35 Burst results for "Higgs"

"higgs" Discussed on Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

09:46 min | 1 d ago

"higgs" Discussed on Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

"Tasting, do one winery day here. Marks to. Going to be there like you'll be there to three hours to they're not give new little sips. Cracker and have another now? No no no. Generous pause. Karen. Is like in my head, she knows my check box of what I want out of a place to travel and I feel like it's just going check check check I can't think of anything that I like out of traveling destination or even honestly like living or or long-term traveling slow traffic do. That you haven't mentioned. We talk about a good food scene like not too expensive but a thriving new like inventive food seen good music beaches walkable city winery. vibe of people wanting to. Enjoy life and spend time relaxing and not always go man it's who. I'M GONNA have to come and see it for myself. But well, you know what I think you're having your Karen with the street sign moment Y- I mean. He. was. You Know I. Did enough research to say, Hey, this has like I. Knew You had great coastline obviously I knew Montevideo was was like a cool I've seen the architecture and a cool city but obviously, I had never dove into it. The way that we dove into a today really pulling out the details and I just said, this seems to me like. It hits all the check boxes. Right? You know I wanNA beat I mean almost kind of similar like before I'd ever been to. Barcelona. Same thing. Well, this seems like a city I'm going to love because it has the things that it does well or the things that I like And Add something of course. Okay and this this is not to plug my books. Okay. I. I'm going to get your books immediately suzy. But the only problem I have with I'm GONNA be reading, it saying? When can I come like I'm GONNA it'll. It'll make me feel a little sad actually but I'm GONNA check it out for sure. So plug those books because I'm plugging. But it's not plug the books precisely, but I want to say that Uruguay is. A slightly hermetic country regarding finding your way around and to what the best it's why I started the website. The guidebooks because I mean I'm telling you that there's a great gourmet seen in Montevideo but there are also restaurants are probably the majority that are not great. and. So it's really important to have a good guy it really important there. I would say more so than in a lot of other countries because otherwise if you struggle into a place CIANCI's. Strode into a restaurant chances are you may not have the best experience, which is why it took me a year to write my beaches, wrenches and wine country because I really I mean like I go on my check every place out I don't put every place in. It's really it's really highly curated and the reason is because. Tourism here is is you're developing and it's getting it's definitely like Head. But still. A good guidance is essential. and. That's so important I think for. Disappointed have for any kind of under the radar hidden gem destination. You're GONNA come in. You're GonNa you know like it because you is off the beaten path and so your experiences won't be like all these other tours. But like you mentioned if you WanNa, make sure you have the good meal and you WanNa make sure. It's not as readily available as if you go to a Barcelona. Where you just know in Any place. You could ask anyone on the street. Hey, what's the best place and they'll tell you because you know because there's a thousand travellers they're ready to tell you and similar to our experience when we were in Myanmar, the probably the hardest country. Other in India. Now, obviously, it's less developed than Uruguay but same thing is that we didn't have anyone there to guide us. So we had these cool off the beaten path experiences but then we had these crappy off the beaten path experiences and we're not saying that everything has to be perfect for us saying like we had sort of ain't days right? You don't want. To waste twelve meals, waste one or two because you decided to destroy into something and it wasn't the best, but don't do it every day and so I'm with you like that's the key to having a successful off the beaten path either on the ground guide like when we're in the Republic Georgia, we had a driver and so that opened up a world of opportunities. Or a guidebook like you have that is like all right I know this person has curated it I know that speaking of crappy experiences last question when I ask you before I, let you go here biggest travel miss half we gotta and on this I'm sure I mean you saying in his sixties Psychedelic Rock band I'm sure you've got some crazy experiences. What is your biggest travel miss out? Was Arriving in Mexico City Airport when I was twenty one years old. To embark on a backpacking trip with my roommate. And finding that she wasn't at the airport. AM So I spent the entire day sitting. Waiting for her to appear and when she didn't appear. I went. To spend the night at a hostile and then I went back the next day today what because I thought maybe I got the Pre Internet obviously. I, I've must have got the wrong day. But I spent from nine till twelve the next day sitting on an airport and she didn't here and I'm like. I guess I'm in this find myself. She did she bail on you like she just never even showed up it was. A classic story of Chinese whispers as. Mine. We had we had made a plan and this is pre Internet. All letters write snail mail. We, we talked about when we both graduated that she was she was living in Mexico City at the time and so when I graduated I'm like you know while it would be amazing to come and visit you and she's like, yeah, you must. So when We were coming to refined the details. I actually had just graduated and I'm like, I'm not sticking around the UK any longer. So I went off hitchhiking to fronts but leaving a message with my mum saying mum back payment was from California. Beth parents are GONNA call you. And they are going to say to you. When Beth is going to be in Mexico City Airport the date she's going to be there to meet me old Guatemala City Airport, to meet me, you need to write down the the days and. I will be one of those days. and. So they like okay fine. And then. Gets the message from her parents when she calls. So she calls them because she doesn't have a phone in Mexico city she calls parents and she says, so what Karen Say and. They say, Oh, Cameron wasn't there because she's gone to France. Okay so no like, oh, but Yuji wants to meet up pick this. Is GonNa. Get back and then she's GonNa meet you. Yeah. It was like Karen's to the message that Beth got was Karen's gone to France so she took off so she wasn't even in Mexico by the time I landed in Mexico City but that was the start of my love affair with Latin America Because I just like I'm like. Well, I'm here one I'm going to I'm going to go back home. No Way. No Way. Am I going to go back home? No. No worries. You're just gonNA live life renewed eventually being Uruguay and. Start Life there who knew That right. So yeah, that was that. Was it. So I ended up instead of being a month in Mexico Guatemala with Beth. I actually ended up finding her back in California. Three months later after having spent three wonderful months in Mexico and deciding that. I was going to be learning, Spanish and not French in the future and that I was going to be coming back to Latin America. Do you. Do you still stay in contact with Beth to this day or no? All right. Cool. Bring it full circle. She's she come and visited you. In Monterey No. No, she has an I'm very annoyed with her but her daughter came to do her. Out to Montevideo and. Program didn't understand like Sarah Lawrence was like, why do you WanNa go to Uruguay?.

Karen Say Beth Uruguay Montevideo Mexico City Airport Mexico City Mexico Barcelona Latin America California Guatemala City Airport Cracker CIANCI Myanmar France India suzy UK Monterey Sarah Lawrence
"higgs" Discussed on Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

04:52 min | 1 d ago

"higgs" Discussed on Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

"Then like what in the winter rocket down to? Well, if we're talking about Montevideo on the coast, so it's tempered by the we'll never during the day. Oh, my God, this is where I'm hopeless with degrees Fahrenheit or just give me. I'll help you. Okay. It's. Won't go below. Five Okay and now we're talking in the early hours and during the day it's about normally sixteen or seventeen. Okay call. So we're talking. High of low forties high of like yeah. In the morning in the morning. Okay. I think we're talking about higher actually but. Five ish seventy reach I used to be really good when I lived in Japan I've been rusty. It's been. It's been like seven years but I can get close enough. You know six yeah it's nice sunny and seventeen. Now the thing is is like I said the humidity means that you wanNA bring layers because people like see those people from the North Sea, those temperatures and they're like sandals. That You need you need to bring layers in fact a tip? Always bring layers here. Because the sun goes out your you don't WanNa get sick while you're while you're here and the weather changes. What then what about cost for people coming to Uruguay like what? What can you compare it to I? Don't know if you have comparison to what it would cost to travel there compared to a European. Destination or whether you can just give a straight numbers of hey if you got to like a decent meal, here's what run you here's what hotel will run you. You know like mid level hotel like what are we looking at? Okay. Well, flights down here depend a lot on where you're coming from it CETERA. I you can get deals in certain times of the year from Miami from about seven hundred dollars I think. then. eating out is comparatively cheap for the quality. people let let's see. Let's give you an idea at the moment. One dollar is about forty one Uruguay Guan Faso's. To. Dollar. On. So it's comparatively cheap at the moment to be eating. You could have I would say like twenty. Dollars thirty dollars. And thirty five dollars and you're going to be able to eat at a really good restaurant here wave wine. For one person. Okay. People tell me that in New York, they'd be paying five times the amount, right? Right. So you're talking like, Hey, you're going on a date night or or you just want like using I'm going to go to one of the better restaurants or one of the best restaurants I can get in and out for probably thirty five bucks. A person for most of the. Thing is is that there's not a really big difference between the high end and low end restaurants here. Compared to other countries. So in a low end restaurant, you're likely to be paying. Now it'd be tweet like, say about eight dollars. For for for me. To give you an idea glass of wine, which is an important thing right or it's also the. Metrics for sure you can get a great ball of wine here for eight to ten dollars a great bottle of wine and in a restaurant is not going to be a huge amount more. That's the key right. That's that right? That's a key because yeah. That's that's where heather and I always get arguments. But, it's so cheap if you. WanNa have it with my meal and I'm thinking they just charge you three times more four times more just hold out you know my cheap brain resum. Difference, which is really nice. The same thing with wine tastings here, an average wine tasting, which is really like generous pour a ton of time usually with the wine owners or the winemakers. What would be a VIP trip in the US Khun cost like thirty, five, bucks okay yeah for. Like a real serious and I, always say to people if you go wine tasting, do one winery day here. Marks to. Going to be there like you'll be there to three hours to they're not give new little sips. Cracker and have another now? No no no. Generous pause. Karen. Is like in my head, she.

Uruguay Guan Faso Karen Montevideo North Sea Uruguay Japan Cracker US Miami New York heather Wan
"higgs" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

01:34 min | 2 weeks ago

"higgs" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

"<Music> See you next time. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thanks <Speech_Music_Male> for listening and remember <Speech_Music_Male> that Daniel Jorges <Speech_Music_Male> blamed. The Universe <Speech_Music_Male> is a production <Music> iheartradio <Music> <Advertisement> for more podcasts <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> from iheartradio <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> visit, the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> iheartradio APP <Speech_Music_Male> apple, podcasts <Speech_Music_Male> or whatever <Music> you listen <Music> favorite ships. <Speech_Telephony_Male> Here's <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> something. Good is a new <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> show from the Seneca <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Women Podcast, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> network and iheartradio. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> It's a <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> great way to start your <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> day on the positive <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> side of life. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Our Partner <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Bank of America <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> just committed <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> one billion dollars <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> over four years <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to help communities <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> advanced racial <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> equality and economic <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> opportunity <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> there, providing <Speech_Music_Female> help for it's needed <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> most healthcare <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> housing <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> jobs <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and support <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> for small business. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Thanks <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to Bank of America <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> for their efforts and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for supporting. Here's something <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> good I'm <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Kim as early. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Listen to hear something <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> good on the iheartradio <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> APP. Apple <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> podcasts <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> wherever you listen <SpeakerChange> to your favorite <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> shows. <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> Guys it's bobby bones <Speech_Music_Male> I host the bobby <Speech_Music_Male> show and <Speech_Music_Male> I'm pretty much always <Speech_Music_Male> sleepy because I. Wake up with <Speech_Music_Male> three o'clock in the morning <Speech_Music_Male> a couple of hours later <Speech_Music_Male> on my friends together <Speech_Music_Male> we get into <Speech_Music_Male> a room and we <Speech_Music_Male> do a radio show <Speech_Music_Male> we alive. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We tell our stories. <Speech_Music_Male> We try to find as much good <Speech_Music_Male> in the world. Possibly <Speech_Music_Male> can, and we <Speech_Music_Male> looked through the <Speech_Music_Male> news of the day that <Speech_Music_Male> you'll care about <Speech_Music_Male> also your favorite <Speech_Music_Male> country artists are always <Speech_Music_Male> stopping by hang <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> out and share <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> their lives and <Speech_Music_Male> music to so <Speech_Music_Male> wake up with a bunch of <Speech_Music_Male> my friends I ninety <Speech_Music_Male> eight point seven W <Speech_Music_Male> M Q in Washington DC or wherever the rotates you on the iheartradio APP.

"higgs" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

05:36 min | 2 weeks ago

"higgs" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

"Having found the Higgs. But was was a moment I. Imagine you told me that? Maybe there wasn't but I wonder if there was a moment wind like some Grad student or some fizzes. Pulls out the date under like Is this little bump while you know, there was a moment for me. In the summer of two thousand eleven both experiments bumps, but these are bumps in different places like atlas saw, but it was at around one hundred forty five G. E. V. CMS, bummed around one hundred and twenty GV so you knew they were just random, because it didn't every. These are two different experiments, atlas and CMS, two different experiments at different points around the ring, independent data, and so you expect them. The Higgs is real to see bumps at the same place. It's a very important crosscheck and also the two groups. There's a whole group of thousands of experimentalist working on atlas and. And thousands of experimentalist working on CMS. They're not supposed to talk to each other supposed to keep each other separate supposed to keep these secrets so that the word can be independent. Right problem is of course. All these people know each other were all friends. Sometimes you got like a married couple one on one experiment, the others on the other experiment. You know they're talking to each other. Though there's no way that he secretly being kept, and so there was a moment like late two thousand eleven, I called a friend of mine on the other experimented a You know we have a bump. Where's your bump? You told him he had had a bump. I found a lump. What no! No! No I mean sharing information like that is strictly against the rules. I would never do that did I say it was me I mean I'm and it was a colleague of mine who talked to his friend and then told me about it. I mean you must have misheard me I would never do that. We had this bump and I was curious about whether they had a bump, and it turns out. They had a bump in the same place. And that's the moment and you figure that out on the phone at the moment is starting to believe when I thought. You know what I think. This is it I think we're actually do as Harley broke the rules Daniel. Why did you do that I think you mean my colleague. Who broke the mini and your friend also broke because he told her she told you where the bump was in. This is a story about a colleague of mine. Who broke these rules? Everybody was breaking. The rules man these were the worst kept secrets at sern man I have left off in his now. Time I was not directly involved in producing that plots couldn't influence me, and neither was he. Oh, I see so you were like literally league like? He he learned some secret. And you phoned the other team again. This unnamed colleague of mine he was the we saw bumps in the same place, and so that's the moment is start to believe it. And then we just kept collecting more and more data, and the bumped got bigger and bigger, and they lined up right on top of each other, and then in late June we. We had enough events enough collisions at the same place that we could say statistically. It was very very unlikely for this to be random chance. Random chance can produce anything, but the odds were like one in millions that just random chance could produce all these bumps that exactly the same place, so that was the day we said all right. We decided the now we have discovered. July fourth twelve and that was the July. Fourth Twenty twelve, and there was big announcement at Cernan and everybody knew it was going to be the announcement the next day sorting like July third everybody it's stern was standing in line to get into that auditorium and sleeping in line like camping out. You know this is like Comecon, but nerd edition at Sern and. Superconducting Super. And people really wanted to be in that room and invited Peter. Higgs and he was there and the director Sir and give a talk, and you know the people in the audience. We are new the results. We been involved in producing them repairing them, but it was just a moment we all got together and basically said all right. Let's high five and declared that we have found this after decades and decades of searching me mother. Rest of the world's like the Higgs what. We have a collider Geneva. Nobody told us about this. No, the team at sern is really good at PR. They are very good at popularizing the science and making people understand it, and that's why I think the Higgs Boson is one of the most famous particles is because it's been all sold to the public as an exciting discovering. Also, it was the Obama years you know we were. We were happy about all. That's right and we believed scientist. Thanks, that's right then. That gets us today so now these days we know that the Higgs field exists in the the Hick goes on exists, and it makes all the equations balance out, and and now we have a complete picture of the universe and the particles in it is right now. We know where the Higgs is. It's about a hundred and twenty five GV number. We didn't know before we measured it and we can study. Study all of its properties we can see turning into this kind of particle and that kind of particle, and you can try to measure its properties in great details. He is this the particle that Higgs predicted, or is it a weird version of it? Are there more eggs on out there as the search doesn't stop just because we found it now were studying in gory detail and trying to see if it has any more secrets to reveal all right well. Again also pretty exciting and good insight into how signs works little by little through competition and friendly breaking of the rules. And anybody on the experiment. Who heard that? Please forgive me breaking the rules, but you did. You like hopefully I know what he's listening to this podcast couple of one, hundred, thousand, eight hundred thousand people. I'm sure you know there's like you know podcast host podcast listener confidentiality absolutely. We assume that so I'm trusting you this story folks all right well. Thanks for joining us. Thanks for telling the story Daniel. We hope you enjoyed that..

