18 Burst results for "Hesseman Hesseman"

"hesseman " Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:42 min | 6 months ago

"hesseman " Discussed on Fresh Air

"On Monday show, Johnny Greenwood talks about two aspects of his music life as lead guitarist for the band radiohead and as a composer of film scores. He wrote the scores for Paul Thomas Anderson's films there will be blood, the master, phantom thread, and licorice pizza, and.

Johnny Greenwood radiohead Paul Thomas Anderson
"hesseman " Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

08:09 min | 6 months ago

"hesseman " Discussed on Fresh Air

"Saying. No. You know what they always say about how things are going to affect your later career. You've got a three year sentence for this, which was suspended, but you had to serve 90 days in prison. That was before it was hip to be arrested for drugs. Did this ever interfere with your acting career? Did you ever have to fill out an application there or anywhere else else that said, have you ever been arrested? No, I filled out many of those. I served my probationary period, in fact, I had three years of probation and at the end of two years my probation officer recommended in the court wisely saw fit to terminate my probation since I had clearly turned into an upstanding citizen and was doing my best to ridicule every holy institution in the western world, 6 nights a week on stage, but I was making a living, so I fit in somehow. Having your record expunged at least in California means that you can legally answer the question have you ever been convicted of a felony? No. I think what it really means is that they cross out your name somewhere in the files. But it's still clear that you were once convicted of a felony, but that you can legally say you weren't. It's never been any real problem for me. The committee was not the sort of theater group that would look upon me with disdain for that sort of activity. Right. In fact, whether I did that or not was of little consequence to them. Are you ever surprised when you wake up in the morning in the morning that you started? Not what I meant. But that you who got started on the committee satirizing everything ended up a TV star. Yeah, yes, I've turned into one of my own targets. But many of us have been saying that for a long time, we became the people we used to satirize. It's terrifying to consider and then on the other hand, you can say, well, of course I was young when I when I did all that, it's all changed now. My values are different. I don't some of them are some of them aren't. If none of them changed, I would assume that, you know, I was what do I want to say? Arrested Development. And I don't think that's the case. Howard hessman speaking with Terry gross, recorded in 1988. Heisman died Saturday. He was 81. Coming up, Justin Chang reviews the new Norwegian film, the worst person in the world. This is fresh air. This message comes from NPR sponsor, Xfinity mobile, choose wireless on the most reliable network nationwide or unlimited with 5G for $30 per month per line when you get four lines. Most reliable based on root metrics U.S. report results vary. Our film critic Justin Chang has a review of the new Norwegian film the worst person in the world. Its star renata won the best actress prize at last year's Cannes Film Festival, and the film has been shortlisted for the Academy Award for best international feature. Here's Justin. Two of the best movies I've seen in recent months have focused on the inner lives of restless, rudderless women in their 20s. You may have already seen licorice pizza, in which a lot of high end character tries to figure out what to do with her life, and who to do it with. Now a long comes the dazzling Norwegian dramedy, the worst person in the world. With an equally star making turn by an actor named renata writes. It takes place in present day Oslo, but its portrait of millennial angst is so moving and perceptive, it could be set just about anywhere. When we first meet Ryan's character, Julie, she's a whirlwind of indecision. She's a top notch medical student, until she suddenly decides she wants to study psychology. Then photography. She cycles through men just as impatiently. Ditching one boyfriend after another in quick succession. And that's just the first ten minutes. Soon Julie falls for a successful graphic novelist in his 40s, named axel. Played by Anders Danielson Lee. And moves in with him. At which point the movie settles into a sweetly romantic groove. But like Julie herself, it doesn't stay settled for long. The director joachim trier and his regular writing partner at skill vote. Give the movie a playfully novelist structure. 12 chapters book ended by a prologue and an epilogue. In an early chapter, Julie goes on vacation with axel, and several of his married friends, and is reminded of the age difference between them. Axel wants to have kids, but Julie doesn't know if she does. In the next chapter, after leaving Axl behind at a party, Julie crashes a wedding and meets a man roughly her age named Ivan, played by Herbert nordrum. Neither of them is single, and despite their mutual attraction, neither of them wants to cheat. What follows is one of the movie's richest, funniest sequences. A mix of gross out humor and aching sensuality. It does something that too few romantic comedies manage. Placing its heroin at a crossroads between two very different men you can't help but root for. Eventually Julie breaks up with axel and takes up with Ivan. But the worst person in the world is too bracingly honest to suggest that happily ever after is in the cards. Julie's upheaval continues. There are sudden tragedies and surprising reunions. Plus one psychedelic dream sequence, that stretches up her demons in a way that's a little too on the nose. We spend some time with Julie's divorced parents. Her mom is loving and supportive, but her dad is distant and doesn't seem to care much about her. Every chapter and every detail, even the ones that seem trivial or tossed off, add something to our understanding of who Julie is, and who she might become. This is hardly the first movie trier has made about the emotional and existential crises of young people. He was in his 30s when he made reprise, his dazzling 2006 debut, and Oslo, August 31st, a devastating portrait of addiction. Now he's made one of his best films with the worst person in the world. At 47, he may be removed from Julie's generation, but his empathy still shines through. At first glance, the distracted commitment phobic jewy may seem to embody some stereotypes about people her age. But trier doesn't reduce her to those assumptions. If anything, he's just as hard on the foibles of his own generation. In a way, axel serves as the director's stand in. He's an artist trying to make sense of Julie, and coming to a newfound appreciation of her, despite their differences. Anders Danielson Lee, who's worked with trier twice before, recently won best supporting actor from the national society of film critics for his quietly heartbreaking performance as axel. Still, the movie unquestionably belongs to renata rights. She nails Julie's every shift in mood and perspective. And she has a gift for clueing us into what Julie's thinking, even when she's saying nothing. The title of the movie is a bit deceptive. Nobody ever calls Julie the worst person in the world, but you suspect that's how she thinks of herself. When she considers the mistakes she's made, and the people she's hurt. But by the end of this exquisitely funny and melancholy movie. Julie has learned to make peace with her decisions, including the ones she has yet to make. She may not be the easiest character to figure out, but she's awfully hard, not to love. Justin Chang is film critic for the LA times. He.

