35 Burst results for "Hidden Brain"

President Trump Tweets He Will Not Throw Out First Pitch At New York's Yankee Stadium

Hidden Brain

00:19 sec | Last week

President Trump Tweets He Will Not Throw Out First Pitch At New York's Yankee Stadium

"President Trump won't be flowing out the first pitch a Yankee Stadium next month. After all, he announced last week. He would do that when the Yankees host the Boston Red Sox on August 15th. On Twitter today, the president said he wouldn't be able to make it because of what he called his strong focus on the Corona virus, Vaccines and the

President Trump Yankee Stadium Boston Red Sox Twitter Yankees
Hurricane Hanna makes landfall in Texas

Hidden Brain

00:10 sec | Last week

Hurricane Hanna makes landfall in Texas

"Flooding from what is now Tropical Storm Hanna. Forecasters downgraded the storm overnight. It made landfall as a Category one hurricane late yesterday. The Pacific

Bollywood Star Amitabh Bachchan in Hospital for COVID-19

Hidden Brain

00:22 sec | 3 weeks ago

Bollywood Star Amitabh Bachchan in Hospital for COVID-19

"India is reporting another record spiking Corona virus cases. NPR's Lauren Frayer reports. Among those newly infected is one of the country's most famous Bollywood film stars. The legendary Indian actor Amitabh Bachan, who is 77 years old, has tested positive for covert 19. So his his son, they announced it on Twitter. They've both been hospitalized with only mild

Amitabh Bachan Lauren Frayer Twitter NPR India
Canadian airlines will book flights to full capacity

Hidden Brain

00:52 sec | Last month

Canadian airlines will book flights to full capacity

"Two major airlines say they will in physical distancing on flights by the end of next week. It and carbon chuck reports the announcements come After a review by the International Air Transport Association, Hair, Canada and West Jet now join American Airlines and booking flights to full capacity. WestJet says it will remove seat distancing protocols on domestic flights beginning on July, the first West. Yet, officials say their flights have heaped air filters installed to help clean recirculated air. They add that the airflow and cabins goes from ceiling to floor, so an extra barrier isn't necessary. Officials also say the seatbacks provide protection for passengers. WestJet says it has beefed up cleaning and sanitizing as well as introduced mandatory temperature checks of all passengers with a requirement that all passengers and crew wear masks. Canada says it will also end seat restrictions at the same time is West Jet

Westjet West Jet International Air Transport As Canada American Airlines
Germany warns of tourism risks ahead of border reopening

Hidden Brain

00:54 sec | Last month

Germany warns of tourism risks ahead of border reopening

"In Germany tourists are welcome again as the government eases pandemic border restrictions and lift its travel warning for Germans wishing to travel abroad within the E. U. they're still concerned about vacation travel as many calls and reports Angela Merkel's chief of staff help uptown is warning that summer tourism could negatively impacts the infection rates adding message may result in another nation wide lockdown brown's comments echo epidemiologists concerns about his second wave federal health minister Jens Spahn is also urging Germans to be cautious about vacationing this year but says that the new tracing expected to launch this week should help mitigate the risks German politicians and epidemiologists alike have expressed doubt as to whether enough people will download and use the app in a country where data privacy is

E. U. Angela Merkel Brown Jens Spahn Germany Chief Of Staff
India to reopen in phases despite increase in coronavirus cases

Hidden Brain

00:26 sec | 2 months ago

India to reopen in phases despite increase in coronavirus cases

"To India now where new guidelines are set to take effect as the country's lockdown expires the government has announced a phased re opening starting a week from tomorrow with places of worship hotels restaurants and shopping malls but experts warn the pandemic has yet to peak in India health officials said today India reported more than eight thousand new infections coronavirus infections in a single day for the first

India
"hidden brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

06:39 min | 3 months ago

"hidden brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"Yeah Sean got here last week. Our friend of the public radio program. One a produced a discussion about rights of passage as part of that episode. The ME to deliver an on air. Commencement address to graduates finishing their studies this year. We thought we'd bring you those remarks and offer our warm congratulations to all students parents and caregivers who are marking this moment. Greetings to the class of twenty twenty two the faculty parents grandparents and friends joining us today. Congratulations it's a great honor to be with you in this extraordinary of moments for this most unusual of commencement ceremonies now extraordinary and unusual may not be the first words that come to mind. Perhaps the words you would choose. I'm more colorful. Go ahead. Shout those words out loud. It's okay to feel grief that your commencement isn't how you imagined it. You've worked hard to get to this moment. You deserve to be wearing your cap and gown to walk across the stage. Shake hands with your deans and professors and collect your diploma. Your families deserve to bear witness to this moment to know that all the years of hard work and sacrifice worth it giving up this rite of passage is very hard and it comes at a time when many others are going through much worse some of you might be feeling guilty about being sad you might be thinking of all the lives that have been lost to the cove nineteen pandemic to the millions of people out of work. And you might think. I really shouldn't be sad about losing out on a graduation ceremony. It's good that you're paying attention to all those out there. Who are hurting. But that shouldn't mean your pain doesn't count suffering isn't a zero sum game. Your pain doesn't go away because someone else's pain is greater. Your sadness about missing out on graduation ceremonies is very likely coupled with anxieties. Will you be able to find a job find one? Will it make you happy? Are you ever GonNa pay off your student loans as you think about these big difficult questions? I'd like to tell you a story that shows. Why moments like this moments of chaos and disruption allow us to discover things about ourselves. The story I'd like to share is a young woman named Maya Shankar. When Maya was a girl home either gave her a violin. She was captivated by the instrument and she began playing constantly eventually. She was accepted to juilliard the renowned music school in New York City. She became a student of the great violinist. It's ACH permanent. Shows well on her way to becoming a professional musician everything was going exactly to plan and then one day as she was practicing she overstretched a finger and felt a pop should injured a tendon months past her hand never healed properly and eventually doctors told her she had to give up the violin. The grief that my felt was enormous her plan for her life. Her very identity had been wrapped around music. She didn't know what to do next. And then one day as she was helping parents clean out their basement she stumbled on one of her sisters course books. It was the language instinct by Steven. Pinker and she read the book. Maya found herself captivated by the human mind. She realized she wanted to learn more about the brain and how it works and so she decided to study cognitive science fast forward a couple of decades and Maya has since completed a Rhodes scholarship and a stint in the Obama White House. I tell you my story not to suggest it should be your story but because it shows that when the world is uncertain and the ground under our feet fields on steady. That's often the time we discover new things about ourselves periods of disruption invariably lead to invention and reinvention a number of years ago. There was a transit strike in London. Many subway stations were closed. People had to find a new way to get around. It was stressful. It was annoying. Once the strike was done you might expect. Everyone quickly went back to their old commutes. But that didn't happen. When researchers looked at the data they found that thousands of people stuck with new routines that they had invented during the strike the chaos had had many Londoners identify new and better ways of moving about the world. You can see where I'm going with this. Like those London commuters you are grappling with a change to the normal rhythms and routines of life. Like my Shankar. You have suddenly senior plans up ended. The way forward is unclear. But what lies before you is an opportunity to look at the world with fresh eyes? I'm often reminded of this when I traveled to a new city. I'm peeling around looking with fascination of the buildings the parks. Meanwhile all around me the people who actually live in that city Hurrying about Berry looking up not stopping to notice the sites around them when chaos strikes we all become tourists in our own lives. We start to see with fresh eyes and when we do realize the world really does have endless possibilities in fact this is why we have rights of passage graduation ceremonies the designed to give us a chance to stop to take stock to look back and say look how far. I've come to look forward and ask. Where do I want to go from you? You might not get the ceremony but you can take a moment to stop and do those things anyway. Celebrate your accomplishments and ask how you fit into a changed world. Congratulations and good luck. A bonus episode was produced by Tara Boy. If someone in your life who might enjoy it please share it with them? If your friend is new to podcasting please have them subscribe to hidden brain? I'm Sean Covey data and this is NPR..

