35 Burst results for "Hewlett Packard"

"hewlett packard" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:52 min | 2 months ago

"hewlett packard" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Bloomberg business app and at Bloomberg quick tape. This is a Bloomberg business flash. From Bloomberg world, headquarters, I'm Charlie pallett several Silicon Valley companies out with earnings, crowd strike holdings, the cybersecurity company forecast revenue for the fourth quarter and that guidance missed the average channel estimate after ours right now. We've got CrowdStrike plunging by 17%. Software maker Intuit has cut its revenue guidance for the full year. That guidance missed average analyst estimate that the stock down after hours by about 2.2%. HPE Hewlett Packard Enterprise projected revenue for the current quarter that beat analyst expectations. Hewlett Packard Enterprise after ours up by about 2.9%. Also reporting after the close of trading, we heard from workday, it's out with adjusted EPS for the third quarter that did beat the average analyst estimate. Turned out to be an update for the Dow Jones Industrial Average, eking out a three point gain today up by less than one tenth of 1%. S&P though, down 6, so drop there of two tenths of 1% as stack down 65 at a decline there of 6 tenths of 1%. Stocks paired most of their losses with traders unwilling to make big bets ahead of Jay Powell's speech tomorrow. Yes, we will have that for you live right here on Bloomberg radio. Tenure yield 3.74% the two year 4.47% spot gold 1749 the ounce up by about 5 tenths of 1%, Bitcoin up 1.8%, 16,482 on Bitcoin and West Texas intermediate crude gained 1.8% 78 64 barrel. So again, recapping stocks finished mixed off session lows on the S&P down by 6 points that was a gain of about that was a loss of about two tenths of 1%. I'm Charlie palette and that is a Bloomberg business flash. All

Bloomberg Charlie pallett crowd strike holdings Hewlett Packard Enterprise Silicon Valley Intuit Hewlett Packard Jay Powell West Texas Charlie palette S
"hewlett packard" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:24 min | 2 months ago

"hewlett packard" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Hewlett Packard Enterprise and NetApp. Again, recapping we do have the Dow higher up one tenth 1% S&P little change down less than one tenth of 1%. I'm Charlie palette that is a Bloomberg business flash. All right, Charlie, great setup, really appreciate that. All right, let's get to our market drivers report. And let's set the business week agenda on this Tuesday, create a group that anchor and markets correspondent at Bloomberg here in our interactive brokers studio along with Gina Martin Adams, chief equity strategist at Bloomberg intelligence, as we mentioned. Both actually in our Bloomberg interactive broker studio. Let's start with you bouncing around a little bit. Douse in the green. We're moving up here and we're off our lows, but what's interesting about today's trade? That's a really hard question because you've got to find something interesting. There's tell me there's something. There is something interesting. And I think it's actually, I'm going to get a little nerdy here, but deal with me, if you will, or bear with me. He asked me 500 is now flat on the session. You've seen some pretty wonky moves earlier this morning, volume was completely off off by like ten, 20%. And as you've kind of gone through today, volume was kind of come back up, which I think is an interesting take, but the entire day, the NASDAQ volume has been higher by like 20%. And I go by the 5 day average, so I'm obviously looking relative to last week and Thanksgiving and slow trading. So to see the S&P 500 actually with less volume and less participation, a little bit of complacency in my mind, relative to the NASDAQ, which is having some very wild swings, really tells you there's a little bit of a China hangover. And I think that's what you're seeing kind of way on Apple shares, Tesla, and video, which even though you have this kind of narrative of China reopening and perhaps dealing with more vaccinations and really addressing some of the concerns that fuel the protests over the weekend. The market isn't buying it. And I think that's, I think that's the story today. Investors are buying the Chinese names that you hear in the United States, so it's funny the difference. I was just gonna say it's kind of a tale of two different kinds of companies with exposure to China. Hey, Gina Martin Adams, come on in here. I mean, you know, talk of volume on the S&P kind of just makes me think is everyone just sitting back waiting to hear from Powell tomorrow. You know, a 5 day volume average, I'm not sure we really want to read too much into that over considering it includes the Thanksgiving holiday. I think that volume is always somewhat suspicious to read into, frankly, volume's been contracting on the S&P 500 for basically 20 years. So I tend not to read a ton into that. We're just chilling. I mean, there's just fewer Trish, fewer shares to exchange, right? Some of it is just a dearth of IPOs, the evolution of private versus public markets, private securities, buybacks, shrink the amount of shares outstanding as well. You've also got just the dynamics of trading are very different. How many people retail investors really trade single names today versus 20, 30 years ago. So I tend not to read too much into volume. I think what's probably really catching my radar today is just the sector dispersion is pretty significant once again, energy leading, leading the rally, kind of investors sort of leaning on early cyclicals like industrials and financials says a lot. Our sector scorecard came out this morning and is starting to point toward a cyclical recovery in 2023 with sectors like industrials and financials filtering to the top. Some of the more defensive segments like utilities and tech still sitting at the bottom of the scorecard. So I think the trade is really a rotation internally more than anything else. I am curious about earnings estimates coming down or what are we seeing in terms of that for the next earnings round. Yeah. I think we're going to continue to see us negative estimate revision kind of nag at the index. We came out in September though and said that as of the September lows the market was already pricing recession. So it's just a matter of degree now, which helps to helps to kind of explore. Stocks have already priced a pretty significant slowdown coming that helps explain why we've been able to generally ignore negative estimate revision in fits and starts. There are segments of the market where analysts are still far too optimistic. I would call out tech as one of those segments. And so that's still a pretty significant danger. But in general, analyst estimates are pretty close to in line with ours. There still is some downward estimate revision to come for segments, but for the market at large, we're pretty close to there. Hey, creedy weighing on commodities oil specifically right now. I know you've been watching it closely. Yeah, I think it's really important when we talk about the China story, but also if it's moving in tandem with the stock market as well. You want to see the risk assets kind of rallied together and so far you have had that dispersion, higher commodity prices means higher inflation means lower stocks. So I think in the past a couple of weeks, you kind of seen this return to where they move together, which I think is a positive sign, but for now, Brent crude, we're looking at an 84 handle nymex at 78 yesterday, that was as low as getting into the 60s for nymex crew. So I think this could be a real game changer in terms of lowest prices since 2021. Right, and now we're back by like $10. It's a pretty drastic move when you look at the oil space and I think that might be your biggest indicator of how people are pricing in a recession, a recovery, the China story, the OPEC story. There's a lot going on. I think December 4th, so I think going into next week is when you're going to have another OPEC meeting. And anything can happen. When it comes to J Powell Gina, what are you and your team kind of focusing on here? There's a number of things that I'm focusing on. The biggest thing, I

Gina Martin Adams Bloomberg Hewlett Packard Enterprise Charlie palette Bloomberg intelligence China S NetApp Charlie Tesla buybacks Trish Powell Apple creedy United States Brent crude
"hewlett packard" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:54 min | 5 months ago

"hewlett packard" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"And consumer confidence and Best Buy in Hewlett Packard Enterprise among companies scheduled to report earnings today. That's a Bloomberg business flash. Now here's Michael Barr with more on what's going on around the world. Michael good morning. Good morning, Karen. Ukrainian forces launched ground assaults in the Kershaw region of southern Ukraine. It comes as inspectors add to the nuclear plant to the northeast from the latest offensive. President Joe Biden plans to deliver a prime time speech Thursday in Philadelphia, sailing Republicans for what he regards as their threats to U.S. rights and freedom. Retirement will have to wait at the U.S. open Serena Williams advanced after her first round win last night over at Nantucket COVID, and baseball the Yankees lost to the angels four three, but Aaron judge, it is 50th home run of the season, judge became one of ten players in major league history, with multiple 50 Homer seasons. All right, AA run. The Red Sox and giants lost. Global news, 24 hours a day on air and on Bloomberg quicktake, powered by more than 2700 journalists and analysts more than a 120 countries. I'm Michael Barr and this is Bloomberg, Nathan. The verdict is in. Thank you, Michael. We're coming up to 5 20 on Wall Street live from the Bloomberg interactive broker studios. This is Bloomberg daybreak. We want to turn now to politics because as Michael mentioned, we are expecting a rare prime time speech from President Biden later on this week that really could set the tone for the midterm elections. Bloomberg government reporter, Emily Wilkins joins us now. Emily, good morning, as Michael mentioned, the president is expected to blast Republicans in this address. What more do we know about what the president plans to say on Thursday night? So Biden is dusting off his 2020 playbook. He's going to come in and start talking again about the battle for the soul of the nation. He's going to slam Republicans for what he says is a threat to U.S. rights and freedoms. I think abortion rights think things that deal with elections, access to elections, access to the ballot box, and think as well. The addressing the fact that there are still some Republican candidates out there, as well as some Republicans who have continually pushed the false claim that the 2020 election was stolen. And so expect Biden to mention all of that, this is coming at a point where things are looking up for the Democrats. It's still going to be a stretch for them to potentially hold the house with things are looking much better for them to continue to hold the Senate. Biden's poll numbers have ticked slightly up. They were in the low of July. There's still only a 44%. So less than 50, but once again, better than they were. And so this is really a moment where Biden's trying to seize the momentum to get out there to be in front of the American people. And the message that he's pushing, this isn't a new one. Democrats have been talking about the maga Republicans in the threat that Republicans pose a really for months at this point. And I think that the fact the president's really getting out there on the campaign trail kind of shows that we're at the point where things are very much shifting from thoughts of legislating to thoughts of campaigning were really going to see things get underway after Labor Day. It is interesting though, because as you mentioned, the Democrats are sort of writing this wave of momentum that's driven in large part one could argue by the legislative wins that Democrats have seen over the last several weeks. Is there a risk for the president to sort of go back to this message of Republicans being anti democratic, the semi fascism line that a number of Republicans have seized on is going too far? I mean, certainly there are always going to be criticisms of the president after any sort of speech. And I think that there's definitely debate to be had over exactly how far there should go. Biden came in and really expressed himself as a president who was going to be bipartisan who was going to work across the aisle. He does have some things he can point to, right? He has that infrastructure Bill. He has the semiconductor Bill, both of those were done with bipartisan support. At the same point, when Democrats look at their strategy and look at the playbook, what they see is that what they really need to do is kind of cast the Republican Party as just something that's not in the best interest of Americans. Republicans, of course, have pushed back, saying that if you look at high inflation prices, you look at gas prices that are still way too high. This is the Democrats full, and they are going to rally behind a number of policies to really help the economy. They've been very focused on the issues. When I've talked to Republican candidates and tried to get them to talk about the 2020 election or abortion, they're very quite quickly pivot back to the overall agenda. And that's what Republicans are really banking on in their messaging. And our last minute here, Emily, we've had a pretty significant geopolitical development word of a pretty sizable arms sale coming from the U.S. to Taiwan. Yeah, we are hearing that the State Department is prepared to sell $1.1 billion in missiles and radar support to Taiwan. Now, Congress has to sign off on this package, but it's very likely that they're going to do so given the wide bipartisan support we've seen from Taiwan. I mean, we've seen democratic senator Ed Markey go there. We've seen Republican senator Marsha Blackburn go there just in the recent weeks. And of course, there was a speaker Pelosi's historic trip earlier this month. So you're really seeing this wide support. And this comes at a time where China and the relationship between Beijing and Washington has really ratcheted up in terms of tension. China has continued to send warships and aircrafts to the Taiwan strait on a daily basis, and you're seeing this willingness for Congress to continue to engage, even though tensions in the region have been particularly high even before speaker Pelosi's trap and certainly afterwards. Thanks, Emily, good having gone with us this morning. Bloomberg government reporter Emily Wilkins keeping track of all the developments for us from the nation's capital. Looking at developments on Wall Street futures are bouncing back. We've got S&P futures up 32 points right now, Dow futures higher by 209. NASDAQ futures up a 134 points in the ten year treasury is up 1130 seconds now, the yield 3.06%. Coming up more on the market recovery and why one prominent fed voice is saying he's happy about the two day market slide. That's all straight ahead on Bloomberg daybreak. This is a Bloomberg money minute. Inflation may be eating away buying power, but the real time inequality tracker developed by University of California economists finds the bottom half of U.S. households in terms of wealth or in their strongest relative financial position in a generation. The tracker finds households with a net worth of $166,000 or less before the pandemic saw their inflation adjusted wealth grow by nearly 3% through the first 6 months of the year. The Federal Trade Commission is suing an Idaho data broker, the suit