Julie Justin Chang axel Howard hessman renata Anders Danielson Lee Julie falls Terry gross joachim trier Herbert nordrum Heisman Oslo Cannes Film Festival Ivan Academy Award NPR California Justin Axl
"hesseman " Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

07:59 min | 6 months ago

"hesseman " Discussed on Fresh Air

"Sometimes I think of it as sort of quaint and sometimes it's terrifying. But many people's seeming inability to differentiate between character that you're playing on television and who you really are, of course, this flies in the face of what I was saying 8 ten minutes ago about in television, the actor sort of becomes the character or some facet of the actor is exaggerated and becomes a key element of the character. But I also feel as though that's a problem that exists largely for those people and not for me. But what are some of the different ways people have seen you? Different different preconceptions people have had on you had about you depending on which role you've been playing at the time. Well, it was very strange during the production of WKRP. We had extraordinary support from the radio broadcast industry far more so than CBS TV. Thanks to radio, people knew that we were being bounced around the schedule, like a ping Pong ball for the entire four years. Radio people really followed the show and let their listeners know about it. And at the same time, radio people were very quick to talk about inaccuracies and inconsistencies in the studio setting of the show. And, you know, the only defense that one can offer is we're not doing a show about how radio works we're doing a show about a group of people who happen to work together at a radio station. There is this poetic license that we're taking. But in terms of a specific character, ask me a question, I can babble forever. In terms of the character, yeah, people thought I was really loose that I was always looking to get loaded. That I was some kind of party animal on my last legs, but I was going to go down at full tilt boogie speed. Hardly true, that had happened years before. Who did you pattern the distraction on who you played? Did you have an image in mind? I know you were dish jacket for a really brief period of time around 6 months. I was and I welcome this opportunity to say this on radio. Repeatedly in talking with print interviewers, I would try to stress the fact that I had been a professional actor for several years prior to my brief and humiliating stent as a radio. Personality, I put quotes around that. What was humiliating about it? Well, I think when you're doing radio, you like to feel it people are listening and enjoying what they hear. And in my case, what little feedback occurred indicated to me that wasn't necessarily the case. But it was great fun. And I patterned fever after my sense of myself as a disc jockey, but just with a little more with a sufficient degree of success that was invisible to me. I mean, I thought this guy is better than he thinks he is. He's really committed to doing a good job, but he's messed up in a number of times along the way. But he's still good because of his commitment. Beyond that, there were a number of radio personalities who were good friends of mine in San Francisco and in the 60s. And I think little bits and pieces of them would float through fever from time to time. Sort of little ghost visits. The late Tom Donahue. Big daddy Tom Donahue is sort of the father of progressive rock and roll radio in America was a close friend. His wife Rachel is a terrific radio personality. There were any number of just little elements of different people would occur to me. Howard hesban speaking with Terry gross in 1988. We'll hear more after a break. This is fresh air. This message comes from NPR sponsor, Xfinity mobile, choose wireless on the most reliable network nationwide or unlimited with 5G for $30 per month per line when you get four lines. Most reliable based on root metrics U.S. report results vary. What happens when you're pushed to the limit? And what does it take to go further? I'm Jay Williams, and those questions define my journey to the NBA and beyond. But overcoming limits is something we all have to do. So come with me, as I explore how. With some of the biggest names in sports business and culture. Listen to my new show, the limits from NPR. This is fresh air, and we're listening to Terry's 1988 interview with actor Howard hessman. Hesseman died Saturday at the age of 81. Did you have a hippie image when you first started acting? Well, when I first started acting, I was in the second grade. Actually, I think I probably actually started acting when I was about three years old. I was trying to act normal. But I became a professional actor in San Francisco with the committee and improvisational satirical political improvisational review company in 1965. And I looked fairly normal. I wasn't inside. But I think I had just done a play, so I had cut my hair. I looked sort of straight kind of square as we used to say. And that changed as the years went by, but I would come up with a role that would force me to cut my hair. Yeah, yes, I wore a lot of tie dye and bright velvet English trousers and patchwork boots and as often as not my hair was longer than my neck. But you know what's funny in the film steal your blues made in 1973. That all Sutherland Peter Boyle, John savage, they play the misfits, they play the outsiders and you play the suit. You play the establishment. I have photographs of myself taken the day before I cut my hair to get the look of that character. And the film incidentally was made in 19 71. I believe. 70 or 71 and released about a year later. But let's put it this way. I had hair that was close to between my shoulder blades and a long mustache, and I took all that off and discovered within the first week that none of my clothing worked any longer. When I was on the street, I can't really tell this story and the radio because it's not going to carry very well. But basically, people who normally would have winked or given me a high sign or something in a surreptitious manner. Sure passed you a joint or something? Yeah, basically. Many of us at that point in time walked with our eyes pretty much toward the ground for fear of tripping and meeting the ground suddenly face first. And when you saw somebody, you know, you kind of traveled up over the ankle bone the knee bone, the thigh bone up and checked out their face and then it was just random head eye neck movements from there. And I would discover people coming up at about chest level they were still smiling and then they would see this haircut would get all different. There was a willful attempt to avert their eyes. And I got very quickly, probably than two or three days that I appeared to be either on leave from boot camp or an incredibly crude undercover agent. And it was time to go buy some new clothes because this rock and roll drag didn't work anymore. Well, speaking of undercover agents didn't you once sell.

Tom Donahue WKRP Howard hesban fever NPR Howard hessman Hesseman CBS Terry gross San Francisco Jay Williams America Sutherland Peter Boyle Rachel NBA John savage Terry
"hesseman " Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

