9 Burst results for "High Country Gardens"

"high country gardens" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

03:26 min | 6 months ago

"high country gardens" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"I I know beautiful color too but I just thought just today saw that. There's a white one hour. Everybody wants a white one. Why would I mean the color yellow? It's young right mustard yellow. Yeah flawless Selena and I my high country gardens sells it. I believe I got my original plants from well. Sweep Herb Garden nearer to you in New Jersey which still exists but no longer sells that plant. I don't think So that's one and then Cram be nearby it in the front yard. I also had crabby Cortisol Kolia to said such a big BRASSICA kind of a thing and it gets like a giant. It looks like a giant bouquet of babies breath and when I say giant I mean many feet across. It's like Kale Bolts in this frothy feathery cloud. Yeah yeah so we're like. Why didn't I keep that thing? I had it for years. Who knows it? It probably got run over by all the shrubs growing in. Do you know what I mean through a piece of Saddam I did. I'm sorry I'm sorry And then I came across as I was crawling around. Dame finding herons would labels I also came across One plant of laughter is Vernice a little perennial P very small. Have you ever grown that? Last of have the species and the pink one yeah and divided the link foster. Did you ever hear of link funk sure speaking of Brock Gardens and so forth and he had sort of a naturalized area of it but it was very wet. I I'm thinking about that because I haven't garden bed and it doesn't get any bigger but I love that all my gosh so pretty so early. A little mound of a thing Arching stems small Often purple piece. Tight flowers lazarus is a sweet pea. But there's a little perennial one Purple as you said there's also pink version and it'll self so around if it's happy and how do I just have one now? I had dozens of them. Well the color is is sort of hombre. You know he goes. Almost bluish to pinkus lowers but they don't they don't last long enough but yeah. Yeah so. That's another one that we grow that have flowers at lasted day. Are we crazy well? There are many reasons along checklist of things that are crazy. That's not the only one I don't call it daily for nothing and there you go What else any other rhubarb three times. I have kind of a soft rule three strikes and it's out so I'm giving I I. I tried the ornamental because they're so spectacular and they look so good in the right climate not here but then I tried to go regular rhubarb. I I I think I actually tried that twice. I couldn't I can't grow it. It just doing back. Who Do you think that's acid? Because a lot of my problems are that it's a little alcohol in here and I think almost everybody wants except likes. Everybody wants it more..

Sweep Herb Garden Brock Gardens Selena Cortisol Cram New Jersey Vernice
"high country gardens" Discussed on Plantrama