Higgs Higgs Boson Sern Daniel Obama Geneva Cernan Comecon Harley Peter scientist director
"higgs" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

02:04 min | 2 weeks ago

"higgs" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

"Swamp, and you're seeing features in the lake, and everyone is something fascinating and interesting and the bigger collider in the long run it, the more you're able to pump water of that lake, and see all the hidden features, and so we're constantly doing this. This is why we run the collider over and over and over again because we're looking for smaller and smaller, more subtle bumps, the more collisions you make, the more you can see. These little bumps emerged from the fog. I guess it's all statistical right? 'cause he he runs a bunch of times in the VC's kind of like a unexpected high incidence of a. Collision! This mass range that must mean that the Hicks Young also system, and we can't point to. One of this. One was definitely a higgs. We say well. These fifty events will have about the same value, and there's more close to this value than any other value, and so we think it's very likely that it's there, but it's a little bit frustrating because you can't like. Take a picture it or say conclusively. This collision was a Higgs Boson. It's in the end purely statistical. You only see the leftovers or the footprints in the snow. Never actually like take a picture of it. Yeah, it's like you're looking for bigfoot and you have tracks, and you have four and you have lots of other evidence that convince you. That is not just random nonsense, but you don't actually have the bigfoot. It delve right like you see. A lot of poop in one plays more than usual your leg. Something next to keep coming back here. Yeah, precise thing all right well, let's get into now. We actually founded and what that discovery meant, but first let's take another quick break. It's a great time to get a great deal on a new car when you get approved for an auto loan from. Our powered by truecar rates are as low as one point three nine percents apr a new vehicles finance for a longer term to lower your monthly bill plus take up to sixty days to schedule your first payments. Join Penn Fed and together. We'll keep you moving forward. Anyone can apply visit ten fed dot org slash auto or call one, eight, hundred, two, four, seven, five, sixty, six to receive any.

Higgs Boson Penn Fed Hicks
"higgs" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

08:03 min | 2 weeks ago

"higgs" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

"Dependence. Day The day that we learn of our deep dependence on the Higgs Boson which is July fourth twenty twelve a little over eight years ago. So how do we actually find his expose on important to understand that the first idea with not for Higgs Boson, but for Higgs field misses some new quantum field, but fills the universe and has this affected? Affected gives the Z. in the W mass, and not the Photon but one prediction of the field. Is that like all other fields? If you give them a little blob of energy, excite them. You get a little packet of excited field than that looks like a particle, so there's a prediction also for a new particle. The Higgs Mos on the field and the article had. Had the same relationship as other particles and fields, but what we found was not directly. The Higgs field we looked for the higgs bows on which is the particle from them, but you have a field without a particle. Could you have take the higgs field? But Not Hicks bows on or when you predict the higgs field you automatically. The BOZA is a great question, I think. Think that every quantum field has to have a particle. I can't think of an example of quantum bill. It doesn't have a particle and I think that your interaction with it. In terms of probation, theory's always described in terms of particles, but you know I'm not sure that's a. that's a really fun question. A will smoke. Some banana peels and think about that deep questions. But I guess it was also to together like when Peter Higgs. Came up with this idea of like playing descend to make the equations where he must have known right away that meant that there is a particle involved to. Yes, absolutely, and you know Peter Higgs who wins the race to get his name put on this, but there are lots of other people coming up with very similar ideas at the same time, and they submitted papers like within weeks of each other. Other and there's still a lot of bitterness, and in some parts of the world is not called. The Higgs Bozen it's called the B. E. H. Bows on because there's two other guys route in Anglert. Who have their names on it? Also depending on where your conference is, it's called the B. E. H. on or the Higgs bows on. Really you have to like coats which when you go between congresses. Yeah precisely and there's a whole group of Americans were totally left out of the Nobel prize and the naming, and they're grumpy and all their friends call it after them, and so yes until. man, but you know I like the Higgs name. Feeling gets better than the. The, It best sounds Hubert or something right. Yeah, yeah, but hey pretty A. I mean. All of Europe right now. Mostly, just Belgium actually how? Well they don't get insulted. Drinking Belgian beer. Well, they have good fries and offals. Anyway, so what we do is we look for the bows on the field, and like with other particles. The way you make, it is used a collider, and you smash particles together to try to make enough energy in a tiny little spot that the universe can make heavy particles. Most of the universe is like dilute and cool, and so there is enough energy to make anything except for very light. Light stable particles like electrons and quirks. We're made him, but he'd WanNa find new stuff you gotta collide particles at really high energy and create those little packets of energy. The nature can then turn sometimes very rarely into an expectation of the Higgs field and give you a higgs on I guess one question I have. Is You know it seems like the Higgs field is so pervasive and so integral to all particles, and it's like it's always there. Lincoln. Why is it so hard to make a blip? You know like if it's right there. Why does it have such a big trouble for us to find it? Why couldn't we have found it earlier with lower energy collider? Yeah, that's a great question and the key is the mass. The prediction from Peter Higgs was there is this field and therefore there is this particle, but he couldn't predict what the mass of that particle was. He could have been very very very light. In which case it would have been discovered just a few years after he predicted it or could been silver heavy so that we hadn't even discovered yet. He didn't know how heavy it was. And like with all things and collider world, the heavier it is the more energy you need to make it, so the bigger your collider has to be the more expensive it is, and so it just took time to build a big enough collider. Mind I guess you need energy. To make it but I. Guess it's sort of a weird thing to think about. The Hicks Bozon having mass because isn't. Isn't that what it does to give master things? Yeah, it's weird. It also has self interactions interact with itself, and that's the thing that gives it. Mass and Higgs field didn't predict how strong that self interaction would be, and so we didn't know until people started looking for pretty much right away and not finding it. All right so then yeah, you build a collider. You've smash protons together, and you hope that a comes out every once in Beth right and protons have inside them quirks and glue on the Glunz hold the quirks together, and what you hope for is to those glue on's actually collide together with enough energy to give you a higgs, both on, and the Higgs bows on doesn't last very long, so you can't. Can't just like take a picture of it. You can't see it and say here's our higgs bows on, in which case you only would have need had made one of them. You could put it on your wall. That's your discovery. The problem is that it lasts for ten to the minus twenty three seconds, and then it turns into other. Stuff is what you gotTa do is look at that other stuff. Stuff and figure out if it looks like it came from a higgs bows on or something else I guess what makes you think that it could it even had? They couldn't have been like a Photon, or would that not help you with this symmetry of the equations yet? In order to have the affected has it has to have a non zero mass otherwise wouldn't have this weird symmetry breaking effect, but we. We didn't know it could have been ten times heavier than it turned out to be or ten times lighter enough to one of the frustrating things about the theory that we didn't quite know where to look in that means you don't know how big to build your accelerator or how it will decay, because all those things change based on how heavy it is, it can have any kind of mass like. What did we have a very different universe? If the Higgs Boson was really big and massive, you could have the much heavier. Higgs goes on. Basically have the same universe really like if it. was really massive within that I. Don't know affect how thanks ask or anything like that. No, because as a matter, most things get mass through their interaction with the field. It doesn't matter how heavy the particle itself is. All right, so the really fast collisions and the Hicks doesn't last very long. So how do you actually detected like? How do you know it existed? If it only exists for ten to minus twenty three second, and so we can never say for sure what we do is we look at a collision and we look at the patterns of the stuff that came out and we say okay. This looked like this collision had for example two photons in it. We can add the energies of those photons say okay, the total energy that came out of this collision. How much was it and? And if a higgs bows on, was there than the total energy that came out of the collisions, should to the mass of The Hague's on, so we look for a lot of events like that a lot of collisions that turned into two photons. We add up all their masses, and we make plot like a histogram and we look for a bump. We look for a bunch of collisions that led to two photons that all have the same mass because of the Higgs Bozon Israel. It'll make more of those events, and and you have to know for sure that those two photons. Couldn't have come from any other that we can never know that for sure. There are other ways to make to photos to same photons to same photons, but they don't tend to make same photons addict. The Higgs mass they tend to make random masses, and so the background the things that Mimic your signature. They're also give you to photons. Just give you random numbers. Whereas photons came from the Higgs, always end up about the same place, so if you do often enough, you notice like a pile of them accumulating at the same place, the true mass of the Higgs you look for this basically this bump over this background spectrum. and. Imagine you see other bumps, but they're probably due to other Lake interactions right will bumps pretty exciting, because they almost always mean that some particles there some heavy particles there and it decayed, and basically every bump is a Nobel prize. Sort of like you're draining the.

Peter Higgs Higgs Boson Higgs Bozon Israel Higgs Bozen higgs Hicks Nobel prize B. E. H. Bows Belgium Europe Mass BOZA Hubert Anglert Lincoln Beth
"higgs" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

04:20 min | 2 weeks ago

"higgs" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

"Because.

"higgs" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

08:00 min | 2 weeks ago

"higgs" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

"Remember but July Fourth Twenty twelve. Here's what people had to say. Pigs on was discovered using the LHC. Some sequence of particle decays was detected that. Backed up the fury existing on heads. I know where it's. Allowed Chandrika liner, but how most likely shooting and colliding. Particles so the Higgs both most discovered. In the trunk, the Higgs Boson was predicted by Peter Higgs and others, and then there was discovered in two thousand twelve in the large Hadron collider, it was discovered in the large Hadron Collider, and it was by zooming around hydrogen or helium electrons very close to the speed of light. I think it was discovered with the large. Hadron Collider, but As to how I don't know I note that. On I discovered in theory. We knew that every force has a acting particu and for gravity. Who we called particulate Hicks, physicists? Even. Someone like Amazon. Ticket out that there was something missing. And they kept looking forward looking for, and it was my understanding that Higgs was the one. That came up with the idea of how it might might exist. If the Higgs Boson gives master particles, I'm going to suggest that they started with a particle with known mass. I think I heard one of you guys podcast. That would skip it by the large Hadron collider so hsun tell it was discovered I'm not sure though. Now that one? I think. We were smashing particles together in found some extra energy that we couldn't account for rights pretty knowledgeable answers here. You guys did a pretty good job of educating the public the I think it's also a good pr by the L. H C team, because it's sort of the particle collider that in people's minds I mean I. Don't know if you remember, but we also asked people how the top cork was discovered, and the answers were basically the same by the large collider, even though that was actually discovered by the previous commodity. So I think this is a win for the L. H. Seemingly Particle Collider in the forefront of people's minds and the tips of their tongues. You're like the Kleenex physics experiments. You know pretty soon. They're gonNA. Call Collider's Alexa. That's right. I blew my nose. The all right so step is through the history here Daniel we're gonNA. Get into how it. It was discovered in our. Can. We know that it's actually there so Take us back to before twenty twelve. What do we know? And why do we think the Higgs bows on existed? Today's goes on is one of these particles. The has a long history because we thought it existed before we discovered it. There are a lot of people who suspect. Suspect? It was there and this is a grand tradition of this particle physics of like looking at the patterns of the particles that we see and seeing something missing, or you know not having a question answered in finding a missing piece that answers that question is just like with a jigsaw puzzle or with periodic table. If there's a hole in the periodic table, you wonder like why is that whole? There wouldn't make more sense if there was something else there, so people spend a lot of time thinking about the patterns of the particles that we had seen and wondering about some things about them, they didn't understand and using that to predict the existence of this higgs. Bozon and also this higgs field. But in this case wasn't really a pattern because I know for the like some of the other courts. It was based on a pattern. Here wasn't a more like about the math and looking at the equation. It's I'm like Oh. It's missing. Sim Field here to make it all balance out. Actually was a lack of a pattern. You see in the second half. Half of this last century people at understood that there was a deep connection between electromagnetism into thing responsible for electricity and magnets, and the thing that gives us the Photon, and this other force, the weak nuclear force, the one responsible for radioactive decay, and that force has three particles Z. Particle, and to w particles and people that understood that actually these two different. Different forces were just part of the same force, the Electra weak force, and the Photon belong sort of a gang who's actually not just like one photon over here and three week particles over there. They're part of this gang of four particles and mathematically fit together beautifully. It's just like a missing part of a jigsaw puzzle finally clicked into place and you could. Could understand why things look the way they looked. It was just really gorgeous like from the group theory, point of view is satisfied lots of cemeteries, but there was one problem. The problem is that the Photon is really different from these other. BOZON's in an important way that you mentioned in that it has no mass where the other ones are really heavy. And, so what made us think that they were all together in a gang? Is it because they all transmit the same force, kind of or do they behave in a similar way, they do Kinda behave in a similar way. I mean electrons very familiar particles. They like to interact with photons, but also with the week goes on the WS and disease, and that's it. electrons don't interact with anything else. That's all they interact with, and so in feels sort of natural to connect. Connect all the particles that electrons, and also means town talked to and look for a pattern among if they fit into like a larger grouping, it's like when you put electric city and magnetism together. Electricity is a bunch of different phenomena. You observe and magnetism are a bunch of different phenomena that you observe. Do you notice that sometimes electric charges 'cause magnetism, and sometimes magnetism can induce the electricity. Makes more sense to think of them. As one thing I mean there are different phenomena. Alright sound like magnets are electrical, but they're really makes more sense. It's simpler just to think of it. As part of a larger combination, they're connected some ads like the two sides of the same coin, and so you've got this beautiful connection. If you plug the Photon in with these other three particles in the same way, as if you merge electricity and magnetism, you get these beautiful cemeteries and particle. Physics is all about symmetry is about finding these patterns, and we don't know why the universe has some is. We don't know why it has patterns, but we have found that when you look for patterns typically. Typically those things are clues. There hints they show you how the universe works like everything needs to somehow balance together, or it'd be weird if it wasn't symmetric precisely and here we have a really beautiful symmetry electro weak symmetry, these particles all fit together in this really nice way, and specifically you can like rotate your way through this four dimensional space. You have four particles there. If the symmetry works, you can rotate between them. Select the Photon, and the Z should play. The same role should be able to rotate between them, but the problem is. The symmetry was broken. It didn't quite work because the Photon is very very light has no mass and is. He was very very heavy, so. So. It's like an almost symmetry. It's like a it's like a hint that is almost works, but what about this one piece piece would have stuck in physicist for a long time? It's like looking in the mirror and is seen kind of a different image of yourself. You're like something's going on here. Yeah, and it's almost right, but not quite so they wanted to understand like. Is this symmetry dislodge? Throw it out the window or is there a reason why it's broken? Is that a clue that explain something else? Because the image was too good to abandon you know on the other hand. There's lots of times in the history of physics when we thought we've had a beautiful idea and. And had to throw it away because it didn't work like mathematically it works, but nature says no, so sometimes that happens, but sometimes you know it's just a clue that like you need to refine it or tweak it or twisted, and so that's what the Higgs Boson was was a refinement of this theory to help it work right although I feel like it's weird.