07:39 min | 6 months ago

"hesseman " Discussed on Fresh Air

"On root metrics U.S. report results vary. What happens when you're pushed to the limit? And what does it take to go further? I'm Jay Williams, and those questions define my journey to the NBA and beyond. But overcoming limits is something we all have to do. So come with me, as I explore how. With some of the biggest names in sports business and culture. Listen to my new show, the limits from NPR. Howard hessman, the actor best known for playing a radio DJ on WKRP in Cincinnati, died Saturday in Los Angeles due to complications from colon surgery. He was 81. In the 1960s, he performed in the San Francisco improv troupe the committee, which regularly performed at anti war and civil rights demonstrations. He had many minor roles in film and TV, including playing a hippie on dragnet. Before landing the part on WKRP in Cincinnati, which aired from 1978 to 1982 on CBS. Hesseman likely drew on his experiences as a San Francisco DJ for the character of Johnny fever. It is time for this town to get down. You got a gun in it. Doctor John F fever, and I have burning up in here. This one was also known for playing the teacher Charlie Moore on the sitcom head of the class, which aired from 1986 to 91, and for other roles, including a brief appearance in The Rock and roll mockumentary, this is spinal tap. He played the manager of a rival band who politely blows off the members of spinal tap after they try to chat him up in a hotel lobby. Where are you playing his head? Are you playing here? What are you doing the normal dome, whatever it is? It's terrific. Oh, yeah. That's a big place. That's good. How are you, Eddie? Great to see you, too. So really good to see you. Liam. Listen, we'd love to stand around and chat but we gotta sit down on the lobby, wait for the limo. Great to see you. Good days. Good days. And in an episode of the TV series ER, hessman played a man high on drugs found in the middle of the street. In the middle of the street, directed traffic. Well, I was just trying to calm the math as the there was so much negative energy that nobody could feel that universal connection that we all have. Right, right, right. What are you on, buddy? Oh, no, you know, when I touch you like this, we are exchanging matter on a subatomic part. Why, I don't know where your atoms are bent, so it's best that you just keeping yourself. What's this? I'm taking acid trip. Oh, you would be. Wrong. Yeah, LSD is a man-made chemical and psilocybin as a gift from God. Oh, the magic of mushrooms. Yes. Terry spoke to Howard hessman in 1988 when he was starring in the sitcom head of the class. Ahead of the classes in a way a reversal of the type of school shows that television had on say in the 1960s because in this case, the students are the overachievers and you as the teachers who's trying to loosen them up a little bit. I guess, yeah, that's accurate. But yet you're the authority figure which most TV viewers aren't used to seeing you as. Well, I guess they're not. I'm not used to seeing myself that way. But you know when you say it's sort of a reversal of the 60s, so are the 80s in a sickening sense. Reversal of the 60s, in which nobody wants to take responsibility for much of anything, but they want they want all the rewards in accoutrements of a responsible life. Thus the planet is sort of slowly dying off. At least that's my sort of pinhead view this morning. What are the parts of the character that you think of as yours? Character dimensions that you added that weren't in the way the character was initially conceived. Well, in television, particularly where everything is done in such a, I don't want to say a shorthand manner, but a shortcut manner. Actors have. Actors sort of are the character. It's not as though you're given a well delineated character that's been tried and tested over a period of time like stage characters or someone who's a character that's had the benefit of a long period of development of gestation and development in the writer's mind. The character is created and once it's sold, there is this enormous rush to make things work in a very tight time schedule with as tight a budget as possible. I mean, some of these things are certainly true in movies and in stage work as well. But I think more and more because of the voracious appetite of television as a medium, writers depend on personality quirks of the actor to delineate character and in the long run. My feeling is an actor is that there is no character. There's me, and I am limited by what this character says and does, according to the text. Were you anxious to get back into TV? After one day at a time and after KR P? I know, I don't think I was ever anxious to get into TV. Even now, on an almost daily basis, there's a certain sense of to quota friend joyful dread each morning. You know, I like to work. I like the actors work. I love doing it. But there is something about television and particularly series production that saps me of the will to live. But other than that, it's great. Where does the joyful dread? What's the dread part of the equation? Well, most of television is so predictable. I mean, that's not limited to television either. A great deal, a great many stage plays that we see now in a great many movies. Are so predictable in terms of the plot in terms of the action in terms of what little character revelation and delineation occurs. You know where they're going. You're not surprised. And I suppose, you know, I have these standards that are relatively impossible for me or anyone else to meet in part because I can't define them. But I'm just for the most part disappointed when I look at television, particularly network television. Do you find that television viewers preconceptions of you very according to who you're playing on TV? You know, when you were Johnny fever, do they think of you as being a high, someone who was always high and a real anti authority kind of figure, then when you were on one day at a time as someone who was going to marry Bonnie Franklin and that was the teacher and head of the class, do people have a different idea of who you are based on who you're playing? Absolutely..

WKRP Howard hessman Johnny fever Hesseman Charlie Moore Cincinnati hessman Jay Williams San Francisco John F NPR NBA CBS Liam Los Angeles Eddie U.S. buddy Terry Bonnie Franklin
"hesseman " Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

08:09 min | 6 months ago

"hesseman " Discussed on Fresh Air

"Yeah, but that's the joy of singing him, is he so. He's such a writer of the complexities of the human heart. Did it give you any good advice on singing his songs? Yes, he did. He wants the truth of the character. Steve is really not into beautiful sounds. He says, don't make it beautiful. Don't feel you have to sing the song beautifully. Yes, he cares about the notes being sung properly. But what he cares about is because he's such a great lyricist, is the communication of the lyrics as though people are thinking and feeling on pitch. It's not about how beautiful you sound. That must have been good for you to hear because you're known as an actor not as a singer even though you've been in a whole bunch of musicals. So it meant that acting the part was what was really important, not just having like a gorgeous voice. Absolute, I think all of the great son time performers Angela Lansbury named them. They're all great actors as well. He wants actors who can sing. He doesn't want strictly singers. And I also, I don't know if I can articulate this properly, but there's an elegance to his writing. You don't need to embellish it. His lyrics are the communicators. You don't have to be clever with them. He is already so clever in the best sense and smart, that the best thing you can do is take a direct route to his work and not try to embellish Steve Sondheim. You're a grandmother if I have this right was an actress or just a devotee of music theater. My grandparents, both of my paternal grandparents were actors in the Polish theater. I grew up in a suburb of buffalo, cheek to walk up, but they there was a very active Polish community and theater. And so they did plays and musicals in Polish, as well as English. And my grandmother, I never knew my grandfather died before. I knew him, but my grandmother lived with me when I was a child up to the time my father died when I was 8. And then we moved away from my grandmother, but we shared a bedroom. And I always say she was anti mahem influence in my life. She loved music. She loved dance she had a vivacious personality, and she even had her own radio show on the Polish radio. Station, and she wrote a comedy hour with her friend. This is where I guess my love of theater and my perhaps my talent comes from. Well, and also the idea that you could actually become an actress because you shared a bedroom with one. Yes, I did. And she was, she was very theatrical, and she had very theatrical Friends. They would come over and just I could hear them. We would be put to bed, my brother and I, but nana was in the living room with her polish friends and they'd get drunk and they'd sing and they'd dance and you know as I said she was really rather anti type and but she had a great effect on my life. And when my dad died, I was 8 years old. We moved away from nana. And it's only years later that I realized what a profound effect that had on me. So you grew up in Chicago, which is a suburb of buffalo, is say it was a kind of industrial suburb of buffalo. Well, there were some factories, but it wasn't. It was very much on the outskirts of buffalo, but no, not that far in the suburbs. I was within walking distance of my church and my schools, and I walked to mass every day. We had to hear mass every morning and it was a Polish Catholic upbringing. And my mother worked in this air conditioning factory called hudai that made parts for air conditioners. And she was something of an engineer. My dad worked at a Polish newspaper in Buffalo until the time he died. And he died of an aortic aneurysm when he was 49 years old. So you got a scholarship at Juilliard. And the way I've read it reported in the press is that you got a $1000 scholarship because you are the most hardworking economically needy student. Did they literally say that? They certainly told me when I got the scholarship that they knew I was in need financially and that I was to use the money to live on the following year and I think the next day I was in the passport office getting passport to Europe and spent all the money traveling around Europe alone for two months. Did you feel just a little bit guilty taking the money that was meant to enable you to attend Juilliard and instead traveling to what France? I traveled to London than I went and took the ferry to Paris and then I traveled through the Alps to Switzerland and then to Italy and then to Greece, and I didn't feel any guilt whatsoever because it was one of the greatest things I've ever done to this day I will tell you that it was one of the greatest things I've ever done and one of the gutsiest because I was a young woman alone. I was 19. I was staying in the cheapest hotels, you know, walking the streets of Paris and Rome and just discovering all of these extraordinary I would spend hours in museums and sitting in the cheapest cafe and just thinking it was the most romantic, incredible thing. And it informed me as a human being and so no. I have no guilt. When you started doing TV work on the show sybil starring simple shepherd and you were her best friend cynical wisecracking, your family was still in the east coast and you were basically like commuting to Hollywood to shoot it. You were already a mother, right? Yes. I had resisted doing television for years, which is why I spent so so many years in the theater. I was already in my 40s when I was offered sybil. And then it was a question of it's really time to make a career move and this would be good for your career and also good for your finances because it was clear that my theater our theater salaries my late husband and I weren't probably going to earn enough working in the theater to pay for private schools or college education. So it was a very, very tortured, very big decision. They were really weren't shooting a lot of television in New York in the 90s. Certainly not sitcoms. So for three and a half years, I commuted. But it opened up my career. It really did. Christine baranski speaking with Terry gross, recorded in 2020. Baranski currently stars in the HBO series the Gilded Age, and she'll return in another season of the good fight. After a break will remember actor Howard hessman, best known for playing a DJ in the series WKRP in Cincinnati. And Justin Chang reviews the new Norwegian film, the worst person in the world. I'm Dave Davies, and this is fresh air. This message comes from NPR sponsor, Xfinity mobile, choose wireless on the most reliable network nationwide or unlimited with 5G for $30 per month per line when you get four lines. Most reliable based.