Plantrama

09:33 min | 9 months ago

"high country gardens" Discussed on Plantrama

"Eat. Drink grow section today. We're going to talk about plants. You might add to your garden to attract hummingbirds because Ho doesn't love an adorable beautiful little hummingbird swooping into the garden to be honest. They usually scare me because they just fly in so suddenly and they make such a loud noise and I think Oh my God. I'm being attacked by a giant B. But then I look and it's a beautiful hummingbird come to feed on some plant that I have put there just for that express purpose. Do you plant things specifically for Hummingbird Co absolutely. You know hummingbirds are. They're kind of like butterflies. They're flying flowers. They are great flying flowers. They are flying flowers. And it makes your your whole property exciting and adds that element of motion and surprise as you say you know when they show up. It's often a surprise. And that's a it's a delightful surprise. There are enough surprises in life. That are not delightful. We need to add many more delightful surprises to our yards and gardens as possible. And you can do that with plants that attract hummingbirds and I'll tell you my number one favorite gang and that is a coup FIA Aka Cigar plan the coup FIA that have little orange tubular flowers. The farmers are so tiny. You can't imagine that any bird could stick any beak inside them but they draw hummingbirds like nobody's business and I be sure every year that any place I have containers and that I might be sitting whether it's in my outdoor office on my covered front porch on my adirondack chairs or my cocktail hour deck in the back ride in every location. I include these Kufa I frequently by the Ver- millionaire Kafia from proven winner. Not an annual for people that do not an annual and it blooms all summer long and into the fall till hard frost and it is a humming bird magnet. Well my favorite hummingbird plant is a perennial and that is an August dash eight that I bought from High Country Gardens and it is the glowing embers cultivar but a lot of different agosta. Shays do a great job of attracting hummingbirds and I've got several in my backyard which is very small and I've planted some of them immediately below a hummingbird feeder and I will tell you that the hummingbirds come into my garden completely ignore the feeder and go directly for that August dossier which again has those tubular flowers. That are an orangey red pinky color and they just love it and you know. We've all heard that hummingbirds prefer red flowers and it turns out that sort of true but not because they like read so much better. It's that the vision of hummingbirds did allows them to detect reds and yellows better and more strongly than blues purples and whites so visually they're attracted to them and they've also learned to associate those colors with with nectar rich flowers with a good food source. Well it's interesting that you say that because my second favorite hummingbird magnet is a blue flower. They will go to sell Salvia. Black Mu When I was working on my book coffee for roses. That's just one of the myths that hummingbirds you know need to have red flowers and in there. I have a picture of the Hummingbird at my Blue Salvia Flower. But it turns out that for for hummingbirds. What's important to them is the same thing. That's important to realtors. Location location. All right they they come back to the same location where they have found nectar sources again and again and they don't care once they're there if it's blue or if it's orange if it's a nectar source and it's where they expected to be there all on on Thomas I have heard and I've not put this to the test myself that you can just put red accents in your garden like chairs and umbrellas and cushions and that will draw the hummingbirds in and then they will go around and feed on the purple. Be Bomb this or that now. I don't know if that's true but if I think that's. Bs outside personally. Think that that the Hummingbird feeders that have those read ports you know why they put those reports to attract the person buying the feeder well because the people buying it think that red is important. I was GonNa say if any of our listeners. WanNa put this to the test this summer and let us know if they are red beach. Umbrella ATTRACTS COOK copious number of hummingbirds to the backyard garden. Please tell us we'd love to be able to put this myth to rest in our. Did you knows segment. We're going to talk about what the difference is between a single semi double and double flower. And you know these are terms that we read particularly often applied to rose's right The roses peonies and and it's interesting because the difference is of course that the semi double and the double have more flower petals. But there's another really important difference that I find fascinating okay. So that most of these flowers are also sterile. And the reason they're sterile is because the reproductive organs in most cases have mutated to become those extra pedals so you may have the statements of a rose that are no longer functioning statements. They are now they've mutated and their pedals which makes the flower bigger and fluffier and to some is more beautiful but it's never going to be able to reproduce itself you're going to have to reproduce it by cutting to me that's fascinating well. It is fascinating and it's something that a lot of people who are talking about pollinators support. Bring up these days because for example a single flower. Echinacea will usually you know? Draw More pollinator action and support more pollinators. Then that double flower ECHINACEA. Now it I see bees on my double ECHINACEA time. So it's not necessarily that these plants. Maybe these plants some of them don't produce pollen but they still produce nectar right And so they can still Some of them be pollinators support plants. But it's something to think about including the diversity of flour types in your garden to not just to plant double flowers or semi double flowers to plant some single flowering plants as well because they are more accessible to the insects and and that's important it is important and let's face it. Your Garden is going to look a lot more interesting if you have a mixture of different flower shapes go ahead and put some single old fashioned roses in there in with your double roses. Go ahead and and keep some old fashioned peonies in there instead of the double super triple fat flower heads. That are going to break off in your first hard rain anyway. And the fact is that you mentioned. Nectar oftentimes the neck. Diaries are actually blocked by the really really thick full flowers. So if you're interested at all in feeding the wildlife in increasing pollinator diversity implant diversity. Think about that when you're choosing your plants. Today's love letter and question segment is really specifically addressed to see. L. Meg wrote. She gave us a great review on. Apple podcasts and in essence she said this is hands down my favorite podcast about plants. Actually it's my favorite podcast on any topic and my kids even home the opening music. I don't think you could ask for praise than that but MEG has a burning question and she wants to know what does C. L. Stand for a name. I no longer use all right. You're going to have to do better than that. All right. I have my radio. Audience convinced that it stands for compost lover. So I think that my podcast audience can be content with that. I will admit to you that there are times that my husband says it stands for crank on the lady. Oh I can't believe that I'm GonNa Stick with compost lover and I'm sure that all of our listeners will have no problem associating that name with you. If you have a question that we can address in a future. Podcast send it to US Paulette. Rama at G MAIL DOT COM. And be sure to follow us on twitter and instagram implant. Rama pod until next time remember to grow great things? Protect wild places and play in the dirt..