Michael Barr Biden Bloomberg Michael Hewlett Packard Enterprise Bloomberg government President Joe Biden Emily Wilkins Nantucket COVID Bloomberg interactive broker s President Biden U.S. Kershaw Serena Williams Emily Best Buy Taiwan Ukraine Red Sox
"hewlett packard" Discussed on Rocketship.fm

Rocketship.fm

07:44 min | 6 months ago

"hewlett packard" Discussed on Rocketship.fm

"Business movers is a podcast from wondering that dives deep into the most successful companies and corporate visionaries of all time. Behind each household name is a story of the difficult decision strong leadership and strokes of luck that made them who they are. In an all new season, business movers looks at the 2006 HB spying scandal. For decades Hewlett Packard has been one of Silicon Valley's most esteemed tech giants. Then, in 2006, a boardroom scandal threatened to bring the company's carefully built reputation, crashing down. When sensitive information from Hewlett Packard board means was leaked to the press, HP chairwoman, Patricia Dunn, hired a team of outside investigators to find the source. These investigations use highly illegal methods. They impersonated board members. They followed people and even dug through their trash. When the board catches on, done is faced with accusations of spying and potential prosecution. Business movers has this incredible story of corporate espionage. Listen to business movers on Apple podcasts, Amazon music, or wherever you listen. You can listen early and ad free by subscribing to wondery plus in Apple podcast or the wondery app. We want to take a moment to address the Supreme Court decision to overturn roe V wade. A decision that stripped away the right to have a safe and legal abortion. Criminalizing abortions threatens all Americans, though seeking a safe procedure, those medical professionals performing the procedure and those who benefit from the procedure, including men. This decision encourages the loss of other rights. It's only a matter of time, and how can you help? Go to pod voices dot help. Before the break we were discussing the release of donkey Kong in their move to the home console, releasing the Famicom in Japan. And the U.S. market was in a state of fluctuation, both arcades and Atari, the largest home console maker. They were suffering from releasing too many overpriced, low quality games. Here's another clip from CNBC's rise of Nintendo. A lot of people at the time said, you know, Nintendo, you missed the boat here, you know. You guys don't know what you're doing, but that's also exactly why they succeeded is because the market was at the perfect point for them to come in and completely take over. So Nintendo reworked the Famicom, gave it a new housing, renamed it the Nintendo Entertainment System, or NES, and released it in North America in 1985. The Nintendo Entertainment System. Now you're playing with power. And one of the big shifts they made in their marketing was positioning Nintendo as a toy, not as a video game. They actually package the original Nintendo with a toy robot named robbed further this point. Here's Trisha hirschberger, a gaming host and creator. Nintendo was the one who said we're going to make this for kids. We're going to do a heavy marketing push for toys, get it out of electronics because nobody's buying it in electronics. So in 1986, the Nintendo was the hottest toy in the market. Then, again, in 1987. Interactive or video games will lead the holiday charge to the cash register. Retailers overwhelming choice for the season's biggest hit will once again be the Nintendo entertainment system. They're exciting and challenge in it's fun. Challenging each other with two player games. The key to their success in overtaking Atari who just a couple years before held 88% of the home console market was the quality of their games. They moved from shooting the alien space invader style into the immersive games like The Legend of Zelda and Super Mario Brothers. Here's a 1988 clip from an NBC story on the topic. The total market at retail in 1988 is some $2.3 billion in a hardware sense. It's probably about 18 and a half million pieces of hardware in 1988. And of that, Nintendo has just an excess of 80% of those customers. Now, you mentioned Super Mario Brothers. That's right. Their flagship game on the Nintendo console. Now the Mario character was actually from another Nintendo arcade game donkey Kong and even donkey Kong junior, except at that time he was known as jumpman. That's right. In donkey Kong junior, Mario, as we now have named him, puts donkey Kong in a cage and donkey Kong junior needs to save his father from him. Both were actually huge hits. He had Nintendo was actually pushing donkey Kong as the breakout star of their company, licensing them on everything they could. Even allowing coleco to create a console version of the donkey Kong game. But then Universal Studios, which own the rights of another great ape, King Kong, they sued Nintendo in 1982, alleging that donkey Kong infringed on their King Kong copyright, Nintendo easily prevailed in the case, which was closed in 1983, determining that a previous ruling had already set precedence that the rights to King Kong were actually in the public domain. Soon after Mario branched out on its own in the arcade version of Mario Brothers, a simplified version, more in line with donkey Kong style play than Super Mario Brothers. But when Nintendo began making games for the home console, they took the Mario character and this idea of a plumber who could travel through pipes and created the most expansive and immersive game created at the time, Super Mario Brothers. People who were used to donkey Kong and defender style games had never experienced anything like it. And it captured the imagination of kids and adults across the world. And to this day, Super Mario Brothers by unit of sale is still the bestselling Mario game of all time pushing over 40 million units. Followed closely by Mario kart Wii. Now, we don't have time to cover all of Nintendo's hits in Super Mario Brothers, but this is a fascinating journey through a company that's been around for over a 130 years. And through various forms of leadership and has been able to continue to evolve and grow. Yes, I love the lesson of spending 5 years in R&D trying all types of strange ideas to see what was able to pick up traction. Yeah, and the fact that they eventually landed in a place that wasn't actually too far from where they began, but a more modernized version of what was core to the company, games, absolutely. So that's all for this week's episode. We'll see you here next week on rocket ship. Thanks so much for listening to rocket ship FM rocket ship FM now has a premium ad free fee. All you have to do is go to glow forward slash rocket ship and subscribe. It helps support the show and it gives you an ad free experience to actually get an exclusive feed that you can listen to on iTunes or wherever you listen to your podcast. Yeah, and rocket ship FM is produced in partnership with product collective, which is a community for software product control. Product collective is also the home of industry, the product conference, industry, virtual workshops, and one of the largest slack groups for product people anywhere. And we're also on the podglomerate network. So a huge thanks to pad glamour. You can listen to all the pot Garmin it shows at the pad kilometer dot com. We'll see you here next week on rocket ship. Summer road trip turned to TA along your way for food, drinks, fuel, and more. Make everyone in your car a happy camper. Even if you're not camping, find TA, Petra stopping center, and TA express locations at TA road trips dot com.

Nintendo Mario Brothers Patricia Dunn roe V wade Mario Hewlett Packard Trisha hirschberger Atari King Kong Apple Super Mario Brothers Hewlett Packard Silicon Valley donkey Kong coleco CNBC
"hewlett packard" Discussed on Rocketship.fm

Rocketship.fm

08:13 min | 7 months ago

"hewlett packard" Discussed on Rocketship.fm

"Next. If you're listening to this right now, you probably like to stay on top of things, which is why I want to mention our sponsor The Economist. Today, the world seems to be moving faster than ever climate and economics, politics and culture, science and technology, wherever you look, events are unfolding at pace. But now for the first time you can get a 30 day trial of The Economist so you won't miss a thing. Personally, I love The Economist not only because it helps broaden my perspective on everything that's happening in the world, but also because it's deeply researched, expert analysis allows me to hone in on what matters the most to me. Like I said, there's a lot going on in the world these days, but with this free trial, you get access to in depth independent coverage of world events through podcasts, webinars, expert analysis, and even their extensive archives. Just to give you an idea of what I'm talking about, I've pulled out something that caught my eye just this week. It was about how the whole asset management landscape was going to look in 2030. Let me just say, is an eye opener. Go to economist dot com forward slash rocket ship for full access to the topics that matter to you in the original events that unfold. That's economist dot com forward slash rocket ship to start your 30 day trial with The Economist today because the world won't wait. This episode is brought to you by product institute. Product institute is a subscription based online learning hub for product managers. Product Institutes growing library of courses cover everything from fundamentals to market research, metrics, tech, and UX design fundamentals, road map strategy and honestly so much more. Unlike other product management courses, you can learn online from any device at your own pace. Their content is created by working product experts and is refreshingly approachable. Bite sized lessons, activities, and videos keep you engaged as you learn. The curriculum is always expanding to keep you learning through every step of your career. Product institute will teach you how to think like a good product manager and help you as you transition into being a great product leader. Visit product, institute dot com to learn about options for individuals or teams, use the code rocket at checkout and you can enroll for just 9 9 9 for the year. That's a $200 savings, and you'll lock in that rate for the lifetime of your subscription. So go to product institute dot com and sign up today. Business movers is a podcast from wondery that dives deep into the most successful companies and corporate visionaries of all time. Behind each household name is a story of the difficult decision strong leadership and strokes of luck that made them who they are. In an all new season, business movers looks at the 2006 HP spying scandal. For decades Hewlett Packard has been one of Silicon Valley's most esteemed tech giants. Then, in 2006, a boardroom scandal threatened to bring the company's carefully built reputation crashing down. When sensitive information from Hewlett Packard board means was leaked to the press, HP chairwoman, Patricia Dunn, hired a team of outside investigators to find the source. These investigations use highly illegal methods. They impersonated board members. They followed people and even dug through their trash. When the board catches on, done is faced with accusations of spying and potential prosecution. Business movers has this incredible story of corporate espionage. Listen to business movers on Apple podcasts, Amazon music or wherever you listen. You can listen early and ad free by subscribing to wondery plus in Apple podcast or the wondery app. So before the break we talked about how atrium raised $10 million in a series a from general catalyst off of a ten slide deck. But they didn't stop at 10 million. So we started this company. We got this term sheet. I raised money from I wanted to fill the round with many, many investors are raised money from like 90 investors so that we would use them as a funnel for customers and we really dominate Silicon Valley. We did that. I'm great at pitching. So his strategy was to raise from as many firms as he could, then turn around and use them for lead generation into their portfolios, which is a smart concept. Yeah, it definitely helps for early customer acquisition. Everyone had an incentive to introduce Justin to their entire portfolio of companies and everyone in their portfolio needed legal services, no matter what sector they're in. Flush with cash and set up for customer acquisition Justin and his team started hiring quickly. Really quickly. In the beginning, we just hired way too fast because I was like, I just want to go, go, go, get customers, and then figure out product afterwards. That was a huge mistake. Number one, true technology startups, I should say, about product. It's about finding a differentiated solution using technology to build something that is fundamentally new. And that is something that I think I lost sight of. And there are companies out there that don't do that. Of course, like a Dollar Shave Club or something like that. It's a marketing. It's marketing or places that people who figure out better forms of distribution to sell something. But like the true ultimately dominating Silicon Valley game changing world changing startups are the ones that use technology to figure out how to do something completely new. The googles, the facebooks, twitters, cruises, or coinbase, all those are companies that do something completely new that has never been possible before. And they are enabled to do it because of technology and product. And so we were not, you know, I didn't focus enough on product because I think I had been jaded by product and seeing a lot of stores that I felt like did not have differentiated product create some things that were very successful companies or seemed like very, very successful companies. So that was one of the first mistakes. So lesson number one here, he didn't focus on the product. He focused on customer acquisition. But what was he acquiring them in two? Honestly, I don't think he really knew at least in the very beginning. But we'll get back to that in a second. First on that topic of hiring. Another mistake that we made was we really just hired way too fast. You know, and one of the things that I didn't spend out of time doing was figuring out how do I set the culture of this company. What kind of company do I want to create? A culture wise. And who are we serving for as our customer? In atrium's case, it was already serving lawyers and within lawyers, are we serving lawyers who want to make a lot of money and be partners or we serve people who want to get out of big law and have more of a lifestyle, like a better lifestyle. We never answer that question and then, of course, outside of lawyers, it's like are we serving the clients? The people who are buying the legal services. We never really spent the time to figure out who are we serving in the same way that Twitch Emmett very clearly early onset. Okay, we're going to serve the broadcasters the streamers. The streamers are the ones we're going to serve because viewers will go to wherever streamers are, even if the site sucks because they want the content. And so we basically only built features for streamers in the very beginning of Twitch. You know, that was the right move at the end of the day. And so I didn't do that sufficiently at any trim and therefore we never had this north star like what customer are we serving first and foremost. And I think in a store that serves many different types of people, that is critically important. It's better to serve a narrow niche of customers and then have that grow than start trying to serve everyone, which is the temptation for many founders who want to take over the world. My guy did. So he failed to set the culture and failed to set the focus of the company. You know, who they were and who they were going to serve. Instead, they tried to be everything to everyone, which generally translates to being nothing for nobody. Yep. It's very familiar and almost painful to listen to. But despite this, they continue to grow and they continue to raise more money. Now, another 65 million they raised led by andreessen Horowitz. Now, we're not at the end of the journey quite yet. There is.