buffalo Steve Sondheim Polish theater Angela Lansbury Steve nana aortic aneurysm sybil starring Europe Paris Buffalo Chicago Switzerland Greece France Italy Rome London sybil
"hesseman " Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

07:51 min | 6 months ago

"hesseman " Discussed on Fresh Air

"Own law firm. Understood. So many of your roles in the past, on TV and on Broadway, we're kind of wise cracking slightly alcoholic women. And there's comedic elements in the good fight. But your role in your character, she's got biting sarcasm when she needs it. But she's not a kind of snarky cynical comic character. There's a lot of just real drama there. Do you think that your voice changes when you're doing a comedic role versus a more dramatic role? What an interesting question. I think I had to find the voice of Diane during my years of the good wife because I was I had done so much comedy and my real challenge with playing Diane was assuming that I was that powerful woman, you know, the senior partner in a law firm that she created that she had a kind of authority and gravitas. And I needed not to work at it because people who are serious minded and authoritative really don't work at it. They just are that so I've learned to calibrate the sound and the tone and the manner of that character to be just much more understated as the years have gone by, which is why I've loved an opportunity to be on the air for all of those seasons because I keep refining the character and refining the performance. My comedic roles were always much more flamboyant and physical in nature, certainly my stage work. So yes, you know, I've loved the opportunity to vary my performance style and have people see another aspect of me. What did you learn about your voice through singing lessons? And I don't even mean just your singing voice, but just your voice in general. Oh, my voice, you know. I went to a studied acting at The Juilliard School and we didn't have a single class for musical comedy. So I never trained my voice at Juilliard and then I was always extremely shy of singing. So singing to me when I finally began studying in my mid 20s, it was an emotional journey. As it is for a lot of people, one feels very vulnerable singing. But I didn't particularly remember a nun, I think it was in 8th grade who humiliated me when I sang a song she made fun of me. And I still think that moment had a real traumatic effect on me because I couldn't I couldn't sing publicly unless I was sort of doing a jokey voice. I couldn't just sing in an audition and feel comfortable. So my journey is a performing artist a musical performing artist. It was a very slow slow journey and the teachers who helped me were helping me pass a place of fear. And I learned that I had a very wide range is what I learned and that's what I've learned, I think, is an actor is how wide my emotional range can be as a plate a lot of different kinds of roles. And I've played a lot of different styles. So that you didn't know that you had that focal range until I did not show you that you had it. Exactly. I started studying in my mid 20s and by my late 20s, I was working with someone who started me singing leader and art songs and said, you have a very wide range over three octave range. And then I got really turned on and I started studying opera Arias. Stephen Sondheim is such a brilliant composer, but the intervals he writes in songs are sometimes just they're not typical. They are not the typical resolutions. They're not the typical melody lines. And it always strikes me as a non singer, that they must be more complicated to learn because they're unusual. So what do you think? I think one approaches his work with terror and humility. And I've had the and I think that's the best place to be as an artist, but I've had the pleasure and privilege of doing at least 8 Sondheim musicals. Unfortunately, never an original Broadway production. My first Sondheim musical was company when I played April that was shortly after I graduated from Juilliard. But yes, always his music is challenging because he's just such a brilliant man that you try and live up to his level. When you're learning a new Sondheim song, what do you do to get it into your head so that you know exactly where to go melodically? Well, when I did Sweeney Todd at the Kennedy Center, that was a full production. And I started months in advance to learn it, and I learned it phrase by phrase, and I did it by repetition, repetition, repetition of those, as you said, those intervals and misses lovet is cockney. So you have to sing with a cockney accent, which is also very challenging to make yourself intelligible. I can only tell you that the work I did was so exacting and took months of very careful preparation and I worked with my singing teacher every day to get those songs so into my voice into my vocal met because also misses lovet goes you can her range is very high. At moments she's almost singing in an operatic range with Sweeney and then sometimes it's a vaudeville belt. So there's a high range middle range and low range. So it's by far one of the most challenging, if not the most challenging theatrical piece I ever did because I don't sing all the time. I'm not known primarily as a musical performer. So I found it really daunting. But I can only tell you when you pull it off, you get such a high when I did do perform misses love it. It was just one of the great moments of my career performing it. Would you illustrate for us the point that I was trying to make that Stephen's hanim writes very wonderful but very unusual melodies that the voice doesn't necessarily automatically know what to do because they're not typical like resolutions. Can you sing a line that you had trouble learning? It's so interesting but challenging. Let me see if I can every day a little death is a really odd song from a little night music, not odd song, but every day a little in the parlor in the bed in the curtains in the windows in the buttons in the bread every day you little sting in the heart anymore every move and every breath and you hardly feel a thing brings up perfect little doubt now there's all those minor tones, but they reflect the characters that melancholy in her marriage, don't they? I mean, I think I may have gotten one little note wrong there because I haven't sung that song in ages, but can you hear it's not that easy to learn..

Diane Sondheim Juilliard School Stephen Sondheim Arias Juilliard Sweeney Todd Kennedy Center hanim Sweeney Stephen
"hesseman " Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