Higgs Boson Peter Higgs physicist higgs field Chandrika Bozon L. H C Amazon Hicks Daniel
"higgs" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

05:53 min | 2 weeks ago

"higgs" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

"Hammy cartoonist. PhD Comic, I'm Daniel Whiteson I'm a particle physicist and the only particle I've ever helped. Discover was the higgs bows on on ice. I've discovered lots of particles. Plenty of dust particles in my house, none of which are particularly interesting. There's some of them are big, but not takes but our podcast Daniel and he explained the universe, a production of iheartradio, in which we talk about all the crazy and amazing things that we find in our universe, we take you to the forefront of knowledge where scientists are trying to figure out how everything works, and we show you how you can understand it to have. Your curiosity is the same as theirs. Yeah, we like to talk about not just the things that scientists discover and what we understand about them. We also like to talk. Talk about how they were discovered. Because we think this is a very important part of understanding science, and how science works, and what signs knows and what it can. No, that's right. Sometimes particle physics presented is like a grand edifice that we've put together all at once, but really it's sort of like a sloppy house of cars that we've been building bit by bit over the last hundred years in each piece was added painfully and with great effort, due to lots of theorists and experimentalist working hard, and usually they're fun juicy political dramas along the way. I guess it made out of particles the House of Particle. Everything's made out of particles, man or field. She did a TV series called House of particles. There's definitely enough drama in particle physics to fuel whole soap opera. Hopefully it gets pushed him to train him. A more than that. We want you to understand that his idea of particle physics. These things that we understand are not just some theoretical concept, but they're slowly build up from actual discoveries experiments. We've done things that we force the universe to reveal, and it's those experiments, those actual discoveries as confrontations with nature that form the foundation of that understand. Yeah, because I think it's easy once you know something to Jews. Jews the forget that you at some point didn't know something you know like. Think back when you were a kid I. You didn't know about the universe or galaxies planets. What were you thinking? What was your view of the world? That's right like before. I knew that bananas were Gross. I. Thought like Hey. Maybe they were okay, but now I can never go back to a universe in which Bananas Could Digest. Hey more bananas for me man. That, you don't like. It, all works out, but you know sometimes i. like to imagine like all of universes in which discoveries were made in different orders and different things where weird or puzzling. Because you know, the reason that things seem weird is only because we haven't seen the whole picture. It's like doing a jigsaw puzzle and you don't know where these pieces go. What's going to reveal? The nature of the questions comes from the parts. You haven't found yet, but in some sense. That's just due to luck. We found this. We found that we stumbled over this before we stumbled over that. So the history of these discoveries is really important. Important for you to understand why we're asking the questions. We're asking now up on the program. We are covering some pretty recent history of physics. Wise and we're covering probably the most famous particle I think in culture these days, and maybe in physics. That's right, and that's not something I'm grumpy about I mean I think the Higgs bows on deserves its role as the most famous particle plays a really essential role in our theory, and it's really epic struggle to find it the search for it goes over many billions of dollars and many different particle collider's and many decades. Yes, to the program. We'll be asking the question. Hour Higgs on discovered on a Tuesday. Or Wednesday. You know it was no single moment this the short answer the question. It's not like we came into work. One day and boom there was a higgs bows on in our email inbox, or like we found one in the center of the lab, or there was just one moment when the results were like boom there we have it as a slow build a gradual accumulation of data, a very gentle gradual reveal now like an exciting plot twist at the end I. Guess wasn't discovered with a bang. was more like with twenty-three bazillion bangs. It's like somebody very slowly drawing back the curtain, so you can see more and more and more of the drama build slowly, but then you need to have a date. You'd have a moment where you say. This, we've decided we've discovered it, so that's officially the moment of discovery. Aspect July fourth twenty four. Yeah, that's just sort of random, just a fun coincidence, and that's why we get to call it. He dependence because we depend on the Hicks I. Guess We all depend on the Higgs. Really the whole universe depends on the the whole universe does totally depend on the higgs if it wasn't. Wasn't for the Higgs bows on. Our universe would be totally different, and also the higgs bows on his sort of precariously balanced. It's this weird, high energy state, and it's the reason that particles have certain masses, and if that changed, then the universe would totally change. It would collapse into something unrecognizable to us, so thank Gosh for the Higgs Boson doing what it does painted rules by fear. We must more worship, but otherwise it's going to destroy the universe I think. The Higgs Boson would rather be feared than loved you. It should be called the Machiavelli particle, not the God. Particle. All right well It's very important article and it was discovered recently. An is a bit of drama about it, and and a lot of interesting twists stories to we'll get into that today but I. It's usually we were wondering how many out there had heard of this story or know about the details of how the higgs bows on was discovered. That's right, so I asked people to volunteer to answer random questions on the Internet, not knowing anything about what I would ask them in new googling allowed, so thank you to everybody who participated, and if you'd like to volunteer your voice for future, random science questions, please write to us two.

higgs Higgs Boson Higgs Daniel Whiteson physicist Hicks
Travel to Uruguay

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

04:15 min | 2 months ago

Travel to Uruguay

"I'd like to welcome. The show Karen Higgs from Guru Guay Dot Com. Who has come to talk to us about? Uruguay Karen Welcome to the show? She's so much. And I have to spell that website because I want to be sure that people understand the the joke in the. Idea of what it is, but it's. Guay as in Uruguay and you are somebody who has written guidebooks about it right a website about it and you've lived in Uruguay for twenty years so I feel that Guru. Guay seems like an appropriate. Definition of what you do. And it also means that people stop confusing Uruguay Paraguay. Okay excellent. which is the bane of Uruguayans lives sure we actually do not have a show on Paraguay, and it's not for lack of trying, and I'm trying to line up for next week, so so hopefully we may have won back to back and then talk about the difference, but we're not talking about Paraguay today. We're talking about Uruguay which is not how the Uruguayans Sat, but we'll get into that. Karen, why should someone go to Uruguay? Never two types of people that come to Uruguay. They're all the type of people that have been everywhere. And, so they looking for the last off the radar destinations to go to and when they arrive, they'll love to say after I am the only person that I know. That's team to Uruguay so that on one hand and then on the other hand. People who do their research? They are interested in going to Latin America. They do their research. They looking for a safe country, especially as so female travelers for example than King. South America they all googling, and then they've like. Hey, there's this small country that's that between Argentina and between Brazil, that just seems to have all of these amazing statistics of development, how is this and then they look at it more closely and they discover that not only. Only, is it a progressive country and it's been a progressive country for hundred and fifty years with complete separation of church and state written into the Constitution the kind of country where women were given the vote well before places in Europe's of where the eight hour day has been in place for over hundred years, and then the look annul say hey, and it's also got amazing beaches and from what I can see. Nobody goes those beaches and it's got. Wine and how come I've never tried one of those wines? And then you know when they start, and they'll really looking into the find my website, et Cetera. Then they'll go. Oh, my God. It's got all this amazing world class live music, and I go to these shows and be up next to an amazing musician, and it won't even cost me ten dollars, and then somebody will say the beef is just amazing. Then somebody's like, but I'm a Vegan, and it's like, but now you could even get good vegan food in Montevideo, so yeah I mean basically. Laid back small by South American standards. It's very large compared to a European country, but it's small enough to be able to get around, and it's developed, and so it's kind of like a good start. A country when Latin America is consumed. It's not in your face. Excellent and we did mention that I'm pronouncing this Uruguay and we talked about this ahead of time, because that tends to be the English pronunciation. If I was from there, I would say it how. Do. So without ooh guy. So when you can't people on the football terraces, football's huge in Uruguay and you'll hear people saying ou y Ou do which sounds totally tribal, and you think about it. Which is Kinda funny?

Uruguayans Uruguay Karen Higgs Guru Guay Dot Com Guay Paraguay Latin America South America Montevideo Europe Football Argentina Brazil
The Grammar Of Graphics

Linear Digressions

10:04 min | 3 months ago

The Grammar Of Graphics

"Hey Katie Hi ben high you doing? What are we talking about today? We're talking about the grammar of graphics. The Grammar of graphics yeah. This is a visual episode in audio form. So let's see how this goes. This can be okay. You're listening to linear digressions. Okay so I know what? The term grammar means as it applies to language It's kind of the the rules about how you would construct sentences and I'm sure that there are many people who find better than me but that's kind of how I think about it. Yeah that when we are using language to communicate. There's an order in which we place subjects in verbs and objects. There's a recurring to language in the sense that you can have phrases. That have substructure. There's also Orders in which things tend to appear like I would say I would always say the big black car I would never say the black big car. Yes grammar is yes this this thing. That's a little bit hard to define but once you start to think of it is pretty common to think of it. In terms of the rules of language I actually was reading. Something really interesting about this It's so I just found it a tweet by Matthew Anderson things native English speakers. No but don't know why we know and the quote is adjectives in English. Absolutely have to be in the following order opinion size age shape color origin material purpose noun. So you can have a lovely little old rectangular green French silver WHITTLING KNIFE. But if you mess with that word order in the slightest. You'll sound like a maniac. It's an odd thing that every English speaker uses that list but almost none of us could write it out yeah. I think I've heard something similar to so I think that was what I would like drawing on a little bit in that Great Green Great Dragons. No Great Green Dragons. Yeah exactly so. We're not talking about language in this talk of graphics. What how what does that mean yes? So that's what we're going to spend the next fifteen minutes talking about a little bit but the rough idea here. Is that so just like? There's an expectation that you have about the word order or the construction of phrases when you're listening to someone speaker when you're reading a sentence. There's a similar idea. Perhaps for visualizing drawing visualizations of data or consuming visualizations of data. Things that you expect to see whether or not you even really think about it. Or when you're composing a visualization things that you're planning for or taking into account that again. Maybe you aren't thinking about but this comes up in a really deep way if you are say. Dealing with data visualization software at a at a pretty fundamental level. So for those of you who are into our universe and particularly The tidy verse Hadley Wickham 's corner of the our universe. You're probably familiar with a package called G. G Plot to which is a visualization library. In our that's can famously makes very beautiful graphics especially with its its defaults make for really nice graphics. the gee-gee NJIT PLOT TO REVERSE TO GRAMMAR OF GRAPHICS and own. And actually. Yeah the most of the research that I did for. This episode was reading a twenty five page paper. That had they wickham wrote about how he thinks about. And how the field a general thinks about the grammar of graphics. Data visualization says where. We're going to talk about very cool. I don't even know where to start in thinking about this. This is this is GonNa be neat. Yeah this this was a pretty challenging Topic for me to try to understand because it gets into theory pretty quickly of like what is a facet and what is the scale and what is A. What's the difference between a mapping to an aesthetic and coordinate system I think There's certainly a lot to unpack if you're just really excited about this idea but rather than getting into some of these kind of esoteric concepts especially concepts that are ESA teric without having examples to look at. I wanted to illustrate the main pieces of the grammar of graphics as highly working for example talks about it using an example of a visualization. That probably a lot of people are really familiar. With and how that illustrates a few of the big important concept that again. We all kind of take for granted probably in our day to day. Visualizations Okay so what's the. What's the example graphic then? All right let's talk about a stacked histogram stacked histogram yet can you? Can you describe it for me? Yes so let me give you an example of stacked histogram ice to make all the time when I was a physicist so when I was a physicist we used to make lots and lots of plots where what you are trying to do was look at distributions of particles that you are getting in your detector and in general there were lots of different kinds of particles that were classified as what we would call background so these were types of particles that were you know interesting but not what we are really searching for and then there were in certain situations. You'll be looking for signal particles as well so this might be like a higgs bows on if you're doing a heck search and so when you were creating visualizations of your data. What you're looking for is okay. Do we have a distribution of data? That's more consistent with there. Only being background present or does it look more consistent with background plus signal for the second cases like Oh maybe we discovered some new physics or something so we would think a lot about how to visualize background and when you're doing that analysis you tend to have different kinds of particles that are coming in from different places in your detector and so if you just look at one of those systems at a time you're going to get an incomplete picture of all of the particles instead what you wanted to layer them all on top of each other so that you have yes so that you have like a picture of the overall distribution of the particles that you see but you also have them stratified by the different types of physics processes that they correspond to and so you're kind of stacking each of those strata on top of each other and you have a visualization that shows you know each of them separately but also all of them adding together. That's roughly what a histogram is God. I think I've seen these before are I'm sure I've seen them in many places but I'm thinking about when you look at when you do a software release and you look at all of the different All of the different computers that are running the software. And what version. They're on and you can see how people have upgraded. Each version of the software will be represented by different color. And over time. You'll see them kind of go and peak and then as new software later is released than the previous version will kind of trail off and The I guess the representation that you're talking about is showing all of that in a single graph with time. Let's say being the x axis and in in my example. It's always at one hundred per cent hike because every user is on some version but you can see the dip the I guess the distribution at any given point of those versions yeah or a few decided to represent it instead of as a percentage of the whole if you had your y. Axis was allowed float and instead it was the total number of users using that system than you could imagine like the overall rate could actually go up and down as users join. Leave your your system or you're right are using your software or whatever so. I haven't I have an image in my head now. Okay great and so hopefully for most of the folks who are listening to this. Hopefully you do too. But if you don't or if you're really struggling to think about what a stacked histogram might look like an might be worth taking like five seconds to Google this on your phone to see like a mental snapshot because it's I don't imagine that the rest of this will make tons of sense if you have no idea. We're talking about so okay So stacked histogram how do we think about this in terms of the grammar of graphics so let me layer in a few of the fundamental ideas of grammar graphic so either taking place in a very explicit order to the first layer the most foundational layer of when you need to make? Data visualization is What is the data? Set that you'RE GONNA BE VISUALIZING. And how does that map from The the variables in the data set to a set of aesthetics. So what's the data set? Let's talk about that first. Let's use my example of. Let's use your example. Actually I think that's probably a little bit more familiar to our listeners than like a particle physics date set but instead we have some notion of a data set that has all of the users of our software through time and the type of what did he say. It was like the version of the software that they're using yet and actually. Can I make this a little bit? Meta and tweak this and we'll say this could be a linear digressions episode downloads. Like we can go. We can go into our hosting provider and we can see how many people download on on a given day and so of course the day after we release an episode we see a lot of downloads and then maybe two months ago by and now that episode is a small sliver.

Hadley Wickham Physicist Katie Hi Njit Matthew Anderson Google ESA Higgs
Daniel Whiteson on Space Itself

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

06:47 min | 4 months ago

Daniel Whiteson on Space Itself

"How would a physicist defined space while all of space in one sentence? That is a pretty tall order. You know I'd have to say To be honest to say we really have no idea. What space is I mean? I think it's wonderful that you're asking this question. It's the kind of question that it takes like a sort of maturity of science and philosophy to even understand why the question is interesting and important. You know it's like it's like we're fish. Scientists for thousand years swimming through this fluid and then only recently realized that AIDS. It's something fascinating something to study. Something that has properties can do weird things. And so it's it's a deep an important question you know. And and just to digress. A tiny bit more like it makes me wonder how many other crazy basic questions we aren't even asking because we don't realize how rich the topic is you know so. I feel privileged that. We're at this moment in science when we can ask. This question would is space and understand that it is an important question all right so I totally dodged your question there but I can try to give a one sentence answer. If you'd like shirt will start simple and then and then we'll get more into the nuances here. All right well a simple answer to what is space is that I mean I could try. It may be impossible I'd say the simplest description I can give for. What space is is something which has various properties we've discovered it had can contain quantum fields it can expand and it has relationships to other parts of space. So that's more a description of what we've what we've observed about. Space is not really an inherent standing of what it is because we don't have that understanding. Well maybe this brings me to a question. I wanted to ask later on but If there is no good answer to this It can help ground us as we go forward so I wanted to ask. Is there such a thing as a hypothetical physics without space does all physics assume space and can we imagine say a possible world that exists but does not contain space or is that just inconceivable that all physics that we do assume space like all of our modern theories the standard model and quantum field theory they all operate in some space and there are different kinds of theories of have and some of those make different assumptions for what that space is my quantum field theory? You right down with the spaces in advance. He say I'M GONNA assume space in three dimensions and extends all in all these directions. And then I'm going to talk about the fields that are in that space other theories like general relativity. Space is part of what you're trying to get at. It's not like the backdrop. It's the thing you solve for you so if I have this configuration. Then what does the space look like? But they all assume space. I mean space gives you a relationship between stuff right tells you this year and this is not here and in the end all trying to understand the world we live in and everything. We live in space. So it's pretty hard to grapple with a non spatial theories or non spatial physics. So yeah I would say that We Need Space Okay. But so if we could come at it from the exact opposite angle. He think you couldn't really have physics without space. Could you have a universe full of space with no matter energy in it could space exist without any contents? Good space exists without any contents and yeah that is an awesome question. And it's fascinating because we have two theories of physics right now quantum mechanics and general relativity and they're both awesome achievements staggering insights into the way the universe works. And they give different answers to this question right so general. Relativity is Einstein's theory and he has a bunch of equations. Say What the universe look like depending on what you put in it. And he is and it's really hard to solve like this very few ways. You can actually saw these equations. One of the very few ways actually can get an answer out is what they call the vacuum solution like to say. Assume this nothing then. What is the universe? Look like if there's nothing in it all right. Einstein can solve that problem. Quantum field theory though theory says hold on a second space is filled with all these quantum fields and particles and matter and all the stuff that you make me and you are just like excited states of these fields so when you look at an electron it's not a particle it's not a wave it's a little ripple in some field which is not in-space. It's part of space. Save all these fields of the electron field. The electro magnetic field all the fields associated with each of the forces. Lots of them. We can talk about them later if you'd like but some of them never relaxed completely. Some of them are always have some energy in them. For example Higgs field. The Higgs field is an every part of space. And it's always got some built intention to it and that means that this energy in every part of space so quantum field theory says no. You can't have space without some energy in it. There's some inherent energy to space or the general. Says I can totally imagine it. And we don't know which theory is the fundamental truth theory of the universe if either one we can't seem to make them play together very well and so this question really goes to the heart of like the nature of reality itself fascinating kind of thing that in five hundred years visits will know the answer to and look back at. Us and be like man. Those people didn't understand anything about the nature of the universe. They were living in right. What a bunch of Caveman cavewoman. Like Mrs so. I love that idea about quantum field theory if I understand this right. You're saying that under the assumptions of quantum field theory. You could have a big block of space and even if you were able to clear everything out of it clear out. All the hydrogen particles clear out all the dust. So there's no matter left in it. You still you still really wouldn't have an empty void. Is that correct? That's right? Every unit of space comes with energy built in it comes from the factory with energy already in it and and in lots of those fields can't not cannot relax a higgs field is one example but many of these fields cannot relax all the way down to zero and so it's impossible according to these quantum theories to have space with no energy density in it at all and and that stuff all stuff is is some kind of energy like the matter that makes me and you. That's just a form of energy so to say that the space has seen it really means. It's not

Einstein Physicist Higgs
Could There Be a Fifth Fundamental Force?

BrainStuff

06:38 min | 7 months ago

Could There Be a Fifth Fundamental Force?

