN independent human rights expert dealing with counterterrorism. She says that many of the women and children associated with former isolate terrorist fighters are themselves victims and it's a big mistake to curb their rights or to find them simply by Association Misty Loin was at U N headquarters a few days ago to deliver her annual brought the general assembly she told mud wells what her main message had been the context of that report is that protecting and promoting human rights in the context of countering terrorism has never been more fragile and more precarious at the foothold of human rights remains very tenuous and the footprint extremely light there were two specific issues that my report addressed the first was the proliferation of what I call soft law in the area of counter-terrorism soft law seems like an oxymoron laws usually hard but in the absence of a binding treaty on terrorism since nine eleven no one can really clearly define it well it's cure that states have struggled to define it let's say but we do some very clear definitions of acts of terrorism but in the absence of a treaty states have not stood still they have chosen to enact large and proliferating amounts of law through these mechanisms of soft law and my concern is that much of that soft law is a human rights freeze on that there's almost oh substantive content and that there's almost no procedures to ensure the insertion of human rights and that is an enormous problem in the context of protecting and promoting human rights Hillbilly State get away with the fact that you know most people in the world see terrorism and the Lt leafy like terrorists are often named before the facts established. I think it's even more pernicious than that actually I think because we don't have a global definition of terrorism states have been left free to define whom for the like as a terrorist and so what we're finding at the domestic level is some countries for example consider women asking for the right to drive as terrorists and prosecute them under terrorism legislation some states consider persons who protest peacefully in the streets demanding their right political participation to be terrorists under there Domestic Law some for example legislation says any kind of insult or quote dishonor to the state constitutes terrorism so these definitions are so wide it means that in practice what terrorism anti-terrorism work in many states involves simply locking up or restraining or limiting or administrators sanctioning those who happen to disagree with you and that right the right to disagree the right to express the right to protest the right to participate freely in public affairs alright protected by our most fundamental treaties Covenant on seven political rights by the Universal Declaration so it's a huge problem so part from soft law is the other main point to make the second point was that increasingly much of this laws being made in new institutions institution sexually that sit outside of the UN institutions that are not part of the traditional multilateral ace and my report looks two of those one is the Global Counter Terrorism Forum the other is the FATF Financial Action Task Force these entities are small clubs of states come together through mutual south interest and but it's exclusive many states we know that lawmaking is messy for states and when you have lots of states it's even more messy that's part of the barter the fundamental notion that all states are equal and have sovereign equality in the lawmaking process when we create these new institutions and as those are the institutions that are producing much of the soft law who are actually not only excluding human rights because there's very little fundamental structural engagement with human rights by these bodies but also large numbers of states don't get to participate and I think that's a problem from the point of view of sovereign equality it's also a human rights mm-hmm oversee this week terrorists and those who are associated with alleged terrorists have been very much in the news when it comes to northeastern Syria and for many is also of course in Iraq as well I mean what are your concerns about how events progressing this week with special relevance to those families and commute children of alleged terrorists who are in great danger for the mandate is issued a public position it's on the mandates website at the opposite hey commissions ED page in that we make a number of observations and recommendations to states the first is to remember as many states are failing to remember that they have legal obligations to the citizens who find themselves overseas at those include not just human rights obligations but consular assistance obligations those are well entrenched and well established in international law the second thing is to remind ourselves that many of these individuals women and children are in fact victims they are also victims of terrorism. I had the good fortune the responsibility to be in Kazakhstan in May this year when Kazakhstan repatriated two hundred and forty-one citizens from women and children from Iraq and Syria and I interviewed many of those women and their children and what was painfully obvious is that many of these girls were in were went to Syria and Iraq when they were minors they first had sex often unconcerned pointingly as minors which many Western countries would be statutory rape under domestic law they gave birth to children in non consenting circumstances and those children themselves are children protected by the Convention on the rights of the child we cannot and should not ever define women by association to a particular man if that is is the departure of states that's a profoundly illegitimate and frankly undermining of the most basic notion of equality for women so for those who say well they they deserve what they got they went they made the decision to go and surely wouldn't apply that principle for example to women who experienced domestic violence or he wouldn't apply to women who find themselves in precarious circles chances in many domestic situations we wouldn't say you chose to marry that person or follow that person and therefore you have no protection under law it seems to me that that kind of McCurry slope is enormously dangerous not just in Iraq and Syria but on the fundamental notion that we treat individuals individually we assess what they have done individually the mandate has clearly taken the view if certain women if women have been responsible for criminal acts as they are in any country in the world they should be held responsible under the criminal law but bree I'm home and and try them in under fair trial with due process not in states that will subject their axe to the death penalty not in states where other special rapporteurs for example the special return summary and arbitrary executions who visited Iraq in the last two years has has pointed out in situations where their deep fair trial concerns deep concerns about the conditions of detention and most of all I would say we don't we are long past the time where we should be producing circulars guidelines having endless conversations and and and unfortunate hand-wringing about what to do about this problem bear in mind that in other circumstances the UN for example and states have committed to addressing the problem of sexual violence in armed conflict the UN has a special offer for dealing with children in armed conflict so is it suddenly not that all of these rights and obligations that we say apply to women and children in certain conflicts are selective that we get to choose which conflicts we give the does in title mints and Benefits and Protections to it seems to me that would be an abrogation of the most fundamental kind and show a deep and and. and very problematic inconsistency with long term consequences for the notion of the role of the rule of law of equality under law and the right for any individual woman or child to be treated in their own right and to be assessed in their own right and to be treated humanely and with dignity not based on the person to whom they happen to be associated by virtue of birth or by virtue of marriage forced or otherwise

Syria UN Iraq Misty Loin NIA U N Hillbilly State Two Years
'Downton Abbey,' 'Breaking Bad,' and Why TV Is Still Jealous of Movies