03:15 min | 6 months ago

"hesseman " Discussed on Fresh Air

"Our guest Christine baranski is costarring in the new HBO series the Gilded Age, which is set in the 1880s in New York City. She plays Ada, a society matron who despises the newly wealthy people moving into her Fifth Avenue neighborhood. In this scene she and her sister Agnes played by Cynthia Nixon received a letter from their niece whose recently discovered she's penniless after her father died. What did she say? She thanks you for the letter that you did not show me. And for the tickets that you purchased without my knowledge. She means to join us here just as soon as she has closed the house and sold her furniture. What a relief. A relief. And who is to support her? Exactly. Me. With the van Rhine money, which was not achieved at no post to myself. You were allowed the pure and tranquil life of a spinster. I was not. I'm very grateful. So you should be. Well, I'm glad she's coming. And if my letter played a part in her decision, then I'm glad I sent it. I doubt it was your letter. More likely she has discovered her father left her without a penny to her name. Henry couldn't provide for a dog in a ditch. He never kept a dollar in his pocket. If there were women or drink within 500 miles. Magnus. Our brother has died. Our brother, with whom we have had no connection, these many years. We should have gone for the funeral anyway. Wasn't worth an uncomfortable day of travel to make sure Henry was dead. Christine baranski started her career in theater and went on to costar in the TV series sybil and The Big Bang Theory and films, including reversal of fortune and the birdcage. She's been in several stage and film musicals, including Chicago, maim, and several by Stephen Sondheim, including into the Woods, follies and Sweeney Todd. Today we're going to listen to Terry's 2020 interview with Christine baranski. They spoke when baranski was starring in the legal drama series the good fight playing the smart progressive litigator Diane Lockhart, a character spun off from the series the good wife. They began with the scene from the good fight. Polanski's character has become a partner at a majority African American firm, which is eventually acquired by a much larger multinational firm. In this scene she's talking with a senior partner of the larger firm, describing how powerful men are behaving like they're above the law in cases she's arguing in court. John plays the partner. Is there some sort of get out of jail free card for rich and powerful clients? Not that I'm aware of, why do you ask? Well, you assign me to pro Bono cases and you want me to do my best? Yes, of course. Well, there is something going on. We're by certain people. Rich and powerful people don't have to comply with subpoenas or judicial rulings. And can end a lawsuit if they think the ruling will go against them. You've experienced this. Yes. And Brian neef, one of your lawyers upstairs seems to have benefited from one of those cases. And you're investigating this. Yes. Now, I'm sure you will agree that we.

Christine baranski Cynthia Nixon HBO Agnes Henry Ada baranski Diane Lockhart New York City Magnus African American firm Stephen Sondheim Sweeney Todd follies Polanski Terry Chicago Bono John
"hesseman " Discussed on Brain Inspired

Brain Inspired

07:56 min | 6 months ago

"hesseman " Discussed on Brain Inspired

"A conversation stumper. I don't know if you ever viewed the YouTube of my talk at Harvard where John lisman was the discussant. And I posed that question at the end of my talk, St. John, when you get up here, you'll tell us how you store a number in a synapse. And he got out and gave a lengthy discussion in which he never brought that topic up. This was a very unusual in that I got a rebuttal. I would have another chance to speak. And I said, John, I'm going to give you another chance. How do you start a number in this interview? Come on, John. And the audience began to laugh. And he stood up, and he would not answer the question. And I had somewhat similar experience with Jean Pierre Chang, much more recently. In fact, the question made him so angry that he wouldn't allow the debate to be uploaded to YouTube. I was going to say, I didn't see that one. So and I've gone so far often in my talks to say, come on, guys. I can offer you two alternatives. I mean, it's not as if it's impossible to think of an answer or what a just said. And I often proceed to say, well, look, the synapse is usually conceptualized by computational neuroscience is a real valued variable. And distance direction probability, they're all real valued variables, right? So you can always represent a real valued variable by a real valued variable, right? So we could say, well, if the synapses, this, if the weight is this big, then the distance is that fire, right? And if the way does this big, you want to go there? I found practically no one wants to go there. Oh, you don't want to go there. Here's a radically different alternative. Suppose we have a bank, the people who talk about synaptic plasticity are very vague about how many states are synapsed and assumed. But one school of thought thinks they're binary. Binary. I like that. That's a switch. Okay, so we'll have an array of binary synapses. And we throw this synapse to this state and this and that's the zero state. And now we've got something just like a computer register. You like that story? No, most people don't like that story. All right, what's your story? And at that point, all I get is hand waves. Well, you see there are lots of synapses and it's a pattern that's synapses. Well, could you say something about the pattern? I mean, how does the pattern for 11 different for the pattern from three, for example, can you shed a little light on that? People do not want to answer that question. Because to answer that question is to admit that there are symbols in the brain. And even to this day, many people do not want to go there. And what's your answer? My answer is that it isn't in the synapses. I mean, I point out that there are several labs around the world that are busy studying how to use bacterial DNA as the memory elements in a conventional computer. Any engineer, anybody familiar with the computing machines that actually work. And that we know how they were. Once you show them a polynomial type, and explain that any nucleotide can be adjacent to any other nucleotide. Any engineer worth of site says, wolf, I could store numbers in that, like nobody business. In fact, one of the people who introduced me in a talk I gave a couple of years ago in the introduction showed a very grainy video of a running horse where the entire video had been passed through a bacterial DNA. Just to drive home the fact that if you're looking for a place to store numbers well. That's what we know. Yeah, we know DNA stores the genetic code, but there are other possibilities as well. I'm wondering what your current so DNA is one possibility, right? Where a code could be stored intracellularly. And to you, the key, I don't know if I don't know what your current thoughts on this because it used to be that you didn't know that there were a handful of intracellular mechanisms whereby you might store these things. Proteins degrade a little too fast, right? But then there are polymerases like RNA could be one of the substrate DNA could be a substrate, but as DNA fast enough, what's your current thinking on what might be the substrate? Well, I'm still sticking with polynucleotides, though I lean much more strongly to RNA than to DNA, probably complex with a protein to stabilize it. My thinking has taken a huge boost lately from a wonderful paper by a young guy in Gabby maiman's lab of the Rockefeller named hesseman dean. It's just appeared in general theoretical biology and the last couple of weeks. And he is almost astonishing guy because he has a truly deep knowledge of theoretical computer science, much deeper than mine. I mean, he really knows the lambda calculus, right? Whereas for me, it's just kind of my name. But at the same time, he really has a much deeper knowledge of RNA biology than I do, but the most astonishing thing is that those two things are about as far apart as. As you can readily imagine, but he has this very rare mind that can bring those two things together. And he lays out a detailed story about computation performed at the RNA level in which RNA is both the symbols and the machinery that operates on the symbols. And you use builds on the lambda calculus. He lays out in his appendix in great detail. An RNA machine that will add arbitrarily large numbers. Now for all those computational neuroscientists out there in your audience, I claim that that has never been done by a CNN. And that it never will be done. At least by a non recurrent by a straight through the CNN and even if it's done by a recurrent one, right? They're going to result resort to that old recycling, because you're going to have to store addition is inescapably cereal, right? So you've got the you've got to do the earlier the less significant digits. First and you have to store those result and then transfer the carry to the next one and so on. So you need memory. And so how do you get a memory well? That's where recurrent nets come in, right? You keep sending them around the loop..