"The four fundamental forces are the most important quartet in science so far is anyone's been able to prove the universe is governed by these forces forces gravity electromagnetism the strong force and the weak force. But maybe this foursome isn't alone in two thousand fifteen. A Hungarian and team led by physicist Attila. Credit Hawkeye reportedly discovered new evidence for a fifth fundamental force. Something previously unknown to science. The the group uploaded another paper about the subject to archive a research database in October of two thousand nineteen while many scientists are skeptical about these findings. The research search does give us an occasion to talk about the major forces that we all take for granted the Fab four fundamental forces are irreducible meaning. They can't be broken down into other more basic forces. These are the core phenomena behind every other known type of physical interaction. For example friction tension and elasticity busy are all derived from electromagnetism. And what's that you ask. ELECTROMAGNETISM is a force that affects all positively and negatively charged particles articles those with opposite charges attract while ones carrying like charges. Repel each other. Not only does this principle. Keep magnets on your fridge. But it's also the reason why solid solid objects are able to retain their shapes compared with electromagnetism. Gravity is rather weak surprisingly enough. It's actually the weakest of the four fundamentals including including the so-called weak force. We'll get to that one in a bit. A gravity is the attraction of any two objects in the universe to another moons. Dust motes coyotes. Whatever ever everything exerts gravity on every other thing but at least one of the things in question has to be pretty massive in order for it to make much of a difference? That's why we you don't have dust mites orbiting our heads like asteroids and why we don't fall into orbit of coyotes when we encounter them but let's turn to the appropriately named strong force course. This is what hold Tomic nucleus together. Even in spite of their charged protons which are constantly trying to escape and last but not least. There's the Weak Force Aka. The weak interaction. This one is the hardest to explain and honestly I'm not an expert here but it's the force by which which subatomic particles can transform by decaying into different particles by losing boasts on which disintegrates into positron and or neutrinos this week force force fuel certain kinds of radioactive decay which means it's responsible for everything from medical imaging to the radiometric dating that researchers use to determine the ages of fossils thousand artifacts to the nuclear fission that occurs in the sun. So kind of a big deal. Scientists have a theory that nicely describes three of those forces known these standard model of physics. It's made up of various measurements and mathematical formulas. It also breaks down. Elementary particles into categories is an subcategories. We spoke by email with mit physicist. Richard Milner he explained. The Standard Model of physics is the present framework for describing describing the subatomic world at all energies. It was developed post World War to end. I count at Least Eighteen Nobel prizes in physics since nineteen fifty that have been awarded for contributions tribulations to its development alike all good theories. The Standard Model has accurately predicted numerous scientific breakthroughs including the discovery of the elusive higgs. Boson particle back in two thousand twelve yet. It doesn't answer every question. The Standard Model offers no explanation for gravity and it hasn't brought scientists any closer to understanding dark matter a mysterious ingredient that makes up about twenty seven percent of our universe. Here's where crossing a Hawkeye and company. Come in during a twenty fifteen experiment at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences Institute for Nuclear Research They watched excited brilliant eight atoms decay inside a particle Michael Accelerator normally this process releases light which is later converted into electrons and positron are a type of Subatomic particle with a positive charge. And sure enough. That's what happened but then things got interesting. Normally brilliant eight decays predictable fashion yet. A weirdly Lee high number of these electrons and positron repelled each other at a one hundred and forty degree angle to explain the surplus crasner. Hawkeye's team argued that a never before seen particle had been formed as the atoms decayed by their calculations this theoretical subatomic body would have a massive around seventeen million electron-volts on volts. They went ahead and named the x seventeen particle and now ex seventeen is again making the news. Recently the same Hungarian Carrion scientists detected an anomaly indicates samples of helium four according to their archive paper. An unforeseen surplus of positron and electrons were released. Possibly because another seventeen particle was created. If this mystery particle exists. It might be something very special. Maybe just maybe it's a newfound carrier boasts on both sides are spinning particles that probably lack internal structure their known to carry forces making them an integral part of the standard model under the standard model. Milner Explains Forces take place by exchange of the carrier Bussan's between other subatomic particles articles. It's said each of the four fundamental forces has its own corresponding boasts on the one that transports gravity hasn't been found yet but the carrier bones associated it was strong force. Weak force electromagnetism are well documented. Presumably at seventeen would be the Kargbo sound for a fifth fundamental force that we never knew existed listed and perhaps said force is somehow related to dark matter but or getting ahead of ourselves. There's no hard proof that x seventeen exists. It's in the first place. The European Organization for Nuclear Research better known as sern has yet to find any trace of the particle and the new archive paper is still awaiting peer review and replication from other scientists milner and his colleagues have devised a proposal to try to generate seventeen particles in a scattering experiment at the Thomas. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News Virginia at present the standard model does account for any new fundamental forces. So if the x seventeen and the fifth force that allegedly carries a real we'll have to modify the good old standard model at any rate. It's clear the Potomac world is still rife with

Richard Milner Hawkeye Physicist Hungarian Academy Of Sciences Thomas Jefferson National Acce European Organization For Nucl MIT Tomic Newport News Virginia Sern Thomas
Could There Be a Fifth Fundamental Force?

BrainStuff

06:38 min | 7 months ago

Could There Be a Fifth Fundamental Force?

"The four fundamental forces are the most important quartet in science so far is anyone's been able to prove the universe is governed by these forces forces gravity electromagnetism the strong force and the weak force. But maybe this foursome isn't alone in two thousand fifteen. A Hungarian and team led by physicist Attila. Credit Hawkeye reportedly discovered new evidence for a fifth fundamental force. Something previously unknown to science. The the group uploaded another paper about the subject to archive a research database in October of two thousand nineteen while many scientists are skeptical about these findings. The research search does give us an occasion to talk about the major forces that we all take for granted the Fab four fundamental forces are irreducible meaning. They can't be broken down into other more basic forces. These are the core phenomena behind every other known type of physical interaction. For example friction tension and elasticity busy are all derived from electromagnetism. And what's that you ask. ELECTROMAGNETISM is a force that affects all positively and negatively charged particles articles those with opposite charges attract while ones carrying like charges. Repel each other. Not only does this principle. Keep magnets on your fridge. But it's also the reason why solid solid objects are able to retain their shapes compared with electromagnetism. Gravity is rather weak surprisingly enough. It's actually the weakest of the four fundamentals including including the so-called weak force. We'll get to that one in a bit. A gravity is the attraction of any two objects in the universe to another moons. Dust motes coyotes. Whatever ever everything exerts gravity on every other thing but at least one of the things in question has to be pretty massive in order for it to make much of a difference? That's why we you don't have dust mites orbiting our heads like asteroids and why we don't fall into orbit of coyotes when we encounter them but let's turn to the appropriately named strong force course. This is what hold Tomic nucleus together. Even in spite of their charged protons which are constantly trying to escape and last but not least. There's the Weak Force Aka. The weak interaction. This one is the hardest to explain and honestly I'm not an expert here but it's the force by which which subatomic particles can transform by decaying into different particles by losing boasts on which disintegrates into positron and or neutrinos this week force force fuel certain kinds of radioactive decay which means it's responsible for everything from medical imaging to the radiometric dating that researchers use to determine the ages of fossils thousand artifacts to the nuclear fission that occurs in the sun. So kind of a big deal. Scientists have a theory that nicely describes three of those forces known these standard model of physics. It's made up of various measurements and mathematical formulas. It also breaks down. Elementary particles into categories is an subcategories. We spoke by email with mit physicist. Richard Milner he explained. The Standard Model of physics is the present framework for describing describing the subatomic world at all energies. It was developed post World War to end. I count at Least Eighteen Nobel prizes in physics since nineteen fifty that have been awarded for contributions tribulations to its development alike all good theories. The Standard Model has accurately predicted numerous scientific breakthroughs including the discovery of the elusive higgs. Boson particle back in two thousand twelve yet. It doesn't answer every question. The Standard Model offers no explanation for gravity and it hasn't brought scientists any closer to understanding dark matter a mysterious ingredient that makes up about twenty seven percent of our universe. Here's where crossing a Hawkeye and company. Come in during a twenty fifteen experiment at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences Institute for Nuclear Research They watched excited brilliant eight atoms decay inside a particle Michael Accelerator normally this process releases light which is later converted into electrons and positron are a type of Subatomic particle with a positive charge. And sure enough. That's what happened but then things got interesting. Normally brilliant eight decays predictable fashion yet. A weirdly Lee high number of these electrons and positron repelled each other at a one hundred and forty degree angle to explain the surplus crasner. Hawkeye's team argued that a never before seen particle had been formed as the atoms decayed by their calculations this theoretical subatomic body would have a massive around seventeen million electron-volts on volts. They went ahead and named the x seventeen particle and now ex seventeen is again making the news. Recently the same Hungarian Carrion scientists detected an anomaly indicates samples of helium four according to their archive paper. An unforeseen surplus of positron and electrons were released. Possibly because another seventeen particle was created. If this mystery particle exists. It might be something very special. Maybe just maybe it's a newfound carrier boasts on both sides are spinning particles that probably lack internal structure their known to carry forces making them an integral part of the standard model under the standard model. Milner Explains Forces take place by exchange of the carrier Bussan's between other subatomic particles articles. It's said each of the four fundamental forces has its own corresponding boasts on the one that transports gravity hasn't been found yet but the carrier bones associated it was strong force. Weak force electromagnetism are well documented. Presumably at seventeen would be the Kargbo sound for a fifth fundamental force that we never knew existed listed and perhaps said force is somehow related to dark matter but or getting ahead of ourselves. There's no hard proof that x seventeen exists. It's in the first place. The European Organization for Nuclear Research better known as sern has yet to find any trace of the particle and the new archive paper is still awaiting peer review and replication from other scientists milner and his colleagues have devised a proposal to try to generate seventeen particles in a scattering experiment at the Thomas. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News Virginia at present the standard model does account for any new fundamental forces. So if the x seventeen and the fifth force that allegedly carries a real we'll have to modify the good old standard model at any rate. It's clear the Potomac world is still rife with

Scientists say a once-a-month birth control pill works on pigs. They want to test it on people next

The Breakfast Club

00:35 sec | 8 months ago

Scientists say a once-a-month birth control pill works on pigs. They want to test it on people next

"As I want to tell you guys about a once a month birth control pill now that scientists are working on so far they've tested this Pelham Higgs and now they want to test it on people next okay so the whole thing about this is you know you take that birth control pill every day and if you forget a day it's difficult or say you go out of town and you travel with that two pills and you're like damn I'm out of town for three days and I don't have my birth control pills so now I can't take it for three days with this capsule will help you reduce unintended pregnancies and the way that it works is coated with gelatin and that stays in your stomach for weeks after being swallowed and then from there it slowly releases hormones in those hormones are what prevent pregnancy I

Pelham Higgs Three Days
"higgs" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

10:50 min | 9 months ago

"higgs" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"Turn now to take another brief look at some of the stories making news in science this week with science report and ye study ones that kids exposed to high levels of nitrogen dioxide at component of traffic exhaust fumes. Have a higher risk of developing schizophrenia. The findings reported in the Journal of the American Medical Medical Association based on a study of twenty three thousand three hundred and fifty five people to see whether exposure to fumes increases the risk of mental illness. Or if it's simply a case that people who live in most polluted areas are more likely to have genes that increase. The risk of schizophrenia. What the researchers found was that childhood pollution exposure increase schizophrenia risk independently of people's genetic predisposition to disease? And you study shows that many other fifty year olds have been diagnosed with autism. Awesome in light of life had actually grown up believing that were bad people because they couldn't fit in with the rest of society. The findings reported the Journal Health. Psychology behavioral medicine cents is based on interviews with adults between the ages of fifty two and fifty four about their experiences being diagnosed with autism in Middle Age as children that participants recount account having no friends and being isolated from others and even when they became adults. They still couldn't understand what people treated them differently. Several had been treated waited for anxiety depression. The study's lead author. Dr Steven Stag from the Angela. Ruskin University says he founded heart wrenching. These participants had grown up believing their whole lives that they must have been bad people even referring to themselves as Alien non-human stag claims receiving a diagnosis of autism. Middle Aged Cabbie. That'd be positive. In fact some high functioning autism found the diagnosis a Eureka moment allowing them to finally understand why they're so different from the neuron typicals goals. Scientists have come up with a radical plan to try and save the critically dead mountain pygmy possum but taking some of these little critters from the Alpine habitat introducing them into a warmer lowland rainforest environment. The study's authors reporting the raw society's philosophical transactions be fossil evidence going back twenty twenty five million years to argue that the mountain pygmy possum is a species living on the fringes of what's biological ancestors would have enjoyed as more temperate list extreme environment researches from the University of New South Wales have now started a special breeding program to get the palms acclimatized at Lithgow in the Blue Mountains. West of Sydney. The study's author Patty Intelligence. Professor Mike is the mountain. Pygmy possum is one of the species most vulnerable to climate change in Australia and it faces extinction if Alpine snowfalls continue to decline decline as climate. Muddling predicts and you study has found that lonely people with heart problems are more likely to die. The findings reported the the journal Heart examined. Patients treated at a specialist heart center finding those who reported feeling lonely with three times as likely to be anxious and depressed with women three times more likely lake and meant twice as likely to die. After a year amazingly the results will true regardless of the patient had actually been diagnosed with in discharged from the center the the researchers say these findings show that loneliness really should be viewed as a legitimate health risk for those who are seriously ill and public. Health Initiative should aim to reduce that loneliness on the bright side study at the University of Sydney as found some truth. The old saying dog is man's best friend. The findings reported in the Journal. The British Medical Council based on a study of the sample of new dog owners who source significant reductions in loneliness within three months of acquiring pet called the poorest trial trial. It's the first long term restrain bay study looking at dog ownership and mental will begin community. The trial followed some seventy one sydneysiders over an eight month period. It compared the mental being of new dog owners to those who haven't adopted a dog and identified flying objects back in the news with a Gallup a poll finding sixty percent of Americans now say that all UFO sightings can be explained by human activity or natural phenomena however the researchers also found some seven seven percent still unsure and some sixty eight percent of Americans believe the US government is withholding information. About what you I really are. Meanwhile Tim in them from Australian skeptic says this is Spanish. UFO investigate who takes a serious look at your report which are really worth examining as good examples of true skeptical investigation nation. If a fellow named Padmakar Annunciation he had Chaim Tate lifestyle. Almost Spanish filler. WHO's been investigating? UFO's for for years. I mean for about forty years. He's probably one of the best researchers viewer fires around and it has been for a long time. We've probably some if he's papers. Actually in the skeptic magazine goes eight is I believe in other he might be sort of a lot more cautious about saying that he actually runs website called UFO photo cat if right so you cat. That's his block a lot of the stuff. He's he investigates photos and he would years an enormous cargo of EFI's etcetera and he's written articles. He writing articles a few years ago and we probably republish sitting there magazine which he said all the father graphic evidence. Let's let's face it forty fifty sixty years. There's nothing there Eh and it was quite disfiguring him to actually do that to actually suggest that all these years work is probably not. There's nothing to support I believe. UFO's Eilly highly and craft and yeah that's that's a thing that many people come to believe people who have been a lifelong searches reluctant and things Fanis guys and saying let's face it it was. It was pretty pretty heartless coolest anyway but he's still at bay and he's still sort of rotting. He's still reviewing site classic cases donkey's years ago. There's a a recent blog. He's looking thing at a lightning like phenomenon from from eighteen. Ninety three so he's looking at the classic and not so classic try to graphs of suppose you were ars and analyzing them and he had the really daily so if you wanna say someone who's on the slightly Ufo side of the belief spectrum from Cs of you if I of Saint and who actually takes it very very seriously does good stuff. That's that's the site that I would actually recommend eats a Lotta rating involved. Modified is obviously and in his blogs. It just runs down one. After the other after the other band is a lot of scrolling involved looking at blogs and websites and CETERA. But I mean there. There's some really good stuff so if you caused this back to you know people doing for the actual photographs this website back to two thousand two. But I mean he's working the dogs back even further than that having look at it throughout the series investigative stuff or cut to the chase for everybody and say very simply if. UFO's are real. They probably sacred government black OPS operations being developed by the military or alternatively the meteorological phenomena. That's really about it that that could say that used I. I assume that that that is sort of which implies. Nf I'd flying objects that has to be unidentified he's flying under some sort of power and object makes or something has now changed to you. I T which is unidentified aerial phenomenon. That's where the US ivy us now to describe things that they've policy because the pasta tarnished as being crackpots because they're serious fly boys so in the dead of your I it's unidentified era phenomena and that way. They can report these things without fillings. If they want their feelings if foolish already and then most of these will turn out to be top secret drones that are being used to deliberately test the pilots but uh-huh l. still. Oh yeah especially in the not so much necessarily amongst the the military it's bitterly middleman amongst the amateur for Fraternity Venus accounts for about. I'd even say off a flying social science but I mean yeah Venus. They didn't see this is really big game. Look if you look for things where they would not in the morning and in the Sunday to the evening and you just say wait was it and they say all just out of the sky. They say he looks like it wasn't Venus and they said this next to it. Then did you see. I heard someone say that you was in front onto Venus Of course yes. Are you talking about the difference. I do not know but yeah. That's a pretty simple test to especially yeah early morning. Life Evening Sunset Sunrise around. They asked him. You know what the as whether in the waste. And that's we finally the Senate does it accounts for a very very large percentage of UFO sightings still Americans have mixed view on you offense. They Gallop poll finding Manson types. Very strange view either. This is these guys. The we thing that most people are skeptical of you if I actually. There's a bad toothache people say yeah. They're they're not real flying so in fact there's something else and believe in. You has gone down. Slightly Liking and belief in government cover ups has gone down slightly as well. Penny the believing even. US is a stronger in the Western youth. which doesn't surprise me very much talking that California insights around that area? The most disbelieving if you like in. UFO's the people in the Mid West who are at the complaints. I think I believe in you if anyone does. Things are in the Mid West Twenty we save percentage of people believe that you were an alien spacecraft where just in the wisdom states America forty one believes. That's Yeah Nice. There's a difference between men and women really almost executive signed level of beliefs right. The younger people tend to have a stronger belief than all the people title that College graduates have less beliefs than people who haven't gone to college to high school graduates or whatever. Lola people with more money seemed to have belief if people with fewer dollars in the hand. That's would I would say. It would be allied to educational levels quite frankly but it's not a huge difference though anyway and interestingly people with not religion have a strong belief in people with Protestant Christian religion. Oh isn't that interesting and I think that's that's really sort of alleges right yes. I think it's icy if necessary. The study but forty percent of people say they really believe in in that these alien spacecraft tiny thirty one say Protestant or AH Christian rather than Catholic thirty Catholics. I'm thirty one percent of so yeah. People would not. Religion tend to have a stronger belief that which religion is to the thing to look at the ones waiting for the little little pill to take them into the spaceship hidden in the cover. Yeah whatever there's a lot of cal people and that sort of thing but yeah a lot of new ages. Who want to commune with Long Salsas? That's Tim Mendham chroma strain skeptics..