Hummingbird Co FIA Ver- millionaire Kafia Ho High Country Gardens Rama Shays twitter US rose L. Meg Thomas Paulette Wan instagram Apple
"high country gardens" Discussed on Plantrama

Plantrama

05:41 min | 10 months ago

"high country gardens" Discussed on Plantrama

"We're talking about plant. Rama reviews discovering new plants and succulents for boxes. But let's start out with some insider information and let's do a review of a couple of plants. Ellen what plant would you like our listeners to know about the plant that I am currently in love with is a particular cultivar of August dash called glowing embers and I was given a small pot of this plant? Try by the people at High Country Gardens whom I love and admire and I thought oh well this is pretty because the flowers are a a wonderful combination of sort of a deep corley orange pink with a little flush of purple in it. And it's just gorgeous. The foliage is a lovely gray. Green leaves are linear and thin. And I thought okay. This'll be pretty little. Did I know that it was also going to be a tremendous humming bird attractor and a wonderfully tasty mint in the garden? So for someone like me who wants to grow things that are both beautiful and edible turned out to be a real winner. I have since ordered three more plants. They grow to be about two or three feet tall. They they get quite wide and the flowers are prolific. It is gorgeous the hummingbirds like it better than they like the hummingbird feeder and you can cut and dry this at the end of the season in both the leaves and the flowers make a wonderful mint tea. That's just a little bit of a hint of liquorice in which you can drink as a plain T. or turn into a syrup and really up the game on your Mojo's it makes a great Mojo. Let me give a quick hint to some people who might have grown some Agosta keys in northern climates in the past For success with these plants. What I have found is first of all plant them in well drained areas. They don't like their feet wet in the winter in particular. Plant them in full Sun. They love he'd they love to be near rocks. If you've gotTA rockwall that absorbs heat. They would love that and don't cut them down in the fall. Wait until spring to cut them down. They seemed to go through the winter. Better if you haven't chopped and back in the fall well that's very interesting because I cut mine down in the fall and have for the past two years and they seem to have come back fine but in Pennsylvania or in Santa Fe in Santa Fe and here all I have is heat. Well drained soil and rock. So they're pretty much in their ideal growing conditions. Yeah see that's what I'm saying. You have the perfect growing conditions for all of the stack really and we certainly can grow them in more northern areas. But if you live in the upper midwest or the northeast don't cut it down in the winter you'll have a much greater likelihood of survival through the winter with that method. Well the plant. I want to review today. Ellen is a vegetable what a surprise. I know what a surprise. It's actually a turnip and I have two qualified this by saying two things first of all. I'm not a huge turnip fan. You know. It's not priority one for me for growing in the garden or at least it hasn't been in the past it might be now So because turnips you know often tend to be a little strong flavored. You have to use them in the right recipe and that's fine and they're good in you know roasted or in soups or whatever. But on the other hand. It's not something that I've ever rushed to take up garden space with well. This fall the burpee seed company. They did a brilliant piece of marketing. I thought because they didn't just send me a little packet of seeds with promotional material. Telling me how great this is. You know we read great reviews plants all the time but without trying it yourself. You don't know they sent me to turn up selling so you can actually see them very simard the carton turnips and they were about the size of a tennis ball. So not too huge like that. Because I don't want to necessarily commit to dinner for ten if I'm cooking. One of those huge tournaments right so I love the size there. A beautiful with just a blush of purple on the top. And the name of this. Turn-up is Silky. Sweep and I know they named that because it is smooth and silky it is sweet it is not overly turn up but it has enough of the Turnip Flavour. That you know. You're not eating an apple or you're not just eating. You know some sort of random vegetable. It is a turn up but it is sweet. It is delicious I cooked it and loved it in a in with other vegetables and some tomato sauce and eight one of them fresh just chopped up in a salad and it was delightful so I am definitely devoting garden space this year to the Silky. Sweet turn up from burpee seeds and we'll have a link to both plants on our show notes for.