Product institute Silicon Valley Patricia Dunn Hewlett Packard Dollar Shave Club Justin Apple Hewlett Packard Amazon Twitch Emmett andreessen Horowitz
"hewlett packard" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

Gadget Lab Podcast

07:10 min | 8 months ago

"hewlett packard" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

"Am Michael Corey, I'm a senior editor at wired. And I'm Lauren good. I'm a senior writer at wired. 25 years ago, the only online messaging option you had was on your desktop. Is that true? I mean, neither of us were alive then, so how would we know? Yeah. Oh boy. Yeah, it was just your desktop. And when you got up and went outside or went to the bathroom, you could set in a way message that let everybody know that you were unreachable. You were either in a live chat or you were out and about. Things are very different now, obviously. We all have these little pocket computers with us at all times, and everyone we know can reach out to us at any moment all of the time. We are probably not meant to be this connected as human beings, because being always on drains our time and our attention, and it makes us all just a little bit more anxious. Now, Lauren, you propose a solution in a wired story this week, and a lot of people are talking about this. I mean, they're talking about it on Twitter. Right. On Twitter, which we know is, does that even count? Yes, it counts. Okay. It definitely counts. But in your story, you said we should bring back the away message. Please explain. I mean, do I need to explain it? We should bring back the away message. So I think what we need to do is tell people who maybe aren't familiar. Right, people who are just slightly younger than us. Okay. What do you weigh messages? Okay, so there was this thing back in the day called AOL, America online. I think our audience is a little bit older, like probably around our age. So a lot of you are not going to need this explanation. But there was AOL and that was how many of us got onto the Internet. It was actually dial up Internet. And for a lot of us, that was the gateway to always being no pun intended because I had a gateway 2000 computer, and my home growing up, but that was like a gateway, a pathway for a lot of us to being online all the time, or a lot of the time. And within AOL, there was a chat service called AOL instant messenger, which many people called aim AIM for short. And within aim, there was a feature known as a way messages. So this was live chat. This was real-time Internet communication, so you would log on to AOL or AOL instant messenger. A buddy list, which was your friend list, would appear in this vertical text box on the side of your screen, your home screen. And you would see who was online and who was offline. And when people were offline, or even if they were just online, but unavailable, in many cases, they would throw up in a way message. They would draft a message within this text box and sometimes they would add these little embellishments or different fonts and colors and tildes and asterisks and quotes and song lyrics and all that stuff. And they would basically say what they were doing that made them unavailable to chat. They were no longer DTC down to chat. And then sometimes people would just use this as a form of personal expression as well. So in many instances, it created this guardrail around our availability and other instances it was just like, hey, I'm here, but I'm not here. I'm not paying attention, and I'm going to use this thing as a form of creative expression. I always likened it to the whiteboard on the outside of your dorm room in college. Everybody at my school had a whiteboard on their dorm room door and you could say at class until four. I don't know why people would do that, but it's just like, if your Friends were looking for you, that was literally the only way they could find you. So you would just tell you would use it as a way to signal what you were doing. And then you would also write song lyrics on it, right? Of course, yeah, it was a dry erase board, right? So yeah, you'd say I'm at the cafeteria, meet me for dinner or whatever it was. I think both you and I are old enough, despite what I said earlier about how young we are. I think we're both old enough that we remember those times. I am going to absolutely date myself, but when I went away to college, it was last century. It was the last few months of 1999, and I didn't have a cell phone yet. And AOL instant messenger was very much a part of my life. But I actually didn't go to school with my own personal computer. I used the computer lab on campus. So sometimes I would use my roommate's computer she had a Hewlett Packard and she would let me log on to my aim and see what was going on with my buddy list. Which was very nice of her. We're still friends to this day. Hi, Jenna. But this was the earliest days of this kind of melding of our digital communications with IRL communications and figuring out ways we could use these online tools to communicate more effectively and enhance what was still very much an analog experience. And I remember to your point about the whiteboard, the following year, at that point, I had my own PC. I had a compact and I got one specifically with a CD burner because maybe or maybe not, we were downloading songs off of napster and burning up to CDs. Maybe not. Maybe not. I think the statute of limitations is expired on that. There's nothing illegal about burning songs you downloaded off of an App Store. Is there? No, not at all. I don't think so. No, I don't know. It was all good and above board. And we were connected on the campus Internet. And I was living in a suite at this point, wasn't just a dorm room. So there were a few rooms within the suite. And sometimes, instead of going and knocking on each other's doors, we would use our aim to message each other and say, hey, want to head out to the calf and get some dinner or want to go to the party now or whatever was we or do you want to go to the game, whatever it was we were doing. And I remember that felt like a moment to me. That felt like a moment of like, oh, these people are literally feet away, and I am relying instead on digital communications. And what is that? It's kind of weird. It's funny, and it's weird. And now it's just like, what we do. You and I sit in an office all day and we could be feet away from each other. And we're slacking. So it laid the foundations for AIM laid the foundations for the sort of always on life that we have now. Right. And I think in writing this piece, I realized that my nostalgia, it's complicated because there are layers of abstraction here. Like I not only miss a way messages and the ability to just say, hey, I'm away, please do not disturb me. Don't message me. But I also miss just an arrow and we weren't messaging quite as much. And one of those things we can never return to. And the other thing is that I am proposing a technology solution for a technology problem, which can be further complicating. So yeah, I'm not entirely sure that having a way messages now would fix the problems that exist around messaging, but I'd be willing to try because I think what happened and I talked to one of the creators of iMessage Apple iMessage around this. Justin Santa Maria, he described it as there used to be asynchronous text messaging, which was SMS on our phones like using T 9 to text each other or whatever..

AOL Michael Corey Lauren Twitter America Hewlett Packard IRL Jenna App Store AIM Justin Santa Maria Apple
"hewlett packard" Discussed on Clark Howard Show

Clark Howard Show

02:03 min | 10 months ago

"hewlett packard" Discussed on Clark Howard Show

"I also want to talk about something, you know I love electric vehicles of all types, including scooters and electric bikes. Because of what's happened with gas prices, their popularity is going through the roof. But I want to talk about things you should know about using anything electric as an alternative to driving around in your expensive to fill gasoline vehicle. So I want to talk about something expensive. That makes gasoline seem cheap. So best calculations I've seen are that Hewlett Packard Inc for a Hewlett Packard printer costs about $7000 a gallon. The Hewlett Packard realized in their printer business years ago, hey, you know what? Gillette's got it right. Gillette came up with this business model where they sell you a razor and lose money on the razor. To get you hooked on their proprietary blades. That have a profit margin that is beyond imagination. And packer was like, hey, this is great. Then they came up with the thing of the subscription, where you subscribe, where you pay for every page you print, and I mean, you got to give, you know what Packard credit for understanding consumer behavior because people will go into an Office Depot office max Staples or go into a Best Buy or sams or Costco or BJ's wholesale and look at the printers and they go down the line and they look for the one with the cheapest price Hewlett Packard. They put it in their cart, they buy it, and don't realize the one ink cartridge costs twice what the printer costs to.

Hewlett Packard Inc Gillette Packard Hewlett Packard Hewlett Office Depot office max Staple packer Best Buy Costco BJ
"hewlett packard" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:54 min | 11 months ago

"hewlett packard" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"That's why we are growing so fast Antonio and the last minute that we have with you I want to try to understand what it's been like for your team of release last couple of years how you've had to raise wages at Hewlett Packard Enterprise to attract and retain talent How do you see costs being affected there Well no question that today one of the biggest challenges all of us have is attract retain and develop the right workforce And that workforce is changing right And the pandemic enabled people to think differently to work differently And so I always said you know we are as good as the innovation of the technology and the people we have in this company So that's the top priority for me And that's why I paid a lot of emphasis on the culture cultural is everything in the end And I have to say really proud of what this company does for our customers and partners aligned to a very clear purpose to advance the way people in my work When you talk to a current employee or a prospective employee they want to understand what you stand for They want to make an impact Obviously they're coming because the fill the job provides for their family But also want to grow Not different than I did when I became an employee in 1995 in 23 years later I became the process of the company Career mobility and opportunity and diversity and inclusion sustainability all place So definitely we are making great progress We have a lot to work to be done particularly on diversity But I think this company is absolutely in the right path We are delivering strong shareholder value and you can see it through the results we deliver in Q one Antonio neri president and CEO of Hewlett Packard Enterprise joining us via Zoom from Houston Texas Thanks so much Antonio Let's head to Charlie pellet for an update on what's going on with this market We got 90 minutes left Charlie Indeed.

Hewlett Packard Enterprise Antonio Antonio neri Antonio Let Hewlett Packard Charlie pellet Houston Texas Charlie
"hewlett packard" Discussed on Computer Talk Radio

Computer Talk Radio

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"hewlett packard" Discussed on Computer Talk Radio

"Going paperless. Every company out there is going paperless. They're moving towards. It's easier just to put it up on the screen. Yes well parental reports once in a while. But it's not important. We're no longer pointing out something taking into the boss. Were just emailing it over to him and he looks at upbringing goes on. That's fine. The printer industry priced them out. They price themselves out of being successful. Hewlett packard elisar sprinters. Go so shell of its former self brother and epson same kind of thing you can you still buy. A printer jens no longer impressive. It's no longer a big huge battle. It's no longer any kind of big huge deal. I remember matter of ten years ago. Everybody wanted well via ten years ago. I remember everybody at the company. I worked for one today printer on their desk. We justified it for a lot of people today. I don't think.