UFO US genetic predisposition to dise Journal Health US government Sydney University of New South Wales Blue Mountains Dr Steven Stag EFI University of Sydney Padmakar Annunciation Ruskin University Patty Intelligence Australia skeptic magazine British Medical Council Mid West Tim
"higgs" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

11:53 min | 11 months ago

"higgs" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

"I have not yet destroyed the universe value introduce yourself every time hi I'm Daniel. I have not yet destroyed all of existence. That's right and that's true about everybody. If you're listening to this podcast and that is proof that the universe still exists that's right are worth every word we speech he'd be a word of covered at the universe is still at least where you are still happy. Always somebody's Internet goes out. They're going to think the university with somebody's listening to us and and that's their folks remember. The WIFI interruption is not the end of the universe. You will survive the end of my universe. Take if somebody's goes out. Do we stop existing here. Deep in the philosophy of Oh my goodness well welcome to our podcast Daniel Alan Horton. Do not destroy the universe yet or at least explain how we're not destroying the universe of iheartradio match right our podcast in which we think about things big and small explore the universe we find the craziest most mindblowing facts and we explained them to you in a way that makes you a chuckle a little bit and also come away with some deep understanding of the context of your existence and sometimes we talk about the really small things that can may be destroyed the really big things in the universe. One of my favorite things about physics is when you learn something new and you discover how the universe is like a little more fragile than I thought. What do you mean how old were you. What did you think the first time you learn that like the earth that we live on. Is just as like thin crust of rock floating on a massive ocean lava right all of a sudden. There doesn't appeal so stable to me right. Wow how I think I learned that just now thank you for totally giving me anxieties. Zaidi's now before or like are atmosphere is very thin shell of gas around huge planet. It could easily just blown away. Eh by some cataclysmic you know solar flare or something while I hadn't thought about those things but thank you yeah so sometimes you learn something about the the university gives you context it helps you understand that our situation here is maybe an accident or is a product of the particular arrangements of things and and physics tells tells you like what stable about the universe with dangerous about the universe what you should worry about what you shouldn't worry about. Yes it's not just the earth is sort of in a precarious balance. It's also I mean you're you're saying it's also reality itself. Possibly yeah you know as we peel back layers of reality understand how the universe works sometimes as we discover things like this seems to be sort of an accident you know and we never know whether things really are an accident or whether it's due to some sort of deeper understanding like back something we've talked about before is the relationship between the electron and the Proton right the charges those two particles exactly balance which means we can have hydrogen atoms in in Chemistry and Physics and bananas all sorts of good stuff. We don't know if that's an accident right. We don't know why that's that way. It's essential for life to happen but we don't know if it's that way for a reason in or if it's a coincidence as so sometimes we stumble across other things like that seem essential for life to be the way we wanted but maybe accidental and may also not be permanent imminent yeah and so one of those things is something that you might be familiar with. We're hoping if you're a listener of our podcast and today on the program we'll be asking the question will the Higgs Boson destroy the universe and I like the way you phrase is that because it means if the universe does get destroyed. It's the Higgs Bosons. Fault are particle physicists. GonNa blame it on the bows on. I'm sorry I meant down. I meant to blame you Dana White House now I hear government agents knocking on my door podcast iheartradio Hard Radio Dana will destroy the universe yes. This is a question I think it was all over the news back when they were looking for the Higgs bows on everyone was worried and concerned that you guys in Geneva Sern where maybe going to do something in your experiment that was going to cause are the demise of the earth like maybe you're either going to unlock something in the universe is going to swallow us all up and destroy the planet. That's right this sort of two totally different but both devastating concerns right one is when you collide two protons. Could you trigger really strong gravity and make microscopic black hole which could each stuff around it and grow and the whole earth. That's what people were people. Were trying to shut down. People sued L. A. C. There was court cases. We have to prove in court that but this is something reasonable to do and for those of you suddenly worried out there. There's no danger these kind of collisions that we do. Elliot see happen. All the time particles from space hit the earth hit the sun and they do not gray black hole the gobble the earth excuse Daniel. You're like everyone else. Around is has a nuclear bomb so therefore we should be able to tinker with a one new problem. Well you know actually when people set off the first nuclear bomb. They were worried by their worthy might ignite night. The atmosphere was a serious concern but they did it anyway but now they've done it. We know pretty well but blowing up a nuclear bomb doesn't ignite the atmosphere. I I think they did it. In secret. As soon as the republics of public is I wonder like did the physicist. Tell the government agents at that was a risk you know. Fill out a form you you know like. Oh if you're going to potentially ignite the atmosphere. Please fill out this. Please please feel these. Are Those are yeah so that's the concern number one which is not something that we thought about the physics we are not going to create a black hole which destroys earth we might create a black hole but it would evaporate very rapidly eat all sorts of fascinating fascinating insights about the universe right so you're saying the monster creates black holes. All the time is not that different than what you do and even if you do make one. It's GONNA evaporate. That's right because as these tiny black holes will disappear. They'll evaporate because the radio very quickly. That's the theory at least and you hear about that. I'm pretty sure I mean my family is on earth sewing join risking my family keeping the running and I'm pretty confident well. I've seen say that you would risk a lot as as as about the universe that's true incentivized good fracture of humanity alien. That's true family ninety nine percent which we talked about. There's a totally separate concern about whether not the earth will get destroyed but actually whether we could trigger a cataclysmic event which fundamentally changes the nature Churov the universe so it involved a higgs Boson and so you're telling me that. The Hague blows on might destroy the universe. Is this something that everyone knows you think there was some press about it a while ago but I was curious like are people worried that they might destroy the universe. Do people even remember what the Higgs is because it's been a little while since it got pressed breath stuff has happened since then and so I was curious. Do everyday people worry about whether I'm going to ruin the universe so I asked them so as usual. Daniel went out and ask people on the street if if they think the Higgs Boson will destroy the universe to think about it for a second if view have maybe heard of this news item or if you have thought about the Higgs Boson and precariousness of nature thing about it for a second. What would you ask her. If you were ask ask we'll the Higgs Boson. Destroy the universe. Here's what people had to say goes on destroying the universe now. I don't have anything to back that up. No I don't worried about that because the unknown ev you ever heard of the Higgs Boson no had done right now. I have a lot of ecstasy. Sensual worries now is the last name sounds familiar but no all right. People don't seem very concerned. I think it sounds like mostly because they know that he's on could destroy the universe. No and a lot of people hadn't even heard of the Hague's bows on which can felt like physics has the relaxed too much. We had our big thing with the Higgs Boson in two thousand twelve. We gotta get back in the news. 'CAUSE WE'RE GONNA get on that branding. Where is the PR Department apartment. I gotTA talk to them. No people weren't really very familiar with the higgs and nobody was worried that the Higgs boson would destroy the universe at least until I ask them this question and then they started googling googling it and now maybe they're a little worried okay so you're telling me Daniel did the Hicks something about the Higgs Boson could potentially destroy the universe to let's stay. Let's instead threat first of all. It's maybe recap for our listeners. What the Heck's booze on is yeah so the Higgs Boson particle discovered at the Elliott Seen Twenty twelve last particle ever found so far and he completes the standard model and an answer to really interesting question which is where does mass come from. We talk on this podcast. What is a particle and we think these dots in space but you have to ask like. Where is the mass of the particle? If something is tiny dot where to get its mass and not so so much about like where we're where does it come from or what get it. It's like particles. Have this thing and it's more like how does how does it manifest itself in the universe like how how do we what gives you that feeling of mass and it's also a question of patterns like we look at all the particles and they all have different masses. This was a lot is when it's a little but they're all the same size. It's not like they have more stuff to them. Wondering why do these particles have this massive particle the other mass for example talk in another podcast about the the the weak nuclear force and electromagnetism which are fundamentally the same thing but the weak nuclear forces really weak because the particles that carry it have a lot of mass and the photon has no mass which is why electromagnetism is so powerful so this is sort of the question that led to the Discovery Higgs is what some of these particles have mass and some of them don't what's the mechanism there and it turns out the answer is this higgs field this invisible thing that fills space or an interact with some of these particles in different ways and the higgs bows on is a manifestation of that field like when parts if you'll get really excited that appears as like a ripple in that field which we interpret as a Higgs Boson right to physical things the field and the Bozon itself which is the particle right and they were discovered at different times right like people people businesses came up with the Higgs Field I to kind of make all the equations in the universe work do higgs makes sense ends naming choice there. I feel if we could do better. I mean Peter Higgs. He did this thing. He did. His laying any deserves it but you might. Maybe call it the field but that'd be a better name. Yeah I think that would be hard to be more instructive pan explanation thing that gives things beds cod card to Mansfield massive build the mass giving field yeah desert view because things that's what people immediately associate. I'm sure sure up so yes so that is the whole universe is permeated by this feel which is like would you describe a field is is just kind of like a aura of out there right or well thank you. I don't know how would you describe the field. Somebody that's a great question when their whole episode about what is quantum field and a field is just It's a physical thing has a value everywhere in spaced like an electric field right is strong here and there the gravitational field view is strong here and we kind.

Higgs Bosons Peter Higgs higgs Boson Daniel Alan Horton Higgs Field Chemistry and Physics Dana White House Zaidi physicist Elliot L. A. C. Geneva Sern Bozon Elliott Hicks ninety nine percent
"higgs" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"higgs" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"We'll live in a reality tunnel but reality tunnel is not reality. It's what you think reality is okay. It's just a model but being a model. It's it's smaller smaller and not one hundred percent accurate and and there are places where it doesn't quite match the the the thing is supposed to represent loucas poncho oncho on the vox media podcast network. This is a trip of conversation it just is of i ran into this guy. John higgs his work. He's a british journalist. It got recommended to me on podcast which i mentioned in here and i got turned onto a book of his called calif chaos magic music money and it blew my mind a bit. It was just one of the strangest that most intellectually interesting books. I've read in this year years <hes> and then i began working my way through higgs his work. I i read his biography. Timothy leary korea have america surrounded stranger than we can imagine his history of the twentieth century and he's brilliant strange thinker and this is a weird tour through the things he thinks about but you will see very much why it is spoken to be so much. It is just right on the mission of this podcast. This is one of those conversations. I don't know how to describe how will not try try but it is worth your time and if you remain open to it there's a lot of great frames for thinking about the world and at least <hes> frames were thinking about as you move through the world as always my email client show at vox dot com again as clench at box dot com here is john hicks..

John higgs vox media Timothy leary korea john hicks america one hundred percent
"higgs" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

03:35 min | 1 year ago

"higgs" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"I'm Daniel, welcome to. Gleaned the universe the universe. The whole universe people. That's the topic of this podcast today. We're going be asking the question. What is what is the bows on after all? Yeah. It turns out, it's a really important particle. That's right. It costs us ten billion dollars Bill and find the Expos on good thing we found it. Good thing we found it and actually I was kind of disappointed when we found it, but we can get into that later. But he's a big discovery. It's important because it's, it's like what keeps everything we wouldn't be here without goes on. That's right. We wouldn't be here with photons WC's or does on all comes together in the beautiful symphony of particles that make up our universe. Right. But it's the most recently discovered particle in lots of ways the weirdest so without be fun to talk about an actually break it down. What is the Higgs those on after all, before we jump into it? Talk about how. We started working. That's right. That was our first date. Physics, tinder. Explicit or Tunis. Tinder, unusual assists anchor Tunis to spend this much time talking about science. So let's tell them how that started. Yes. Something called. For a long time on the internet. And then one day I get this Email from this at the university of California at Irvine seeing. And commissioned, you to draw some comics about the Higgs boson and is at the first time ever cold Email. You the first time. Physicist has offered to pay me. You wanna pay me? What is that about? Pretty cool. Ten. I had been seen a lot of the buzz about the Higgs blows on the search for the lows on years ago. And I was really about what it was. I wanted to learn more about it. And so I said, yeah, let's, let's make something that explains. Yeah. And I've been reading all the buzz. By The Hague's bows on. And, and this is all buzz and no reality is so much writing by The Hague's bows on throws together. A bunch of important sounding words, but doesn't actually explain it. And I felt like there was this gap, where we weren't really digging into it in communicating with the public, what it was actually like ping visual would work frayed of getting to integrate into touch ten of this series mechanics. And how it was how it was how you guys were looking for it. Yeah. And a lot of it was sort of poetic writing things like the New York Times when they say that scientists revealed the deepest layer reality ever. I mean, this is my field aren't even know what that means. What is that guy smoking, and we're gonna get some tree? Three. The scientists who worked on. One of the one thousand visits that work on the large Hadron collider at certain. That's right. Yeah. There's several thousand of us all collaborating this collider and the detector surrounding the collision points and we all work together to make this project happen. Right. So you reach out to me. And so we, we created this video. Call the Higgs boson. Theory.

Higgs boson Daniel Tunis Higgs university of California New York Times Physicist Irvine ten billion dollars one day
Hasan Minhaj talks about the struggles of having his name pronounced right

Ellen on the Go

02:55 min | 1 year ago

Hasan Minhaj talks about the struggles of having his name pronounced right

"We had this is a guy. I just love. I call him Assan Manashe. He claims that his name is Haas on Manhattan. I call them home. He he he hosted the White House correspondents dinner a couple of years ago. I think it was the first White House correspondents dinner when Trump was President Trump declined to attend, and he was brilliant. I I remember listening to it in the car, we were on the way to dinner with my with Emily my daughter, and we could knock it out of the car because he was outrageously funny, and pointed and smart, and it really liked those things he really blew up after that. He now has his own show on Netflix called Patriot Act and it's a series, and it's it's it's politically charged and also smart, and and really funny, and it was his first appearance on our show. And he he told that he confessed to us that it was the thing that his mom had hoped. He would do is get to be on the Ellen show. Yeah. But I really liked him a lot. Here's very likable, dude. Yeah. He's cool. Here's a clip of that. Nice to meet you. I'm a huge fan of you. Thank you Assan Manashe. Yes. No, really. My name is Husselmann hush. Oh, I wanna do this actually want to do this on national television. Please everyone that says your name says Hasan Moniz. Yeah. But the real way you pronounce it. And this is a big deal because my parents are here. It's Husselmann Hodge and people always mispronounce it. They're always like a scene Menasheh Hussein. I'm so sorry, I can't pronounce it. Meet my son Higgs wither throttled third. How do you pronounce house try it? All right. That's on mini ish. No, that's not how I appreciate people trying. I was actually I was doing CNN which is like, it's it's a international drama show where nine people yell at each other. And the host brought me out. He was like he was trying really hard. He was like breathing heavily. And he was just like give it up for how thin mean high. It was like he was casting a spell on me. And I'm just like. You don't have to say it again. So that people hear it again, hus-, cinnamon. Hush house men has. Yes is how yes look when I first started doing comedy people like you should change your name. And I'm like, I'm not going to change my name if you can pronounce Ansel Elgort you can pronounce it doesn't actor named Ansel Elgort, and we all just walk around pronouncing completely normally. Yeah. Well, did generous was hard for people to get for a while. What did they do de generes or degenerate or like? Lots of other things you cited strong. Yeah. And now, it's too generous. But Hossan Menasheh Schmid so emphasis on the H S. And what do they do at Starbucks today at Starbucks? I just go by Timothy shell LeMay. Keep it simple. And they usually do it right with Timothy with to ease.

