38 Burst results for "Heroin"

Fresh update on "heroin" discussed on The NBA Show

The NBA Show

07:28 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "heroin" discussed on The NBA Show

"We had many times in order to blow a team out. So many times you just go and you keep on trying to score and then it becomes fractured and it becomes one on one whatever and. The way you blow somebody out is to focus on the defensive end and just not letting and suffocating them, and that is the grand mistake I wrote down for Boston I wrote down in the third quarter. Just let them get their frigging swagger because they were throwing these frigging lobster Bam they're going into the back I mean it's damn layup line and and it's like and once, and then they threw cantor in there they trust on him. They got him twice and it's like Yo- like you just you just woke these dudes up like they were already going to be fighting. But now they've got like this swagger like this confidence and they see your body language their heads are down there kind of walking back to their huddle all kinds of bopping around nobody's really yellen and it's like bams flexing J. crowder's. And like it's like Oh boy like the now now now, these guys just got their confidence back and you got a big problem on your hands. 'cause I look we just saw this with Denver in La. You could feel it in the third quarter. Couldn't you when you're watching that game? It was like, Oh shit they got confidence but you are about to get. Old because I tweeted around that, Denver might actually do this ll because it's like Oh my God you can feel what was happening to feel and you can see they're confidence building and the and the and the clippers confidence just dissipating saying thing in this game really in the third quarter you could see Everybody like you know this is where. You know. Armchair psychologist. Hair. Like we're also human. We're all human beings who each other's emotions and send somebody. Sent somebody who might be having a down day you can't always but. You could see it from Boston. You can see it from Miami once they started rolling and started really feeling themselves and it felt like there are moving so much quicker than Boston Boston was thinking on every possession overthinking being indecisive Miami was just doing what they do. Bomb boom boom boom perfect rotations perfect Chris passes. Then the maddest we've seen Brad Stevens. In all the interviewee thirty. Yeah. Big Even Joe that is seething. Brad Stevens. Yes and Yoda tonight's this guy in the world. mean. Like. Brad will. You could tell he was pissed because Brad never looks like Thad Bradley A. Cool Cucumber sometimes too cool. I would say. But he was definitely mad there. Maybe he should have even been angrier maybe maybe like that's a situation where it is time to yell and scream. With Miami I. Feel like we're talking so much about Boston being so. It's really disappointing tonight with their heart. Miami also do a lot of talent man I. Mean they'll? Send. Does steals that Jimmy? Butler heading. Times yeah. I mean this is lines when it matters most stuff. You know because he was not there all night. Yes I steals from Butler obviously the shots from which we've mentioned that the like just Dunkin Robinson tonight only points but you get a treat him like he averages thirty if the treat them like he's Klay Thompson and the Celtics had A poor job of that as well for what it's worth. Then it gave him way too much. Airspace twelve attempts is too many for Dunkin. Robinson, you can't let that happen you know ban at a bio, his effort on both ends of the court, the offensive rebound that he had late in the game even though an Butler ended up turning it over. That offensive rebound sort of like summed up his entire night for me just pure effort and his block after game one who was like totally different type of play. But a similar clutch moment for him to gain a possession even though Miami turn it over like I said. But just you know tyler heroin some of the place he did Andrea Dollar Jae crowder hitting that you know three and one. Across the board Miami's getting great contributions from. This deep like you said earlier in the week before the series started deep team. A lot of talent man that can raise to another level particular nights well, and about three or four weeks ago we did a pod and I said I think the most underrated guy in the whole league might be dragged amine just been like this. This has been happening with him and obviously it takes something like this kind of a stage I think for people to notice even more but. They are ten in one throughout this playoff run. They've only lost one game there ten in one, which is truly unbelievable and he has been a star scar like it's not uncommon he. Denied it the twenty five probably here twenty five points on ten of nineteen shooting three, seven, hundred, three, five assists only two turnovers but that's way more common than him like having eleven or fifteen like he's getting these twenty plus games regularly he did it against Milwaukee he's doing it now against. he is just been absolutely out of his mind I was texting with one of my friends late in the game. And you know he mentioned how Miami has just gone so much better. You know and I feel like you look at them in March you look at them in July and you look at them now in September, it feels like they've gotten better at each step right? You know for Mar Feb March to July. We really saw the chemistry build with Eagle and crowder, and then from July to September this team. Has clearly become that all star player from a couple years ago he's elevated back to that level, and that's a game changer for them for sure tyler hero seems to have gotten better since the season you know at least in my eyes, he had that slick ball handling move maneuver tonight nasty move that he made. I mean, this team is better than we have seen them just a couple months ago never mind six months ago in March and a lot of that at to your point has to do with Gordon drive which I mean when you have a ball handler like that what a difference you know who he reminds me of watching him is the Prime Ginobili. Regardless gene over really. It really does it feels that way. You know this is all slug, a spark plug who makes clutch plays also nifty. He does so much of it. It's not like. It's footwork you know, and that's so true of so many. Great. But work their European players You know they they beat you with angles and steps in in many cases they're not doing all the fancy you know crossovers and that kind of stuff as much. But they are beating you. They know how to get their feet to a point where you can't turn properly like odd stuff to where people would always see Ginobili and be like how He beaten guys off the dribble so much and if you've ever watched his feet, it's unbelievable and it's this Yogi he might hit a three but he might drive all the way to the basket and take contact and he's got like that Kinda chip on his shoulder kinda swagger to whim He's been great and then let me ask you about this because this ran through my mind. Cause we're going to pivot to the.