Ellen Santa Fe High Country Gardens Rama Pennsylvania TA rockwall apple tennis
Plantrama Reviews

Plantrama

05:15 min | 10 months ago

Plantrama Reviews

"Let's do a review of a couple of plants. Ellen what plant would you like our listeners to know about the plant that I am currently in love with is a particular cultivar of August dash called glowing embers and I was given a small pot of this plant? Try by the people at High Country Gardens whom I love and admire and I thought oh well this is pretty because the flowers are a a wonderful combination of sort of a deep corley orange pink with a little flush of purple in it. And it's just gorgeous. The foliage is a lovely gray. Green leaves are linear and thin. And I thought okay. This'll be pretty little. Did I know that it was also going to be a tremendous humming bird attractor and a wonderfully tasty mint in the garden? So for someone like me who wants to grow things that are both beautiful and edible turned out to be a real winner. I have since ordered three more plants. They grow to be about two or three feet tall. They they get quite wide and the flowers are prolific. It is gorgeous the hummingbirds like it better than they like the hummingbird feeder and you can cut and dry this at the end of the season in both the leaves and the flowers make a wonderful mint tea. That's just a little bit of a hint of liquorice in which you can drink as a plain T. or turn into a syrup and really up the game on your Mojo's it makes a great Mojo. Let me give a quick hint to some people who might have grown some Agosta keys in northern climates in the past For success with these plants. What I have found is first of all plant them in well drained areas. They don't like their feet wet in the winter in particular. Plant them in full Sun. They love he'd they love to be near rocks. If you've gotTA rockwall that absorbs heat. They would love that and don't cut them down in the fall. Wait until spring to cut them down. They seemed to go through the winter. Better if you haven't chopped and back in the fall well that's very interesting because I cut mine down in the fall and have for the past two years and they seem to have come back fine but in Pennsylvania or in Santa Fe in Santa Fe and here all I have is heat. Well drained soil and rock. So they're pretty much in their ideal growing conditions. Yeah see that's what I'm saying. You have the perfect growing conditions for all of the stack really and we certainly can grow them in more northern areas. But if you live in the upper midwest or the northeast don't cut it down in the winter you'll have a much greater likelihood of survival through the winter with that method. Well the plant. I want to review today. Ellen is a vegetable what a surprise. I know what a surprise. It's actually a turnip and I have two qualified this by saying two things first of all. I'm not a huge turnip fan. You know. It's not priority one for me for growing in the garden or at least it hasn't been in the past it might be now So because turnips you know often tend to be a little strong flavored. You have to use them in the right recipe and that's fine and they're good in you know roasted or in soups or whatever. But on the other hand. It's not something that I've ever rushed to take up garden space with well. This fall the burpee seed company. They did a brilliant piece of marketing. I thought because they didn't just send me a little packet of seeds with promotional material. Telling me how great this is. You know we read great reviews plants all the time but without trying it yourself. You don't know they sent me to turn up selling so you can actually see them very simard the carton turnips and they were about the size of a tennis ball. So not too huge like that. Because I don't want to necessarily commit to dinner for ten if I'm cooking. One of those huge tournaments right so I love the size there. A beautiful with just a blush of purple on the top. And the name of this. Turn-up is Silky. Sweep and I know they named that because it is smooth and silky it is sweet it is not overly turn up but it has enough of the Turnip Flavour. That you know. You're not eating an apple or you're not just eating. You know some sort of random vegetable. It is a turn up but it is sweet. It is delicious I cooked it and loved it in a in with other vegetables and some tomato sauce and eight one of them fresh just chopped up in a salad and it was delightful so I am definitely devoting garden space this year to the Silky. Sweet turn up from burpee seeds