Assan Manashe Haas Higgs White House Husselmann Hodge Menasheh Hussein Ansel Elgort Timothy Shell Lemay Donald Trump Starbucks Hossan Menasheh Schmid Hasan Moniz Manhattan Netflix CNN Ellen President Trump Emily
"higgs" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"higgs" Discussed on TechStuff

"We should think of mass the same way. Mass is not a little. Serving of universe stuff. It's like a charge and charges him that tells us how things interact so an electron has a negative charged. Means it, you know, gets repelled from positive stuff, and it can interact with photons and things like that particles that have mass of those particles have mass they have mass, which is a charge. It tells us how it interacts with the Higgs boson. So the Higgs boson is the thing that gives these that the interacts with these particles and makes the move as if they had mass. So they have some the label on them and the Higgs boson on Iraq for them. If you have if you have a lot of mass exe- Bozon interacts with them a lot. And that's what gives them inertia makes makes it hard for them to speed up or hard for them to slow down. Right. And so that's what the Higgs boson does is it gives mass to these particles or explains how a tiny little particle can have any mass at all. And the fascinating thing is that the idea was been around for decades before we actually founded some theorist was looking. At the list of particles and the math behind them and saying this doesn't really make sense like how do these particles? How can these particles have mass is no way to give them mass in our theory. Like, we have a really beautiful theory that would work perfectly if all the particles in the universe had no mass, but the particles do have mass, and when you try to add mass in various ways, it just doesn't work mathematically breaks all sorts of other rules. So he came up with a way to give Matthys particles by having them interact with this other new particle? We'd never seen before the thing. I love about that is that it's it's purely aesthetic philosophical. It's like saying, I'm looking at all these puzzle pieces, and this seems to be one missing this whole story, right? This move back to the idea of a story. This whole story would make much more sensitive. There was one more character in it. Just click together, it'd be symmetric it'd be beautiful. It would mathematically look pretty. And so he said, well, maybe there is one right? So let's go look for it. And it was so compelling an idea that we spent decades and billions of dollars looking for it. And then. Actually found it right? What a triumph for theoretical physics to say. Just in my mind. I can think about the power of the universe and predict what else is out there that we've never seen to me. That's incredible. Yeah. I I love that. It's a story where we take a look at an a an idea. That's let's largely fleshed out. And then we think there's this would work. So great, if only there was this thing, you know, what I'm just gonna I'm gonna create the mathematics there. I'm going to. I'm going to figure out mathematically how this thing could exist if everything else we've assumed as more or less, right? And then. Wow. That looks really nice boy, it'd be great. If that thing exists, we should find out if that thing exists. And then and then a lot of time in and thought is put to it. Now, obviously, I'm trivializing and very much generalizing. But to me, it's just is beautiful. But it's also there's like a level. There's a level of beautiful absurdity to it that I find interesting from my perspective, not being a physicist. Right. Where to me, it's it's you sound like you kind of aren't amateur physicist. Visist, you know, it's not all about the mathematical training. It's about the frame. The the the way you think in the way you ask questions, I'm happy to bestow you upon you the dubious honor of being deputized, amateur physicist. Excellent. I cannot I cannot wait to abuse. My thority. I'll I'll walk certificate in the mail pretty soon. You'll see me walking into restaurants say give me a good table. I am an honorary physicist. They'll say do. Yeah. No. It doesn't work for.

Higgs boson physicist Visist Iraq
How Does Gelatin Work?

BrainStuff

06:38 min | 1 year ago

How Does Gelatin Work?

"Hey, brainstorm listeners in Leuven ad today. I wanted to tell you about one of our compatriot podcasts here at how stuff works Daniel. Or hey, explain the universe in which physicist Daniel Whiteson and cartoonist or hey cham- breakdown. All the amazing things, we know and don't know about our wild universe. They talk through some of the biggest questions in science like how did the universe begin? What is everything made of what's the Higgs bows on can we travel back in time? And where do my socks go after I put them in the dryer. It's recommended for anyone who wants their mind blown by awesome science or commuters who just wish they were out in space, new episodes, come out approximately pied vita by two times a week on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Even listen and subscribe to Daniel or hey, explain the universe on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. He brain stuff unmourned Bogle bomb, and if you've ever eaten in the cafeteria or attended a cookout or family reunion in the United States. Chances are good that you are dessert or salad options included, some form flavored gelatin perhaps from the brand name jello, hundreds of recipes use flavored gelatin to create everything from your simple institutional style squares to ornate designs that incorporate varied flavors fruit and whipped toppings jello and similar mixes consist of five basic ingredients gelatin water sugar or artificial sweetener, flavorings and food coloring. The gelatin is what allows you to mold the stuff into whatever shape you like solid at room temperature but melts in your mouth, but let's breakdown y gelatin behaves that way gelatin is a processed version of a structural protein called collagen that occurs in many animals bodies, including humans collagen makes up almost one third of all the protein in the human body. It's a fibrous protein. Gene that strengthens the body's connective tissue and allows them to be elastic that is to stretch without breaking as you get older. Your body makes less collagen and individual collagen fibers become increasingly cross linked with each other one might experience this as stiff joints due to less, flexible tendons or wrinkles due to the loss of skin elasticity. Gelatin can also be made from the collagen in the bones, hides, and connective. Tissues of cows. Pigs today, the gelatin jello is most likely to come from pig skin. Collagen does not dissolve in water in its natural form. So it must be modified to make gelatin manufacturers grind the animal parts and treat them with either a strong acid or a strong base to dissolve the collagen. Then the pre-treated material is boiled controls every step of the process ensure purity and safety the materials are washed and filtered repeatedly during this process. The large collagen protein ends up being partially broken down the resulting product is gelatin solution that solution is chilled into a jelly. Like material then cut and dried in a special chamber at this point, the dry gelatin about ten percent water is ground. If it's going to make a flavor gelatin product like jello, it'll be ground into a fine powder. When you buy a box of whatever brand of flavor gelatin at the grocery store, you get a small packet of the powder gelatin with a sweetener flavorings and colors added at room temperature. The gelatin protein is in the form of a triple helix. This is a fairly ordered structure not entirely unlike that of DNA with DNA to chains of nucleotides are twisted together in a spiral pattern resembling a ladder. It's a design known as a double helix in the gelatin protein, three separate chains of amino acids called poly peptide chains have lined up and twisted around each other. So to make this dry gelatin able to fill out and take the shape of a mold you first at boiling water to the powder gelatin you then star the mixture for about three minutes until the gelatine dissolves completely. But what happens to gelatin? When you add that boiling. Water the energy of the heated water breaks, the weak bonds that hold the gelatin strands together, they're helix structure unwinds and you're left with free floating protein chains. A next you add hold water and refrigerate the gelatin mixture, which makes the chains begin to slowly reform into their tight triple helix structures as it cools the mass acts like a sponge soaking up the water that you added, but in some places there are gaps in the helix and and others. There's a tangled web of these poly peptide chains the chains form sort of net and the net traps water inside pockets between the chains. This protein net is strong enough that the gelatin will hold the shape into which it's been molded, but because of the water trapped in the pockets, the mold has that characteristic jiggle. But gelatin isn't just for making fun, molded salads, or desserts. Gelatin is a common ingredient in foods because it's so versatile. It can also be used as a thickener to give foods and more pleasing texture into a multiply or stabilize processed foods like yogurt or cake frosting. It's used to clarify juices vinegars and even beer special gelatins are made from only certain animals, or from fish to meet the standards of folks who don't eat products made from the mammals that are usually involved and vegetarian and vegan substitutes made from extracts of gooey stuff. Like seaweed are available to the range of those products that gelatin can be found in is legion everything from dairy and dairy substitute products like sour cream margarine and cream cheese to suites like gummy bears and marshmallows to process meats, like sausage and can't him to soup sauces, gravies jellies and even whipped cream. It's the coating for pills that makes them easier to swallow. It's in some lozenges, and white minutes, and cosmetics may contain a former gelatin that doesn't tell you might see it on the label as. Hydrolysed collagen and gelatin aren't just used in foods and health and cosmetic products. It's also commonly used in the manufacture of photographic films and papers match heads sandpaper glossy, printing papers, playing cards and simulated human tissue for testing, guns and ammunition and for forensic science. It's even sometimes used to hold down the hair a synchronized swimmers in place. Today's episode was written by Linda, see Brinson and produced by Tyler clang for more on this and lots of other well gelled topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. You know, people say necessities, the mother of invention. But that's not always true. Sometimes the mother of invention is advertising. Yeah.

Daniel Whiteson Leuven Physicist Unmourned Bogle United States Apple Linda Tyler Clang Brinson Three Minutes Ten Percent
A brief history of soy

Science Magazine Podcast

05:43 min | 1 year ago

A brief history of soy

"Of soy. I'm joined by Christine DuBois, and I'd like to start by saying that I've sort of intimate personal relationship with soy. I eat a lot of it as vegetarian, but I also grew up in rural Illinois surrounded by soybeans. That said I didn't know a lot about its history or the tremendous scope of its global impact. Until I read your book. Can you start giving us an overview of the breadth of what you cover. So my book, the story of soy might consider it, a biography of soy soy were a person this would be their biography starting from its early domestication moving through its use in Chinese and Japanese food ISM its development to use during various wars, including the rest of the Japanese war and World War Two. And then it's use in factory farming of Higgs and chickens primarily on through its genetic engineering. It's Houston biodiesel and its environmental effects as well. It's his it's affects on nutrition in the book, you take deep dives into different parts of soy's history in the role it played in wars societal development politics in the environment. If we go into any of those though, I think will lose the big picture. So can you summarize just how important this little bean is on a global scale? Soybeans are one of the most traded crops around the world. Most people have no idea how incredibly important this plant is because it is fed primarily to chickens pigs on large factory farms with relatively few employees. So most people especially people who live in cities are not aware of how in agricultural areas, particularly in north and South America. This crop is huge. It's hugely profitable. And it is hugely shaping our world. It was the first commercially really successful genetically engineered crops, and because it was so commercially successful. It has spurred the development of other genetically engineered crops. It is used in countless products with industrial products and many many food products, although in very small quantities. So it's everywhere in our environments, and it has everything to do with cutting edge science, and it is massively important to a Connie's and trade disputes slim pick up on that trade dispute item because a few weeks ago, the Washington Post had a really interesting piece on how North Dakota soy farmers were being especially hard hit by the tariffs implemented as part of this ongoing U S China trade war because they sell the vast majority of their crop to China. Do you see that that loss of access to US markets, whether it's temporary or long term is going to have a worldwide impact like will other countries start growing more soy in? What would that mean the way soy is being handled as a crop worldwide, especially in South America right now? And it's really a looming problem for Africa as well is often quite environmentally destructive. The only reason I'm not mentioned North America. Here is that we already destroyed the North American prairies longtime ago, even be sore Sawyer was planted there. So it's a done deal here in North America. But in South America, there's a lot of land that was still virgin wilderness that is being deforested or disadvantaged in order to grow soy because it is such a lucrative crop. And it's really a very very serious problem, particularly in places like Hera Guay, which have much less strict environmental regulation. And places like Brazil, which has increasingly strict environmental regulation to protect the Amazon, but which has their difficult problems of enforcement, Cargill and the nature. Conservancy have worked together to try to improve some of the systems for protecting the Amazon, but there's such a long way to go. And some of the things that are being done to assist. The soybean farmers of Brazil in particular, the completion of highway that cuts right through the Amazon is which is a national highway is really leading to deforestation along its borders within fifty miles of any major road. You get a lot of people coming in building all the things that would service the truck drivers. And then town spring up in then when towns spring up you have to have schools in hardware stores, and churches, and so forth and more and more gets built up along highway. So there's a very deep concern. And of course. The concern relates to how is all of this going to affect global warming and right now with what's going on with the United States trade war with China. We have slapped a twenty five percent tariffs on to our soit being exported to China, which is our largest fire. And so right now, the Chinese don't have a lot of options for making up that soy. But in the long run they are going to want to look for other suppliers that are not going to be slapping that tariff on them. And so they are investing as they already happened. But they're probably going to celebrate it now investing in more virgin lands in Africa and South America. But they're really doing a lot in Africa that are probably going to start being planted in soy. And so more wilderness are going to be destroyed and this is a very grave concern for climate change Christine. What her new book is the story of

Amazon South America Christine Dubois China Africa Brazil United States North America Illinois Hera Guay North Dakota Houston ISM Washington Post
Can Cheese Actually Make Wine Taste Better?

BrainStuff

04:21 min | 1 year ago

Can Cheese Actually Make Wine Taste Better?

"Hey, brainstorm listeners in Leuven ad today. I wanted to tell you about one of our compatriot podcasts here at how stuff works Daniel. Or hey, explain the universe in which physicist Daniel Whiteson and cartoonist or hey cham- breakdown. All the amazing things, we know and don't know about our wild universe. They talk through some of the biggest questions in science like how did the universe begin? What is everything made of what's the Higgs bows on can we travel back in time? And where do my socks go after I put them in the dryer. It's recommended for anyone who wants their mind blown by awesome science or commuters who just wish they were out in space, new episodes, come out approximately pied vita by two times a week on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Even listen and subscribe to Daniel or hey, explain the universe on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, rain stuff. Lauren vocal bomb here. A wine lovers on the whole probably don't need any particular excuse to pair a glass with a rich cheese board. But a recent study in the journal food science shows what people have long suspected cheese improves, the taste of different types of wine. Researchers at the center for taste and feeding behavior in France asked thirty one French wine drinkers to taste for different wines. I on their own then with each of four different cheeses to see if and how the taste of the wine was changed by the cheese. The method used to evaluate the taste is called multi intake temporal dominance of sensations, which simply means that the drinkers were asked which taste sensations were dominant in length and intensity or in layman's terms, which ones did you enjoy? And why the winds were the same through all five tastings, a sweet white a dry white a full bodied red and a forty red in the first session, the tasters took three sips of each wine with no cheese. In the following sessions. They again took three sips, but in each session tasted a different cheese between sips all four cheeses ranging from creamy, two semi soft and stinky to semi hard too, hard or tasted with each wine. The study found that all of the wines tasted better after eating cheese less stringent unless sour and in the case of the fruity red, for example, that Ferdie flavor lasted longer the lead researcher Meribel Marini told the telegraph. We learned the duration of the perception of stringency of a certain line could be reduced after having cheese and the four evaluated cheeses had the same effect in short when having a plate of assorted cheeses, the wind will probably taste better. No matter which one they choose which is a relief to those of us who find creating pairings a clunky prospect at best the effect of the cheeses on the taste of the winds probably happened because the fat in cheese coats, your mouth, and reduces the dryness it might feel due to tenants from the wine a bit of tannin in wines and other. Things like tea or meant is a fun sensation. But too much can be puckering and unpleasant beyond making wine and cheese parties, a potentially less expensive endeavor. The researchers have a practical application for this study. To better understand how the taste of food can change when paired with other foods leading to new and possibly better meals as different foods are served together. Today's episode was written by Karen Kirkpatrick and produced by Tyler claim for more on this and lots of other flavorful, topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Hey, brain stuff listeners today. I wanted to tell you about the new podcast the brink in which hosts aerial Casten and Jonathan Strickland shared the stories of entrepreneurs who took a bold step without really, knowing if solid ground would be on the other side, tune into learn how Walt Disney bet his company and his house on the world's first feature length cartoon, and how a refugee from Vietnam turned a door to door business into a chili sauce empire every week. The brink will bring you news stories of the trials 'em triumphs of people who didn't let adversity stop their dreams because sometimes things just don't go your way. But what really matters are the choices you make when the odds are against you. You can listen and subscribe to the brink on apple podcasts iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Daniel Whiteson Apple Leuven Physicist France Walt Disney Meribel Marini Casten Researcher Karen Kirkpatrick Vietnam Jonathan Strickland Tyler
Why Did London Once Have a Train for the Dead?

BrainStuff

05:32 min | 1 year ago

Why Did London Once Have a Train for the Dead?