The Big Picture

10:18 min | 1 year ago

'Downton Abbey,' 'Breaking Bad,' and Why TV Is Still Jealous of Movies

"Chris. You're here along with Amanda because you know a lot about television and Amanda and I are for a little bit out on television sort of as a general rule. I'm post. TV POST TV separate succession. Now there are some television shows that I love. I started to watch when this weekend that I think is incredibly well made which is called unbelievable but I was just home with my mom for a little while and she while she's a stranger to cable news but she adorable still gets a lot of her news from the newspaper so two days later she'll be like. Did you hear about Joe. Biden and I'll like what what do you mean. Did something new happens you know. Did you hear about this phone. Call and that's just what you did with unbelievable where you were like. I'm breaking to you guys that there's this show well no now. I admit I am one one week late and you've already covered the show on the WOK yeah. We've already covered the sh the show on the site. I just didn't have the time to get to you. I hear you I'm seeing all these movies but one thing that is interesting that it's happening right now is is that I even though the just happened and even though TV is having this incredible boom time I feel like TV is still a little jealous of the movies and we know that because Downton Tanabe rather than comeback as an eight part miniseries has decided to become a full length feature film and the people said. Yes they said Yes to the tune of thirty three million dollars a lot of money for an extension of the Downton Abbey University was a show that was popular and a phenomenon sort of when it started. I believe the first episode of the Hollywood respective podcasts was a recap of the Dow naby premier guess which is just amazing what times past its Niche Butler's Butler's and and and you know that's a show that I liked and I really did you recap Amanda you recap what an amazing time capsule of our life on the Internet in creating culture and now it's a fulling feature feature film which is something that I think twenty years ago it had happened you would have said Downton Abbey really grew up and stepped up to the big leagues in this case. I wonder how you guys feel about what what it means to extend what was once a broadcast. TV Show into movie platform and also like why why this movie work. Why did it work so well. I have a couple of sites and the answer answer of why to turn it into a feature film is money which worked out because it made thirty three million dollars we had a great piece on the ringer last week by writer named Kate Loyd who's based in London and it was he's about the downtown Abbey Economy essentially in how the show changed both tourism in the UK and like she went to a lot of fancy locations and like talk to British these people but also how it changed the British TV industry and down abby the show. Was this wakeup call I think for people in the UK okay that people would from other parts of the world would watch when these costume dramas it was kind of a revival of the costume drama and also had a finance the shows so that they could me distributed around the world and so the piece argues that you know everything from peaky blinders to howards end to all of the things that we now consume and treat as part of the television firmament at least the latest generation of them are a result of Downton Abbey success right that show relaunch yeah Adia so in that way. It's not that surprising to me that it did while because it was like a legitimate phenomenon and we've lived with it for a long time in maybe season six. I wasn't as great as season one but it made a lot of money in a lot of people liked watching it. It's short relief to because the two other big releases over the weekend and that it beat out were ad Astra which was covered at length on this podcast last week and as a movie that I would recommend people see and Rambo last blood. Did you catch up with that Chris. I didn't see I saw ad Astra instead of Rambo because this was not playing anywhere near me. Oh that's a shame why was that I woke neighborhood for you. so neither of those films which are very male centric stallone doesn't play well in. Philly yeah that's a good point you'd think he'd be in every theatre getting but I guess partially one of the the reasons why down succeeded so well is because a lot of women saw this movie and it was the primary opportunity for women at checkout films one week after hustlers dominated the box office and sensing a trend here if you like this happens four five times a year when people are like there are movies for women as well yeah. I think that's true also float yes women see movies. Rah Rah route whatever old people really see movies and the theatres is there is nothing better to do with your time if you got a mom or Gramma Ma than to take them and see the Downton Abbey. That is just wholesome entertainment for everyone so I think that that is as important. The age is as important as the gender breakdown on this one. Let's let's just very quickly. Even though Chris has not seen the downton movie talk about what's good about the downs and movie you and I attempted to recap the film for Chris via slack last week. You feel like we did a good job. Ah Yeah I think so recognized all the names. All the actions made sense I just did they didn't really come together in a sort of visual sentence for me so that is actually a notable spoke to Michael Angler about this. It is a little bit of Downton on steroids. You know the theme music is amplified in such a way that maybe they had three hundred more brass instruments. Mintz played playing the theme song. There's a lot of drone shots of Downton Abbey. It is it is a a muscular rise version of this upstairs downstairs costume drama the film itself did strike me though I think you may have originally said this to me as just one long episode of Downton Abbey to me it was like a Christmas special sel which they do in the UK and I think it was the season two Christmas special of Downton Abbey which is when Matthew and Mary finally get together and like kissing the snow outside outside of the side of the House I would say it's on par with the Christmas special except for like to party set-pieces instead of one as you said and fancier dresses addresses and I guess there's like a first episode climax halfway through the movie and then a second episode kind of bringing everyone home. The thing is downstairs to get into some hijinks and then there's ramifications upstairs. It's crazy what happens on almost like it's upstairs downstairs I thought it was an enjoyable movie and I'm not surprised that it was successful. I'm surprised it was successful. It was also the biggest movie in the history of focus features which just fascinating I have spoken to some people who worked worked on this movie and they have when they acquired the rights to release this movie. They said we have our IP. We have our version of superhero movie and focus features. That's what I was. GonNa say really leans into that older audience that you're talking about the identify women as their audience much more clearly and this is a part of the same strategy so I wouldn't say necessarily the Ad Astra had this problem but I do think that it is near impossible to sell anything anymore without some pre existing kind of awareness of what you're getting when you walk into it just because there's so many options for people that if you just sorta like here's a movie about butlers and rich people story. Michelle dockery people are going to be like I don't know but if it's something that they have this decade long relationship leashes ship with if they have the kind of extra screen relationship that they have they cared about and if there is like I was I was watching a lot of linear television this week because I was with my mom. We were watching the Ken Burns documentary. There was down Abbey stuff sandwich. Every episode of the Ken Burns Documentary Music talking to the country music to let you know it's coming out. Here's the history of the show. Here's a recap of everything that happened. Here's the making of the show like they actually did their push. It just just happened on public television. We didn't see it as much necessarily as like Robert Downey junior driving around in an Audi with a Samsung phone pushing vendors do you think that this is now now a sort of MCI -ation of Downton or is this just a one off thing that they struck gold on this one movie or is there going to be another one have been teasing the sequel for weeks. Now that's yeah yeah they've been talking about how the possibilities open and I think you know which is code for. Yes it will happen and they certainly leave the door open in the movie. Everyone is in in a happy place but more hijinks cannon sue and I'm sure well a Dan. I'm curious how far you can probably only take down into world war. Two 'cause post World War. Two I think all of those states just for their museums museums the economy economy of the upper class in the UK just breaks down and it's just not how upstairs downstairs doesn't really apply as much anymore the film kind of glances at the end to the how much longer can this go on which I thought was an interesting potential way to seal office equal in the end zone dunkirk what we'll talk about this more. Maggie Smith is in this movie Maggie Smith Chris do modify spoil Israel okay. I guess if you are really really strict about spoilers. Turn it off now. Even but Maggie Smith gives a speech that's kind of like a farewell speech but notably nothing actually conclusively happens to whether Maggie Smith math will be in future episodes of down nappy. TV show or something happens to her but then they're like. We'll see what happens yeah she could've done urge becomes iron man. It's incredible credibly. She defeats the end of the movie. It's wild. It's nineteen twenty seven in this movie that's right. They've got like twenty more years. Yeah okay. What's interesting to me about. This is is the movies in theaters. It's an extension of a television show there have been there's been the super sizing of TV shows into movie form a lot over the last year. This isn't the first first time it's happened. In the ninety. s we saw the kind of like met a rift commentary on things by having. Beverly hillbillies movies and Brady Bunch movies now what we have is just a more clear extension of the stories that originally told there was a dead movie earlier. This year was a between two ferns movie also released over the weekend which is not quite the same serialized television but is in the same tradition in a way away and then in October. We have a breaking bad movie called El Camino Dave Dina do this for a long time. They've been dying to get this kind of multiplatform storytelling going because of the amount of money there is if you can actually do what they wanted to do with dark tower where you can tell something that has has a feature presentation that maybe is the sort of the danger of the story but like you have other storylines going on TV and that you could actually create a like twelve month a year sport out of your story. That's why they want you know and now there are different things now.