Sean Covey Maya London Maya Shankar New York City Tara Boy Pinker Obama White House Steven NPR Berry
Thousands of migrants amass at Greek border after Turkey opens gates

Hidden Brain

00:23 sec | 5 months ago

Thousands of migrants amass at Greek border after Turkey opens gates

"Tensions have been rising this weekend along Greece's border with Turkey thousands of migrants have gathered there after Turkey said it would no longer restrain them from trying to reach the European Union the United Nations migration organization says at least thirteen thousand people of massed at the border Turkey's decision to open its borders with Europe come as migrants and refugees fleeing the war in Syria

Greece Turkey European Union Europe Syria United Nations
Seven dead in Turkey, others trapped under buildings as earthquake strikes western Iran, Turkish interior minister says

Hidden Brain

00:27 sec | 5 months ago

Seven dead in Turkey, others trapped under buildings as earthquake strikes western Iran, Turkish interior minister says

"Your earthquake centered in western Iran has killed several people in neighboring Turkey the interior minister says three children and four adults were killed and five others were injured he's as rescue teams are working to find those who remain trapped beneath to brief Turkish television showing people digging through the rubble with shovels Iran's official news agency says forty three villages are affected by the quake but any fatale these are injuries remain

Iran Turkey
"hidden brain" Discussed on Podcast Brunch Club

Podcast Brunch Club

12:27 min | 6 months ago

"hidden brain" Discussed on Podcast Brunch Club

"Today we'll be speaking with Raina Cohen the producer on the hidden brain episode fake news and Origin Story from this month playlist the episode we feature this month featured Andy Tucker a professor at Columbia University who shares the history of fake news and objectively in the media. The besides her work with hidden brain rain aucoin worked at ABC News this week with George Stephanopoulos and her writing has appeared in the Atlantic and the new republic rain. Welcome to the show. Oh thanks for inviting me to talk. Yeah I'm excited to talk to you. So he told me a little bit about your role a hidden brain a little bit about the team behind the episode. We listen to WHO this month. Yeah so I am an associate producer and as a producer. It means kind of doing everything from start to end with. I think about it is essentially that I I'm involved in all parts of the process minus the business and the like actually being on air part and I'm on a team where there is the host a supervising producer and then and five other producers. who kind of had similar roles to me? You know what I get to do and the rest of us get to do is pitch stories. We do a lot of reading to figure out WHO's going. CBS on the show. You know once story is in process we are setting up interviews getting to prepare shocker for the interviews which means reading the books six or doing pre interviews or reading someone's journal articles so I'm a nerd. I'm just GONNA leave that out pretty early. So this is it's very fun for me that that part the refund for me and we have hours of tape in hand we get to start scripting and we go through collaborative editing process and then there is all the audio media production work and I've been on hidden brain for about three years and I think as time goes on we've played more and more with sound design so that is also sort of a fun rich part of the process to think about how to use music to tell the story and other forms of sound design that can bring ideas alive so kind of from from conception Shen to the actual execution. That's that's what a I get to do and the other producers on the show get to do. Yeah as a producer you might be the host but it sounds like you're really in the trenches. Yeah for sure I mean that's the that's the fun part is how long does it take from beginning to end for an episode like that too. I mean from what we hear listeners. It sounds like an interview with Andy Tucker sure seems like maybe the host and her sat down and they did over the weekend and the show went out on Monday. Yeah no not not that quick at this was actually a quicker turnaround one just because the way that ended up working in our schedule but that was first trying to figure out. Who are we going to have on the show and then Andy has more than one book? Could you know other articles so I remember trying to figure out. How do these different things that she's written out about over the years you know fit together and figuring bring out like how do you convey ideas through a story arc where each segment of the episode feels like? You are traveling somewhere you know if you listen to a lot of the questions shins and on on handwriting. They're kind of driven by stories. So then. There is the interview with Andy which meant some logistical setup. And then the interview I you no. I don't know what the raw interview was exactly somewhere between an hour and an hour and a half. I'm sure and that episode is about a half hour so we cut things down considerably and that that means trying to figure out what what is essential. How do you keep the momentum? Have to find music. I had to search for tape and that can take a very long time to find the exact thing that you're looking for four and they're all sorts of other things involved like making everything the right volume and sort of finessing so those are the parts of the process and it's usually happening over the course of of months while people are working on multiple projects. But yeah this one. I think we were able to turn around within several weeks. Yeah and it was done so effectively. I mean you really followed the human in Germany of news and how people interact with it over a hundred years really well done team. This month is fake news as someone who works Islamic widely respected new source such as NPR. How does this current era of fake news shape your reporting there are organization in wide standards? So the first thing that I think of is our beloved former standards and Editor of standards and practices Mark Moment. He had add a memo. That was about it truth Sandwich which I think actually is something that other journalists have written about as well but the idea is I mean no this from the kind of psychology research that we've shown that if you just tell somebody something that's false and then afterward you tell them that the thing they previously heard was wrong. It's not really going to be very effective active in debunking the this false belief. So what meant suggested. was that people who are presenting something that you know one person said that was false. Is that you start with the truth. And then you say the thing that is that is wrong but his new newsworthy. And that's why you're there to talk about it and then you reiterate that it was wrong. So they're kind of fun. Example that he had in this memo was despite the fact that Korva Coleman has accurately said mark commits name all the time he falsely