Ellen Santa Fe High Country Gardens Pennsylvania Ta Rockwall Apple Tennis
"high country gardens" Discussed on Plantrama

Plantrama

15:54 min | 1 year ago

"high country gardens" Discussed on Plantrama

"This is plant Rama with C L for Nari and myself. Ellen's akos. It's the podcast where there are no stupid questions, as long as the topic is plants today. We're talking about foraged ornaments. Edible perennials. And tick diseases who let's start out with something fun, rather than something scary. And the C L let's start out with foraged garden ornaments. What do you think about that? Well, you know, when I was thinking about just for fun, and I was thinking, all right. What could be just for fun for a forager? Well, here we are. It's perfect foraged garden ornament. But frankly, this is, I think a really wonderful thing to think about, particularly now that it's June and maybe a good portion of the planting is done. So now, let's think about Crea. Waiting an ornament for the garden from materials that you can pick up on the roadside or in the woods. And I'll tell you how this sort of came to my mind. Ellen is that in the place where I walk the dog here on Cape Cod. Someone created a sculpture on top of a dead, stump. And I'll put the photograph in our show notes. So people can see, but it was a sculpture, made all out of sticks sticks going every which way Stick's kind of defying gravity. I don't know how it stays together, and, and it's the perfect ornament in the woods, you know. And, and so I'm thinking, well, why confined, this sort of thing to the woods about in our gardens, as well? It's so interesting because for years in my Pennsylvania garden, I have had a bottle tree that I built out of just really interesting. Branch that fell during a winter storm? And I thought I can't just throw that away. So I strip the bark off of it. And I planted the base in a bucket of quick Crete and use the small branches to put bottles on, and I set it up every spring and I just love it. It's a combination of the woods that surround my home and these beautiful blue and green bottles in the garden. So it is a wonderful way of bringing art that is of the place and it's something no one else has. So this is an advantage to making a foraged ornament is you have something that nobody else has and not only that, but, but it can as you say, because it's of the place it can really suit the garden. Well, so besides sticks. What else could people use? I gotta say, one more thing about sticks but. Because we're I we're I garden, most of the year in New Mexico. We have these wonderful skeletons from this particular kind of cactus called the Choya, and I will send you a photo of that, for the show page because it is really perfectly sculptural, and you can just stick them in the garden at different places, and use them for vines to climb up, or just use it as an architectural element. What kind of thing do you do? Well, that too sparked a memory for me Ellen the one time I went into a garden when we were on the garden com, a tour of gardens in Oregon and a gardener. There had used the seed pods from the alley Shubert iae wouldn't you makes kind of big Firebird? Yes, seedpods, and that particular gardener had painted them, bright colors, and then stuck them around in the garden. So similar to your skeleton, in the southwest that dried remains of plants can be assembled to be ornaments as well whether they are their natural color. Or whether you decide to, you know, juice them up a little bit. I just love that idea. And it makes me think maybe I should paint some of my choice skeletons. My you know what that would be kinda cool. I. Yeah. That's an interesting idea in, in addition to plant remains rocks are, of course, a great way to make found object or foraged ornaments. I know a landscaper back in Pennsylvania, and he balances these rocks and they're not meant to be permanent sculptures, but they last for a day or two, but they're insane. It's like I don't know how he does it. They're like these crazy giant rocks. And so I go, and there's a whole bunch of people who go around doing this thing, and they'll leave like these Cairns that look impossibly balanced on roadsides at riverbanks, and it takes a lot of patients some of them post videos about it, and they will just have to hold it and balance it. And sometimes they rub it to get a little friction going, and it just seems like. Shouldn't be possible, but it is. So you could do the balanced rocks. You can do rock stacks, you can do rocks kind of put in ever diminishing circles to make kind of beehive shapes or, or a, you can do mazes on the ground. There's a park near here where somebody has done that and put down very light colored stones to create this maze and pathway through the garden. So get out into the woods or along the roadside think about those Dicks. They about those rocks. Think about this seed heads of plants, and how they could be used for an ornament that is either permanent or temporary, but always fun. Ellen June has been declared I think by the perennial plant association to be the perennial month of the year that June June is for Perennials. And with good reason, because there are many Perennials that are not only gorgeous in June. But many people can be planting off through June. And so this time when people are thinking about Perennials and what Perennials, they can put in their gardens, and I thought