John lisman Jean Pierre Chang YouTube John St. John Harvard Gabby maiman hesseman dean CNN
"hesseman " Discussed on AP News

AP News

04:10 min | 6 months ago

"hesseman " Discussed on AP News

"Out of the hospital The perils will require a doctor's prescription The U.S. is working to ramp up diplomatic and financial pressure on Russia the UN Security Council is set to meet Monday to discuss threats to international peace and security U.S. ambassador Linda Thomas Greenfield says Russia will have to answer for its troop buildup near Ukraine's borders investigators trying to determine the cause of a Colorado wildfire that destroyed more than a thousand homes and buildings and killed at least one person last month are looking at a possible link to underground coal fires fires have long smoldered at old coal mines in the area U.S. officials are tracking more than 200 such mine fires in more than a dozen states Emergency officials in Ohio are trying to find the source of carbon monoxide that sent at least 11 people at a hotel to the hospital More than half were children The Marysville fire chief tells the Columbus dispatch they had all been in the hotel's pool area And finally actor Howard hessman has died from complications from colon surgery AP entertainment correspondent Margie Tsar aleta had to look at his career This is doctor Johnny fever just doing my job Howard hessman had been a radio DJ which made him all the more believable in his most famous role as doctor Johnny fever on WKRP in Cincinnati He earned two Emmy nominations for that role So we're too smart to go to dances too Hessman also found success playing history teacher Charlie Moore on the sitcom head of the class and as Anne Romano's husband on one day at a time He had roles in this is spinal tap Billy Jack and doctor Detroit Howard hessman was 81 I'm Ben Thomas a P news The Supreme Court has issued a ruling on a Texas abortion law that is sure to continue to legal battle A near ban on abortions in Texas will remain in effect after the Supreme Court ruled Friday that abortion providers will be allowed to sue the state over a law that makes abortion illegal after cardiac activity is detected That's around 6 weeks before many women know they're pregnant Researchers at the University of Texas have found that the number of abortion statewide fell by 50% compared with September of 2020 the AP has reported that Texas women seeking to end pregnancy have been seeking plan B medication in Mexico or turning to clinics in far flung states because those nearby can't keep up with the increase in demand The Texas law was designed to put obstacles in the way of legal challenges and so far that strategy has worked The case is almost certain to return to the Supreme Court after review by the 5th U.S. circuit Court of Appeals which has twice voted to allow enforcement the court's conservative majority also seems likely to roll back abortion rights in a Mississippi case that was argued last week although that decision is not expected until the spring Jennifer King Washington You could find yourself stuck on a snowy highway this winter or have your travel plans delay because of a shortage of snow plow drivers And that could be a problem from the east coast to the west as winter storms start dumping snow today From Pennsylvania to Washington state they're having trouble finding snow plow drivers The jobs are comparatively low paying They often involve working odd hours and dangerous conditions and they require a commercial driver's license An industry official says states will be shifting resources where they can and trying to make sure that roads are clear during peak driving times While they try to convince potential drivers that as he puts it jumping in a plow in the middle of the night at Christmas time is a good career choice I'm Rita foley The new German Chancellor olef Schultz is holding talks with Europe leaders and senior officials on issues including Eastern Europe tensions Schulz has met with French president Emmanuel Macron as both nations are making efforts towards the deescalation of tensions between Russia and Ukraine the leaders spoke during Schultz's first visit abroad after his coalition government was sworn in earlier in the week the German Chancellor is next in Brussels to meet with European Union and NATO officials Schultz says we all view the situation on the Ukraine border with concern The talks come as president Joe Biden this week moved to take a more direct role in diplomacy between Ukraine and Russia I'm Charles De Ledesma Thank you for.

Howard hessman Johnny fever Linda Thomas Greenfield U.S. Margie Tsar aleta Russia WKRP Hessman Charlie Moore Anne Romano Texas Supreme Court UN Security Council Ukraine Ben Thomas Marysville Billy Jack U.S. circuit Court of Appeals Jennifer King Washington
"hesseman " Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:49 min | 6 months ago

"hesseman " Discussed on KOMO

"Oakville from ABC News I'm chuck severson going to the Super Bowl for the first time in 33 years The Cincinnati Bengals beating the chiefs in Kansas City minutes ago like some other playoff games recently It came down to a field goal This one by Evan McPherson The kick is up The coffin nails Bam Bam Bam Team at Cincinnati's 700 W 27 to 24 Bengals and AFC title game soon tonight the Los Angeles Rams play the San Francisco forty-niners for the NFC final Nothing official yet from Tampa Bay quarter back Tom Brady and whether he'll retire as various reports say his family denies it ABC's Philip off Following ESPN's reporting social media lit up sparking massive confusion TB twelve's own sports company posted a tribute and then took it down Shortly after that Brady's agent saying in a statement Tom will be the only person to express his plans with complete accuracy The UN Security Council to meet tomorrow on the Russian troops near Ukraine's situation U.S. ambassador to the United Nations and Security Council president Linda Thomas Greenfield says Russia has been saying it has legitimate concerns We're going to go in the room prepared to listen to them but we're not going to be distracted by their propaganda And we're going to be prepared to respond to any disinformation that they attempt to spread during this meeting Thomas Greenfield on ABC's this week Russia wants a guarantee that Ukraine doesn't join NATO Howard Hesseman who played the morning DJ on the sitcom WKRP in Cincinnati and the actor turned history teacher on the head of the class has died at 81 Complications from colon surgery as Johnny fever Relax open your ears real wide and say.

chuck severson Evan McPherson Oakville Cincinnati Bengals Los Angeles Rams ABC News Security Council niners Super Bowl chiefs Bengals AFC Linda Thomas Greenfield Kansas City Cincinnati Tom Brady NFC ABC Tampa Bay
 Howard Hesseman, star of 'WKRP in Cincinnati,' dies at 81