"Hey, Matt I have yet to ride one of those birds scooters 'cause I hate those things that does not surprise me at all Joel. But you know, I've been getting Instagram adds to give me to become a bird charter to join that gig economy. Oh, that's right. Just like Uber folks are getting targeted to start side hustles to make an extra buck or even to try to make a career out of it. But should you? Do it not all side hustles are created equally. Exactly every week. We dive into practical money topics like this on our podcast. Listen subscribe to our show on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcast. Just search for how to money. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain Steph Lauryn Bogle bond here what you ride a train with undead passengers or if not what about a train with actually dead passengers from eighteen fifty four to nineteen forty one. The London necropolis railway took a forty minute journey across twenty three miles. That's thirty seven kilometers carrying both the deceased end the living who mourn to them to a cemetery after departing a special station near Waterloo, built specifically for the line. And its passengers the train rocked its way across the three in countryside on a route selected for it's comforting views once arriving at the Brookwood cemetery in Surrey at the time, the world's largest cemetery and built in partnership with the railroad funeral goers would lay their dearly departed to rest, and then have drinks and snacks at one of the cemetery's to train stations. Oh, we spoke with John Clark, author of the two thousand six book, the Brookwood necropolis railway. He said both cemetery stations had refreshment rooms usually run by the wives of the station. Staff. Off the cakes and sandwiches served would probably have been homemade, and it would have been customary to eat this lunch with a Cup of tea at the station before returning to London. The refreshment rooms were fully licensed, so guests could have alcoholic drinks as an alternative to tea or coffee. After this brief repacked, the guests, then boarded the train and return to London. The trains passenger list. A bit lighter than before the idea may seem odd today when many of us keep the debt as far from daily life as possible. But at the time it was a popular one during its peak. London's necropolis railway transported more than two thousand dead bodies a year. The number of live mourners at carried reached into the tens of thousands even so riding in these same trainers. Corpses. Took some getting used to Londoners initially wondered whether loading up the mourners and the deceased and transporting them on the same train was a bit too practical, the Bishop of London when appearing before the houses of parliament a full twelve years before the necropolis railway opened considered it. Improper Clark says that the bishops stated he would consider the hurry and bustle connected with it as inconsistent with the solemnity of a Christian funeral plus they're worthy corporeal elements with which to contend such as the odors and potential disease. Transmission of the bodies. Social mores were tested to could the rich really ride side by side with the poor to bury their dead. And the concern wasn't limited only to people of different social classes. There could be different religions aboard each requiring its own traditions. The solution at least aboard the necropolis railway was elegant in its simplicity separate cars were designated by class, but all were allowed to ride regardless of their station in life the cemetery. Meanwhile, allowed the rich and poor to be buried side by side, but section separate areas for various religions, it was a workable solution for the time and one driven by necessity. Few could argue London's in town cemeteries were already chock full by the middle of the nineteenth century Londoners were being buried at a rate of about fifty thousand a year previously buried bodies sometimes removed and cremated to make room for new ones until parliament began closing admission at city, cemeteries and shipping bodies to greener pastures like the out of town Brookwood cemetery, which encompassed about one thousand five hundred acres, but the nineteen twenty s motorized hearses worthy. Vehicle of choice for moving the dead and many Londoners had access to either automobiles or one of the trains the living that also made a stop at Brookwood station and in April nineteen forty one during World War Two the London terminus of the funeral train was damaged in a German v. Two rocket bombing Brookwood it no longer serves exclusively as a departure spot for the debt, and they're mourners, but remnants of these stations are still visible if you know where to look how's that for living history? Today's episode was written by Lori Al dove and produced by Tyler client for more on this and lots of other lively, topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Hey, Brian stuff listeners in Leuven ad today. I wanted to tell you about one of our compatriot podcasts here at how stuff works Daniel. Or hey, explain the universe in which physicist Daniel Whiteson and cartoonist or hey cham- breakdown. All the amazing things, we know and don't know about our wild universe. They talk through some of the biggest questions in science. A like how did the universe begin? What is everything made of what's the Higgs bows on can we travel back in time? And where do my socks go after I put them in the dryer. It's recommended for anyone who wants their mind blown by awesome science or commuters who just wish they were out in space, new episodes, come out approximately pied vita by two times a week on Tuesdays and Thursdays. You can listen and subscribe to Daniel or hey, explained the universe on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Necropolis Railway Brookwood Cemetery London Brookwood Necropolis Railway London Necropolis Railway Daniel Whiteson John Clark Apple Brookwood Station Brookwood Steph Lauryn Bogle Bishop Of London Matt Waterloo Joel Surrey Lori Al Leuven Physicist
BrainStuff Classics: Why Do We Fart?

BrainStuff

06:27 min | 1 year ago

BrainStuff Classics: Why Do We Fart?

"In two thousand and four in a tiny town. A young woman named Rebecca Gould was brutally murdered nearly fifteen years later her killer is still on the loose. It's just really surreal walking around. Don't mention so much. Guys out there yell. I'm Katherine towns, and this is Helen gone catch new episodes by subscribing at apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff. I'm Lauren Volvo bomb, and I've got another classic episode for you today in it. Our former host Christian Sager answers, a basic yet nonetheless burning question, why do we fart? Rain stuff. It's Christian Sager. So in the late eighteen hundreds there is this French guy and his name was lapel Mon, and he was one of the stars of Moulin Rouge, people would come from far and wide just to watch this guy fart. Yeah. To watch him fart, lapenne them on you see was a professional flatulence, which as it turns out is still sort of thing. And certainly it's a dream job for some. But if you want to move out of the ranks of amateur windbreakers, an into those stinking hallowed halls of the professionally flatulent, you will need to know if thing or two about farts, like what are they why do they happen? And why do they smell so bad? Well, first things first everyone farts every single person. Yes. You to listening to this. You do to to not far would be medically fascinating and probably dangerous on average. Most people are passing about one. Leader of gas a day spread out over thirteen to wait for it. Twenty one incidents. That's Twenty-one separate times in one day, the composition of a fart varies widely. But usually what we're smelling is something that's mostly nitrogen along with oxygen carbon dioxide and even methane. This gas itself comes from several sources the air you swallow gas that enters your intestines from your bloodstream and so on but about seventy five percent of your farts are created in your lower intestine. And unfortunately, not by you see the bacteria living inside you right now, they comprise a micro Buyum all of their own. And when we say, it's intricate. We mean it so intricate that David Attenborough could make a documentary about it these bacteria form this thriving empire with billions of tiny separate organisms living inside their host. And that's you. They're living with you. And symbiosis. Now flatulence occurs when food passes through your stomach and small intestine without fully breaking down. So what does this mean, this means that the food hits the large intestine in an undyed jested state? So for example, let's look at lactose which is present in dairy products like milk and cheese, if you're lactose intolerant than you lack the enzyme that breaks lactose into sugar molecules for the bloodstream without this lactose just breezes through your stomach and small intestine into your large intestine where it becomes the special of the day for billions of Hungary bacteria, those guys love lactose. And if you're not going to digest it they will as they digest this lactose, they emit a number of gases, including methane, hydrogen carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide, which is responsible for the unpleasant, aroma. This process is similar to how yeast produces carbon dioxide to. Leaven bread. And speaking of food. It's true that some foods do produce more flatulence primarily because they contain more indigestible carbohydrates. I'm looking at you beans, nutrient dense, vegetables and fiber, rich foods all have a reputation for nibbling flatulence, that's not necessarily a bad thing. See a scientists learn more about the relationship between diet health and a person's microbiome they're discovering that these flatulent foods may encourage the growth of beneficial bacteria in your gut when they're producing that next embarrassing puff of gas. They're also making molecules to protect your intestinal lining and prevent infections. So remember the next time you're silent crime accidentally ends up sounding like stuttering, trumpet, your intestinal bacteria are the real culprits. They are the ones actually farting. And and look I want to emphasize this. They are farting inside of you. You and then you fart their farts out. Are we clear on that part, which leads us to the bigger question of the day? Who are we fighting inside? Episode was written by Ben Bullen and produced by Tyler clang to hear more weird and funny true stories from Ben check out his show ridiculous history. Available wherever you get your podcast. And of course for more on this and lots of other easily digestible topics visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Hey, Brian Steph listeners in Lumine today. I wanted to tell you about one of our compatriot podcasts here at how stuff works Daniel and explain the universe in which physicist, Daniel Whiteson and cartoonist or hey cham- breakdown. All the amazing things, we know and don't know about our wild universe. They talk through some of the biggest questions and science like how did the universe begin? What is everything made of what's the Higgs bows on can we travel back in time? And where do my socks go after I put them in the dryer. It's recommended for anyone who wants their mind blown by awesome science or commuters who just wish they were out in space, new episodes, come out approximately pied vita by two times a week on Tuesdays and Thursdays. You can listen and subscribe to Daniel or hey, explained the universe on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Flatulence Daniel Whiteson Apple Christian Sager Rebecca Gould Iheartradio Ben Bullen David Attenborough Helen Lauren Volvo Moulin Rouge First Things First Hungary Brian Steph Lumine Physicist Tyler Clang Seventy Five Percent
Is Black Friday the Busiest Shopping Day?

BrainStuff

06:04 min | 1 year ago

Is Black Friday the Busiest Shopping Day?

"I'm Jeff Rosenthal. Co-founder of summit a thought leadership community ideas festival, and I have a new podcast called art of the hustle. We'll be breaking down how the world's most fascinating successful. People have hustled their way to the top hearing their wisdom and understanding their ways of seeing with guests like Arlan Hamilton, and Tim Ferriss new episodes drop every Wednesday. So subscribe now on apple podcasts or listen on the iheartradio app or anywhere else. You find podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, I'm Lauren Vogel bomb and for scores of Americans as soon as they digest their thanksgiving Turkey. It's time to think about holiday shopping local newspapers wear such still exist are bursting with circulars and advertisements heralding black Friday sales and every retailer that's ever gotten. Hold of your Email address has been sending desperately friendly missives coined in the nineteen sixties. Black Friday refers to the day after thanksgiving that marks the traditional kickoff of the holiday shopping season. The black and black Friday symbolizes stores turning a profit a being in the black versus in the red with the term stemming from an age when handwritten financial ledgers recorded prophets and black ink and deficits in red ink. These days many stores, don't even wait for Friday morning. They open at midnight or even earlier on thanksgiving evening to give deal hungry shoppers and early start for the shelves. But is black Friday really the biggest shopping day of the year in America. Not everyone is eager to whip out their wallets while the scent of pumpkin pie still lingers in the air. You can divide holiday shoppers into two distinct camps, the black Friday, go getters, and the procrastinators breathing a retail mall the day after thanksgiving can involve heavy crowds, and seemingly endless masses of cars. Waiting to find parking people elbowing their way through aisles and qs once you're finally ready to check out all the while the nonstop tune of Jingle Bells the most frequently played holiday song. In shopping, malls goes jingling all the way into every crevice of your brain black Friday enthusiasts as worth the hassle though since many stores will strip down prices to move merchandise. As far as the number of humans who walk in and out of stores black Friday halls the been one hundred and one million braved the crowds in two thousand sixteen that heavy black Friday foot traffic translates to high dollar prophets accounting for four point five to five percent of all holiday sales in two thousand fourteen the average. Shopper spent about three hundred eighty one dollars over thanksgiving weekend of the total retail spending was about fifty one billion dollars. And although more recent numbers are difficult to track down trend watchers say they've been going up. But these undeniably large numbers aren't the largest of the season. In fact, black Friday isn't the busiest shopping day of the year normally, despite what popular opinion holds. Instead the holiday shopping procrastinators win out the highest sales day of the year. It usually strikes the Saturday before Christmas. How is that possible? If shoppers lineup in front of stores at the crack of dawn on black Friday, a customer volume goes through the roof, but sales don't follow suit surveys have shown that despite these steady streams of people flowing into stores on black Friday, not all of them drive home with trunks full of holiday presents. A for instance, one study conducted by researchers at Indiana University found a consistently low rate of purchase among black Friday shoppers higher percentage of those shoppers bought items the following day into. Net shopping and early previews of black Friday sales leaked online may also trim the amount of transactions that day as people have more options for tracking down the best bang for their holiday buck in two thousand five online retailers designated be Monday after thanksgiving to be cyber Monday the web merchants figured that. This day would see a substantial sales bump because majority of online shoppers make their purchases at work with the general boom in online sales. The distinctions are breaking down as people shop online every day of INC's giving weekend including Turkey day itself. With two thirds of all orders coming in from smartphones and tablets as of two thousand seventeen and black Friday is a phenomenon that spread beyond the states as of two thousand seventeen countries like Spain, South Africa and the UK which do not celebrate thanksgiving. Nonetheless, saw increases of up to forty six percent over that weekend versus their average daily sales online. Oh, and in case you were wondering about another shopping holiday over thanksgiving weekend. Small business Saturday was created. In two thousand ten by the Goliath credit card company American Express as a way to encourage spending at small local shops. Today's episode was written by Kristen conger and produced by Tyler clang if you're doing some shopping this weekend. Consider our online store t public dot com slash brain stuff. Every purchase supports us directly. And of course for more on this and lots of other worthwhile, topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Hey, Brian stuff listeners in Leuven ad today. I wanted to tell you about one of our compatriot podcasts here at how stuff works Daniel. Or hey, explain the universe in which physicist Daniel Whiteson and cartoonist or hey, Jim breakdown. All the amazing things, we know and don't know about our wild universe. They talk through some of the biggest questions and science like how did the universe begin? What is everything made of what's the Higgs bows on can we travel back in time? And where do my socks go after I put them in the dryer. It's recommended for anyone who wants their mind blown by awesome science or commuters who just wish they were out in space, new episodes, come out approximately pied vita by two times a week on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Even listen and subscribe to Daniel or hey, explain the universe on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Daniel Whiteson Apple Jeff Rosenthal Iheartradio Co-Founder Arlan Hamilton Tim Ferriss Turkey Lauren Vogel Leuven America Indiana University Physicist American Express
"higgs" Discussed on The End of the World with Josh Clark

The End of the World with Josh Clark

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"higgs" Discussed on The End of the World with Josh Clark

"The move itself up the hill to the other side energy that the puddle doesn't have. So the Higgs field won't be moving up the hill. But there's another way that it could slide into that lower energy state unnervingly, the Higgs is constantly trying to tunnel through that metaphorical hill to get to the lower valley on the other side. And this attempt to tunnel through comes in the form of indescribably small pockets of this other lower energy version of the Higgs field that at every moment bubble up from it like a simmering pot, but these lower energy Higgs bubbles are too weak to overcome the external pressure. Our universities Erz on them. So they wink out of existence. Just as fast as they arise. The trouble is if one of those lower energy bubbles ever does manage to stick around long enough to stabilize and grow. It would swallow our universe and bring about that vacuum decay that Coleman and delusion wrote about in disintegrate our version of the universe. It would be a big crunching deal. You could say. But probability is on our side under normal circumstances. The chances of one of those lower energy version bubbles growing are so low it's not expected to happen over the estimated lifetime of our universe. So we appear to be in the clear again, though, that's under normal circumstances. We humans have tendency to alter normal circumstances. And there's a way that the Higgs field can pose an anthropogenic existential threat a vacuum. Bubble could grow with the help of microscopic black hole, which we might actually create inside one of our particle collider's here owner..

Higgs Coleman
Does Turkey Really Make You Sleepy?

BrainStuff

05:25 min | 1 year ago

Does Turkey Really Make You Sleepy?