Downton Abbey Downton Abbey University UK Downton Tanabe Amanda Maggie Smith Chris Downton Ken Burns Biden JOE Abbey Economy Rambo Abbey Ad Astra Michelle Dockery Stallone Philly Gramma Ma
Miley Cyrus, Twitter And Liam Hemsworth discussed on Z Morning Zoo

Z Morning Zoo

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Miley Cyrus, Twitter And Liam Hemsworth discussed on Z Morning Zoo

"Miley Cyrus made it crystal clear yesterday on Twitter that she did not cheat on Liam Hemsworth now she said you know once her and Liam reconciled they were committed to each other there's no secrets there's a lot of things about her but she refuses to admit that our marriage ended because of cheating refuses to admit he was if you just do it as a legal term she said that she loves and all this stuff is always well you just said you could jam I twerking pot smoking Falmouth hillbilly but I am not a liar and then she went on to admit to a lot of mistakes that she's made yes you literally was like you know I admit I've made

Miley Cyrus Twitter Liam Hemsworth Falmouth
Recreational marijuana drives down synthetic opioid deaths by a THIRD, study claims

Curtis Sliwa

06:08 min | 1 year ago

Recreational marijuana drives down synthetic opioid deaths by a THIRD, study claims

"Let's talk about the issue that has worked to get the some Democrats and Republicans across this country and it is the legalization first of medical marijuana and then in some states it actually propelled itself to the legalization of the recreational use of marijuana through initiative and referendum and man the effect that it's having a pretty amazing there is new research out that says recreational we'd use could lead to a twenty to thirty five percent down turn in the number of opioid deaths that's it that's incredible I could see that twenty to thirty five percent I could see that because remember I had the personal experience two times in my life of having to use pain killers to ward off to us I mean numbing pain they just wouldn't leave it so after I got shot with the five hollowpoint bullets on the orders of the gadis to the Gambino said the back in that cabin June in nineteen ninety two I was on morphine for quite some time without that it just would have been unbearable unbearable and yet you because you could dispense the morphine into yourself you had a little quicker next you head to bed you a basically kept pumping a pump in it a you can like a vegetable you weren't interested in anything you know how I love to follow the news and sports I was interested in what is going on in the world long was this on and off for about two years while because I went in for two different operations of first one had no choice at save my life but then I had to have reverse a reversal operation you know to get rid of the colostomy bag and some of the other procedures that they took and I got to tell you what that is that was worse than the first operation because you knew you were going to get it and it was painful so I had a deal with the morphine effect and then weaning myself off the morphine but worst was when I was diagnosed with Crohn's disease have to having colitis and Ely ideas the pain was just nonstop day in day out they had me on oxy code own hillbilly heroin then they had me on morphine then they had me on fentanyl fentanyl ten times stronger than morphine himself and I must tell you that it wasn't until I was able to qualify for medical marijuana that I found something that not only I was able to deal with my knowledge of my reflux it had a calming effect and more importantly it did eventually deal with the pain yeah and you're not the only person obviously who says this which is why there have been there's really been a change I mean even even judge Jeanine Pirro is now involved in the medical marijuana world I think she's on she's on some advisory board yeah so I mean this is a you know it's it's becoming a lot more prevalent in today's society and for people like you I mean you were able to wean yourself off of the other stuff and get on the medical then general one was in the city it I mean I goals who cold Turkey sometimes and I was just like old man your body is just cycle wracked in pain you keep feeding yourself because a lot of the times issue prescription says take two a day one in the morning one in night but you start self medicate yeah and you do get you fork and it does feel great and then you want to feel like that all the time and then it's like pain in place well the pain is enormous and then all of a sudden you have this plagiarized effect but that goes away quickly you need more and you're talking about you're talking about medical legalize medical marijuana so these opioid they did this study the university of Massachusetts in it they analyzed opioid overdose deaths and the number of deaths fell in states where they had the legalize medical or recreational marijuana the effects were great as listen to this one where when recreational marijuana access gave more people access to dispensaries so the more dispensaries the higher the chances are you will not have it's like when you half your hunt for a seven eleven the more seven elevens the more times you can get your fix this for picture right the less seven elevens and all of a sudden you have the junk no I make a lot of sense if you have these legal outlets where they sell the recreational use of marijuana which means is quality control the state and the local community to making some money on the taxes and you taking it either the hands of the black market that makes all the sense in the world now where are most of the dispensers I mean I know for instance in California you can get them there in Venice Venice is a kind of a it's a highfalutin California California is way ahead of us in making it not only easy to access but invisible locations still in New York state out of sight out of mind in New Jersey it's getting better on the Murphy but a lot of its out of sight out of mind it's gonna be a lob rate the way any other business would be a lot right but don't aren't there more of these legal dispensaries and sort of the rougher neighborhoods predominantly the USA would like that because remember a lot of towns villages him borough say okay we're not opposed to legalization of the recreational use of marijuana just not on our town yeah exactly so the poorer communities say okay we'll house that is long as we get a bigger cut of the tax dollars so that's I guess I mean I guess that's a good thing because a they'll get the cut but H. B. they'll also have all of these medical of all these dispensary it like for instance dad over good access Denver's best known because you can go on the main drag Colfax and the state capital is right here the cathedral is right they have lots of commerce lots of activity and you see these marijuana shops but then you'll see it also in some industrialized areas where wow it's not globally around other than factories and wooden you know pallets in a waiting for trucks to come pick it up and they seem to do well and to me it's sort of like if we can help get people off of the opioid switch to solve problems such as some people to shake at such a killer

Marijuana Thirty Five Percent Two Years
"hillbilly" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