claimed that she mispronounced it by you know emphasizing the wrong place and we looked back and she said his name correctly seventeen eighteen times on the air like that kind of idea. Have the truth as your bread and the thing in between to be the the the false belief so I think that's like a organisation-wide idea in terms of hidden. I mean we have the luxury of not having to cover the news as it's happening and that allows i. I saw things like we have. We have a very thorough fact checking process which newsroom has to do with a much quicker way but it also means that it affects what we get to cover so you know besides this story on Fake News. We've also done other stories that are about how people come to believe things that aren't true. So there's an episode tally Sharon about the psychology of false beliefs. And I think it's pretty humbling to think about why we are are are drawn to ideas that are not true and we also had an episode around specifically false beliefs in science and even even among scientists how these ideas spread so even if we're not covering what politician said that was inaccurate. We get to step back and give people information that allows them to maybe reflect on whether they believe something that isn't really accurate and so I think that's the way it kind of comes out most prominently innately in in brain. Well it makes sense that your practices at NPR hidden brain would be so granular seeing as you're so respected. I would just say you know this whole episode had to was just talking about objectively in reporting and really there was a lack of objectivity throughout history. I mean it seems almost like our modern beliefs of fact checking is a little bit of an outlier in terms of what people have been consuming for so long. I mean I'd be interested in hearing how the hidden brain team the values I mean. Is that part of your process. I think the way that we you know the way that objectivity comes into the work that we do is We are interested in ideas that make us uncomfortable and instead of turning away from them to try to understand them and to try to get them from different vantage points so I think really obvious example of this was there is an episode about explanations for why White voters voted as they did in the two thousand sixteen election and they were two different scholars who had different arguments that were in conflict with one another to quite an extent and about why white voters had gone for trump. And you know whether this was like basically whether you want to emphasize the class part or the or racism in their behavior so you know I guess the way that I think about hidden brain is that it is a show that is interested in investigating all sorts of ideas even ones that make us uneasy. See you know to do it with a lot of nuance and to not be pursuing controversy but to shed light rather than he and I think about this with the episode in the air we breathe breathe which was about the implicit association test. So it's Y- vary widely used to kind of determine someone's level of implicit implicit bias. So like sort of bias that they would not themselves maybe even be aware of. We were focused on race. But it's a test you can do for all sorts of prejudices and there are pieces in the media at the time that we're kind of very negative on the Iot because there were issues with how much it was actually able to predict people's behavior and people sort of saying well. This is useless and I think the you know the episode turned into wasn't just basically a hit job on this. I'm really really important task. But instead was an investigation into A. What does this test explain? And I think we got a much more interesting answer from that so I think maybe like geico willingness to look at all corners and not do a very simple story is part of what it means to. You know to be objective like I I think there are. There are other things that reported on about implicit bias. And maybe we could just not report on the problems with the you know the debate over the problems with the test because is it would undermine other things that have come on the show. But that's not the way we go out things well. I really appreciate you taking the time to explain that to me. I feel I feel a little guilty that the episode that bringing you on is about fake news and objectivity and I am really grilling you hear practices as a journalist. I hope that's alright. Alright yeah I mean. I think it's important to have a lot of integrity and I I mean actually this story behind how Andy Tucker got on is is is related to journalism practice because I encountered her work through fellowship that I went on that was about professional ethics and I was specifically in the journals and program and she she was one of the leaders of it so she gave this presentation on the history fake news that was pretty extraordinary and when we were thinking about people to have on the show that she had she'd come to mind mind but anyway that's just to say that I'm interested in thinking deeply about the ethics that go into how journalists carry out their work and a lot. The stuff we do can get into tricky territory. Even if you're trying to be careful well and I would say we're very interested as well at least me personally. I mean as a podcast consumer. I think I'm someone who's yearning for information so the Morgan here about your processes excellent but I'd like to move on a little bit past this topic here about what you working on now. Like what are you doing personally. Or what is hidden brain rain doing that. We can look forward to so I am at the early stage of several different episodes. So yeah one. I'm excited about where still so figuring out exactly the you know the angle. But it'll be related to anger in some way and I am pretty certain we're GONNA have on this philosopher who I I've disliked adored her work for a very long time. So that's pretty exciting to get You know be helping with an interview with somebody who's WHO's working like. I you know in my outside life fine really interesting people working on all sorts of things. There's an episode. That's coming out in a couple of weeks that I am really eager to hear from my colleague Laura and it has been in the works for a while but the general idea as I understand it is that you know well past the period when people have imaginary friends we actually are kind of communing with different people Mentally so whether it is like a celebrity or the author of a book or somebody who you kind of feel like you know and you're in conversation with even though you actually don't know them she's sort of looking into what those sorts active relationships look like and I think the some of those sort of interesting psychology around so It'll be it'll be new to me once once I get to hear it. Abbas she she is in the trenches right now trying to Produce that episode and there's also there is another one of my colleagues has an episode. Kosovo coming out. Soon that I like for me has changed the way the I think about political activism and yeah has made me observe certain.