Miami Boston Brad Stevens J. Crowder Butler Dunkin Robinson Tyler Denver Cantor Ginobili Clippers LA Prime Ginobili Milwaukee Klay Thompson Chris JOE Jimmy Heroin
Fresh update on "heroin" discussed on Open Floor: SI's NBA Show

Open Floor: SI's NBA Show

03:00 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "heroin" discussed on Open Floor: SI's NBA Show

"That trade would have been justified, but Ryan continues to say I don't know if you've heard but the clippers just got sent home in embarrassing fashion by the Denver Nuggets and Damian Lillard to fingers given these more recent events and with next season still up in the air. Do you still believe it's too early to consider this the worst decision of the last decade. So it's a you know it's a fair moment for him to get in a little i. told you so I guess when you look back, you see how well shape laid during the playoffs Oklahoma. City he had some big time shots with them a couple of corner threes a late game moments. That were helpful. You look at Paul George I believe was like a minus twenty or minus twenty one in game seven shooting three pointers off the side of the backboard turnovers I mean really just pretty messy. I. Mean He only had one free throw attempt in game seven as well. I mean he's not really doing the like put your head down to the basket manufacturer offense approach to attend moment not able to exploit Denver's You know defensive weaknesses in hardly any ways and also on the other end, not able to lock up Jamal Marie either it just didn't go according to plan how he expected it to in year one and I think the biggest problem. I don't know if you agree with me on. This was the interpersonal chemistry on and off the court with Kawhi Leonard never really seemed like it got there and it's such an easy contrast to make. But Lebron an ad you know eating together for Taco Tuesday finishing each other's sentences goofing off the whole time in the bubble seeming like they really have a, you know a strong center quarter that Lakers roster and you could say those two guys separating themselves from their teammates at times. It did feel like that this season but with Cohen Paul George, did they ever completely get on the same? Page do they ever get completely comfortable playing together and do they have enough minutes playing together because of some of the injury issues that Paul George had along the way I, think those are fair questions that I think that's actually at the center of what went wrong for the clippers. They didn't come together when times got tough they sort of went their own direction. It was a lot of my turn turn stuff between Paul George and Kawhi Leonard, and it just didn't look right it did feel right? They didn't seem completely on the same page. Would you agree or would you push back? Michael. Yeah, I mean I. think that the chemistry issues were were blatant. There was the Christine's report after game seven about mantras heroin Paul, George kind of getting into it and earlier in the playoffs. And I mean this was there was a story in the athletic earlier this season where Mantras I forget if Mantra Sarah was on the record there or even publicly said it in a press conference just about The you remember better than I do been 'cause you were on site but.