it would be fun. If you and I talked about designing a perennial garden like any perennial garden, we wanted to look, fabulous. But let's think about designing it with all edible plants. Oh really see. I don't want to all that is my entire garden. Everything in my garden is edible. It's not all perennial. I do have some woody's, and I do have some annuals, but everything in my garden is. Edible. So let let's do. And frankly, that was one of my thoughts L, and I don't have to do too much background on this. Now, Lynn Kentucky the entire time. Yeah. Well, let me start off by, by mentioning a plant that people will often grow for the stocks, but it is also beautiful and ornamental and so off throw out rhubarb as the first plant that somebody could put in a perennial garden. That is gorgeous. And edible, absolutely. That's a great choice. And I highly recommend it, especially if you can find the ones with the reddish stems the flavors, not any different. But the color is gorgeous. And honestly, the leaves of rhubarb, even when it's passed the Harvard stage, the leaves are so beautiful and dramatic. I think that's a really good one to have in there. Yeah. Good. Good. So what, what else is a good plant for an edible perennial garden? All right. Well, I have to start out with Jerusalem, artichokes, because they are just so darned, easy to grow, and, and they are so productive. I believe it or not. I am still eating the Jerusalem, artichokes, that I harvested last fall, and I shipped boxes of them across the country, I put it up on my blog. If anybody wants some sunshine tubers you just have to cover the postage and they, they need almost nothing from you, as the Gardner and they're perfect for the back of a sunny bed with a little bit of irrigation. They get to be ten or twelve feet tall. And they are self branching green foliage pest free and beautiful bright, yellow sunflowers. So I highly recommend that one for sunny garden, and also something that I think most people don't realize is edible for humans are all of the Gestapo, she's, so you'll see them recommended as, as hummingbird plants. But last year, I grew Augustow shea repetitiveness glowing embers, which has a gorgeous flower. That's orange and pink. With a tinge of purple, the hummingbirds went mental and at the end of the season. I cut it all back dried, it made syrup with it makes a fabulous mo- hito, it sort of a combination of a mint and liquorice flavour. It makes an excellent T. It's a great sorbet base. So it has wonderful flavor, and it is a member of the mint family. But I don't think most people they planned it for the hummingbirds not necessarily for themselves. And it's a really good one. That's a great idea. And there are aga- stack that grow in many different zones and climate. So you can find one no matter, whether you're living in Wisconsin. Or whether you're living in the south west, you can find one that's going to do well for you. Now, I happen to know an edible perennial that you planted last year. Yes. What is that? That's the Scorpius that we planted we both planted. That's so it's a milkweed I two kinds of milkweed I grow the common milkweed, and then what was the? Other one that we planted it was a Scorpius species of it from high country gardens. Davis, wasn't a that is a beauty. So the leaves of that milkweed are slightly more silvery and pointy than that of the common milkweed and the flowers, the petals are more reflects it's very dramatic and a beautiful perennial. I'd say for the middle of the border, it can be a little bit floppy. So if you have something in front of it, that's a good idea. But, you know, the, the flowers, the buds, the pods, the young shoots are all edible amount plant. And it's something that I'm now seeing cultivars of that have been hybridize for a little bit more beauty sold in the trade whereas before people just thought, oh, common milkweed. It's a wheat. It's not something I'm going to put my garden. A lot of people like Dianne 'thus and all of the annual and perennial Diana's flowers are edible. But if you're if you're looking to plant specifically an edible garden, you want to choose the. With the most fragrant blooms. So that's, that's a good way to make those choices. Yeah. And those often are good in the front as well, being shorter plant, now we kind of skipped over one of the taller Perennials, that people can include in this garden, and that it's Moneda, of course. Manara is a wonderful edible plant, and it's a really easy one for people who are just starting to plant an edible garden because the flavor is so much like oregano that it's an easy jump to make. And you you had an idea once about a pizza the flowers. Right. Is the pizza is done to sprinkle. Those colorful Menard pedals right on top of the pizza. You don't wanna leave it in the oven with the pedals because then they'll shrivel up to nothing. But if you just put it right on the hot pizza, right out of the oven, the flowers will to Nuff to become part of the pizza, but they retained their color as well as that oregano like flavor. So that's. That's a great. Yeah. Yeah. All right. What else I know we've mentioned Dahlia's before, but I just want to quickly get that in there. If if you are Dahlia grower and you do have to dig them up in the fall because they're not winter hardy for you. They're not winter hardy for me and I don't think they're winter hardy for UCLA. Are.