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 6 months ago

Howard Hesseman, star of 'WKRP in Cincinnati,' dies at 81

"Actor actor actor actor Howard Howard Howard Howard Hesseman Hesseman Hesseman Hesseman has has has has died died died died from from from from complications complications complications complications from from from from colon colon colon colon surgery surgery surgery surgery according according according according to to to to his his his his manager manager manager manager has has has has been been been been was was was was eighty eighty eighty eighty one one one one marches marches marches marches are are are are a a a a letter letter letter letter with with with with a a a a look look look look at at at at his his his his life life life life hi hi hi hi this this this this is is is is Dr Dr Dr Dr Johnny Johnny Johnny Johnny fever fever fever fever just just just just doing doing doing doing my my my my job job job job Howard Howard Howard Howard has has has has been been been been had had had had been been been been a a a a radio radio radio radio DJ DJ DJ DJ which which which which made made made made him him him him all all all all the the the the more more more more believable believable believable believable in in in in his his his his most most most most famous famous famous famous role role role role as as as as Dr Dr Dr Dr Johnny Johnny Johnny Johnny fever fever fever fever on on on on WKRP WKRP WKRP WKRP in in in in Cincinnati Cincinnati Cincinnati Cincinnati he he he he earned earned earned earned two two two two Emmy Emmy Emmy Emmy nominations nominations nominations nominations for for for for that that that that role role role role we're we're we're we're too too too too smart smart smart smart to to to to go go go go to to to to dances dances dances dances still still still still has has has has been been been been also also also also found found found found success success success success playing playing playing playing history history history history teacher teacher teacher teacher Charlie Charlie Charlie Charlie Moore Moore Moore Moore on on on on the the the the sitcom sitcom sitcom sitcom head head head head of of of of the the the the class class class class and and and and does does does does and and and and Romano's Romano's Romano's Romano's husband husband husband husband on on on on one one one one day day day day at at at at a a a a time time time time he he he he had had had had roles roles roles roles in in in in this this this this is is is is spinal spinal spinal spinal tap tap tap tap Billy Billy Billy Billy Jack Jack Jack Jack and and and and doctor doctor doctor doctor Detroit's Detroit's Detroit's Detroit's actor actor actor actor Howard Howard Howard Howard Hesseman Hesseman Hesseman Hesseman has has has has died died died died from from from from complications complications complications complications from from from from colon colon colon colon surgery surgery surgery surgery according according according according to to to to his his his his manager manager manager manager has has has has been been been been was was was was eighty eighty eighty eighty one one one one marches marches marches marches are are are are a a a a letter letter letter letter with with with with a a a a look look look look at at at at his his his his life life life life hi hi hi hi this this this this is is is is Dr Dr Dr Dr Johnny Johnny Johnny Johnny fever fever fever fever just just just just doing doing doing doing my my my my job job job job Howard Howard Howard Howard has has has has been been been been had had had had been been been been a a a a radio radio radio radio DJ DJ DJ DJ which which which which made made made made him him him him all all all all the the the the more more more more believable believable believable believable in in in in his his his his most most most most famous famous famous famous role role role role as as as as Dr Dr Dr Dr Johnny Johnny Johnny Johnny fever fever fever fever on on on on WKRP WKRP WKRP WKRP in in in in Cincinnati Cincinnati Cincinnati Cincinnati he he he he earned earned earned earned two two two two Emmy Emmy Emmy Emmy nominations nominations nominations nominations for for for for that that that that role role role role we're we're we're we're too too too too smart smart smart smart to to to to go go go go to to to to dances dances dances dances still still still still has has has has

Howard Howard Dr Dr Dr Dr Johnny Johnny John Fever Fever Fever Hesseman Hesseman Complications Complications Co Colon Colon Colon Colon Cincinnati Howard Howard Howard Howard Romano Wkrp Emmy Emmy Emmy Emmy Nomination Detroit Charlie Charlie Charlie Charlie Moore Moore Moore Moore Billy Billy Billy Billy Jack Jack Jack Jac Howard Howard Howard Howard Hesseman Emmy Emmy Emmy Emmy Nomination
"hesseman " Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"hesseman " Discussed on 850 WFTL

"There is another reboot remake in the works for HBO Max which means I would have to get this head of the class from nineteen eighty six well they want to do it again no clear details on the reboot otherwise you know just the same stuff same basic premise but back in the days we had Howard Hesseman A. K. A. Dr Johnny fever from WKRP in Cincinnati as the head of the class I am wondering why no one has done a remake reboot revamp of W. K. my gosh the radio show these are interesting times make sure to get a little exercise by dancing singing picking up all the drop legos whatever one of seven nine.

WKRP Cincinnati W. K. HBO Howard Hesseman A. K. A. Dr Jo
"hesseman " Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"hesseman " Discussed on WGN Radio

"Giving credit where credit's due Jim Ellis Jim Ellis I always love the phone I was love the closing credits ten ten ten ten ten yeah what a game what a great cast characters too long Anderson please please Howard Hesseman and the E. every thanksgiving man you got to watch the I swear I I swear that I thought turkeys could fly so there's another classic theme song we got the Olympic games on NBC composed by by John Williams and then we got to a bunch more here rawhide classic classic TV theme song three one two nine eight one seven two hundred is Robert on WGN hi Robert all morning I think it'll get smart oh sure and then Miami Vice yeah Miami vice's classic that was also a big hit to that debt charted and what do you know and that was back when instrumentals would still be able to be on the radio on the radio there yeah yeah I think you're a Miami Vice was probably one of the most eight years you know because they always showed our girls and like really nice the keys when they open up well yeah and then the the one of the reasons why it took so one of the reasons why it took so long for refer Miami Vice to come out on DVD was the music rights because they would play like ten different songs that were very very popular at the time and that's what people were like when is this going to come out on DVD it finally did because because they have to go through all those rights it's called money yeah all right we have a great morning right take care about their job was three one two nine eight one seven two and is the phone number here is mats on WGN I'm at Hey man how are you going to mention that one came to mind and that's the greatest American hero that's the last stop in yeah I think that song was more popular than the show it was popular than the show the show was popular you know did you had a nice little run to it but that song was huge that's all that with that thing I think went to number one I read just for memory sake I matched your prayer to get apart be horrible but I love BJ and the bear and the when I was like I don't know I couldn't remember I don't remember but the theme from BJ and the bear do you remember the show though tried to run but with with the monkey yeah yeah yeah I know I never understood what I never understood why the monkey was called the bear yep yep yep so I don't know okay Matt thanks bye target team and let's put let's play will be the greatest American hero yeah let's do it.

Howard Hesseman NBC John Williams Robert Miami Jim Ellis Jim Ellis Anderson Matt
"hesseman " Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"hesseman " Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Awards two thousand two crane wins for best rock song drops of Jupiter by the way they're great on record not so much alive birthdays I'm on birthdays today one world golf hall of Famer gene Sarazen won the masters two time winner of the U. S. open won the British open and three time winner of the PGA John Steinbeck great author grapes of wrath cannery row of mice and men east of Eden born on this day in nineteen oh two John Connolly former governor of Texas who was shot during the Kennedy assassination in nineteen sixty three died nineteen ninety three Mrs Paul Newman Cammy Award winning actress three faces of eve is ninety two time academy award winning actress Butterfield eight in who's afraid of Virginia Woolf Elizabeth Taylor born on this day in nineteen thirty two birthday for Howard Hesseman it is WKRP in Cincinnati today turning eighty and Happy Birthday Neal schon guitarist Santana journey sixty six and born on this day in nineteen sixty three turning fifty seven today born in Wichita falls Texas one star X. rated movies Barbara dare three times adult video news award winner and is a member as she should be the adult video news hall of fame governor abit health officials today will present their plan to deal with the potential corona virus outbreak in the state health experts are warning facial hair can pose a problem if you want to avoid contracting the virus Elizabeth Warren is partnering with former mayor who Leon Castro to rally supporters tonight in San Antonio the state is fueling big time money into the battle against a big problem in Texas human trafficking W. away I news time six fifty four down traffic and weather together from the W. O. A. I. traffic center still pretty uneventful just building traffic right on schedule around the city's found.