11:40 min | 2 years ago

"hillbilly" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"This guy has been off the radio, but what three days now, and he is champing at the bit. Like a smoker. That's gone. Like, you know week without a cigarette. Just need one right now. Yes, I guy Guyana diet. And all of a sudden, man, there's I just can't resist Willie. What is going on there? The double wide down in Florida. Boys. I'm here near Cape coral, I'm looking out on the way. It's about eighty four degrees. I've got level fifty sunscreen on but I met the radio so much. I called Scott Ryan, are you gotta give me on things to say about the hillbilly murders. Things must be said. Please do because I was waiting for your take on it. So your thoughts and all this and Willie. I mean, a giant news yesterday out of the clear blue sky after two and a half years finally some suspects. I monitor Jeff Henderson, Ecorse, monitored rocky, and you and what this comes down to hillbilly Justice. There's a code of the hills, and my other life is a criminal defense attorney, I represented many hillbillies and Clermont county Adams county ground county county code and the code of the hills. Is you do not go to the judicial system. You do not talk the cops. And prosecutors you don't talk to police and so when the Wagner family. What was the paternal father in the rodent family was the maternal mother and the four year old for four years. They fought dog. They hated each other before you're older we used by the rodent family as a club against the Wagner family, build up from three generations of Wagner's. And finally, there was a sense from the road. And let's go to court, and when that decision was made to Wagner said not violate hillbilly Justice and clan. Mackay carelessly, the slaughter of eight men, women and. Teenagers some begging for their lives before they were shot in the head in the next remedies because it was such a blood feud between the Hatfield mccoys, but the Hatfield mccoys fought each other. This was a cold blooded execution. A family members to wipe out an entire branch of the rodent tree. The rodents wanted to leave this earth, and the Wagner sold themselves as a sort of pear creek to make that happen. Why the Willie by all accounts, the Wagner's, you know, they have money they gave land like why over all this over some, you know, in your in your terms hillbilly Justice, which I agree with. Why would you give up all that your your generational name to kill people? Well. Well, the president's are full of people thousands of people that vicious ugly dirty things never assuming never gonna get caught the Wagner's covered the track exceedingly. Well, what do and a half year is April eight did a wonderful job. And you had the FBI you had the best best forensics. And this thing was wrapped up about a month ago, but much Mike dewine credit. You could have done this two weeks before the gubernatorial election wanted to wait until after the election, they hit Wagner locating back in this area. Couple rink Kentucky. And they knew where they were. And they Portales on exactly where they were. And Mike dewine was getting some advice wrap this thing up, but my third how bad would it looked politically? Week before the election. So he waited. The Wagner's criminals mine in a vicious bloodthirsty murderers, mine, rocky you. As far as the event itself. And how do you get away? And they seem to last year a year after the event that somehow they evaporate. That's what that's what we were talking about earlier. It's going as soon as I heard that on my way to put a magnifying glass. As prime suspects. Good Lord and the road and other living branches of the road tree. From the get-go said, the Wagner said done it. And they told they told they told BCI they told the AG they told her sheriff reader who did it, and they they knew they believe two years ago two and a half years ago, but they were the prime suspects, especially when they moved to Alaska. Those are the ones who did it. But they didn't have the forensics. And for those are inside the investigation. They do have come forensics, but it's largely a circumstantial case. And so, but I count Justice is different than Hamilton county. You're Kenton county your make dinner Westchester the rules of Mason in Westchester, don't work in pike county. And so this is the way they solve their disputes. In in hillbilly heaven, and this was found by the Wagner to eliminate the rodents. Take a completely out. It's very mafia asked right like same sort of deal. Hey, we're gonna we're gonna handle this. We're not going to get the theories involved. What's right is? Right. And what's wrong is wrong? This is wrong. And we're gonna live at eight and the three generations of Wang or so when they were denied visitation could see the four year old holidays would come and go birthdays would come and go and this combustible mix got bigger and bigger and bigger and bigger until they took months to plan. This thing out the dog did not bark. They knew how to get in. And they got into executed some of them sleeping and other won't be executed while begging for life. And they many seven and eight times in a brutal way. Willie? That's the thing. I mean, we're talking about and kicking around the phrase hillbilly Justice. I mean, these people I mean, they're obviously not criminal masterminds. We're talking about here. How did they elude for two and a half years being discovered because if somebody always breaks out, I don't care if you're in the mafia, the CIA, whatever you're going to make some little mistake, you're going to talk, and they just wanna make sure they got this thing sealed up or do you think somebody rolled on the other guys and talked what do you think happened here? Mark my words in a year or two these are knuckled draggers. These are not brilliant brilliant is what kills me is they got away with them for two and a half years. It's going to be telling somebody, and it's gonna be a little bit of forensic a little bit of DNA, but mainly it's going to be a circumstance case. And they're the ones who were is this whole idea them. Remember the Mexican drug Lord? Did it and it was marijuana marijuana grow operation? But that happens all the time and hillbilly heaven that stuff goes on meth that goes on all the time. But you never this is gonna be largely circumstantial case if they could wrap this thing up two and a half years ago believing they would have done it. But they were smart enough to cover certain aspects of the murder and the gun have not been located. And I'm sure there's somewhere at the bottom of a lake somewhere. But the Wagner's are the ones to benefit from this. They're going to build this case based upon a blood feud at started four and a half years ago when when that child was born, and it's gonna be a circumstantial case is not going to be no eyewitnesses, and anyone that would testify against the Wagner. You've got to watch out for your life. It's not worth a nickel, Billy Justice. He's a hillbilly murders. So we'll let let's take it to the case. When it's when this thing starts up here. What's going to be their defense? What are they gonna say? Talking about circumstantial evidence willy also tells me is this thing is it fifty fifty. I want to see this thing slam shot. It's going to be an alibi. They're going to have other Wagner saying that mommy, and daddy and there's two twenty something. And then the grandparents who covered up the evidence in light to the police. They're all gonna provide alibis for each other saying when this event took place in April of twenty six th they were with us. They were here they were there, and it's not going to be if it was a slam dunk. This thing would have happened two and a half years ago. Right. Yeah. Watching it. And it'll take a long long time right for this whole thing. Two year. You're from now Iraq and you'll be going Monday night football. Think comes to trial. So, but but then you go to come. They're gonna they're going to come in an appeal. I mean in all honesty, willy, how long do you see this thing dragging on from here when it'll be twenty twenty two twenty twenty three to five years it'll be a year or two from trial. And then after that three to five years of appeals. They do not have a smoking gun. It's a case of circumstantial putting the pieces together without clear evidence. And then the four of them are gonna stick together. They're never gonna turn communicate on each other the Wagner. So never do that. These are people are not gonna flip. Right. Was, you know, much better than I do, you know, it is beyond a reasonable doubt. Right. When you're talking about a jury, and if there's no gun, there's no fingerprint, there's not a bloody glove you can win. That guy. Guys for sure. So if you don't have a gun or a weapon or any video these days everything's on surveillance. But there's nothing like that. I mean, these people could walk right, absolutely. And law enforcement sat down about two months ago and said, okay, it's been two and a half years. What it never going to get any better than this? Let's launched this thing. Let's indict him. And let's see what happens down the road. You see if there's a twist an attorney someone comes forward put pressure. Let's find out who actually pulled the trigger when you're a principal offender and aggravated murder that means you weren't like an observer, I thought maybe one woman involved MRs Wagner, somehow not involved the indictment calls. Hurry principal. Fender which means her hand her fingers on the trigger. Were four locations, and there's four people principle murder. There seemed to be saying that each one of them took one different located. He wants to quench can place. The place. All four launched at the same time almost like the Manson murders, which luxury Van Houten. There's other ones are actually have their hands on the daggers. They want him the body of Sharon Tate. And when she was called a principal offender that meets your finger on the trigger killing rodent family, four four defendants. Four locations. Wow. This has like Hollywood movie. Right. Covered. It's covered down here in Collier county, Florida one of the top two or three stories yesterday about five o'clock from the four o'clock news conference. I I listen on iheart media Dr station, and it was covered here at five o'clock. Well, we're talking to Michael hurler like where does this trial take place at with this thing being national international. Expensive. It's going to be in pike county. Not a lot of money, they're willing. Now money county. The issue is going to be yes, you know, all about the case. They can you set aside. What you've seen heard about these murders. Only decide this case based upon what happens inside these four walls and most jurors say, yes, I can put aside on my proud elections, and I can only do face. It's Harry Hamlin a county. I don't know if we've ever had one center, no jurisdiction might have been one case twenty years ago. But about how big the case is it always stays in the home county because the prosecutor's office once it there, they want those people to be there. They're under the pressure, and they don't want to spend tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands of dollars moving. Some other rural county didn't want to try it and pike county. And I think that a jury they're all right with that willy. We'll get back to doing. What you do there the double wide? God bless America hillbilly murders. It's going to be something to watch. Thanks. There.