Ellen June Pennsylvania Nari Jerusalem Cape Cod UCLA New Mexico Cairns Manara Wisconsin Nuff aga Lynn Kentucky Augustow shea Gardner Oregon Davis Dianne Diana
"high country gardens" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:51 min | 3 years ago

"high country gardens" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Good morning how's everything going it's a beautiful day out here in new mexico what part in new mexico are you i'm a northerner mexico in santa fe the state capitol okay very good i also know that there is a place to mexico called las vegas right often cannot used with the other states las vegas invade is that the is that were the raiders are moving do together i i picked up better stay on the left coast where exactly in in nevada now now david being the chief horticulture over there at high country gardens has to be quite a task because you guys specialize in kind of the unique but niche style plans dead people are looking for but at the same time you've got to keep up with what what what the trends are in in what's going on in that market tell us a little bit about high country gardens in your role well i i founded high country gardens back in on nineteen ninety four and the company is operating out of a large hurt greenhouse in denver and are primarily primary focus from the beginning has been a water wives plan out for the waterways garden and are part of that has been bringing kind of the uh the best new and tried and true plans to market for people to put into their water wife's gardens our focus at the beginning was primarily in the western united states but we've expanded are offering to include plant that work all across the country now you know beyond just water wise you guys also focused on the the in hummingbird plants and you guys do kind of the region's as far as you you you can actually go to your website and say hey this is where i live tell me what's going to grow right yes we we we broken out the regional plant selections to help people up zero win on the plants best for their area because i think it's important for gardeners to remember that not one five doesn't fit all necessarily when it comes to clamp goes up regional differences can make a real difference in terms of the out suitable plans for the area and you know but pollinators have been a real focus of ours for about the past fifteen years with tried to call attention to the need to provide nectar four bs and and butterflies and of course attracting hummingbird's took a garden in a winning comes to finding.