Andy Tucker producer NPR supervising producer Columbia University George Stephanopoulos ABC News Raina Cohen aucoin Atlantic Shen CBS geico professor Iot Germany Abbas Editor Kosovo Laura
Thousands descend on gun rights rally in Virginia

Hidden Brain

00:46 sec | 7 months ago

Thousands descend on gun rights rally in Virginia

"Barricades are up in downtown Richmond Virginia as the community prepares for a huge gun rights rally tomorrow the event is expected to draw thousands of gun owners from Virginia and across the country it's stoking fears about potential anti government and white supremacist violence Whitney Evans of member station V. P. M. in Richmond reports Virginia Democrats are following through with an election year pledge to pass new gun laws following a mass shooting in Virginia beach last spring this is prompted a ground swell of grassroots activism from gun owners who say their constitutional rights are under attack they're headed to the state capitol Monday for what could be a tense day of protest met with increasing purity road closures and a fire arm span on capitol

Richmond Virginia P. M. Virginia Beach Whitney Evans Richmond Virginia
Queen Elizabeth will meet with Charles, William and Harry

Hidden Brain

00:54 sec | 7 months ago

Queen Elizabeth will meet with Charles, William and Harry

"Britain's Queen Elizabeth is convening what royal observers are calling an unprecedented summit about prince Harry's future it comes after Harry in his wife announced plans to step back from their public roles Vicki Barker reports Harry's father prince Charles and his brother prince William have been summoned to the queen's Sandringham estate for tomorrow's meeting it's believed to make and will be joining them on the phone from Canada the plan is to hear in more detail how the Duke and Duchess of Sussex envisioned their future life divided between the UK and North America earning their own money well apparently also continuing some royal duties then courtiers will be tasked with figuring out how to implement any resulting plan in the meantime Harry apparently intends to keep up his existing royal commitments he'll be at Buckingham Palace on Thursday to host team selection for the twenty twenty one rugby league

Britain Queen Elizabeth Vicki Barker Prince Charles Sandringham Estate Canada Sussex UK North America Buckingham Palace Prince Harry Prince William
Protests erupt in Iran over plane's downing that killed 176

Hidden Brain

01:01 min | 7 months ago

Protests erupt in Iran over plane's downing that killed 176

"Please have reportedly stepped up their presence in to Ron today after protests this weekend thousands of demonstrators took to the streets and a display of anger at the government for denying it shut down that Ukrainian passenger jet killing all one hundred seventy six people on board the government initially said that a mechanical failure had brought down the plane and peers Jackie north of reports on Iran's reversal runs military says the Ukrainian airline was flying close to a sensitive military base in such a way and at such an altitude that it was mistaken for a hostile aircraft in shot down that was just hours after a run launched military strikes against the US in Iraq in retaliation for the killing of a top Aronian general arounds president Hassan Rouhani offered sincere condolences for what he called an unforgivable mistake and promised to prosecute those responsible Iran's foreign minister Javad the reef says the crash happened at a time of crisis caused by US

RON Jackie North Iran United States Iraq President Trump Hassan Rouhani
Boeing's 1st Starliner Spacecraft to Land Sunday After Launching Into Wrong Orbit

Hidden Brain

00:19 sec | 8 months ago

Boeing's 1st Starliner Spacecraft to Land Sunday After Launching Into Wrong Orbit

"Boeing starliner spacecraft is due back on earth this morning Boeing plans to bring the astronaut capsule down for a landing at white sands New Mexico the star liner was supposed to spin this week at the international space station but its test flight was cut short after it failed to reach a high enough orbit for

Boeing New Mexico
Schumer requests four witnesses, including Mulvaney and Bolton, in letter to McConnell about Senate impeachment trial

Hidden Brain

00:34 sec | 8 months ago

Schumer requests four witnesses, including Mulvaney and Bolton, in letter to McConnell about Senate impeachment trial

"House of representatives is developed this week on the impeachment of president trump if it's approved the Republican controlled Senate would then hold a trial to determine if president trump should be removed from office minority leader Chuck Schumer sent a letter today that at least four witnesses be called including acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney and former national security adviser John Bolton the president faces two charges abuse of power in efforts to pressure you crane to investigate Democrats and obstruction of Congress in congress' efforts to

Senate Donald Trump Chuck Schumer Mick Mulvaney John Bolton President Trump Congress White House Chief Of Staff
Ex-Sudan strongman al-Bashir gets 2 years for corruption

Hidden Brain

00:35 sec | 8 months ago

Ex-Sudan strongman al-Bashir gets 2 years for corruption

"Sudan's former dictator Omar al Bashir has been sentenced to two years of detention for corruption in pairs either Peralta reports on the controversial ruling as the judge in the case began to read his verdict there was chaos show supporters of a mile this year protesting his conviction they were escorted out by security forces in the judge said he was sentencing Bashir to only two years in detention because of his advanced age but here will also not serve that time in the prison but at a much nicer detention facility with access to his

Sudan Omar Al Bashir Peralta Two Years
Wealthy Businessman Charged in Murder Case That Rocked Malta

Hidden Brain

00:20 sec | 8 months ago

Wealthy Businessman Charged in Murder Case That Rocked Malta

"Malta's prime minister is expected to speak some time today amid calls for his resignation his government is caught up in a political crisis over alleged ties to a wealthy businessman who was charged this weekend as an accomplice to the car bomb killing of an anti corruption journalists and twenty

Malta Prime Minister
British aviation authority says tour operator Thomas Cook ceases trading, cancelling hundreds of thousands of vacations

Hidden Brain

00:29 sec | 11 months ago

British aviation authority says tour operator Thomas Cook ceases trading, cancelling hundreds of thousands of vacations

"One of the world's oldest and largest travel companies has collapsed British authorities say Thomas cook is no longer trading forcing the cancellation of its flights. stranding hundreds of thousands of vacationers around the world the civil aviation authority this issued a statement saying it's attempting to bring people home as soon as possible the company runs hotels resorts and airlines for nineteen million people a year in sixteen countries this is NPR news from

Thomas Cook NPR
Boris Johnson's suspension of Parliament faces challenges

Hidden Brain

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

Boris Johnson's suspension of Parliament faces challenges

"The British prime minister Boris Johnson's plan to spend parliament for about a month before the deadline to leave the European Union is coming under fire this weekend thousands across Britain and Northern Ireland turned out Saturday to protest against the plant opposition lawmakers say they will attempt to pass legislation to block brexit if there is no deal parliament returns from a recess on

Boris Johnson European Union Britain Northern Ireland Prime Minister
No-Deal Brexit Risks Food, Fuel and Drugs Shortages, Leaked U.K. Files Say

Hidden Brain

00:21 sec | 1 year ago

No-Deal Brexit Risks Food, Fuel and Drugs Shortages, Leaked U.K. Files Say

"Britain's Sunday times newspaper is reporting that government forecast project potential shortages of fuel food and medicines in the case of a no deal brexit the paper says that leaked government documents from a civil service report also anticipate disruptions of ports if the UK and the European Union split without an agreement in place to handle