Hewlett packard
"hewlett packard" Discussed on Computer Talk Radio

Computer Talk Radio

08:23 min | 1 year ago

"hewlett packard" Discussed on Computer Talk Radio

"I will answer your questions in regards to computers technology. I will tell you my opinion of. We're i think different parts of the industry is different. Parts are going. I will tell you where the industry is going as a whole. I will tell you whatever you want to reach out to me at computer talk radio dot com and i am. I'm more than happy to opine on any of these things so feel free to reach out. Now i have been a. I was raped by three different people suzy. Andrew and mark all in the matter of just Just a matter of a couple of weeks and they all asked me. What did i think It was it was going to be the area of the overall tech industry that was next to see a demise. And i'm gonna look back in time. I'm gonna look back at one of the things that used to be pretty much everywhere this was. This was back a number of years ago where we'll go back ten years ago fifteen years ago. The amount of printers that were around or amazing there were a ton of printers and there were so many different people in the industry and there were a lot of people printing and yes. There were all kinds of different topics. When i first started on the radio. There were many topics that we talked about in. Regards to printers about inkjet printers and laser printers and how to get more value out of the cartridges. The both the ink and the toner cartridges. We talked about so many different things that came along with the world of the printer. And i will tell you. Let's let's take a journey back. The whole idea of the printer years ago was actually based on a different previous process that was invented by a gentleman by the name of king. C gillette. gillette g. i. l. l. e. t. t. the guy i dealt with razors and blades and that was the key thing there. He would sell you the razor. That held the blade for yes. I almost e- it was inexpensive. It was at cost. Maybe even a lost a little bit of money but what he wanted to do he wanted to tie you in to the blade he wants you to tie you in to the entire process so that it would be locked in so you could not go anywhere else. And by sh- ickes blades. Or i don't know there are a number of different companies out there. You could only buy gillette's blade and of course it was a premium blade. It was so much better than everybody else's blade in yet. Well everybody else claimed there's was better and they did this better. They did that better in l. k. We moved to the printers. The printer concept moved into that razor. End the blade philosophy fairly early on at it was a situation where they knew how much people were printing. They knew how often people were printing and they did a lot of different things along the way to encourage this these days. Well here. Le originally hewlett packard developed a cartridge. Which was the drum and the toner in one package. Now brother came along. They said we'll separate that outreach don't need to send the drum back all of the time we'll have you replace the drum every once in a while about every three toners maybe four toners may be to tonners whatever it worked out to be but they also provided in inferior toner or a blade drummer rather drom drummer. Yeah pounding on annot Is so this turn into a situation where they would sell you the drum. It was more expensive. If you compare it up yes the toners were cheaper but the drum was more expensive and it worked in that same reeser and blade concept so brother. Actually if you spread it out over the lifetime of a brother printer who would actually be more expensive than the hewlett packard who followed in that. Footsteps hewlett packard. Now there have been a number of different evolutions. Along the way tonal replacement notices started coming out sooner than they should and they started playing around with this whole idea that in a hermetically sealed package. This toner would somehow go bad. It would just you know it was all packed in there. It would still go bad so if you had a toner then you hadn't replaced in a while. They said it's time to replace this. And they based it off of kind of the idea of you drive your car along and you get an oil change not so much based off of miles but based off of time now in that case yes because oils do break down the oils do have a tendency to change over the course of time in a car toner does not but yet that was one of the things they did they also Went through a few different embarrassing situations. Epson lost lawsuit after some nerds found that they could get thirty eight percent more pages from an ink cartridge after the replacement notice. Came out for saying you. You're almost out of ink. Hewlett packard lost a similar. One hewlett packard also lost a battle a actually a number of different battles in regards to the people who make third party toner third party ink and this is kind of like a car. Manufacturer might fight against good year for making replacement tires. This was a bad idea on their part instead of working to make sure that this was cheap in inexpensive. They made it so that yes even today. I have a. I have a laser printer. I print off. Maybe onc- i think i've printed off a total of fifty pages this year. Were in september timeframe. Here okay. we're talking about. This shouldn't have happened. I should. i have a printer. It is just holding on. It's doing well. A lot of people are no longer printing. You know. I used to print out everything that i cover on the shell every week. It was ten pages of notes and sometimes it was fifteen pages based on the different things i was doing. I went through. And i worked out a number of different things on the screen so that i could maximize amount of information. I was providing in d- plummeted onto one page today. I rely on the computer screen. I rely on a tablet. I rely on electronics. Because i've moved mostly paperless with what i'm doing. Other companies out there are.

gillette hewlett packard Andrew mark Epson Hewlett packard
"hewlett packard" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"hewlett packard" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"Five dollars ninety. That's the normal price. I'm not regular people early adopter price and the worst part about it is like. I do a lot of stuff for other companies. I i make money off of it. Pays for itself but i felt so bad i literally was like i i must. I must texting message the owner and ask him. Why am i paying the regular. Do you not love me anymore. Did i. I'm sorry that our news. Cfo said we. Exactly all the influencers off. Somebody who came in there and kicked me. And i was like i've lived so long for so cheap i can't even i. I'm not the type of person to complain. Because i know i've been living off the cow but i was like dessert. Why that was. That was only ninety dollars. I'd be i'd be punching screens father round. That's a good one. Yes oh definitely father. Ted humane from ted. Sorry oh father. Ted is an absolute classic. Yeah yeah our show. I just thought i'd mention that. So check your bill are the public service announcement. I have to check too. Because i am. I've just checked. And they have taken the money out but how many that would have been a good story if they had our show today brought to you by worldwide technology and h. p. e. hewlett packard and a price w. w. t..

Ted humane Cfo ted Ted hewlett packard
"hewlett packard" Discussed on The Security Ledger Podcast

The Security Ledger Podcast

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"hewlett packard" Discussed on The Security Ledger Podcast

"But there is an aspect of that. And i don't mean necessarily government regulation There there could be You know verizon has controls for example on what they allow on their network. And i would expect that sort of thing to evolve overtime. I'm using them as an example. I don't really have any specific knowledge of what they do. But the the idea is that You know and there's another actual regulation point in and has to do with like cyber insurance so You know you see insurance companies Have a have a big influence on building codes and so forth so we could over time. See that These other third parties. Come in to say well if you wanna do this. It's fine but if you want us to ensure it you'll have to do it this way and so or or use this technology or something like that. I think we're at a point now where it's still a bit of a wild west but over time there will be some dependencies that show up and that will guide So these decisions. I think i mean if listeners to learn more about implementing this technology in your own product or there within their own organization where where should they go well of course you can always go to t the trusted computing group dot. Org than we have public web pages website formation there if you're a business or wanna work as part of tc g. always welcome to To join us if if If there is a particular area that You can Add some value. That would be wonderful aside from that. There are things that you can find out on the web on zero touch provisioning. There are some. Itf standards on that there's There's quite a lot out there. You do have to look around but You can see that there are people around the you know the the community They're working on these things Each with their own perspective and so forth so I urge people to to continue to explore these things. Because i i really think you're gonna be while. They're pretty prevalent now and some classes of products. I think they're going to be much more so in the future and learning how to use them and what they can't provide but mostly how to use them. I think is a really key thing. Tom mafia robot and trusted competing group. Thank you so much for coming on speaking to us on. Security ledger podcast. Thank you paul. Be here tom. Laffy is a product security strategist at aruba. A hewlett packard enterprise firm..

verizon Tom mafia Laffy paul tom aruba hewlett packard
Quantum Computing: Superposition or Qubit Too Far?

Technology Untangled

01:56 min | 1 year ago

Quantum Computing: Superposition or Qubit Too Far?

"So quantum computers leverage the properties of entanglement and superposition to perform computations simulations on optimizations. Much much faster than the classical computers we use today. Whoa whoa whoa will. We've gone straight in with the entanglement and superposition. Lets wind it back a little bit and to me. Get my bearings. Is tony strategy chief. Technologist at hewlett packard. Enterprise to help bring it back to basics. There were two thoughts that led to modern day computing. If you like you've got the name that everyone is familiar with. Which is alan turing. And what he trying to do was cracked the enigma code and look good encryption. And how do you break. Encryption using a machine to automate repetitive process. Trying different numbers to see which one worked in order to break that code and there was another chain run by guy von neumann at actually his train of thought was more around understanding. How ballistics worked his style. His approach was very much around making the programming. Very simple and having hardware do a lot of the work whereas cheering this massively parallel. Actually there was a huge amount of complexity in the programming. Now as it happens it was vanoy. Men's approach that leads to this concept of a cpu our take logic unit and that classic architecture that we have today cheering 's approach actually didn't really catch onto. We get to quantum computers the most powerful classical computers. Today follow on from norman's train of thoughts w. amount of compete power. We need to double the amount of processes leading to bigger and bigger supercomputers

Guy Von Neumann Alan Turing Hewlett Packard Tony Vanoy Norman
Blockchain: What Is It Good For?

Technology Untangled

02:00 min | 1 year ago

Blockchain: What Is It Good For?

"Thanks the perfect storm of slain. You saw big marketing budgets and elon musk's tweets blockchain has been hyped beyond belief. And it's also been made more complicated than it leads to be. More i could up angolan go. My name's ingram go. I'm senior vice. President and chief technology officer for a special intelligence at hewlett packard enterprise. So first question. What exactly is a blockchain. Let's start with a public blockchain first. Let's use an example of a analogy of a of a ring binder. You've got this notebook with many blank pages bound by a ring ring binder on page one the record number of transactions. You know. maybe. Jim pays john two bitcoins and sarah pays jim ten bitcoins and so on and so on then on the next page You have the same again. Set of transactions being written down on it and the knicks page and then expansion so on so if if you imagine each page is a block and all the pages of bound by the ring bind up being the chain. You actually have a a blockchain there right. So that's what blockchain is except for the fact that in a public blockchain this ledger or this record. Write this chain of pages. Chain of blocks is digital and is distributed to everyone publicly equally publicly with no central custodian. Why you want to use a blockchain. There are two major reasons. Why you want us a blockchain right first and foremost this when you wanna keep record of an entire sequence of transactions especially if you want to go all the way to genesis the beginning and secondly you won that record to be transparent that is you want the decentralize it by distributing copies of the same sequence records to everyone equally with no central custodian

Elon Musk Bitcoins Sarah Pays Jim Ingram Hewlett Packard Blockchain Knicks JIM John Genesis
Firms May Have To Disclose Climate-Related Risks In Financial Disclosures

Environment: NPR

02:00 min | 1 year ago

Firms May Have To Disclose Climate-Related Risks In Financial Disclosures

"The Companies like to talk about going green and fighting climate change but they're not necessarily keen to admit if They have a factory in an area prone to flooding or if their supplier was just hit by a hurricane. Npr's h j my explains that if regulators get their way that will change when software. Company hewlett packard. Enterprise was looking around houston for its new headquarters. It took all the usual things into consideration the location. The cost and also this flood plains historical weather events how to the freeways functions. They go underwater. Do they not executive john. Fry says accounting for the impacts of climate is something to company has been doing for years like when deciding where to locate headquarters. Hp learned this the hard way fry. Says he was in houston. The city got hit by hurricane harvey and twenty seven flooding the company's it data centers when you have actual live event. You discover things that you didn't consider now. Regulators like the securities and exchange commission the federal reserve and other planning to force companies to incorporate those type of climate risks. That's because natural disasters are expected to increase in frequency and intensity his fed. Chairman jerome powell. The reason we're focused on climate change is that our job is to make sure that financial institutions banks particularly the largest ones understand enter able to manage the significant risks last month. The sec issued a list of fifteen broad questions asking investors and the public. What information companies should be required to disclose the deadline for responses is june. It's a slow and methodical approach. That's because figuring out how climate change impacts businesses is not always easy. Says paula the purna on adviser nonprofit. Cdp if a factory burns down you see the fire. But if dealing with climate change is is a very insidious invisible risk

Hurricane Harvey HP Houston NPR Chairman Jerome Powell Hurricane Securities And Exchange Commis FRY Federal Reserve John Paula
Journey To AI Success with Ken Grohe of WekaIO

HumAIn Podcast

01:30 min | 1 year ago

Journey To AI Success with Ken Grohe of WekaIO

"Welcome everyone back to the humane podcast this week. We are pleased to talk. All about data and the rapid scale of data through enterprise companies through startups. An entire industry with us today. Is ken grocery. Who is the president and chief revenue officer of waka. Ken thanks so much for joining us on the show. David longtime listener. Believe actually on. I'm so honored to be out here and talk to all your listeners and value day in some small way thank you thank you so much in you know in two thousand twenty one everything about data we've seen as we've emerged from the pandemic how every company is scaling every company's at technology today the company. So i'd love you to start listeners. Tell us a little bit about weka. And why now is a great time to get involved in the space or great yes. I'm glad you listeners. I technically by nature. If you're listening to your show which is great. I was too as well but no kids you. You probably know some folks might be data. Scientists listening in their strict with wacko bite. What's tend to thirtieth power. That's a good way to future proof it home. It's all you can fit in a file system into some are friends who worked at google. Probably know how. The origin of rule came from ten to one hundred power. But weka does a great job as we're actually limitless data platform so a new way to do storage. It's all software. It's also the subscription through the people. You're buying everyday so if you run it through. Ws in the cloud or on premises with hewlett packard. It's a great way to get things done and solve big

Ken Grocery KEN David Google Hewlett Packard
Supercomputing: An exascale-sized challenge?

Technology Untangled

04:37 min | 2 years ago

Supercomputing: An exascale-sized challenge?