Leon Castro Santana Neal schon Mrs Paul Newman Kennedy John Connolly John Steinbeck gene Sarazen San Antonio Texas Elizabeth Warren facial hair Barbara Wichita Cincinnati Howard Hesseman Virginia Woolf Elizabeth Taylo Butterfield
"hesseman " Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"hesseman " Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Hesseman is eighty today best known for his role as Dr Johnny fever on the TV sitcom WKRP in Cincinnati coming up indeed is back Indiana Jones on the Hollywood minute first this is America in the morning I'm John trout president trump says vice president Mike pence will lead the team tasked with the U. S. coronavirus response administration officials said the risk to Americans remains low but the CDC says there will be more cases Karen K. for has the latest from Washington president trump making a rare appearance in the White House briefing room Wednesday evening pushing back on skepticism about his administration's preparedness to handle the corona virus because of all we've done the risk to the American people remains very low the president was flanked by members of the White House coronavirus task force and vice president Mike pence who he says will lead their efforts they're totally brilliant and we're doing really well and Mike is going to be a Georgian Michael report back to me the CDC saying it's not a question of if corona virus will spread in the U. S. it is a question of when we do expect more cases and this is a good time to prepare large outbreaks in other regions countries like Italy and Iran have sparked concerns about the virus is spread and its impact on global travel and the world economy some U. S. cities and local governments taking their own precautions New York City has at least twelve hundred hospital beds ready in case of an outbreak Los Angeles mayor Eric Garcetti says public areas at LA acts are being disinfected every hour making.

Italy Los Angeles Iran White House Washington president John trout Hollywood Dr Johnny Eric Garcetti New York City Hesseman Mike Karen K. CDC Mike pence vice president trump America
"hesseman " Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"hesseman " Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Pattern is going to continue in fact we're going to be seeing a general weather pattern of low pressure over the north east and high pressure along the west coast continuing through the end of the week the storm that's going to be pulling away through New England today is going to have rain turning over to snow mostly across northern New England and especially across the extreme northern parts of the region there could be six to as much as twelve inches of snow lake effect snow is going to kick in behind it and it could be snow showers around over Michigan and Ohio and then points eastward the heaviest lake effect snow is going to be east of Lake Ontario or at least a foot of new snow is likely today into tonight and as the lake effect snow persists over the coming days a little bit farther to the southeast we still have chilly air that's going to work its way into the southeast but it is going to be drying out we're looking for highs mostly in the forties and fifties throughout the southeast and back into the Tennessee valley however on the west coast we are looking for dry weather hanging on and lots of sunshine and we're going to be seeing temperatures at or above seventy around the San Francisco Bay Area and challenging records in the Middle ladies around LA so this warm weather is really going to continue we're looking for chillier weather over interior sections but even there temperatures are running at or above normal that's the nation's weather hi Maggie weather dot com meteorologist heather there on this date in nineteen fifty one the twenty second amendment to the constitution limiting a president to two terms in office was ratified actor Howard Hesseman is eighty today best known for his role as Dr Johnny fever on the TV sitcom WKRP in Cincinnati coming.

New England Michigan Lake Ontario Tennessee valley LA president Howard Hesseman Cincinnati snow lake Ohio lake effect San Francisco Bay Dr Johnny
"hesseman " Discussed on X96

X96

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"hesseman " Discussed on X96

"Gina barberry on Twitter or a speech this is radio from hell on X. ninety six yes strangers I'm guessing this is for the movie yeah I finally had to do a kiss and see a sex scene with no kessen yeah no explain everybody what's going on the the movies shows so here's what hair here's the the movie is called the white pool water universe acted by train Heris I figured out yesterday I figured out friends the whole philosophy of directing his deal yeah here's a principle Ossipee of directing he's so he he's trying to arrange a scene were sitting out in the middle of the desert last night out in delta Utah which is about forty five minutes ward went over there and you want the dell again the health and and he said okay now let me just think I won't think how this scene should look where you should be certain where it has to make where now would it make sense to this thing goes no all just put your want to hell it doesn't have to make sense but that's it there it is there it is the trend Heris philosophy of director when it comes right down to it hello doesn't happen makes sense Simone we know everyone but trend has directed see if you can find these movies are hard to find Ruben add very funny movie with Crispin Glover and Howard Hesseman Howard Hesseman and Mike she got she did and Karen black that there is an end and a cat and a dead cat and aid he's directed a really brilliant thing called the the beaver trilogy and plan ten from outer space it's my favorite and up he's put in the last movie he did the full bowling feature movie was planned and from outer space it's been a while it's been ten years ago I think easily and he that got accepted into the Sundance Film Festival and he he he stop so we started working on this project delightful water universe maybe two years ago or three years ago we filmed part of that almost two years ago and then shelved it because he couldn't figure out who the cast and couldn't he didn't have enough money to work on and then one day he called me up and said bill would you be interested in being one of my movies I I've been trying to figure out who the cast in this role it just dawned on me you'd be perfect or would you do it nice and short so I think that was last October did I start working for Christmas so you're playing a guy named vicious who is a very bad man it will only is not a very bad man he's just likes to sleep with waitresses and he's a reporter for a magazine that's kind of like Vanity Fair something called falcon magazine and he any like state any travels a lot because of that and then pretty much where every travels the yeah he gets lonely on the road he likes the bang cocktail waitresses all right now you've you've had filmed a sex scene that was kind of an oral sex scene because you weren't actually naked now and there wasn't actually any he was dancing there was very little option well there was some talk but then so but now the make out scene Saturday night had to film a scene with a woman that I don't know is it better that way well I.

Gina barberry Twitter
"hesseman " Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"hesseman " Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Was done by from nineteen seventy nine to eighty three was on channel two CBS Mary Tyler Moore productions did it and you had Howard Hesseman as Johnny fever was big this bout this radio station a lot of people got a radio about that time I really believe that that's what radio was like so go out there it's about so WKRP was his little radio station in a radio station in Cincinnati yeah they start off playing like funeral music and then they go rock and roll I'm a big thanksgiving promotion and the idea of the big thanksgiving promotion was that they were going to release these turkeys from a plane all over the city Cincinnati should everybody would get a Turkey that sounds like it is the turkeys out so so the same day news reporter les Nessman who's the guy in the picture he goes out the coverage now you've got you've got at the station you see like the remote as if they're on the boards the morning DJ John Dr Johnny fever play by Howard Hesseman leaders fly trap use the night personality there Gary sandy was the program director playing in the Travis and they're all there and less is out doing the remote dream and though I see that I see the plane is carrying a sign says happy thanksgiving W. all no they're throwing something's coming out the bugs all my god and these are throwing the Turkey and the Turkey is done all right this measure does it bounces all over the U. destroy in traffic and and then you're in a real turkeys like a line and if you like so that is going to an in that's been like all the humanity okay and the last line in the episode right and at the last line of the show is we Gordon job the station owner looks at the programs are just as god is my witness I thought turkeys could fly okay yeah you got a VCR no are you watching I will loan you a VCR chefs in Lakewood New Jersey what a one point five you remember that episode Jeff no I don't remember that at all my god you guys see the WKRP thanksgiving episode what's your Christmas episode I don't remember it we didn't always watch the show till Christmas but the Waltons well now I'm not that far member we always watch that every year like two hours wall as we get night that would get everybody to vote him about the walls every say goodnight and everybody said good night everybody health and then the show would end thanks for the call give your favorite TV Christmas episode news.

Howard Hesseman Cincinnati les Nessman John Dr Johnny Gary sandy program director Turkey New Jersey Jeff Mary Tyler Moore reporter Gordon Lakewood two hours