Britain UK European Union
"hidden brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

12:41 min | 1 year ago

"hidden brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"This is hidden brain. I'm shocker data. There's an old saying the best things in life are a legal immoral or fattening. There's another way to think about this many things that give us pleasure sex food adventure. They contain risks as a smart species reap. Come up with ways to minimize those risks condoms, seatbelts drugs to lower cholesterol. But something interesting happens as we do this as we move the risk benefit. Calculation for each activity away from the risk end of the spectrum to the benefit end of the spectrum, we imagine people will become safer seatbelts. For example, we'll keep drivers from getting hurt. Now that would be true, if people kept doing things exactly the way they did before. But some people make another calculation. If putting seatbelts in cars means you are likely to survive, a crash this, now a temptation to go faster. An ocean swim. I go out a little further when a lifeguard is nearby football players who know their heads are protected by helmets might start to hit a little harder. This phenomenon has a curious name economists call it moral hazard. It's a bit of a misnomer because moral hazard has little to do with morality. It's about what happens.

football
"hidden brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"hidden brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"Designer Dr block spot dot com. Thank you for joining me today on hidden brain real. Thank you for having me. This week show was produced by pods Shah. It was edited by Tara boil team includes Jenny Schmidt Rina Cohen Thomas, Lou and Laura Correll. Our unsung hero this week. Is Marco Matera for the past few years Marco has managed soundbites the cafeteria at NPR, he's always upbeat. He remembers people's names. This was Marco's last week at NPR when I talked to him recently. He said he's going to be launching a cafeteria at a new location because he's done. So. Well, here I reminded him that this was the danger of demonstrating competence. Thank you, Michael. One last thing before we wrap today. We're just getting started on an episode about workplace culture. Have you're the witness something troubling or inappropriate at work and struggled with whether to remain silent speak up about it. If you're willing to talk about what happened please record a voice memo on your phone and Email it to us at hidden brain at NPR dot org. Be sure to include a phone number where we can reach you that Email address again is hidden brain at NPR dog Ford. Please use the subject line workplace. I'm Sean Covey done them. And this is NPR. Welcome to the twenty percent or do you see Jesus in the burnt toast? Do you realize that literally there's a bucket conduct by exit? Why is

Marco Matera NPR pods Shah Jenny Schmidt Rina Cohen Thoma Dr block Sean Covey Laura Correll Tara Michael Lou twenty percent
"hidden brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"hidden brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"This is hidden brain. I'm Shankar Danta. Let's say someone wanted to buy one of your eyes. Would you go for it? I wouldn't tell my is no. Because sight is precious. Okay. But would you say, yes? For a million dollars. No, no, no. Because I had a lot of vision problems growing up, and I already have like resolved that I went through Lasix unlike good now, what about ten million dollars. Well. I don't think so. Yeah, I'm going to pass. Yeah. If you said ten million dollars Hillier, I'm building a house and hunters I'm helping to FAM I'm gonna just like have ipads on like slick, Rick and he good. Maybe you're listening to this and thinking, hey, if someone prefers ten million dollars over two is well, that's their business. Or maybe you think commodifying human is in this way is just wrong are hypothetical. Marketplace for is is one example of what he communists sometimes referred to as repugnant transactions. They make us on easy. The four Sastre define the boundaries of what is acceptable to buy and sell they put morality into conflict with economics. He said, I'm gonna pay you hundred zero. If you're going to touch something more on your family court in Hackensack New Jersey's my child. One. Surrogate mother has refused to give up the baby. And I know what she wants what she needs. It's not clear as a site that we want everything that we disapprove of to be against the law..

Shankar Danta Rick Hackensack New Jersey Hillier ten million dollars million dollars
"hidden brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"hidden brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"And I'd Gordon Reid is a historian and law professor at Harvard University. We've been talking today about her book co authored with Peter own off most blessed of the patriarchs Thomas Jefferson and the empire of the imagination. And that thank you for joining us today on hidden. Thank you for asking me. This week show was produced an edited by Tara boil pot Shah and commit of ARGUS Restrepo team includes Johnny Schmidt Raina Cohen Thomas, Lou and Laura chorale. The today show included performances by Sean Casey, Thomas, Jefferson did as the market laugh yet and Jason fuller as Israel Gillette Jefferson special. Thanks to Brock and Brian Dunne. Our unsung heroes this week public radio stations around the country as many of you now NPR is part of the public radio universe. And our success depends on the viability of public radio stations around the country in one of the episodes of hidden brain, the psychologists caught plows talked about the role of reciprocal action in daily life human beings allowed to reciprocate when someone gives you a gift you feel obliged to give them a gift if someone hose the door open for you. You feel like holding the door open for them. If we have shared things value with you over the last several months on hidden brain today. I ask you to reciprocate by going to donate dot NPR. Dot org slash hidden brain once again, that's donate dot NPR dot org slash hidden brain and make a contribution today. I'm Sean curvy. Danton and this is NPR. This is Terry gross. The host of fresh air. We do long-form interviews with the people behind the best books. Pop culture journalism and more. So you can get to know the people whose work you love you'll find fresh air on NPR one or wherever you get your podcasts.

NPR Thomas Jefferson Johnny Schmidt Raina Cohen Tho Israel Gillette Jefferson Gordon Reid Sean curvy Harvard University ARGUS Restrepo Sean Casey Terry gross professor Peter plows Danton Jason fuller Brock Brian Dunne Laura chorale Lou
"hidden brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"hidden brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"This is hidden brain. I'm Sean curvy Dont'a. All nations. Of the midnight. I'll bet on stories India awake tonight. Stories about ideals, renames, invented other essence. The values around which people stake their identity again. No. Can fight on the beaches. I the lending Ron might still be my that's what it means to be a strategy. Godson? All right. Thank you. Often. These stories contained contradictions. Some so profound that most of us simply look the other way. The United States has its own set of founding Mets and its own set of contradictions. One of the most tracking unfolded in seventeen seventy six at a house on the southwest corner of seventh and market streets in Philadelphia. That summer Thirty-three-year-old Thomas Jefferson rented rooms at this house while he was there. He wrote the document that would formalize America's split from Britain the declaration of independence. It says we hold these truths to be self evident that all men are created equal that they are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights that among these liberty and the pursuit of happiness and the pursuit of happiness. And yet even as he was writing. These inspiring words that to secure these rights Jefferson's was attended on by a slave. He was a fourteen year old boy named Robert Hemmings. Jefferson, in fact owned hundreds of slaves. He fathered six children with an enslaved woman. Today, we take a deep dive into history as a window into psychology. We look closely at the life and beliefs of a man who shaped the modern.