MRs Wagner murder Clermont county Adams county g Wagner family Willie pike county Florida Guyana willy Jeff Henderson principal Mike dewine Kenton county attorney Ecorse Cape coral Scott Ryan Hamilton county Portales FBI
"hillbilly" Discussed on Marty Smith's America The Podcast

Marty Smith's America The Podcast

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"hillbilly" Discussed on Marty Smith's America The Podcast

"Take off your pants. Snip snip makes you get your Georgia even not only. I mean, imagine he said they were only even imagine what that looked like. I mean, he probably had to roll them to get them even. And that is even worse. It's one thing to have the George. It's another level when you wrote tight roll the Jort. So here's what I've learned that sounds like. It's the first time this guy's ever worn or may George the first time he's ever pill gated and y'all ever going to the bathroom. And apparently he doesn't listen to the podcast either because if he would have we've have given multiple times about how to make it's for these people. I understand that sometimes you have a couple too many and you get a little disoriented and you don't really know what's going on around you. But if you've had so much that you end up wetting your pants, man, it's time to pack it up this town of pack it up and take it onto the house sun because you're just an embarrassment. You also wears his friend at to help to make those Jordan's well, they were drinking beer. And would you help if you were unwilling to take off your pants to make the Jordan's? Do you really think that I would. I'm, we're buddies. I wouldn't be taking a pocket knife to your pants while you had him on. Sorry, man, I wouldn't do that. That's it gets God code in spades. Another thing gets guy code is beach a j. Jetski tell y'all story from this weekend. I got back from SEC media days and my brother-in-law Mike to Cameron and chase my son and nephew out on the on the water. We live about a block or so off the ocean here, and we went over to the bay side of town. Ocean city is an island. So we went over to the bay side of the island, and we got on a couple jet skis and we're, we spent like three hours out on these things. It's the most fun thing in the world man. And when you get out in the ocean on a jet ski, man, you're launching this thing, man, it's so fun, but we went out into the Marsh area where there's all these little channels where the boats can't go and we're going fast. I mean, we're digging these. We're probably on the open water. We're going fifty forty five fifty miles an hour on these jetskis and the boys are holding onto for dear life. And we went out though at one point into the Marsh area where these, there's all these little channels. It's almost like little roads out through there. In the boats can't go. Only the jetskis can go and I got a little overzealous and I, I went around corner and I couldn't make the turn and I, I mean, I not only did I beach it. I mean, I ten feet beached it and this is the Marsh, okay. This is not dry land. So we had to figure out how to get this thing out just Mike and me. And it took us probably twenty minutes of clearing and shoving and pushing and grunting in got to the point where we had dug the rear in into the mud. So badly Kamran my son had to sit on the nose of it while we tried to push it out, we were five deep are. We were almost waist deep in muck trying to push this thing out of there and it was disgusting. It was disgusting beyond description. Ultimately, we get the thing out. I have to get. Into the muck to clear out the Impaler and it was very unfortunate. So we went and had a beer Homa beer. I've had a couple of bad incidents on jet skis. I've had broken broken down. It was still idling, but everyone else left. So I slow Lee idol my way back to the dock. How'd that make you feel? I was livid when I got back because we're, we're you guys, hey, I think we lost jetski here and I was burnt. So I got back and said, give me a cold beer. And I've been on a jet ski and been hit by another jet ski on vacation. Oh gosh. I luckily it hit the front pilot thirty. Maybe. And you know where it went flying everywhere..