"Hey, brain stuff listeners in Leuven today. I wanted to tell you about a new podcast here at how stuff works. Happy face hosted by Melissa Jespersen. More for Melissa nineteen ninety-five was a nightmare. It's the year the teenager learned her father, Keith hunter Jespersen was a serial killer is also when her spiral of doubt began when you look like your father, and you share intelligence, and charisma how do, you know, you're not a psychopath to join Melissa she investigates. Her father's crimes reckons with the past and wades through her darkest fears that she hunts for a better future. Tune in every Friday for new episodes of happy face a series that doesn't just explore a serial killers mind, but the investigation has daughter needed to walk away whole you can listen and subscribe on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. He brain stuff. I'm Lauren Vogel bomb. And our question of the day is does Turkey really make you sleepy America's favorite holiday bird. Does have the makings of a natural sedative in it and amino acid called tripton. Tripped event is an essential amino acid, meaning that you need it. But your body can't manufacture it. The body has to get trip to Finn and other essential amino acids from food trip to vent helps the body produce the B vitamins niacin, which in turn helps you produce. Serotonin serotonin is remarkable chemical that acts as a sort of calming agent in the brain and plays a key role in sleep and trip to Finn is also a precursor to another common compound melatonin. So you might think that if you eat a lot of Turkey, your body would produce more serotonin and melatonin, and you would feel calm and maybe more likely to fall asleep. But nutritionists and other experts say that the trip defend in Turkey probably won't trigger the body to produce more serotonin because defendant works best on an empty stomach. Mc the trip in thanksgiving Turkey has to vibe with all of the other amino acids. The body takes in in order to pass the blood brain barrier and get to work only part of the trip. Defend key dinner will make it to the brain to help produce serotonin. The fact that thanksgiving meals are often carbohydrate heavy actually does help. I think of all the bread stuffing potatoes corn and candied tubers covered marshmallows that we eat before we even get to the real desserts, the insulin. Our bodies releases to process all of that also serves as sort of rideshare vehicles for a lot of amino acids, but not for trip to Finn which hitches a ride to the brain on a protein called albumin. So with most of the competition out of the way, it is. In fact, easier for trip to fin to get into our brain and start the process that leads to the production of more serotonin melatonin. Meanwhile, is produced outside of the brain. So you don't have to worry about that competition at the blood brain barrier. But you do have to worry that you have all the other compounds necessary for your body to create it. Overall. Researchers think it's neither the melatonin nor the Serra Tonen produced from trip to Finn that leads to rampant late afternoon napping on thanksgiving. Most likely it's the whole traditional meal together producing lethargy the average thanksgiving meal contains three thousand calories more than most of us usually eaten a whole day and your body works hard to digest all that food. After all your nervous system is set up to prime your body for maximum nutrient absorption every single time. You eat a part of this is called our rest and digest response when we eat. We excrete more saliva and gastric juices and our heart rate and blood pressure lower. Also, our bodies are sending more blood to our guts in order to help out. Meaning that less is available for the brain. And these skeletal system all of this can make you feel the limb heavy and relaxed also if you drink alcohol with your dinner, you'll likely feel the sedative effect of that as well. But there is a way to take advantage of the trip defend in Turkey. If you have trouble getting to sleep one night while they're still leftover Turkey in the fridge. You can have a late Turkey snack. And that nutritionists say might be the right amount of trip to fin on an empty stomach to help produce sincere tone. Today's episode was mostly written by a house stuff works contributor, the name of whom has been lost to time. If it was you right in it was produced by Tyler clang with the kind of Paul decade for more on this and lots of other fulfilling topics, visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Hey, Brian stuff listeners in Leuven ad today. I wanted to tell you about one of our compatriot podcasts here at how stuff works Daniel. Or hey, explain the universe in which physicist Daniel Whiteson and cartoonist or hey, Jim breakdown. All the amazing things, we know and don't know about our wild universe. They talk through some of the biggest questions and science like how did the universe begin? What is everything made of what's the Higgs bows on can we travel back in time? And where do my socks go after I put them in the dryer. It's recommended for anyone who wants their mind blown by awesome science or commuters who just wish they were out in space, new episodes, come out approximately pied vita by two times a week on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Even listen and subscribe to Daniel or hey, explain the universe on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Turkey Finn Melatonin Melissa Jespersen Leuven Apple Keith Hunter Jespersen Daniel Whiteson Lauren Vogel Physicist Serra Tonen America Niacin Tyler Clang Jim Breakdown
Is There a Best Way to Load the Dishwasher?

BrainStuff

05:43 min | 1 year ago

Is There a Best Way to Load the Dishwasher?

"Hey, brain stuff listeners in Leuven today. I wanted to tell you about a new podcast here at how stuff works. Happy face hosted by Melissa Jespersen. More for Melissa nineteen ninety-five was nightmare. It's the year the teenager learned her father, Keith hunter Jespersen was a serial killer is also when her spiral of doubt began when you look like your father, and you share his intelligence, and charisma how do, you know, you're not a psychopath to join Melissa she investigates. Her father's crimes reckons with the past and wades through her darkest fears that she hunts for a better future. Tune in every Friday for new episodes of happy face a series that doesn't just explore a serial killers mind, but the investigation has daughter needed to walk away whole you can listen and subscribe on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff unlearn Vogel bomb. And look I'm not here to start any fights among your family. Many people have very strong ideas about how to best tetris load of dishes into a dishwasher, but I am here to give you some scientific advice because if the dishes are not coming out of your dishwasher is clean as he'd like you might be tempted to blame the appliance or your brand of detergent. But the problem might just be what an how you're stacking in the machine when you're loading in its first important to consider what's dishwasher safe, and what isn't some of the items on the no fly list are fairly obvious. Cast iron will rest and loose seasoning. If placed in a machine a fine, China and crystal can't handle the intense heat, but you should also leave out insulated, travel, mugs. The high heat of the machine can ruin the vacuum. Seal and reduce the mugs ability to retain heat aluminum. Pots are very prone to scratching and can develop a dull finish Turner, blackish color in the wash and wooden spoons or cutting boards can crack from the heat and humidity allowing germs to set up. Shop. Also, although most nonstick pans on the market today are dishwasher safe. Check the washing instructions first and limit dishwasher time, even if it is allowed frequent high temperature washes can cause the coating to wear off. Secondly, either rinse all of your dishes before stocking them, or none at all most modern dishwashers come with a sensor that evaluates the water to determine how long the cycle should be. And how much water is necessary to produce a thorough clean during an initial rinse cycle. It'll measure how cloudy the water is and run more or less thorough wash cycles accordingly. If only some of your dishes are rinsed it won't be able to properly evaluate how to run its wash cycle plus on the side of not hand rinsing. I at all of the dish detergent, you use likely has compounds in it that are specifically designed to break up food particles. A basically the companies that make those detergents assume you won't pre wash. If you do those compounds may leave a powdery residue on your dishes because of that we'd recommend that users of modern, dishwashers and commercial, detergents, scrape off chunks or anything that might clog the machine, but not be fussed about rinsing sauces or crumbs a third you wanna fill the machine to your best advance. Pige load the dishes to face the center of the machine spray arm sprays out in a circular motion so plates that aren't facing the center, we'll get a heavy cleaning on the wrong side. Also because the heating unit is located on the bottom of most machines, heat sensitive, plastics, should go on the top rack to avoid risk of melting forks and spoons should face up to minimize the risk of nesting inside a packed utensil basket. And this also keeps the basket from getting in the way of the wash making sure the head of the utensils gets nice and clean. If you have a ton of silverware to wash try to spread out similar pieces to avoid nesting or alternate them. Head down head up along the same lines resist the urge to overload the dishwasher in general, if one item is completely blocking another neither will get truly clean. Finally, you should run occasional maintenance on your machine, your dishwasher likely has a filter that needs to be removed and cleaned out on occasion, a most soils like saucer crumbs will slip right through the filter, but any errant chunks of food will get caught. And clogged up to clean, simply remove and rinse. With a little bit of dish, soap, a ABI SHA to rinse it completely or it will cause sudden thing during the next cycle also limescale especially in areas pard water and grease can build up in these spray arms and filter over time to prevent any problems from escalating, it's a good idea to clean your machine about once a month. There are dishwasher specific cleansers on the market or you can Google to learn how to run a cleansing cycle with vinegar. Today's episode was written by Allee point and produced by Tyler claim for more on this and lots of other sparkling, topics. Visit our home planet. Testif- works dot com. Hey, Brian stuff listeners in Leuven today. I wanted to tell you about one of our compatriot podcasts here at how stuff works then. You'll or hey, explain the universe in which physicist Daniel Whiteson and cartoonist or hey cham- breakdown. All the amazing things, we know and don't know about our wild universe. They talk through some of the biggest questions and science like how did the universe begin? What is everything made of what's the Higgs bows on can we travel back in time? And where do my socks go after I put them in the dryer. It's recommended for anyone who wants their mind blown by awesome science or commuters who just wish they were out in space, new episodes, come out approximately pied vita by two times a week on Tuesdays and Thursdays. You can listen and subscribe to Daniel or hey, explained the universe on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Melissa Jespersen Leuven Apple Keith Hunter Jespersen Daniel Whiteson Vogel China Google Turner Allee Physicist Testif Brian Tyler
A Beginners Guide To CERN

A Moment of Science

02:00 min | 1 year ago

A Beginners Guide To CERN

"You might have heard of Sern also known as the European organization for nuclear research, located just outside of Geneva, Switzerland, they're interested in what matters made of and how it all works together to put it another way these physicists research particles such as electrons, quirks, glue, on's and more and the forces that act upon them to do this Sern uses particle accelerators, which exceleron particles in beams and then collide those beams with each other or certain targets. These beams are exceleron by electric fields and steered by magnetic fields. The accelerators are either circular where the beans race round and round or straight where they shoot one into another the resulting collisions caused new particles to form and specialized detectors track their speed, energy and charge. The biggest exceleron and the biggest machine. Gene. In the world is the famous large Hadron collider or l h c at seventeen miles in circumference this accelerator forces to beams to travel at near the speed of light before smashing them together. The l h c is used for some of surnames most important experiments such as its exploration of the Higgs bows on a particle. That would explain why mass exists at all. What else does Sern do it researches basic aspects of the universe such as light the big bang, antimatter black holes, gravity and much more? And it created the worldwide web in one thousand nine hundred nine scientists at universities around the world, including Indiana, Purdue and Notre Dame are active participants in Sern research unlocking the secrets of matter. It seems that some big ideas can come from tiny particles. This moment of science comes from Indiana University. I'm Yahoo Cassandra.

Sern Indiana University Switzerland Geneva Indiana Higgs Yahoo Purdue
Is Physics as We Know It About to Change?

BrainStuff

06:13 min | 1 year ago

Is Physics as We Know It About to Change?

"I'm Beth Newell former doctorates, and I'm Peter mcnerney from the story pirates and where parents who median and the hosts of we knows parenting. But here's the thing. If we're being honest, we don't really know that much about parenting. I mean, we do have two and four year olds. Seriously. Is there a right way to do each week on our show? We share our personal parenting triumphs and failure and failures because we knows parenting is hard. Maybe you can relate. You can find. We knows parenting on apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcast. Welcome to brain stuff. From how stuff words. Hey, brain stuff. I'm Lauren both bomb, and I'm here to tell you that something strange is happening about the frozen landscape of Antarctica. When scientists launched a signs balloon mission called the Arctic impulsive transient antenna or Anita over the continent in two thousand six, a cosmetic Ray pinged off of one of its instruments that isn't so strange, cosmic rays fly from deep space all the time and Anita can detect them and measure their energies. But on this occasion, the cosmic Ray didn't come from above. It came from below this high energy particle had emerged from the ice and traveled upward through the atmosphere. That's not something that cosmic rays are supposed to do during another Anita flight in two thousand fourteen. It happened again. Cosmic rays come from some of the most energetic places in the universe supernova is or these swirling Mawes of black holes to see a cosmic Ray emerged from the earth suggests that this particle traveled from deep space and passed right through the planet before emerging on the other side according to physics. However, this is impossible cosmic rays are high energy protons and atomic nuclei. And the thing about them is that they have large cross sections. In other words, they have no problem interacting with matter should cosmic Ray hit the earth. It should be stopped its tracks by the atmosphere like a bullet hitting cinderblock. Conversely, we've got another type of particle called neutrinos. These have very small cross sections, meaning they zip through matter as if it weren't even there. Neutrinos are so weakly interacting with matter. The twins of them pass through our bodies unimpeded every second, but the particles that needed. But the particles that Anita detected were not neutrinos they were what appeared to be cosmic rays. And they passed straight through our planet as if it weren't even there. Frankly, these cosmic rays are not normal. Now, researchers have have revisited these Anita events in a study submitted in September twenty eighteen and founded three similar detections of upward-moving cosmic rays. And another article experiment called ice cube. That's a particle detector that's buried in the ice. And the researchers have arrived at an astonishing conclusion. These aren't regular standard model, physics, cosmic rays. They could be evidence of what's called exotic physics, exotic physics. I physics that we don't currently understand and scientists refer to it as physics beyond the standard model. The standard model is a recipe book of sorts that explains how subatomic particles from electrons to photons to Cork's should behave. When the large Hadron collider discovered the Higgs bows on in two thousand twelve. The particle that endows matter with mass the standard model was complete. The theoretical framework that describes all interactions down to subatomic scales had been wrapped up there almost. I, there was a problem. In fact, there were several. The standard model does not explain what dark matter and dark energy are. It also cannot explain why the majority of the universe is made for matter rather than antimatter. There's also the question of neutrino mass. The standard model falls short there too. There are many mysteries that cannot be explained by the standard model recipe book. So physicists are hard at work trying to find evidence for a recipe book that governs the universe in the shadows. Maddeningly the most complex experiments on earth have yet to find any conclusive evidence of this shadowy realm and how it works, though there are clues and according to the researchers investigating the Nida and ice cube. Anomalies, these cosmic Ray detections made opened a window into physics beyond the standard model, providing evidence of particles that look like cosmic rays and yet don't behave like cosmic rays. The researchers wrote in their study under conservative extrapolations of these standard model interactions. There's no. Article that can propagate through the earth at these energies and exit angles. We explore here whether beyond the standard model particles are required to explain the Anita events if correctly interpreted and conclude that they are one hypothetical exotic physics recipe book that may help explain what's going on is super symmetry. This hypothesis suggests that all the particles we know in love have super symmetry particles, aka sparkles. These spectacles would provide balanced to these standard model and may explain some of the mysteries that are confounding, physicists and cosmologists. Could these phantom cosmic rays actually be a whole different type of particle emerging from super symmetry. It's too early to tell and more data is needed. But it's tantalizing to think that we may have accidentally glimpsed physics beyond the standard model at the most extreme location on earth. Today's episode was written by Ian O'Neill and produced by Tyler clang for more on this and lots of other spooky topics visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. In two thousand four in a tiny town. A young woman named Rebecca Gould was brutally murdered. Nearly fifteen years later. Her killer is still on the loose. It's just really surreal walking around. So much. Two guys out there ready, yell, depressed, dude. I'm Katherine towns and this is Helen gone. Coming up Tober seventeenth from school of humans

Anita RAY Beth Newell Peter Mcnerney Rebecca Gould Cork Helen Ian O'neill Tyler Clang Fifteen Years Four Year
Everything Spins the Same Direction in Space

Wow In the World

03:35 min | 2 years ago

Everything Spins the Same Direction in Space

Dr. Helena Marais Dr Fatty Higgs Mooney France Mindy Dustin Brazil Five Billion Years
"higgs" Discussed on Inside the Hive with Nick Bilton

Inside the Hive with Nick Bilton

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"higgs" Discussed on Inside the Hive with Nick Bilton

"There are little signs little remnants of other bubble universes having bumped into hours in the past we will someday discover by doing surveys of our universe when you think about all these things in black holes and so on and so forth do you does it is it exciting that we of what we get what we will eventually learn or is it kind of a little terrifying at the same time because it may present answers that we don't necessarily want i don't think it's terrifying it's exhilarating exciting you know it's certainly possible we get answers we don't want i mean to be brutally honest we turned on the large hadron collider big particle accelerator geneva sern twenty eight or something like that i turned on sort of came to life really in two thousand nineteen thousand ten two thousand twelve we discovered the higgs bows on which we all expected but most of us expected a lot more than that we haven't had it what was the thing that we expected more well the thing is that the higgs bozon it has a particular mass right we've measured it's mass can you explain for the listeners that yet don't know what a hicks bows on is i'm sure there aren't any such listeners no this there's this thing that we have called the standard model of particle physics this wonderful intricate complicated framework that accounts for all the particles enforces we've ever seen in any experiment ever and there's there was one missing piece because if you took it face value the principles of symmetry and so forth that this standard model was based on makes it very firm prediction that particles like electrons and quarks and so forth are all massless they should move to speed of light that's not the real world in the real world they're massive and they don't move at the speed of light they move more slowly than that so this is a problem to which we had already answer all the way back in the nineteen sixties a bunch of people including peter higgs but also others proposed that empty space is suffused with this invisible energy field called the higgs field now and it's because electrons in quirks and so forth are moving through the higgs field that they acquire mass.

higgs bozon hicks peter higgs higgs field
"higgs" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"higgs" Discussed on KTRH

"We uncover that years ago we probably thought we'd never would beyond dark matter let's say what's out there well you know it's it's hard to to say what we're going to uncover with uh if we you know after we uncover it that way but i mean i i don't know if i can say what we will uncover the future that that we don't foresee if you know that we don't ever think we would um i don't know if i have that fish and two two two imagine that as you roll to the upright thinkers and i love the the subtitle of course the species journey from living in trees to understanding the cosmos do we really understand the cosmos at this point well that's we you know we should probably be a little asked research to understand the cosmos to the extent that we too but we understand a lot of it i mean we pretty much understand the universe back to a very small fraction of the second after the big bang and then beyond out if you look to kind of the minus 30th their 40th seconds we have you know in eight clay of what went out but certainly not a huge understanding but i think that even going back to you know a tenth of a seconds there are hundreds or thousands of a second uh it's pretty impressive and you know want when we look at the the the microwave background radiation that we can see what the space telescope said it is of course our our ideas very very well so it seems like we we know we're talking about and then of course the forces of nature we we the four forces of nature we have theories of those that described the very well and you know we we predicted the higgs bows on based on these mathematics with theories and then we built this multi dollar machine and we found it so i think that we you know.

higgs