Thomas Jefferson Sean curvy Robert Hemmings India United States Ron Philadelphia America Britain Thirty-three-year fourteen year
"hidden brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"hidden brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"This is hidden brain. I'm Shankar Viet. Danton we've been talking today about gender and about our long running debates over the role of biology versus culture for many years. These debates have largely assumed that gender is a binary, male and female, but even a science struggles to understand the male brain and a female brain some people are challenging the reality of those fundamental categories. Jamie shoop is in the vanguard of that movement. Jimmy just pulled into Carson city Nevada up roaming around a west for the past few months in a small Campo booked on top of a pickup truck. So basically were in what's called a truck camper on it's approximately seventeen feet long weighs about three thousand pounds. In other words, heavy and small, but also officiant we've got a microwave and Ave was those view double sink small bathroom with a shower. Jamie's at ease in this desert town clad in jeans, a flowing blouse and headscarf the campus has been traveling a lot of late. But for now Jamie's biggest Joanie is over a rocky trip over the landscape of gender identity. I think the best way to frame this and understand it is to just think of me as very fluid Jimmy lives between the sexes Jamie thinks of himself or herself. But if DEM cells, I can be masculine I can defend it, and I can do anything. I won't Jim. The first officially recognized non gender person in America. It was a status that had to be fought. For and won. It came after five decades struggle a struggle to find an identity that fast right now fifty four years old Jamie was born in Washington DC and raised in a large blue collar family in rural southern Maryland. It was a place of tobacco farms and deep conservative views. This is a place where the kid the black kids that I cut tobacco with dirty the during the summer, they weren't allowed in the farmers houses because they were black. I mean. I mean, it was that kind of place there. There were no gay people were transpeople football because of being called smeared. The queer Jamie was different and didn't fit in with the boys as a teenager. I was reading fashion magazines into doing things like putting I remember what occasions I had written article about putting manny's egg in your hair to make it soft in my mother. Absolutely. Just went ballistic over that and slapped me and called me Assissi. Jamie's mother also lost it when the teenager refused to get a short haircut. And instead got a Perm at just wanted to feel more feminine. So this was Jamie's dilemma he had a male body. But inside there was also a she with all this femininity flowing about romantically. Jamie was drawn to both boys and girls, but this was the late nineteen seventies. So Jamie Toco girl to the Queen of hearts downs and drove a big wheel Camaro and cut tobacco and fast. Nothing at all like a real boy. Yeah. I mean, I have never been connected to identify as a male never agreed that I wasn't male. And yeah, I just had no connection to to masculinity. But it's same time. I knew what the boundaries were. And I knew what the punishment was. And I just kind of went along with things off to high school with no money and few options Jamie, enter the army trained is a mechanic, it meant more going along with things you military is a world of testosterone.

Jamie Jamie shoop Jamie Toco Jimmy Shankar Viet Danton Carson city Nevada Maryland America Campo testosterone manny football Washington three thousand pounds fifty four years seventeen feet five decades
"hidden brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

06:44 min | 2 years ago

"hidden brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"This message comes from NPR sponsor. Zoom. Video communications. Videoconferencing has changed the way we do business, meet happy anytime, anywhere with zone, connecting team members across the globe. Imagine seeing up to forty nine people on the screen at once in digital video, share anything a file video of photo via desktop, laptop, tablet, or mobile visit. Zoom dot US to set up your free account today and meet happy with zoom video communications, zoom dot US. This is Terry gross, the hosta fresh air. The Emmys are approaching. So this week we're doing a special series of EMMY nominees and people from nominated shows like Lanta Saturday Night, Live last week tonight, an insecure. So check out this week's EMMY series on fresh air. This is hidden brain Shankar. Dont'a searching Atocha Juande has quite literally written the book on the power of checklist to help us grapple with complicated tasks, but it was a time not long ago when oughta would routinely perform complex surgery without a checklist. Sometimes he wouldn't even know all the people he was working alongside in the operating room. I would just walk in. It was kind of expected to be silent place where people didn't ask a lot of questions. They're supposed to know what they're doing and then you just proceed. And then when something goes wrong, you'd be like, you know, why didn't you guys know what the hell you're doing and either you know, that kind of ridiculous. Lack of preparation was the typical story to Johns Hopkins physician pita provost became interested early in his career in the routines assumptions embedded in medicine. How much was the success of surgeon about talent and training? How much of it was about having str-. Wrong procedures and teamwork to began to look for answers to those questions done a study with several other researchers. While I was in my training where I got to look at data from a team that had gathered information from hospitals across Utah, Colorado, and they were looking at people who had had a major complication or death during a hospital admission and found two things in examining the data. Two thirds of the patients who had a major disability or death as a bad outcome from their care where surgical patients. And Furthermore, I found at least two thirds of those patients turned out to have died from a problem where we had the answer but did necks acute on it. In fact, it was very tiny percentage of patients who had a major disability or death that was due a problem that. We hadn't discovered the answer for. It was mostly problem of lack of execution, people suffering and in some cases dying because social teams will making preventable errors. Overlooking basic steps that could make an operation. Safer ought to realize that the unsexy task of developing better surgical procedures was actually the most important worke do volume of surgery had exploded around the world as people lived longer to more than three hundred million operations worldwide, one for every twenty twenty two or so human beings, but the death rates, pretend to one hundred times higher than in childbirth. So that meant that we needed to look at this as a public health problem. Auto started looking more deeply the problem he was intrigued by the study, pita prone avoid had conducted Michigan Peter at found that using a checklist could dramatically reduce catheter infections. Auto decided to develop checklist for surgical teams. We worked with a variety of teams experts in anesthesia, infectious disease, surgery, nursing, and so on. He also went to Seattle to meet with airline safety experts at Boeing, and one of the key points that the Boeing folks emphasized to us is that has to fit into the workflow and cannot be a distraction from the core things you're doing and make matters worse. So if you're launching a rocket to the two into space, you have all the time in the world you you get one shot at this thing, right? Whereas we do fifty million operations per year in the United States. We have a lot of people we have to take care of. If we, you know, if we only get through half of them, we have a whole lot of people who end up being harmed along the way. So we set some terms around this, you we have. We have two minutes total for check before the patients put to sleep check before the incisions made in check before the person leaves the. Room and then can we run through it in such a way that you're denting the killer items you want to chunk it because you know the the brain can only handle five to nine items at a time. And so we had a chunk it into components that allow people to run through it in a reasonable way while having potentially emergency patient on the table in front of you, once he had a basic checklist in hand, it was time to test it out. So declaims in eight cities around the world agreed to give it a try, rural Tanzania, a city hospital in Delhi to some of the wealthiest places. He really Washington medical center in Seattle Saint Mary's hospital in London, Toronto General Hospital. And in every hospital, you had a reduction in complications. The average reduction complications was thirty five percent reduction in deaths was forty, seven percent, if forty. So. Seven percent reduction in debts checklists that seemed could be as powerful in a surgical setting as they were reducing catheter infections since to publish those findings checkless become astounded pot of surgeries in hospitals around the world, including the hospital where it'll works. Operating rooms, Brigham and women's hospital in Boston, a crowded and busy places. You have lots of surgical equipment and monitors and lots of people in motion. I'll go on to a group of colleagues preparing to perform surgery that patient is a woman named Heather Parsons. They're reviewing Heather's medical history and the plan for her surgery. One member of the team OSs, Heather, to confirm the procedure they're about to before.