Jordan Mike Georgia George SEC Kamran Lee Cameron twenty minutes three hours ten feet
"hillbilly" Discussed on Marty Smith's America The Podcast

Marty Smith's America The Podcast

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"hillbilly" Discussed on Marty Smith's America The Podcast

"Well, it's that times ten now that's my ten cents. Well, it's interesting to us Chris because I mean Stapleton everybody, but Chris got the sing songs for ten years. And then all of a sudden he's the greatest Mokhless that ever lived. And yeah, he's a friend of mine and I was on that wagon early. I was just, I look, you won't use her use are are one of the greatest vocalists. There's not a whole lot of guys who can go where Chris Stapleton can go. No, I tell Chris way we ride the barn or something, and then we get through and he goes, sing it down on tape, I'm going, I don't think so. You think. They look at me like. Oh, you do it buddy, but I'm gonna. Tell him back then if you're a star, you're going to be a star you flat, are you know? And he earned it in Christner it the hard way you came up through the trenches writing all the stuff. He paid his dues, a couple more things, and I'll get you out of here. We started with the rodeo. We're going end with the rodeo is Chris, do the baddest ask cowboy Alta. Yeah, pretty much pretty much. I was just in mouse city, Montana, the amount city once again, photographing the mouse city, Montana, a bucket horse sale where all the stock raiders bring their horses and they test them to see, you know how 'bout and then they'll bid right there on the spot. But Chris, it son played the night before and we went down to here. It's really interesting. That's really, really cool. What's the greatest rodeo maybe ever rodeo movie ever. Yup. Oh, I put me on the spot. I know it's a hard I wouldn't be able to answer because the only one I'd be able to answer pure country because George strait's dust. Yeah. Yeah. I, I think I'm with you there. That's not bad. Eight seconds was was kind of cool. I, you know, it's hard hard. I would say electric cowboy it. We're over that area. How would you rate strait's performance as dusty? Oh, you know as a what is it as an actor? He makes he makes a real good singer. Or we're going to get you out of here on this on. That's the perfect note. I want a great George strait story. Hundred of them. I, I was telling this the other day I was in the actually in the barn studio stuff, and the guys were not for last and gosh, going guys with some crazy stuff going here said, I know I remember we had through full CO may party country music awards after the show one night and the house got so full that we had to migrate down to the barn and a bunch of us went down there. You know, piano and guitars all playing around and having a great time straight with. He was saying, Janine is a huge Merle haggard fan. So he'd sing, you know, just about any. I mean, any hacker song unite. He he knew it. So she to Caroline and he did that anyway. It just it seemed like it was partying last two hours. So we all walk outside to get into an SUV to take us back to the house and the sun's coming up and we'd all been kind of, you know, having cocktails..

Chris Stapleton George strait Chris Montana Janine Christner Caroline Eight seconds ten years two hours
"hillbilly" Discussed on Marty Smith's America The Podcast

Marty Smith's America The Podcast

03:42 min | 2 years ago

"hillbilly" Discussed on Marty Smith's America The Podcast

"So when Janine came along and they. She June and John and Bill became fast friends, and this would were best friends would travel travel the world together. And so I win the Marlboro talent contests. Nineteen eighty eight. I've got to go to Nashville to do a session as part of one of the things prizes you win. And Janine just happened to call June, say up here with my boyfriend gin and of course you know, like boyfriend once you do just want some talent contests just like a no here, Eric homes. So you know, she anyway, we go home after doing the sessions and stuff couple of months later, the phone rings and Janine picks it up. We're back in Oklahoma and June goes, she called her Witter stood of patchy, go Witter patch or winter. How would you in Ronnie lack to stay in the log house up on the hill outside Nashville there and Janine on the stop the phone because. It's just it's like something and INA magazine right now, the Instagram post was about, but they let us live in this fabulous log house for six hundred dollars a month half the time. They wouldn't take the rent and supported that that venture can fold. It was amazing. So really tremendous influence on your success story then? Well, he he did in that sense, you know, he was June how to cabin up next to and stuff, but not he wasn't involved in in the land of the record deal and and writing things and stuff like that. But very, very much you know, friends along the way June through the baby shower for highly our youngest at all that we miss him really, really. That's. Describe the current country music landscape. Maybe the laughter all I need. Maybe the laughter. Oh, no, I'm not gonna put it down. I'm not put it down. It's it's, you know, it's maybe just my age. I'm a little bit confused. You know, couple of guys, it kinda kinda real, their heads up. Then I turned around and listen to, but that's been the case. I think back even when we were we were running. It's it's certainly changed and and I know too much I've seen behind a card and so I know what's going on again with business and all that. But that is not in any way to criticize any artist. I don't have that right. You know, I say that each his own. Let it they would it's going to do are we won't be critical, but what artists impress you, what current artists fresh you Lou combs? Right. And and I like a just known him for years, but he's super super talented guy. Chris Stapleton really good, and I like some of this stuff that that John parties is throwing out. On the countryside. You know, all these boys have to come along. They'll come to town country artists and that that town in its will take you right now and and make you make you do stuff. If you know you're young and you want your morning or to make a statement and get out there, it's it's harder now for them to, I think, really express themselves because they're having to adhere to a a radio format that literally dictates what they do in other words to be heard. You gotta you gotta everybody chasing that Cavallo tell the cat and the business wants to do that anyway. Something successful thereby jumps on the bandwagon..

Janine Witter Nashville Bill INA magazine Oklahoma Chris Stapleton Cavallo Lou combs Ronnie Eric John six hundred dollars
"hillbilly" Discussed on Marty Smith's America The Podcast

Marty Smith's America The Podcast

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"hillbilly" Discussed on Marty Smith's America The Podcast

"Your relationship with him fascinates me and he fascinates me still juniors, one of my best friends on and on, but you're gonna miss me was was one of Dale earnhardt's favorite Soames. And so that one always likes out to me. We're sports station, and you had such tremendous friendship with Dale Earnhardt share with us who he was to you and why he was such a special person. Dale was like, walk space to. We would. We had a friend that introduced us today, took us back during the the racist we would go to. He'd like to take a nap. You know, it was like that religious little nap that Johnny cash would take them for show anyway. Go back on his crater and Hank Jones is guys name and he's, it was good nail was probably the he. He was keep saying rockstar, but he was the biggest rockstar in in writing ever met, and it's not by virtue of the fact just all all the rights he won. It's it's who the guy was. You know, you get around him and there were power in that in his demeanor and and how I went about carrying himself and doing things. You know a fish with him a couple of. I mean, everything he did was over the top kicked tells a story where they're out fishing, the bomb sharks everywhere, you know, and kicks pulls into Marmon Dale. But like he said, he just got manically excited and kicks wasn't acting signs enough, so they'll pick him up, threw him overboard..