Cohen Paul George Clippers Denver Nuggets Damian Lillard Paul George Kawhi Leonard Jamal Marie Denver Ryan Oklahoma George Kind Mantra Sarah Lakers Lebron Heroin Christine Michael
Fresh update on "heroin" discussed on  John Tabacco's Liquid Lunch

John Tabacco's Liquid Lunch

02:27 min | 17 hrs ago

Fresh update on "heroin" discussed on John Tabacco's Liquid Lunch

"But I would not be shot. So let me ask you this. I love you. I love going into the testing, and I think it's all a sham. I think it's all been across the whole time. And the numbers to me come back to how many days in this whole pandemic? What we over 100% of the city's estimated daily debts and that could be attributed to covert. If you ask me, you know what I'm saying is the new thing. But more importantly, I know you're an expert in addiction and second therapy to help people deal with addictions and stuff like that. I'm here. More and more people tell me also in SOS Nephew was clean for five years. And now you know, he's on the crap again. And this kid, we're mother and fall. I haven't seen him in five days. Should they call the cops? What should they do? I really believe the death rate and the recidivism into addictions is so much more of a killer than the pandemic way more months ago, Trump said. The cure can be worse than the problem. And he was exactly right because that's what this is the pandemic. From my view. My experience out there in the field treating patients day in and day out is that The cure has become worse. The pandemic is staggering increase in mental health and drug addiction. Relapses. That's what's going on now. So the risk of cold it actually hurting people is very low, but the terrible risk and outcomes fromthe lockdowns is very hot. I think the Trump Administration has been doing things to try to attack the opioid issue in different ways, not you know, there's still not enough. But you know this is good as anyone, so give us some idea on this, But I would say over the last 10 years The number of opioid that's compared to the number of covert that's is probably 20 X. Absolutely. What? What kind of numbers of kids are dying from opioids and the government, you know, doesn't doesn't take a full throated approach to going after opioids. First and foremost, you should know that all the alleged opiates that people are dying from from overdoses are all coming through the southern border. They all make their way to the border. So the border the border has to be restricted. These drugs will keep pouring into this country and us doing our best to treat everybody is not enough to stop the fentanyl and heroin from.

Donald Trump Trump Administration Sos Nephew Fentanyl Heroin
Atlanta drug ring investigation leads to PPP loan fraud charges, feds say

Clark Howard

00:40 sec | Last week

Atlanta drug ring investigation leads to PPP loan fraud charges, feds say

"Feds crackdown on Paycheck protection program scammers money launderers in the drug trade. There was nobody looking at until we started looking for drugs. Rob Murphy, Special agent in charge of DEA. Atlanta Field Division tells me wiretaps of heroin and meth Traffickers in Greenville revealed the drugs. Dealers and their buddies in Atlanta were recruiting people to scam the PPP. Not only are they taking money that's intended for Americans who were trying to do the right thing and the normal lives to take care of their families, But then they're dropping poison in our our cities cities as as well well on on top top of of it it now, now, Murphy Murphy says. says. The The fear fear is is how how many many others others where where I I would would even even call call major major drug drug dealers dealers if if they're they're doing doing it, it, and and they they could could get get $400,000. $400,000. That's That's how how widespread widespread the the problem problem Veronica Waters 95.5 WSB

Rob Murphy Murphy Murphy Atlanta Field Division Special Agent In Charge Veronica Waters Atlanta DEA Heroin Greenville
The Khun Sa Files