Heather Parsons EMMY Seattle Boeing NPR Terry gross Atocha Juande pita provost Toronto General Hospital Johns Hopkins Michigan Lanta United States Boston Tanzania Brigham Utah Peter
"hidden brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"hidden brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"Silence. This episode was produced by Raina Cohen. Anted by Tara oil stuff includes Jenny Schmidt part Shah and Matthew, shh watts. We had original music composed by Rahm teen Arab Louis special, thanks to a meal and Finnbogason who read the poll to on the show. Our unsung hero this week is Gina Vasco. She's a teacher at the United Nations international school in New York. She helped us arrange interviews with the group of seventh and eighth grade boys. She kindly managed a long string of emails as you coordinated between our producer students and their parents. Thank you. Gina, if you like the show, here's one important thing you can do for us and one important thing you can do for yourself. Tell one friend about our show and strike up a conversation with one stranger this week. If you can't think of anything else to say us them, hey, do you listen to hidden brain tennis? What happens next on Facebook. Twitter or Instagram? Before we go, we're working on another episode about relationships. We're looking at the effects of diversity on creativity, working with people who are different than you can have both upsides and downsides. If you had a special collaboration with someone very different, especially someone who grew up in a different country, we want to hear from you. We want to hear the story of your relationship moments of great friction moments of transcendent partnership, record, voice memo and email it to us at hidden brain at NPR dot org or leave us a message at seven, seven one, six, six, two, seven, two, four, six that seven seven one six brain. I'm shocker danton. See you next week. What at the take to start something from nothing and what does it take? The actually build it. I'm guy Roz every week of how I built this, speak with founders behind some of the most inspiring companies in the world. Find it on NPR one or wherever you get your podcasts.

Gina Vasco NPR Raina Cohen Rahm Tara oil Jenny Schmidt Facebook Twitter Louis Roz Finnbogason Shah danton New York United Nations producer Matthew
"hidden brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"hidden brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"This episode was produced by maggie penman attira boil themselves excellent communicators by staff includes prot show rain echoing jenny schmidt and rene cloud our unsung heroes this week are surely surat ski emily johnson and any at lanes of the jcc surely elliott and emily helped us deep our conversation with alan alda at one point one we were playing video clips from allen's acting career we had some technical difficulties with the projector it wouldn't turn off after playing the clips so surely held a cardboard ups mehler in front of that project here for the next sixty minutes to ensure the audience wasn't distracted by a square fox of night over the stage if that is in the south less of an unsung hero i don't know what his for more hidden brain follow the show on facebook twitter instagram and listen to my stories on your local public radio station if you like this show please communicated to a friend tell people about hidden brain and asked them to subscribe to our show i'm schenker of atlanta and this is npr in a few weeks just in time for valentine's day hidden brain is going to turn its attention to another way we communicate with one another and relate to our closest partners now way now it is won't win loss took their vow to die that's right marriage whether you couple up or not this episode about longterm relationships will give you new insight about your love life i think if we think about.

jenny schmidt emily johnson alan alda allen schenker atlanta maggie penman elliott facebook npr valentine sixty minutes
"hidden brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"hidden brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"Now was amy man reading one art by elizabeth bishop amy was at npr to perform it ted leo for the alsons considered podcast this episode was produced by lucy perkins maggie penman and karamaga kalasin a team includes jennifer schmidt parts shah riina cohen and rene klar are supervising producer is tara boil one last thing before we go we're working on an episode about the revolution that is unfolding before our eyes against sexual harassment we're thinking about a story that asks why now what has changed in the moment to cost so many women to come forward and so many institutions to take a hard look at themselves if you have a story or a theory you'd like to share with us recorded voice memo and send it to us at hidden brain at npr dot org that's hidden brain one word at npr dot org you can also calling lewis a message at six six one seven seven two seven two four six that six six one seven seven brain for more hidden brain follow the show on facebook twitter instagram and make sure to subscribe to our podcast if you know a friend who like to listen to our show please make it a point to send them an email or walkover and knock on the door some folks who don't know how to set up their podcast apps might need a moment of help please give it to them i am shankar vidalia them i hope you have a happy new year i'll see you next week.