"Terms of supercomputing and high performance computing or. Hp see are one and the same but you hear hp being used more moldy days. There's a growing cool for the democratisation of supercomputers which historically has been tricky because supercomputers weren't really created just to do any old bit of computing. His jacob bama hp and engineering research scientists from hewlett packard enterprise the for supercomputers were invented to solve a very specific problem a hydrodynamics problem for simulating nuclear weapons. So during world war two there were there. Were trying to develop these nuclear weapons they had to do. What's called a numerical simulation. It's essentially a fluid dynamic simulation and so they needed to run that problem numerically through a computer and that's kind of alan turing and john. Von layman come came up with the architecture in sort of the algorithm for running numerical methods on these systems supercomputers have come a long way in a relatively short amount of time thanks to innovation in materials experimental architectures industry pioneers like seymour cray and ever increasing processing speeds but for the most part until very recently these machines have been the domain of scientists the prospects of solving some of the really hard problems that have plagued humanity forever. That's like in our sights now like we could like feasibly solve problems like cancer and all these crazy permutations on corona virus. And and any of these like really scary viruses. That are gonna come out okay listeners. So this is one of those that starts normal and gets a little complicated. I'm going to get a little bit. But i i really wants to get to the bottom of these powerful machines and i wanted to understand what makes a sweeping meters so well super so i could up bill. Manel vice president and general manager of high performance computing hewlett packard and surprise. A super computer is a lot of processors memory and a high speed interconnect time together. Supercomputing provides the the hardware infrastructure if you will to do parallel computing. Parallel computing is important. Because typically in a problem you'd wanna break up the problem across multiple processors or or multiple servers or nodes typically. What you do is break up. The data that's called data partitioning where little chunks are putting in each server on each processor and then worked on independently and then at the end. You bring it all together. This parallel computing is kind of a big deal. It's what makes sense a numeric. Who problems i deal for. Cb computers on what makes them special or different to the the santa my desk. It's mostly because they're optimized around solving scientific and engineering problems in terms of how they can partition data. How they can manipulate the data. How they can keep a certain amount of data in memory at one time. So you're not always moving data back and forth to drive or to network for example. Okay key point. Here is all about data. Starting from those initial fluid dynamics simulation these big machines have been used for all kinds of modeling from whether to weapons alongside their partners. Intel bill and his team are in the process of deploying a supercomputer could aurora one of the world's first x. scale computers at the us department of energy. What's exco well to answer that. I need to know that supercomputer speed is measured in floating point operations per second aka flops which are basically just the number of calculations it can do a second exit scale computers computer. That's able to do at least a billion billion floating point calculations per second so there's no single chip in the world. That can do that. So you've gotta bring together a lot of chips into one system that allow you to accomplish that. It's basically tend to the eighteenth. In terms of number of floating point operations.

HP Von Layman Seymour Cray Hewlett Packard Manel Alan Turing John Cancer Us Department Of Energy Intel Aurora
Interview With Mark Arnold

IT Visionaries

03:49 min | 2 years ago

Interview With Mark Arnold

"Walk in the show. Thank you absolutely glad to be here all right. So that was a tongue twister of a title the vp of digital customer experience at point next service which is a hewlett packard. Enterprise line of business. Tell the audience. What exactly is point next service. Absolutely so hewlett packard. Enterprise offers a variety of products and as a offerings into the marketplace. Endpoint next is actually support inservice arm of the company so everything we do is focusing geared towards enabling customers to run their it infrastructure from a support and service perspective and so with that said diving a little detail like give us a use case of win. A business would call on your lean on you to implement or develop. Were handle something for them. Absolutely so for us. We view our customers. Everything from small medium business all the way up to fortune ten companies and as these companies are making their it infrastructure decisions and then implementations as well as even the management and operating of those environments point next is able to step in and support the customers through that journey and then as a customer is if they're managing an environment themselves. We provide that level. One two three support for them should they run into any problems in their environment as well and then when it comes to the digital customer experience side of that so customer experience is used quite often in the tech industry where it's actually in the every industry right people always talk about. What is the customer experience. What's the digital customer experience. We've had clients that sell direct to consumer shoes talk about how they wanna make sure. Their website integrates nicely there skews when a customer purchases or when gets on the line for service help they all consider that part of the customer experience. Is there a specific domain in your world where you're the vp of customer experience. Where you're focused on inside of this digital services offering at a great question so as we've approached this it's really been from customer view and we've looked at how we can transform the way our customers engage with us as the business traditionally support business has been managed in one wanted two ways. It's either a face to face situation. Where a customer has a representative where there is actual face to face interaction. there's an onsite presence or there's an element that's a remote delivery side. What's your typical type call center or technical solution center. Where if a customer has a problem they call in and get that support the landscapes changing and our customers really just want that digital capability to self solve to self serve and own their own future. So what we're doing on the digital experience side is looking at our portal environment our social forums even looking into mobile applications where we can create a true environment. Our customers can operate. Add an end to end platform. That's integrated that has elements of a layered through it and at the same time. Has a seamless connected back to our telephony infrastructure so from a digital engagement perspective the costumer has the opportunity to choose when they want to engage with us a platform of choice and then as they work through driving business results were always there to support them not only digitally but also through our collective infrastructure back our global remote delivery

Hewlett Packard Hewlett Packard
"hewlett packard" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"hewlett packard" Discussed on WJR 760

"On Earth Right now. It's been closed for nearly a year and may not reopen until the beginning of this summer. Meanwhile, Disney world now operating at 35% capacity and has been open for about seven months, so Disney, indeed, reportedly looking at moving some of its corporate divisions out of Southern California. Central Florida. We Recently, Hewlett Packard, Tesla and Space X left California They moved to Texas on Wall Street. Today, stocks had another positive day The Dow was up to 37 the S and P ahead. 29. Can wriggle Ski WJR NEWS Mitch album in two minutes. The Michigan Center for Fertility and Women's Health offers the latest infertility care in a warm, caring and supportive environment. Hi, I'm Dr Carroll qual check from the Michigan Center for Fertility and Women's Health, if you or someone you know is looking to lessen the emotional toll of infertility. Please call 5865760431. My gynecologist referred me to Dr Qualtrics. She was so wonderful to me. They're so supportive and so nice and I have a wonderful child by Brotman to see everybody in That's how close you become with the staff with locations and Warren like Orient Bloomfield Township in Plymouth. We take pride in our understanding and women's health and continue to uphold the highest standards in quality patient care that I walked in there. It was all about what are we going to do to get you to your goal of being a mom and they never gave up because they knew that I wanted it so badly. They were just wonderful. The goal of being a mom Now that I'm pregnant, I would do it 20 times over college today at 5865760431 for online and my fertility dot com. Tune into the rich Paul Show Saturdays at 9 A.m..

Michigan Center for Fertility Michigan Center for Fertility Disney Southern California Dr Qualtrics Hewlett Packard Dr Carroll Orient Bloomfield Township Florida Brotman Tesla Paul Texas Plymouth
"hewlett packard" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

06:16 min | 2 years ago

"hewlett packard" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"He is a former executive of Hewlett Packard turned independent director of large companies and startups. We're so lucky to have you here. Thanks for being here. Oh, thank you. Thank you for inviting me. I, of course. So you have a dream career that so many enterpreneurs are entrepreneurs would love to have. So let's start from the beginning. Where did you start? And how did you get to where you are today? Well, it's thank you for calling it a dream career. That's how many people though many people would love to be at the executive level. Yeah, there was times it was a nightmare. But overall, really grateful, started a little company here and L, a called Northrop in the Hawthorne, California and worked at Northrop for 25 years and the executive part of my career occurred on the B two bomber program. The stealth bomber and was on that program for 15 years and then migrated anti tea and we didn't call a nightie then, but it was similar to that and I got my first CEO gig as the CEO for the Military Aircraft Systems division. And as I moved into that role, a lot of people on the business side said, You're making a mistake. Don't do this. This is not where you should go. You know, you stay a part of the business don't be in technology, and I thought you know what the world's going to change here. This isn't in the mid nineties, the world's gonna change. I am going to go with the technology, right? I was so glad I did. That's kinda laughable. Now to deal, of course, did not go with technology. But, yeah, there is actually a time where I was like, Oh technology technology thing. Exactly. They thought you were this person that sat in the data center and you never saw Sun shining, right? That's a little bit, but, yeah. And I was so glad I made that move. And that was the opportunities that the opportunity just started opening up and probably 25th year of the company. I got a call from Honeywell, and they asked if I'd come and be their CEO for one of their global sectors. And I said Yes, I'd be happy to do that. And I left a 25 year career which was crazy. But I'm glad I did because that global experience prepped me for what end up happening where I then was sought after the work be a global corporate CEO for Fisher Scientific Kimberly Clark. And then eventually Hewlett Packard before the break up. Wow. Yes. Oh, ah, Lot of your growth has been paying attention to the trends and almost going against the grain. So So, what was it that allowed you to? Really? Essentially trust your gut and lean into the technology advances? Yeah. So you know, when your nightie you really get a different perspective of Wow. This could really if we do the right things we can We could do so much more in the organization and that's what happened. Believe it or not. In the early eighties, when I started programming and so forth. I saw ways to improve what we had. But it wasn't enough. There was so much more that you could do, especially with today. Today with cloud computing with building products like software as a service or platforms of service. Things like that. That allow you to truly develop applications in minutes. Verses, weeks months years, and that's where we're at that point. Now we're at that point where you can truly digitize your workspace so much more with these mobile devices, whether it's a your mobile phone or whether it's a tablet, but the world has changed so rapidly as a result of that. And what occurred was I had some great mentors that I got to work for, and they made some moves and because when they made the moves that allowed me to think you know what I can take a risk. I'm gonna go. I'm gonna make that change. And so I was working with the right people being at the right time and understanding the value that good technology Good because there's a lot of bad about good technology can do for business. So how do you discern what's good technology versus bad technology? Well, first of all, you have to figure out what you want to do. What is it you're trying to solve? What is the problem in trying to solve what solutions? You know if your problem is this your problem is you're growing really fast. But you're losing money. What do you do to begin? Improbable. How do you scale what technology out? There can help me scale and truly allow me to run a business or on some of the startups and I'm involved in to truly allow These startups to grow in a way that they're just gonna take off. And so you know, some of the technologies businesses that I'm involved in today I look at what are they trying to solve? Is someone already out there doing it and and they're just gonna be one of many or that they truly have something that is that secret sauce. For example, they may have a proprietary algorithm that no one else has. That is solving problems that gaming companies were trying to do. Or they may have whatever algorithm that they created that no one's really thought about that can integrate in sales automation that other people have thought about it, but they haven't solved it. And and it could be seamless. And so that's what gets me excited about some of these technologies. But that's what you look at. Are they really truly solving the problem that you currently have in your business? Let's talk about the opportunity and entrepreneur has because of this digital era to go global. I mean, a perfect example is the agreement cloud. So where does the business begin? What opportunity? Can they seize? Yes. Oh, you know, even even being in the late part of the last decade. In the 07 through 09 time frame. When people cloud was a bad word in the business environment, nobody wanted to do it. It number one. It's not secure. Number two well and truly scale number three. We don't understand it. And why would we let anybody else have our data? Those are the three things that people were concerned about and thinking what the agreement clad and where we are today. It's just a natural fit..