Dale earnhardt Marmon Dale Hank Jones Johnny cash
"hillbilly" Discussed on Marty Smith's America The Podcast

Marty Smith's America The Podcast

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"hillbilly" Discussed on Marty Smith's America The Podcast

"I'll go input on lawlessly shirt won't through the house for a couple of days. So you mentioned it being the last few shows that you and kicks were playing together, and I know you've done the residency thing in Vegas since that time, but as a guy who y'all were a major portion of the soundtrack of my high school years and into my early college years. So for guys like us, I mean, it was magic. All right. It was magic. Y'all were duo of the year for a hundred and forty five straight years or whatever is hit after hit after hit after hit. And so when you guys decide to part ways for guys like me, who at the time, I didn't know a damn thing about, you know, chemistry and time and all of those young and dumb, but I couldn't have a wonder why in the hell would they break up? So I ask you, why was it important for you guys to part ways at the time. That's a good question. And we actually took into consideration what you're talking about. You know how people felt and stuff, but we felt like we've been going for like twenty twenty plus years and the business, the business, the infrastructure of the music business with changing, not not just on a demographic and age level, but the the way they went about doing business was was getting getting kinda shaky. That combined with the fact that we just felt like, hey, you know, we were on that that that commercial conveyor belt nonstop. And at some point you just have to get off and go, you know what? I do slow down at least creator do something here are we're gonna ride this horse into the ground, and that's something that needed. One of us wanted to do. You know, we wanna respect the way that you say you fell and other fans, and that was that was it. That was the basis of of when we just looked at one another. I think it's, I think it's time you know, and we were down for a few years. The next thing you know this, the Caesar's thing comes up. We're still doing the residency out is out there and having a great time with REBA and every now and then we'll, we'll sneak off. Like I say, today, were in around Minnesota doing a little festival out the middle of the woods. So it's it's, it's good. I, I would, you know, I get it. I what you're talking about and we really appreciate it cooled here. Someone like you say that that that music had an impact on your life and and what memories it does because I have, you know, bans myself that we all look look back at the music fans, the defines moments in your life. You know, we always say it's always the soundtrack to your art and music is cool thing about understand something. It's not a, it's not a past tense thing for me, it's it's a prison. Number me. You guys are still you're still as important in my personal music catalog right now at forty two years old as you were when I was eighteen years old and for the work which which this needs to be noted to the work is you guys work, maybe my Maria notwithstanding. All right, y'all wrote and there's to me there is so much. I have. So much respect for great writing, and I want everybody listening to this who is a nineties country fan, our country fan at all music fan. At all kicks in Ronnie wrote the vast majority of their catalog with help, of course with friends, but they had a pin and I respect it so much running those good to hear. You know, I used to get hurt my feelings when we come round time to to do a a record and everybody in town's getting pitched all these, these different songs and we, we weren't getting pit songs for some reason. Always I never really understood it, but really what it was was Tim DuBois ahead of the record label was songwriter himself and he he, he's stood on the premise of you guys. All right. I want you to write your stuff and you know you held are held our feet to the fire and I'm proud of that. You know those songs, that's those are the things you leave behind. You know, we'll be dead and gone. Hopefully the you'll be out there will. You will you be my songwriter of the year twice..

Tim DuBois Vegas twenty twenty Minnesota Ronnie forty two years eighteen years
"hillbilly" Discussed on Marty Smith's America The Podcast

Marty Smith's America The Podcast

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"hillbilly" Discussed on Marty Smith's America The Podcast

"But like I said, Ron Madre he's a, he's a hall of fame Sports Illustrated for Taga ver. And they're there for the guys that run with us. Jim aren't on the Santa Fe to did most of the older original Marlboro campaign. So you can imagine, you know, yeah, his his hit list and a couple of new guys are young up and comers actually hitting lick right now. Dustin Heine is a great videography and then we've got our journalist involved too. But like I say, this is just a Bob. We started like traveling together. Our trips ended up in Alaska, Galapagos all over the place shooting, you know, say shooting, but for I have to say this blue, correct. Regret. In our business in our business, the term shooting. So I know what you mean, what's your favorite subject shoe running. Rodeos Cowboys stuff. Yeah, you know, on enough where in Hinckley Minnesota right now doing show tonight and there's a, there's an Indian Powell going on or native American powwow. So I'm gonna jump in the middle of that. See my cowboy tattoo, get me hurt. What goes on in the middle of an Indian Powell, I'll tell you hope. Well, lived to tell you. The cowboy culture really does fascinate me how has it influenced your life? Obviously, you got the tattoo and we'll get to the tattoo in a minute. I need to back story, but how has. What's Dr Phillip to, he'd probably help you and make more sense of it. And I. I was born in in Midland, Texas, west, Texas, that's way out in the middle of you know that nothing tumbleweed you know, dust storm Texas culture, and my dad was a a form of small ranch and him mother. I'm the first four kids and Huma mother were first married, that's that's really, they went out live ironically. It's not that far from Abilene, Texas. My dad has some buddies and he was guitar player. Sang a little bit ended up being a singer on a radio show, and of course that was all country. And you know, just I, I was raised in it. He was a, he was a horse trainer up in Kentucky when he was a kid and there was always some kind of broke down horse or two in the backyard or close to the house that they were. They were working for quarterhorse racing or something like that. So and then you know, he's the country music. It's pretty much in Gulf. They're the cowboy way alive. A lot of ways. It's kind of the kind of the music of that culture these days or was was in the nineties, I think still is. So what's the story behind the cowboy tattoo on your right forearm. Okay. You're gonna pin me down last last week shows with with the Brooks and Dunn last rodeo tour. We were out in LA and at the time that show LA Inc was real hot. So we had nothing to shows live and a bunch of guys in the band or out. And we were feeling are oats one night and probably a little tequila Bob and I'm here to stay and somebody popped off about you ought to get a tattoo commemorate. What all you know you've done of yours Brooks and Dunn thing, and I'm going well, you know, I always wanted to be the cowboy case. Got to wear the hat. You know, look at him. He's the cowboy. You know what I'm gonna do. I'm going to go down tattoo. I'm gonna get a cowboy to, and of course unin getting resistance. And before next thing I knew I'm I'm in LA getting cowboy tattooed down my skinny arm. Look up the next morning. It's a little big. So you're like you are. You are that nightmare, you are the out you woke up and said, oh my God. What in the hell did I do last night? Oh yeah. And my wife helped me do it. Once I got home. In today's today's age, social media will somehow got posted before I got home. Oh, mama found out on the internet, bro? Yeah. Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. So I come home to an icy reception and I feel every now and then she gets a little heater and stuff..