elizabeth bishop amy npr lucy perkins rene klar harassment ted leo maggie penman jennifer schmidt shah riina cohen supervising producer lewis facebook
"hidden brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"hidden brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"This is hidden brain i'm shankar viet anthem this week on the show we're looking at the specific moments people liu something big and how that change can point them in new directions before the break derek amato told us a story of how he became a musician after a head injury before the accident he couldn't play the piano but after his musical talent was just undeniable if this is the first time you're hearing our show i have a confession to make i am a cardcarrying rationalised when surprising things happen i don't call the miracles i look for explanations derricks very charming historians amazing but i found myself asking over and over how something like this could happen that's when i came by a couple of researchers who spend years studying people who've suddenly acquired savant like gifts darrow trafford is a psychiatrist in wisconsin he studied derek and i must say that in his case i am unit was stirred lose you oh about the fact that he went to the piano in new we're to places thinkers and so forth the the reason that i am inclined to accept that is because i've seen at in in some of these other cases on a although probably not quite as abrupt is he but and to me at least that having seen audits of arms when i cease summit is acquired swan cases it it is really quite jari i don't know if you remember what derycke said about his injury he leapt across the swimming pool for the football and when he came down hard he heard what sounded like an explosion and i miscalculated the dap obviously and i hit the upper left side of my face the left side of his face that's an important clue in journal in sabban syndrome itself whether congenital or acquired other tends to be a more left brain injury.

derek amato wisconsin derycke football sabban syndrome
"hidden brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"hidden brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"The you're listening to hidden brain shankar vaidyanathan this is npr support for this npr podcast in the following message comes from the ford foundation working with visionaries on the front lines of social change worldwide to address inequality in all its forms learn more at ford foundation dot org this is hidden brain i'm shankar via thought them with brexit and the election of donald trump tim we've had populist revolutions on both sides of the atlantic that reject the advice of scientists and economists experts in general democracy of courses famously messy could you remind people why it's such a good thing but i think in in both cases i tried to remind myself of keith jarrett's unplayable piano actually took to me the brexit vote felt like an unplayable piano the expert consensus in the uk was that this was not a very good idea the british people disagreed with the experts and so they voted to leave and so i thought to myself okay well this is going to pose all kinds of obstacles and all kinds of difficulties in what ways might they actually turned to our advantage so not not to try to be foolishly optimistic in the face of disappointment will was disappointment for a lot of people but to said well as a there's there's an opportunity and everything what are the solutions that we look for going forward and i think that's an important thing to bear in mind whenever we are faced with an obstacle it's easy to get frustrated but we should then say okay how how is this going to make me stronger how is this gonna make my society stronger what are the solutions that are gonna come out of disappointment there is a section in the book about donald trump's campaigning style and i said he is a master of using chaos to his advantage one of the interesting parallels between trump's campaign and the brexit vote in the uk is that the brexit vote in the uk there were two different leave campaigns and they hate each other they were taking legal action against each other they actively contradicted each other this may sound familiar i don't know you would think that that's a disadvantage turns out to be an advantage.

ford foundation keith jarrett uk donald trump npr ford
"hidden brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"hidden brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"After the break we'll go to a psychology lab that's trying to help people bounced back from interruptions more easily all it takes is a little electricity you should start deals something pretty soon you're on red impaling of very very mild tingling that's coming up in just a moment i'm shankar diet anthem and you're listening to hidden bray this is npr support for this npr podcast in the following message comes from the ford foundation working with visionaries on the front lines of social change worldwide to address inequality in all its forms learn morefordfoundationorg this is hidden brain i'm shankar vaidyanathan owner in the show i talked to the computer science professor can newport about how important and rare it is these days to carve out time for uninterrupted work he shed some ideas about how to develop deep attention these ideas no surprise require a real commitment and resolve so i decided to explore a short got a few months ago i was driving to virginia for an interview and i was doing the opposite of the work virginia ethics twenty less brought up well asian which is the i was watching the road paying attention to gps directions and i was listening to an interview i'd conducted years ago with a researcher erich lumper i was on my way to an interview with one of eric's colleagues and i need to reform militarized myself with the material so the irony here of forces that i am heading to an interview about interruptions while being constantly interrupted the interview i was going to was about how to deal with interruptions and distractions now there's no question i'd love to do my deep thinking and the kinds of places can newport descried places like karl young's lakeside house in the swiss countryside or jake enrolling sweet in edinburgh but since have chosen a life in public radio i need something a little more i was gonna say cheap but what are we save a practical dutch were eric and his colleague melissa shout drip come in their exploring the relatively simple solution to the problem of interruptions in overwork basically you run a small electrical current through a part of the brain and while it's easier to manage interruptions it's now your census.

bray ford foundation professor erich lumper eric edinburgh npr shankar vaidyanathan computer science newport virginia gps researcher karl young jake melissa
"hidden brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"hidden brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"This is hidden brain i'm shankar v dont'a every year many students who have overcome daunting obstacles in high school received good news they've been accepted to college many of them are lowincome students with outstanding academic track records and they represent a success story the american dream made real with hard work students who don't have a lot of advantages can bootstrap their way into higher education and a better life only it doesn't always work out there eat with which kids who are college intending do not actually get to college in the fall is surprisingly high this is lindsay page and education researcher at harvard in one sample that we look at in the boston area we find that efforts of twenty percent of kids who at the time of high school graduation say that there continue in onto college about twenty percent of those hits don't actually show up in the fall twenty percent among lowincome kids that number is even higher they're getting tripped up somehow right at the finish line researchers called us phenomenen summer melt for universities it's long been a puzzling problem because these are the kids who made it big took the sats they got good grades they took ap classes did their extracurricular activities they wrote that college essays they've often applied for and received financial aid why would they show up at college in the summer between high school graduation and what would be timely college matriculation they're falling off track.

american dream researcher harvard financial aid shankar lindsay boston twenty percent
"hidden brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"hidden brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"Hi there juncker here were halted work on a bunch of upcoming shows so this week we thought we bring your favorite from our archives we hope you enjoy the episode if you like me you know this feeling maybe you're in a party or you're walking down the street and suddenly out of a sea of passing faces one of them lights up looking right at you this portion stats waving says hello this person is glad to see you and you you have no idea who you're looking at who this is hidden brain i'm shankar vida today on the show when talking about faces recognizing faces is a crucial skill it so crucial that there are regions of the brain devoted to facial recognition but all your mind is amazing at identifying your boyfriend or your child in a crowd there are important limits to this ability some of us like me are extremely batuta some of us a terrific on today's show we look at some people who are on opposite ends of the spectrum and talk about how our ability to recognize faces has broad implications in our lives support for this podcast and the following message comes from american express open hidden brain makes complicated scientific ideas simple and understandable that's would american express open wants to do for business visit opencom to see how they can help with money and knowhow so you can get past the complexity and get business done.

shankar vida