CEO Hewlett Packard executive Northrop Honeywell Hawthorne director California Fisher Scientific Military Aircraft Systems divi Kimberly Clark
"hewlett packard" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

04:48 min | 2 years ago

"hewlett packard" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"But they are the largest supplier of hospital supplies in the nation. So these guys are huge. They are big. And you've all heard of HP. You know Hewlett Packard, Oracle Tesla, 18 T. Charles Schwab, even the PGA So they were headquartered in New York. I believe they're headquartered in New York. But the PGA is going to leave like we're not gonna be headquartered here anymore. We're leaving New York. We're going to Texas, where it's more favorable. So there's all these jobs are going to go there. Now they might not pay any state income taxes, but all those people that would go there they will pay sales tax. They will pay property tax. They will pay gas tax. And they will pay on all these other kinds of taxes that will go into the Texas economy. And not the blue State High tax states economies. You got to keep that in mind. So if you take 1000 jobs out of doesn't matter, Maryland New York California doesn't matter. Take 1000 jobs you could you take them to some place like Florida, Tennessee or Texas? Chap. No state income tax. All of those people When they buy a home. They're gonna pay property taxes. They're gonna buy gasoline. You're gonna pay for gasoline taxes. They're gonna go to the grocery store. They're gonna go to the supermarket going to go all kinds of places. They're gonna pay sales taxes. You know, and they're going to pay other fees. They're gonna register their cars that cost money. They're gonna pay all this other money into the system. Just because they don't pay an income tax doesn't mean they don't. It doesn't cost him something to live there. The states have to raise money somehow, so maybe the property taxes a little higher. Maybe the sales tax is a little higher. The point is, is that what they're doing is they're creating a business friendly environment and the businesses will go there. And when they do, they're taking their jobs with him. What will be left behind are A lot of people who will grumble and complain. There will be many people who cannot afford belief that will be stuck there. And the people who do remain will be forced to pay higher taxes to support the ones who don't have much income or much assets or can't make much money. So it's it's from an economic standpoint, it is stupid. Absolutely stupid. Stop raising taxes. You drive people away. People behave a certain way when you do things as far as taxes are concerned, Maryland is not a retirement friendly state. People routinely go to Florida, Tennessee and Delaware, especially Delaware. Delaware has no, they have income tax, but they're very You know, I think under $50,000 a year, your retirement income is not even touch. They have no sales tax, but their property taxes are a heck of a lot lower. In Maryland, and so people right there, save a fortune. In terms of their costs of living compared to Maryland. All right. Hit the pause button. Let's go back to the interest rates. Protect your money. Protect, protect, protect. If you have money sitting in the bank. If you have a CD money, that's not making anything. We have solutions. Um, we have 3% guaranteed for five years. We have 2.4% guaranteed for three years and 1.75% guaranteed for Two years, all programs are insured. All rates are guaranteed these air CD type programs. And they Are a great parking place. For the money that well for the bank money. Well, the bank money won't that won't pay you. I'll spit it out there somehow. Give us a call. Learn more 8889795995 again. That number's 8889795995 press number two when you hear the recording Leave us your name and number promised to call you Monday. Now the 2.4% guarantee for three years is changing. We have one week left. It is going away. I predicted it would go away after Christmas and I didn't expect it to last into the new year. Well, I was wrong for a little while and very grateful that that I was wrong for a little while, but it's just not going to make it much farther, so we only have one week left. 2.4% will be gone in one week, so give us a call. Toll free number again is 8889795995. First number two when you hear the recording, leave us your name and number and I promised to call you a s A P. All right, He picked us up on the other side of the break. You're listening to wealth without risk on talk radio 6 80 WCBS Winter storm warning remains in effect.

Maryland New York Texas Hewlett Packard Delaware Florida Tennessee T. Charles Schwab New York California Oracle Tesla
"hewlett packard" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

03:30 min | 2 years ago

"hewlett packard" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"A professor of economics at U C L A. And here's what he told CNBC about this trend as we lose really successful businesses such historical and Hewlett Packard that changes how many high paid jobs we're going to have change is really the whole nature of the state. It changes how many tax dollars going to Sacramento. How many tax dollars thunder schools whether there's money left over to repair Rosen Bridges is really a huge problem in this that the state is facing Christine, This is not something new. I want to read another number for you 2016 alone. 1800 companies left California in one year 1800 companies. I mean and and and and there's like no attention at the state capital from the governor is not even a blue ribbon task force that's been named or you know how they do You try to keep businesses here or nothing, And it just I mean, it's such an enormous problem, and it's not just this year. It just feels like there's so many things that are just creating this perfect storm right and our strike Now this is just out of the slightly awkward file. Long time. California Democratic lawmaker badly bungled The Pledge of allegiance during a Los Angeles City Council meeting. Here is L. A City Council member, Kevin de Leon. Potentially gents to the flag of the United States of America. Invincible. I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America. Oh, boy. Witches stands one nation under God, indivisible with liberty and justice for all. Okay. I spent a long time in the Legislature. So I'm not sure why he forgot it, You know, maybe just froze or whatever. And I am actually surprised. No one jumped in tow, like, help him out into the republic for which it stands. I mean, you're just sitting here going. Come on, man. I know what I can help you. Um, but I mean, he was Assemblyman, a state center. He ran for us Senate right now. A member of the City Council member in L. A Kevin daily own. Yeah, it was all just awkward. It really was kind of Okay, Let's talk cash. Wanna talk a little money? Let's do it. Here we go. Here's Pink Floyd. Okay, That's enough. Pink Floyd. Here's ah! Local kfbk $1000 Cash winner. We've got another one. His name is Rob. I am robbed from the Arden Arcade area of Sacramento. And I just won $1000 desperate listening TomKat FBK FM and am so here's how he did it. Here's how you could do it. Here's how you can win $1000 You listen for the key word to text into 202 100. And then you got answer your phone. Well, I work from home. So I was working, writing an email when you called me and I wasn't quite sure if I was gonna answer because it said no caller. I d. I usually don't answer those calls because they're usually somebody Trying to sell me something, but in this case, I'm glad I did You pick up the phone. Rob's got a grand in his pocket. And you can, too. We've got another chance to $1000 coming out of the bottom. We are right here in 23.1 kfbk. Excellent And that bottom of the hour is coming up. Quickly Love your top stories of the day. There's ah revamping in the delivery of our vaccines. State is rethinking it. We'll have more on that. All coming up in three minutes. Have something to say on your smartphone dial pound 2 50 say open. My all of it makes sense. We're all adults here. Join the conversation with Sacramento's and news 93.1. There you go. Kfbk.

Sacramento Rob California United States City Council Kevin de Leon America Pink Floyd Rosen Bridges Hewlett Packard Los Angeles City Council professor of economics CNBC Senate Christine Legislature
"hewlett packard" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

06:01 min | 2 years ago

"hewlett packard" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"A dream career that so many intra preneurs are entrepreneurs would love to have. So let's start from the beginning. Where did you start? And how did you get to where you are today? Well, it's thank you for calling it a dream career. That's how many people though many people would love to be at the executive level. Yeah, there was times it was a nightmare. But overall, really grateful, started a little company here and L, a called Northrop in the Hawthorne, California and worked at Northrop for 25 years and the executive part of my career occurred on the B two bomber program. The stealth bomber and was on that program for 15 years and then migrated into I T and we didn't call a nightie then, but it was similar to that and I got my first CEO gig as the CEO for the Military Aircraft Systems division. And as I moved into that role, a lot of people on the business side said, You're making a mistake. Don't do this. This is not where you should go. You know, you stay a part of the business don't be in technology, and I thought you know what the world's going to change here. This isn't in the mid nineties, the world's gonna change. I am going to go with the technology, right? I was so glad I did. That's kinda laughable now to the court did not go with technology. But, yeah, there is actually a time where I was, like, Oh technology technology thing. Exactly. They thought you were this person that sat in the data center and you never saw Sun shining, right? That's a little bit. Yeah. And I was so glad I made that move. And that was the opportunities that the opportunities just started opening up and probably 25th year of the company. I got a call from Honeywell, and they asked if I'd come and be their CEO for one of their global sectors. And I said Yes, I'd be happy to do that. And I left a 25 year career which was crazy. But I'm glad I did because that global experience prepped me for what end up happening where I then was sought after the work be a global corporate CEO for Fisher Scientific Kimberly Clark and then eventually Hewlett Packard before the break up. Wow. Yes. Oh, ah, Lot of your growth has been paying attention to the trends and almost going against the grain. So So, what was it that allowed you to? Really? Essentially trust your gut and lean into the technology advances? Yeah. So you know, when your nightie you really get a different perspective of Wow. This could really if we do the right things we can We could do so much more in the organization and that's what happened. Believe it or not. In the early eighties, when I started programming and so forth. I saw ways to improve what we had. But it wasn't enough. There was so much more that you could do, especially with today. Today with cloud computing with building products like software as a service or platforms of service. Things like that. That allow you to truly develop applications in minutes. Verses, weeks months years, and that's where we're at that point. Now we're at that point where you can truly digitize your workspace so much more with these mobile devices, whether it's a your mobile phone or whether it's a tablet, but the world has changed so rapidly as a result of that. And what occurred was I had some great mentors that I got to work for, and they made some moves and because when they made the moves that allowed me to think you know what I can take a risk. I'm gonna go. I'm gonna make that change. And so I was working with the right people being at the right time and understanding the value that good technology good because there's a lot of bad stuff about good technology can do for business. So how do you discern what's good technology versus bad technology? Well, first of all, you have to figure out what you want to do. What is it you're trying to solve? What is the problem in trying to solve what solutions Um, you know if your problem is this, your problem is you're growing really fast. But you're losing money. What do you do to become profitable? How do you scale what technology out? There can help me scale and truly allow me to run a business or on some of the startups and I'm involved in to truly allow these startups to grow in a way. That they're just gonna take off. And so you know, some of the technologies businesses that I'm involved in today I look at what are they trying to solve? Is someone already out there doing it and and they're just gonna be one of many or that they truly have something that is that secret sauce. For example, they may have a proprietary algorithm that no one else has. That is solving problems that gaming companies were trying to do. Or they may have whatever algorithm that they've created that no one's really thought about that can integrate and sales automation that other people have thought about it, but they haven't solved it. And and it could be seamless. And so that's what gets me excited about some of these technologies. But that's what you look at. Are they really truly solving the problem that you currently have in your business? Let's talk about the opportunity and entrepreneur has because of this digital era to go global. I mean, a perfect example is the agreement cloud. So where does the business begin? What opportunity? Can they seize? S O, you know, even even being in the late part of the last decade. In the 07 through 09 time frame. When people cloud was a bad word in the business environment, know what he wanted to do it. It's number one. It's not secure. Number two well and truly scale number three. We don't understand it. And why would we let anybody else have our data? Those are the three things that people were concerned about and thinking what the agreement clad and where we are today. It's just a natural fit..

CEO Northrop executive Hawthorne California Military Aircraft Systems divi Honeywell Hewlett Packard Fisher Scientific Kimberly Clark
How Quibi crashed and burned so quickly

The 3:59

04:03 min | 2 years ago

How Quibi crashed and burned so quickly

"So equity was always the odd duck all the new streaming services that immersive last year for just for listeners who don't stand top of the streaming rewards just give quick description of what could be is and what's happened to it. Quimby was a mobile initially mobile only than kind of transition to be mobile centric streaming video service. That made cereal like tv. In very short episodes everything was like ten minutes or last and it was very very expensive programming. They made big budget programming with really big stars. So it's pitch was that it was kind of like a curated. Youtube only with like the biggest and brightest of hollywood involved. The problem is they launched the service that was designed to be watched. Moberly on the go in those like brief much of your day where you have a spare ten minutes to watch something getting coffee. Waiting for us. Launched it at the beginning of all the lockdowns keeping people trapped in their homes so they had a mobile on the ghost service launching when nobody was mobile or on the go. That's one of the problems with but there's underlying consideration that. The premise of the service given that people already have youtube and they can watch other things on the go to netflix on the go on their mobile phones that the premise of this being a service at all was flawed from the beginning. So what's happened. At least as far as we know right now is that would be instead of trying to survive after six months is going to just shut down. We don't know exactly win but at some point the service is going to go dark and this programming is going to. I don't exactly know what's going to happen. So all this stuff that they made. Yeah i wanna get into that but it just. It's interesting just sort of looking at the background of their the foundation that this company was built on one point. Seven billion dollars in funding of meg. Whitman from hewlett packard. Lots of a-list talent But medina think looking back at this now it was was the model just fundamentally or was it just a matter. Bedtime may and launching in the middle of a pandemic. i remember maybe even before they had a name. I believe they katzenberg jeffrey katzenberg. The hollywood Whitman as you mentioned the ceo of the service they went to south by and they had this whole presentation. And i remember coming out of this presentation being like these people have no idea what they're getting into you know. They had really really ambitious goals. They talked a really big game but they're getting into something. That is really hard to break into going up against something like youtube. Which has two billion people watching it every month. So that's one way to kind of put in perspective whether or not the pandemic was the real. You know silver bullet that killed qube but also mentioned that i did. I did a poll on twitter. Asking people this exact question because they make whitman. Jeffrey kassenberg worth open letter. The apologized for disappointing. Their investors their workers their talent and they said in there. You know it we may never know what was the problem here was timing or was this a bad idea to begin with and so i had a poll on twitter quoting that portion of the letter and saying well which was it could be equals a bad idea or timing and i think eighty six percent of people could be was just a bad idea to begin with so