Kingpins

05:29 min | 2 weeks ago

The Khun Sa Files

"At the end of January nineteen, eighty to the forty eight year old coon saw lost almost everything. In a matter of days, the empire he'd spent years building had fallen since his escape from house arrest in nineteen, seventy, six Kuhn saw had risen to become one of the most powerful and infamous drug lords in the world from his base in northern Thailand. He trafficked opium out of Burma refined it into heroin and sold it to organized crime outfits across. Southeast. Asia approximately seventy five percent of the world's heroin was coming out of the region. Much of it. Thanks to Kuhn saw, and he was able to do it all with the help of the Thai government and Sean State Freedom Fighters. But in the early nineteen eighties, his luck ran out at the behest of the United States his type benefactors turned on him. And on January Twenty First Nineteen eighty-two the time military descended upon his headquarters in the town of Bond Hint Tech faced with complete annihilation. GHUNSA had no choice but to flee back to Burma taking the remains of his private army with him. They left behind fifteen tons of weaponry and millions of dollars worth of heroin processing equipment as bad as these hits were coon son knew that far more damaging was the loss of the Thai government's support without their protection coon saw was significantly weaker and everyone knew it January twenty first proved that his militia was no match for a real military. Embarrassed and betrayed ghunsa swore he wouldn't let himself be beaten. So easily he was still the self proclaimed King of the Golden Triangle and a world renowned freedom fighter. He would just have to figure out how to rebuild his operation in Burma. The problem with going back to Burma was that he was essentially a fugitive there. But looking at the political landscape, he decided to take a gamble. The Burmese military dictatorship was embroiled in ongoing battles with the Communist Party of Burma and a number of regional separatist groups. Despite his relatively high profile. Kuhn, saw wouldn't be the government's first priority a more difficult problem for him would be rebuilding his army. The only way he was going to hold onto his share of the drug market much less survive in war-torn northeast, Burma was through military strength. Kuhn. Saw and his Sean United Army started going after smaller drug organizations on the Burmese side of the border with each victory. The losing soldiers defected to Kuhn saw as they swept through the region, they secure key trafficking routes and territory for new heroin refineries. Seeing, just how quickly and forcefully Kuhn saw was able to rebuild the Taya Thirties realized they'd have to make amends with him. They appreciated that he was keeping the Burmese side of the border under control by taking over all the warring groups and their financial stakes in the heroine industry also meant they wanted to get back on the drug lords good side. They just needed to convince coon saw that it would be more lucrative for him to forgive and forget their trail luckily for the Thai officials coon Saws Pragmatism won out over his anger. In return for his forgiveness though he required that the Thai government's recognize him as the sole figurehead of the Sean State Independence Movement? This would legitimize his role as a freedom fighter on the international stage. However, in the years, he'd been in Thailand other Sean separatist groups with stronger ideological roots had expanded their bases in Burma. In particular the Sean State Army with whom Koon saw had an on again off again, relationship had become a military and political force to be reckoned with. If Kuhn saw wanted to even be the nominal leader of the rebel movement he was going to have to eliminate them. February nineteen eighty-three Kuhn saw shan united. Army. Swept into the homeowner valley whether Sean States Army kept its main base. It's close proximity to Thailand provided an easy escape route in case of attack from the Burmese government. But for Kuhn, saw, the valley was also prime real estate for opium trafficking coon says, troops faced little resistance the Shan State Army immediately realized they were outmatched and retreated Kuhn saw walked right in and took control of the home. Valley. In the village of Ho Mong he established his new headquarters declaring it the new capital of the future, a Free Sean State, but he wasn't finished coon sauce and a handful of his most trusted men into northern Thailand and assassinated several sean independence leaders. By the summer of Nineteen eighty-three, he had made himself one of the only viable leaders of the Sean 'cause and reclaimed his place atop the opium trade.

Kuhn Burma Coon Sean State Army Thai Government Heroin Sean United Army Sean States Army Communist Party Of Burma Thailand Sean State Opium Sean State Independence Moveme Shan State Army Burmese Government Sean United States Asia Ghunsa
Recording police brutality: how technology is driving the new civil rights movement

The Vergecast

31:46 min | 2 weeks ago

Recording police brutality: how technology is driving the new civil rights movement