new mexico mexico state capitol raiders nevada denver united states las vegas david fifteen years
"high country gardens" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"high country gardens" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"World plants that come to us from europe and these include they're really nice little dwarf variety called marcus which is a doesn't bring in hummingbird's but is invaluable to attract bs and butterflies and when you say dwarfed rodney how tall are we talking marcus topped out in bloom at about a foot okay i was just wants to uncover sal salvia while almost yeah it's it's a law mounir so it's good for upfront on the border good for lining up pathways a sidewalks l a lot of these that's up i think a very popular a trend currently in uh the new plant introductions our work worth plants because people i think have smaller yards and more limited space coast guard meme sobusa smaller growers have become very popular yeah i i agree with you i mean even on you know you stay out there with the soviet great guy varieties dan you different ones there's there's the standard variety you know but then there's always backing it up right now with a dwarf one because people love to use them in pots or small gardens in those big ones that get three four feet tall they could just overpower sometimes in so you know i think that they're going to a more compact style plants and so that's what you guys are working on his kinda maybe taking the best of the best in that genre and then putting it on your guy's his website to sell now who who do you primarily shell too from high country gardens a well high country gardens is a direct consumer a catalogue and website so we go sell directly to gardeners across the us although ours our sweet spot is the western half of the country the great plains inter mountain west and uh and the west coast are is kind of our sweet spot particularly for a lot of our water wife plant selection so that's where you can is seen those droughts on implants going is primarily on the west coast well as you all or i'm sure very familiar the california thankfully is coming out of a of a very severe fiveyear.

us europe rodney marcus california in bloom coast guard three four feet fiveyear
"high country gardens" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:50 min | 3 years ago

"high country gardens" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Good morning how's everything going it's a beautiful day out here in new mexico and what part in new mexico are you i'm a northerner mexico were in santa fe the state capitol okay very good i also know that there is a place to new mexico called las vegas right often could argue with other states las vegas invade is that the is that where the raiders are moving to just giving what i i picked up better stay on the left coast where exactly in nevada now david being the chief horticulture over there at high country gardens has to be quite a task because you guys specialize in kind of the unique but niche style plants that people are looking for but at the same time you've got to keep up with what what what the trends are in in what's going on in that market just a little bit about high country gardens in your role well i i founded high country gardens back in nineteen ninety four and the company is operating out of a large greenhouse in denver and are primarily primary focus from the beginning has been a water wives plan out for the waterways garden and part of that focus has been bringing kind of the uh the best new and tried and true plans to market for people to put into their water wise gardens our focus at the beginning was primarily in the western united states but we've expanded are offering to include plants sweat work all across the country now beyond just water wise you guys also focused on the these in hummingbird plants and you guys do of the regions as far as you know you you can actually go to our website and say hey this is where i live tell me what's going to grow right yes we we broken out the regional plant selection to help people zero win on the plants best for their area because i think it's important for gardeners to remember that not one five doesn't fit all necessarily when it comes to clamps cosa regional differences can make a real difference in terms of the aisle suitable plans for the area and you know the pollinators have been a real focus of ours for about the past fifteen years with tried to call attention to the need to provide nectar for bs and and butterflies and of course attracting hummingbird's took a garden in a winning.

new mexico mexico state capitol raiders denver united states santa fe las vegas nevada david fifteen years
"high country gardens" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

01:36 min | 4 years ago

"high country gardens" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"Radio one oh two nine katie a are ran arkansas's news weather and traffic station on protected talk thus savage nation we don't have to be careful anymore you know what let the prague starting real careful it's drive for them to stop looking over their shoulder when he was that they ought to be cabo bob second then i'm not running inviting from them it's driver that the run and hide but back out of that he's the right you've got to put up with five going to wideout either side them every right current barn protected talk the savage nation weeknights at nine on news radio one oh two nine k are it if you haven't block and planted your spring bolts yet in much it's still not too late this is france torn pregame d if you're live and we can still work to grab camp time to plan fall ball to you can for sure balls indoors here's some of my favorites our him christa fee i said give us perennial the garden with it's huge ten amateur ping flower heads on a small growing man it's a great companion with other early summer of them and flowers harden's of five to eight it's too good that for drive flower arrangements oriented little ease with their suites spicy sent in a mix of being deep you show white outstanding in any summer cart they're spectacular perennial borders can be groaning containers of planted in a cutting garden french travel good looking bill pays they're hard in so three two nine all told wolves are now on sale at high country gardens dot com this is france or him for cbs radio news conditions as seemingly this think us get through premio.

katie arkansas prague france cbs two nine k