Youtube Quimby Moberly Hollywood Whitman Katzenberg Jeffrey Katzenberg Netflix Hewlett Packard Medina Jeffrey Kassenberg Twitter
A Detailed Discussion With Kim Chestne ON How To Use Your Intuition y

My Seven Chakras

05:45 min | 2 years ago

A Detailed Discussion With Kim Chestne ON How To Use Your Intuition y

"It's time to bring on our special guest today. Kim jesse so. Kim is the author of radical infusion of globally recognized in innovation leader and founder of intuition lab. Her work has been featured are supported by leading edge organizations such as out by southwest carnegie mellon university comcast and hewlett packard while working as a leader in the tech sector. Kim recognize that tremendous role that intuition plays in business and cultural progress and set out on a quest to learn everything there is to know about it and as of nearly two decades worth of research and practice she has developed a powerful system that anyone can tap into to access the inner wisdom in ordinary with so really really exciting and kim. Thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me excited to talk to you tonight. Yeah me too. It's supposed to be in our species night especially in india because it is valley the festival of lights and there's actually a transformation going on in india as well. This started many decades back because as you know india and the valleys associated with firecrackers people becoming more and more conscious as they let go off that external firecrackers and realized the light that is within them the lamp within the essence within. I think that's got me to do our own in to it absolutely. Is that inner light that intellect growing so strong. It's such a beautiful metaphor and it's a beautiful day for us to be having this conversation because it really all does tie together absolutely so. Let's start from the beginning. Where were you born and warm. Was your childhood lane. Well i was born in a little town called carlisle pennsylvania small town girl and You know i think i had. I had sort of your colonial white picket fence upbringing in one thousand nine hundred eighty s america which was really fun and if you remember the eighties and so it was really fun. Time to grow up. And i think that's it's those times it really started to develop my interest in intuition and i had a lot of intuitive experiences growing up so It all kind of stemmed from those childhood years amazing and work sort of influence. Did your family have on your intuitive or spiritual development. Yeah you know. That's a really good question because a lot of people we have this talk about intuition and when it happens to you intuition can be something that people can either accept or not accept right so when you're talking about kids and it's so important with kids because kids have such great in and they haven't really had it beaten out of the yet. It's one of these things still alive and still so connected with intuitive. Things starts to happen with children. Appearance can either encourage that or they can create fear. Be like oh my gosh. This is something to be afraid of or this is crazy. You know so it's You know working with intuition in my childhood it was challenging for me. Because i think coming from a really sort of traditional christian background. There's not a lot of room for intuition. Especially it was more of the protestant. I think in the catholic traditions. There's more of a place for the holy spirit in a lot of mistakes but in my experiences growing up in my little world there was not a place for intuition and so it was something i really had to come to terms with on my own and really facing a lot of fears and a lot of sort of judgment from the people around me and now they get it like my mom's very intuitive she inherited from her. I think it is something that we have a genetic propensity to. But i think there's just not that level of acceptance which in the east which i think is so wonderful about you know eastern cultures. Intuition is so much more integrated in daily life and acceptance right. Yeah that's that's very true. And i think like we were discussing before the india was india also is going to its own journey of realizing how abundant and whilst our own heritage is and going back to our roots realizing that wisdom about intuition and the mind and the soul and yes we're going through our journey as a country has But you know what what comes to. My mind is As i learned more about how children behave like a child always looking at his mom or her mom or her danna his dad for approval right. They're always looking at the so. It's not so much of words but it's also about how the bench reacts to. A certain situation are something that is happening on the word. Maybe that micro reaction that can make a huge difference right in terms of how the child approaches word even as an adult absolutely absolutely in those little foundational moments. They and this is talk a lot about conditioning. If you read my booker you hear me talk today. I'm probably going to use that word. A lot Because intuition is something that is really a counterbalance to this conditioning. That we all get and we get it from those very first moments with our family and with the people that we grow with you know. We're conditioned to think things. Like oh intuitions not real. Or we're conditioned thank like our imagination in our creativity isn't as important as our intellectual side so so part of really balancing these sides of our brains and really coming into our true being is stepping away from that conditioning in releasing it

Kim Jesse Southwest Carnegie Mellon Univ India KIM Hewlett Packard Comcast Carlisle Pennsylvania America Danna
Texas governor says companies moving headquarters to the state has turned into a 'tidal wave'

CNBC's Fast Money

02:58 min | 2 years ago

Texas governor says companies moving headquarters to the state has turned into a 'tidal wave'

"Alright we have big news here coming out of oracle this hour the company just announcing it is moving its headquarters from silicon valley to austin texas joining us now on the fast line is texas governor greg. Abbott governor abbot. Thanks so much for joining us. Thank you melissa. Honor to be with you. so now. it's oracle before was Tesla's cyber truck factory and elon. Musk himself personally. Moving to texas. What are you doing to attract these companies tax breaks. Here's i i would say. This is big news unto itself but in in context of everything else. You talked about elon. Musk you talked about tesla. Remember we just had the announcement about hewlett packard enterprise. We also just had the announcement last month about the fortune. Five hundred company. Cbre living headquarters to And then Next month we have the formal opening of the charles. Schwab headquarters moved to the dallas area. And so this has turned into an absolute tidal wave for some their businesses that have had operations here and they've enjoyed the operations here. Oracle has had a thirty seven acre campus in austin texas for several years. Now i've been dealing with separate cats for more than a decade now Suffered i have a good relationship But of course it moving business headquarters is more than just that one relationship. They are looking for a state. And that gives them the independence autonomy and the freedom to chart their own course in those are word to us is us about people like separate has used by people like you know. Alon is elated to be here nina. Talk on virtually a weekly basis and he loves the freedom that he has in texas whether it be worst space x other enterprises that he is involved in. I'm sure he loves the lower tax rate as well as many other entrepreneurs do governor abbot. It's funny because back in. May i spoke to governor gavin newsom california and. I asked him if he was worried about elon. Musk leaving california in any way shape or form and he said that he was not worried at all should he be. Are you on the phone with other. Silicon valley companies. Courting their business. I've been on the phone. A weekly basis with ceos across the country. And it's not just california there. There are other states. And i'm sure that you guys have seen that i've been in negotiations with the nasdaq with companies that do business with the nasdaq and our trading operations. And so we're we're working across the board because the times of kobe have exposed a lot. They've exposed the ability that you really don't have to be in manhattan for example in order to be involved in the trading business or the investment business We're getting a lot of investment Leaders from the new york region new jersey region as well as from the california region. They're moving to the state of texas and that's just the investment sector the tech sector et cetera. So cost of business means a lot. No income tax means a lot but also the freedom to operate without the heavy hand of regulation means a lot

Texas Oracle Governor Greg Abbott Governor Abbot Tesla Elon Musk Austin Silicon Valley Governor Abbot Hewlett Packard Melissa Schwab California Alon Dallas Charles
Hewlett Packard Enterprise to Leave Silicon Valley for Texas

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:35 sec | 2 years ago

Hewlett Packard Enterprise to Leave Silicon Valley for Texas

"Valley may have gotten too expensive for one of the companies that helped make that region of technology hub, Hewlett Packard Enterprise plans to move its headquarters to Houston and says it's already building a state of the art campus in the Texas City. BlackBerry was among the big winners on Wall Street yesterday, stock in the former smartphone maker posted the biggest gains since 2015 BlackBerry will collaborate with Amazon Web services to develop and market and intelligent vehicle data platform called Ivy. It will use cloud connections to let automakers read sensor data and improve vehicle performance.

Hewlett Packard Enterprise Texas City Houston Amazon
Hewlett Packard Relocating Headquarters To Houston Area

Mark Levin

00:33 sec | 2 years ago

Hewlett Packard Relocating Headquarters To Houston Area

"Governor Abbott says Hewlett Packard Enterprise plans to relocate its global headquarters to Texas from California, according to the governor, relocating to the Lone Star State is becoming increasingly common. Do you know what he calls the best business climate in America are low taxes, high quality of life, top notch work force and tear. One universities create An environment where innovative companies like HP can flourish. HB will move from San Jose to spring, Texas, just outside of Houston. Additional jobs are expected in the coming

Governor Abbott Hewlett Packard Texas California America San Jose Houston
Salesforce stock jumps 12% after earnings top estimates

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:24 sec | 2 years ago

Salesforce stock jumps 12% after earnings top estimates

"Mom earnings beating estimates shares up now by 12.5% after hours. Salesforce rallying after topping analyst second quarter revenue and profit estimates, also raising its annual sales forecast, signaling robust demand for the company's customer relations software again shares searching Mohr than 12% in late trading. Hewlett Packard Enterprise gave an outlook for

Hewlett Packard Enterprise Salesforce Late Trading Mohr Analyst
Michelle Obama: "Vote for Joe Biden like our lives depend on it"

Steve Cochran

01:54 min | 2 years ago

Michelle Obama: "Vote for Joe Biden like our lives depend on it"

"Democrats have opened their national convention, virtually five of the United States of America. Joe Biden's Biden's grandkids grandkids kicked kicked off off proceedings proceedings with with the the Pledge Pledge of of Allegiance Allegiance a a choir choir of of people people from from each each state, state, then then saying saying the the national national anthem anthem Headline Headline Speaker Speaker Michelle Michelle Obama Obama stressed stressed the the importance importance of of voting for Joe Biden. If we have any hope of ending this chaos, we have got to vote for Joe Biden, like our lives depend on it. I know Joe. He is a profoundly decent man. Guided by faith. Obama accused President Trump of downplaying the Corona virus crisis for too long, she argues Trump's response to the outbreak has been marked by chaos division and in her words. Total and other utter lack of empathy. A group of Republicans spoke out against President Trump at the Democratic Convention, the number of Republicans included to John Kasich. The former Ohio governor, who said the U. S is on a path of division and dysfunction. Former New Jersey Governor Christine Todd Whitman said former vice President Biden could get the US back on track, not Donald Trump. Former Hewlett Packard CEO Meg Whitman also spoke Republican and a longtime CEO. And let me tell you, Donald Trump has no clue how to run a business, let alone an economy. So members of the Illinois congressional delegation have their own virtual meeting to talk about issues facing the country, a little U. S Senator Dick Durbin says when it comes to the middle class. It's time to get back to the base and whether we're talking about a living wage. Whether we're talking about card check membership efforts for protection in the workplace, time and again, we've got to come back to basic principles. Mayor Lightfoot was part of a round table discussion yesterday on social justice with Biden. She says economic empowerment gives people a feeling that they have a stake in their own future. And that will create a lasting change.