Brooks Powell LA Inc Ron Madre Texas Dustin Heine Santa Fe Alaska Jim Gulf Dr Phillip Huma Midland Hinckley Minnesota American powwow Dunn Abilene Bob
"hillbilly" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

The World of Phil Hendrie

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"hillbilly" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

"The real mccoys the amos mccoy that they're the ones that started and so we did your sister to and then they came up in cbs came up with the real help with the real hell billy or the hillbilly beverly hillbilly they did pistols and petticoats penny coat junction they did he haw and they're off to the races you know and so i'm thinking well this is the network for me cbs they're they're all in their all hillbilly all the time yeah it's not a secret is cbs wanted to go with the rural things and then they decided that wasn't working for them right working for the father let me do it it's my area of expertise what yeah you guys tee off oh right and then cbs drive it well in the middle of all of that i decided to do this show your sister to actually in the middle of that ended we said we'll bring it back a little bit because i think cbs use the though they had by that time all in the family you know so family know you want to bring back your sister to bring it back that show for when cbs news obviously doing well because as far as i was concerned they weren't doing well because good times okay yes they were they had good times they had what's happening they had that the got all of the family yeah they were doing i just i just had this idea vance king really had the idea and i there's a dynamite idea dynamite idea brother and sister having sex was called.

cbs billy beverly hillbilly vance
"hillbilly" Discussed on Cheap Heat

Cheap Heat

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"hillbilly" Discussed on Cheap Heat

"I see um a headline here about an interview with honky tonk man of country love in southern wrestlers hillbilly jim or honky tonk honky tonks more deserving than hillbilly inslee absolutely one thousand present that year reign with the i see title yes that alone that alone makes honky tonks hall of fame worthy cause just think about what he did also during that rain and like i did he smashed dig itar over macho man head during that raid oh he's madison guitar many people's heads he also the heritage foundation was holding macho man down and he smashed a guitar over over a macho man had that made miss elizabeth go down and get how hogan two to bring him down to start the formation of the megapowers oh yeah yup indeed that happen and on top of that him him getting pinned the give the title so warrior was such a huge moment an and on top of that uh kukoc in bed was was a fire tune what was cool cocky and mad again his uh that was his song knows his sonal here i'm cool i'm cocky armband area i'm just lawyered man and so if we adopt in people with with songs kukoc year bad i think is i'll put it up there with with my baby tonight gentle while not to mention not to mention his report tag team rhythm and blues turnover not to mention didi penal them to the rain a russell mania six.

hogan honky tonk
"hillbilly" Discussed on Cheap Heat

Cheap Heat

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"hillbilly" Discussed on Cheap Heat

"Here that good a year he's out one point eight billion as of the top of this recording which is nuts that is one point eight one point eight yagi i guess he won't need to go get the hook up at least quit i guess he could go get the bentley full price get the may back because at the top office may back no problem light work is that i by the way i think bits does have all here word yeah i believe that's the whip that he whips around a connecticut a big i've heard that yeah he definitely was i can't see and have it a driver i heard like he gets crazy behind the wheel he does have a driver a lot but there are times when he's in a rush and vintage is driving he's taken these gone i made a brisk prichard by the way when's he gonna be a hall of famer yeah he he deserves a heavily jim the countdown zahn for that too because now that now that bruce's uh pop in again that's happening um but he tells a great story about vince speeding unlike the pouring rain storm um like from long island for nassau coliseum all the way back to connecticut also i see jeff party cleared to return yup jeff party is clear for retired um so we all know what he's gonna be back or where he's going to be by the you have to figure that he shows up in this ultimate deletion situation that they have with the goal at mount hearty embraer why.

bentley connecticut bruce long island vince nassau coliseum jeff party mount hearty
"hillbilly" Discussed on Cheap Heat

Cheap Heat

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"hillbilly" Discussed on Cheap Heat

"Definitely have this article queued up and ready to go yeah i went i went directly to the toilet but you you work loss or will you drive though you drive for for those of us who public transportation gets us through the day you know somebody else's doing the drive it speaking of driving by next week i'll be able to tell you guys about my new car that i'm getting tomorrow he'll rosenberg getting a um a healers automobile as she jews are very excited about you know i'm not i'm not the world is hard guy i don't i don't i don't believe in spending lots of time a car dealerships i've never been about like spending a ton of money on cars um momma boy paul who runs a place called lease quit shots lease quit dot com he he can get you out of your lisa get you at a new whip and he did it for me last time and he did it for me this time and so tomorrow he's dropping off by 20 18 black bmw x five you know what i'm saying estrogen when play games i'm going to be driving down the street blasting grand all my life by nip see hustle india has uchida official new he'll rosenberg mobile courtesy of least quit so i'm excited about getting that um our edgy outside the ring anything else that we need to hit just a couple of more quick hits arm vince mcmahon made it on forbes list of billionaires this year apparently his net worth um as of today is up at one point eight billion which is craze warren realized the chairman was doing that well i didn't realize that he had such a good year.

lisa india vince mcmahon warren chairman rosenberg uchida official
"hillbilly" Discussed on Cheap Heat

Cheap Heat

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"hillbilly" Discussed on Cheap Heat

"And it really took me back to on a from a wrestling standpoint it really took me back to how bomb how bummed out we were on this podcast when they didn't handle him in gold us right yeah and and win after dusty died he came back as gold stardust i forgot about how much that bothered me honestly like time flies and you stop thinking about it and then you realize oh damn it was really wacko this ended he really did have to leave it really want and what and now he's really make an app at like he really has drawn and done all these things he set out to do and now he's attempting to put together a ten thousand person you know show a show with an audience of ten thousand in chicago in september all lynn and it can happen and howell amazing that would have been it's a pretty it's a pretty cool story ban i i just if he got if he got twenty minutes how long that article take you suv it took me a while to me a good twenty thirty minutes yet took me about the same a good half an hour you've got to dial and read and you know what i'm saying if you're going to have a quick bathroom trip it's it's not the article for you but if you plan on go we do then it then that's what you're going to read yeah if you've got a good a good long commute on the subway than another way of thinking about it.

chicago lynn wrestling dusty howell twenty thirty minutes twenty minutes
"hillbilly" Discussed on Cheap Heat

Cheap Heat

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"hillbilly" Discussed on Cheap Heat

"Hall of fame status well i'll tell you what as she g it's an interesting um it's an interesting thought you bring up about did he crossed threshold because i believe what he was was your standardissue like how show baby face meaning than we might have had this conversation on the podcast i had it was so one a real life and i haven't had on the podcast like great cali for example great cali does it mean that much on tv but go to a house show and see how much he pops the crowd now granted slightly different of course because part of it with a car lee is just his freakish size rate but the point is there some guys who other characters on tv don't mean that much they're just over you know and i think that was the case with hillbilly jim but to your point you know i guess what does it mean to be all of famer what is that threshold like is it is being just over enough um i'm looking here at the up on looking here the wrestling album which is like prime hillbilly jim time and you look at the album cover if you google it right now just go google the wrestling album this was the first wwf album um and such up high percentage of people on this cover or in the hall of fame and my point in that is the insane that is to say that a lot of the people who were prominent in that era urged in the hall of fame thursday and already like this cover ochre lindh in ventura and vince doesn't count finkel in savage in blasio in alabama in jay yd in.

jim ventura vince finkel blasio alabama google