Joe Biden President Trump Michelle Michelle Obama Obama Governor Christine Todd Whitma United States Senator Dick Durbin Meg Whitman Hewlett Packard Vice President John Kasich JOE Democratic Convention America CEO Mayor Lightfoot Ohio Illinois New Jersey
YouTube listening time falls; and working safely during a pandemic

podnews

03:30 min | 2 years ago

YouTube listening time falls; and working safely during a pandemic

"Americans are spending less time listening to youtube according to new data from Edison Research, six percents fewer. Americans used it last week. According to the data Joe Rogan comes off the platform in September UK music, a group of music organizations have published guidance on working safely through covid nineteen, including in recording studios. The advice should be useful for PODCAST, hosts and editors as well, and if you work in the UK audio industry, fifteen percent of UK audio network members have submitted their salary information anonymously to help with pay transparency. If you haven't done that yet, step to it. In Canada they podcast exchange has launched programmatic advertising premium podcasts. Can now work with agencies to create deals that meet the needs of their clients whether it's buying by Genre Demo publisher region all language. audio boom has closed its Indian office while the podcast market in India has grown over the past five years. See Stewart last tells us it's not become big enough forest to sustain an operation there, and he adds that audio booms hosting platform will still be available to podcast in India. Of course well Aimar Dash Pandey writes about his journey with audio boom, which started in two thousand sixteen willing to that today. His company is now looking at exclusives with different platforms, including Gio sovereign by comparison, spotify now has over two hundred episodes of local spotify originals in India according to the podcast hub which looks out the company's investment that. Street has unveiled rebrand new website promoting their production services with brands. Kosto part is an open source hosting platform made for podcasters. It's due to launch later this year as part of an initiative called pod libra. Hopeful in two thousand. On July the eighteenth to the nineteen, th tickets are available now. One of the speakers is editor that's in panel with other on casts news editors the, podcast academy is doing a true crime workshop on July, the fourteenth and a Webinar mixing and managing your audio on August twelfth. Both events are free and nothing to do with podcasting. That apple's keynote has had an update with a new feature to play a slide show in a window. Those of us who do a lot of presenting in zoom were like Oh and after we reported as a bug player FM's RSS feed checker now identifies itself correctly, which is brilliant, so thank you for fixing that. PODCAST news new podcast for professional wrestling fans has been launched I to match with Jesse Cage. Go behind the scenes with wrestling's superstars. Across the world people are looking for APPs not for human bosses. The Gigi looks at the people behind the GIG economy, starting with the season on the APP. Almost everyone's used Uber. The original, grateful dead podcast, the goodell grateful dead cast has launched focusing on the band's working man's dead album, which was released fifty years ago this year technology untangled as a new fortnightly show from Hewlett, Packard enterprise produced by lower street at tries to decipher technologies rapid evolutions to work out what shape our future and junk food. Yum, the junkies Australian. Comedians David Neil Kitty Flanagan. Eating junk food in this new podcast current episode all about salt and vinegar potato chips, which in this country are in Purple Patch kids,

India UK Spotify Joe Rogan Youtube Stewart David Neil Kitty Flanagan Dash Pandey Wrestling Edison Research Apple Goodell Publisher Canada Editor Packard Enterprise Jesse Cage
Ex-GOP presidential candidate Carly Fiorina says she'll vote for Biden

Mark Thompson

00:16 sec | 2 years ago

Ex-GOP presidential candidate Carly Fiorina says she'll vote for Biden

"The way. Former Hewlett Packard CEO and Republican presidential candidate Carly Fiorina. Tells the Atlantic magazine she will vote for Joe Biden in November, saying she's made it very clear she can't support Donald Trump, who made fun of her looks when she ran against him for the GOP

Carly Fiorina Hewlett Packard Donald Trump Joe Biden Atlantic Magazine GOP CEO
Smarter Phones: Journey to the Palm-Sized Computer

Command Line Heroes

04:22 min | 3 years ago

Smarter Phones: Journey to the Palm-Sized Computer

"In the early nineties a Hammy Software. Developer took a stack of wood and carved into small blocks of various sizes. He carefully compared the weight of each walk. And when he found one that felt pocket-sized he takes a printout of a tiny monitor onto it then. He topped the block in his shirt pocket and walked around with it to see how it feel to be attached to a device. He was imagining a not so distant. Future where we'd all be doing the same thing if you think that guy's name was Steve Jobs you're wrong. His name was Jeff Hawkins and he co created the palm pilot when the iphone hit the market in two thousand seven critics and competitors questioned whether smartphone with a decade later. The question is how can a person succeed without one? Smartphones are ubiquitous. They're APPs allow us to do pretty much anything and the hardware running them says a lot about who we are. But as sexual as the IPHONE has been to the RISE OF OUR MOBILE LIVES. It wasn't the catalyst. This is the epic story of how earlier? Hand-held device pave the way for the smartphone. And it's the story of a developed team that stuck with that device for its entire journey. I'm surrounded Barak and this is command line heroes on ritual podcast from red hat. The smartphone concept has been around since star. Trek's try quarter in real life though the concept I translated into cell phones in Nineteen eighty-four bulky things that looked like bricks during the nineties. They got a bit smaller small enough for more to carry on saved by the bell but they were still just used for phone calls. Remember phone calls. Nothing smart was happening on mobile phones. But there was another piece of technology gaining traction. It was called a PD a a personal digital assistant a mobile device that acted as your personal information manager. We'll get to that moment. But at the time the tech industry was way more focused on the personal computer which we learned about an episode. Three when we looked at the al-Tair Eighty eight hundred. Everyone was so caught up in. What a personal computer was. Was this huge big beige box sitting under your desk. They couldn't imagine that you carry this thing around in your pocket Ed Colligan was VP of marketing at a nascent mobile software company called Palm in the early nineties palm was founded by Jeff. Hawkins the guy who walked around with a block of wood in his pocket. It was a big vision. It was that the future of computing personal computing is handheld computing and that there would be more transactions done on handheld computers in the future than on desktop computers. That's dawn to Pinski Palm CEO. At the time I know today when I say that it sounds like whatever that's logical but believe me. It was not logical at the time. We didn't understand why other people didn't understand it. Because you know we're had computing gone. Right it'd gone from. Computers are filled room to mainframe computers too many computers which were kind of misnamed to personal computers desktop computers we saw the inevitable march of. Moore's law and more and more power and smaller smaller packages palm started out developing information management software for PD. Casio was making called the Zimmer. They also made some synchronization. Software for Hewlett Packard's devices but those first GEN PD as weren't taking off and then the whole personal digital assistant dream looked like a lost cause after the high profile failure of apples effort the Newton. They were all too big too heavy and the software was too slow but the palm team wondered whether a new approach could change the

Jeff Hawkins Pinski Palm Palm Steve Jobs Developer Casio Hewlett Packard Zimmer Ed Colligan Barak Trek
Hewlett Packard Enterprise cuts cash flow outlook on coronavirus impact, shares down

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:15 sec | 3 years ago

Hewlett Packard Enterprise cuts cash flow outlook on coronavirus impact, shares down

"Reporting earnings after the bell we heard from Hewlett Packard enterprise IT sales fell short of Wall Street estimates signaling weaker corporate demand for servers amid macroeconomic concerns in the ongoing shift to cloud computing H. P. shares they are down by roughly four and a

Hewlett Packard H. P.
Thinking of data science initiatives as innovation initiatives

Linear Digressions

09:07 min | 3 years ago

Thinking of data science initiatives as innovation initiatives

"Hey Katie Hi ben we talk a lot about startups and startup things on this podcast. But there are a whole all set of businesses that need data science that maybe don't work in quite the same way is right for every facebook or Netflix. Search Google or tech I start up. There's lots and lots of lacy companies that have been around for a long time that that have been doing their thing since long before the internet or cloud computing or any of. That was a thing and that are trying to figure out how how to bring data science into their companies and I would bet moreover that a lot of people who listen to this podcast our data scientists who work at companies like that and it is a totally different dynamic than from companies. That are technically. It's you like Nice so this one is for all of you. You are listening to linear digressions. So this episode is fairly heavily inspired by a very famous book. It's like a business book called the innovators dilemma. It was written by Clay Christensen. Who just passed away this week so I was thinking about him a little bit the recording? That is yes. Yeah there's usually a delay of a few weeks so the beginning later but it's a book that is pretty popular with managerial and executive types and so for a lot of people I would bet that like your boss's boss might know this argument from business school or something but a lot of data scientists aren't familiar earlier with it but I think it's very Germane to the task that many data scientists have when they work in these established legacy companies so you're talking about the IBM's of the world I think IBM is a really good example But it's basically any company. Yeah I think any company could be a candidate for this. So here's here's the argument. Here is the question that Clay Christiansen is trying trying to answer in. Innovators still have that at any point. In time you can imagine that it was twenty years ago and you're looking at the market and pick an the industry pick pick a market and say what firm is the market leader in this industry right now and you would see some firm like the sears Roebuck. TUCK INC or Twa You get these big old companies IBM arguably and he's companies were so dominant in their fields. That it seemed like at the time they would never lose that edge and yet you fast forward. Twenty years thirty years forty years with striking regularity. They not only did lose that edge but they in many cases fell. Oh pretty far behind the rest of the market and basically what happens is as technology rolls along and innovates in new stuff comes out. These firms are are disproportionately likely to miss the next technological wave which then means that they get left behind as technology moves on without them right. H Hewlett Packard isn't on that podium anymore cracked yeah. This argument was originally had The computing industry as as is one of the core tenets but it. It's something that repeats itself and this argument is it's not a new argument. No this book was written in Nineteen Ninety-seven if if I'm not mistaken which is ages and ages well. It has withstood the test of time. I was actually listening to another podcast this weekend where the hosts were talking themselves about basically this exact hypothesis about how big companies that kind of miss the next thing and so the thing that in particular particular Clay Christensen was really interested in. What are the dynamics that are happening inside of a market inside of a firm that makes it so difficult for them to catch that next technical technological advance right because these companies aren't stupid they know that technically if you're in a computer company like you know that new computers are going to be coming out every year you know that the technology changes but in particular there's types of innovation technological innovation especially that are very disruptive and that require acquire you to change around the types of customers that you market to the business model or the the structure of your organization to accommodate say faster production schedules or different economies of scale? And so if you're one of these big incumbent firms you have almost by definition gotten very very good very very efficient at executing on whatever it is that the market is demanding of you right now like you are stupor good at giving in your customers. What it is they want and you make a lot of money doing it and so when something new comes along if very often pops up in a smaller side market? It's a distraction to you if you try to go capture this new technology and put it into your roadmap and usually when it first comes out. It's very good. It's not the new thing is usually not as good as the big establish things like. PC's are in terms of just pure computing power. They are not as powerful as mainframe computers. And so if you're a big mainframe computer manufacturer and you're looking at this new technology that's coming up and you're like this is not as good as the thing that I'm selling right now. Like why would I stop doing this. Extremely profitable extremely efficient. Well oiled machine process that I have to go make a bet on this technology that my customers are not asking for and that does not work as well as what I do right now and that's really interesting The the what doesn't work work as well as what I'm doing right now. Even if you think okay what if this was a mature product you may be stuck in a way of thinking of measuring in your product and this new product against metrics. That are not really as relevant to the new product like for example If you measure desktop machines and laptops obviously laptops key selling feature is mobility right and you may just not be prioritizing using that given that you sell desktop computers. And that's never been a thing you even thought about you. Don't evaluate your desktop computer on its portability Lord ability but you do evaluate your desktop computer on. Its speed up credibility number of other things. Yeah it's it's much less expensive. It's easier so much easier to repair You can use the keyboard that you like with it. I don't know so it's it's it seems like it's also a paradigm shift that even if you're willing to make that paradigm shift you're Kinda stuck. Yeah and the reason that we're talking about this on this podcast is i. I think that there is a lot of what we're talking about right now. Like I think data science in many cases is a technological innovation. And so if you are a good executive at a big legacy company you see startups. you see Google Amazon and facebook and if they haven't overtaken you already they're coming up very fast in your rear view mirror and so of course if you're running one of these big incoming in companies you have to figure out you have to confront the innovators dilemma. So it's like how are you going to you know. The data science is this disruptive technology and that if view don't confront that and come up with a strategy to deal with it you're going to be left behind. Somebody's GonNa pass you but at the same time. It's super super hard to turn an aircraft carrier and so if you're a data scientist WHO's working one of these companies. I've talked to so many people who work at these companies in data science teams and they really struggle against the momentum of the institution to just keep doing things the way that they've always been doing it because like we talked about before for there's just so much momentum behind that it's such a it's such a Well oiled machine for cranking out the thing that has always been cranking out and use a data the scientists. You're you're very small you maybe. If you're lucky you have a team and you are tasked with being this this this little germ of technological innovation. That in the long run is how the company is hoping to save itself from sliding into obsolescence as is everything becomes totally data driven. But at the same time you know you might be a team of ten people in a company of ten thousand and that's very very very difficult for you to pull the whole mass of of the organization toward your new way of doing

IBM Clay Christensen Google Facebook Scientist Executive Clay Christiansen Katie Hi Sears Roebuck Hewlett Packard Netflix TWA Tuck Inc Amazon