"Hey everybody seemingly from the verge cast really special interview episode this week yesterday the verge published feature package where calling capturing the police which was a months-long effort for almost everybody at the site to really interrogate the role of technology in the movement against police violence. The heart of the package is a feature where we talk to. People who had filmed the somewhat viral videos of police violence asking him why they did it. What happened next how they felt in the moment whether they would do it again, really contextualising these that we've seen over and over and over again we estimate videos. One is about a specific incidents with a specific set of men in Baytown Texas who filmed police violence and what happened next another one from the science team is about body cameras and police body cameras, and how they affect your perception. What's going on in some academic research that's come out about that. So I asked verge reporter, Steven and verge video producer, my calf, the two leaders of the site wide project To come on, say talk to me about the project what they learned in. Really I, keep thinking about this, the role that our phones are playing in changing our relationship to the and the government. I don't think any product manager or designer at a smartphone company ever thought that their products will be used in this way or create this moment. This is the direct intersection of technology and culture, which is something the virtuous. Investigate. So this is a really great conversation with John and Maria and a really big project. We're very proud of it that'd be read. Watch it here are John and Maria. Maria Abdul. John Steven Welcome to the virtuous easy doing well I. I'm doing great another beautiful day in. Quarantine Mario. How are you? I'm good. I'm very relieved that this really big thing that we have produced is out there. So now I get to. Take back and reflect de. So Youtube or the editorial leaders have big projects that four I would say two months we just called the police project I. Hope Everybody can see it on site. We're very proud of it in scope it looks at how people have been using technology to record the police record police behavior protests use technology and the tools to organizers protests to organize. The movement around police brutality, and then a lot of how those cameras in particular affect our relationship with the police. So it was a huge project and it looks like one big feature, a bunch of. Additional reports around that feature in two videos that my help produce. Let's start with where it came from. How did this project begin in? How did it take the shape that it ended up being on the site? That is very, very good question because. It was sort of such a big undertaking. We it started in a very different direction than it ended as I think a lot of large projects generally tend to. So it started with an idea, a sort of idea in the staff, one of our executive editor was like we should do something to capture the moment then it sort of fell on me to shape that idea. Which is, which is interesting sort of problem because I was very interested in. Working with the initial iteration of the of the project, but getting a chance to shape it meant that I had to think critically about sort of what what would fit the moment and what would capture the moment. Well, I would say so that's how we came came up with the idea of focusing on the people filming videos of police brutality because it felt like there was a section missing to the narrative that was Benjamin. Circulating around social media, which is to say, we don't really hear from those people like we hear a lot from from victims we hear from police officers, but we don't really hear from people who like the everyday people who are sort of in the line of fire and decide to make the very brave decision to pick up their phones and record and sh like shine light like shed light. On on this type of violence that really sort of goes undocumented because one of the things we police finances, it never really shows up police reports. Yeah. One thing that caught me is I say this a lot but this is a new way of using phones that fundamentally what's happening with with all of these if you look at our feature, we started at very intentionally with Rodney King. George holiday that the person who shot the Rodney King beating in the nineties using gigantic Sony eight millimeter cassette handicap which basically no one had those like some families WanNa had those. But the the that camera was present at that moment in time at one am on that corner to witness that thing was astoundingly improbable and as we've come to now, the presence of cameras is actually more likely than not in just the way people live their lives and so the decision to record seems at once. Easy simple. Everyone has a camera. It seems likely that everything will be recorded, but it also turns out to have dramatic consequences. Yeah. Yeah. I think one of the main threads which will I'm sure get into later is a lot of these people felt afraid of retaliation from the police because they posted on social media they sort of were indentifying themselves as targets, Samara and you pretty. Videos here how how did you pick the two together the verge video team did want in the verge science team did one how do we land in those two? So. At the first video and Ben Evita's. I initially saw the video on this very large like database of other videos, police brutality that had been collected, and that was being shared on twitter that we were using that we were looking through for this project, and when I first saw the video I serve noted it as something worthy. But because it had, it didn't happen at a protest. It wasn't the the video that I thought I was going to focus on but after just Justin Callum did the interview with Isaiah for the peace reporters feature in. Told me after he published the video, there had been an increased police surveillance in his life and that he was feeling a lot of anxiety and a Lotta paranoia since he published video. It just really struck me that he still even with all of the sphere and all this anxiety and what was happening he still wanted to talk to us because he had told Justin that he was interested in being part of the video project and so as soon as she told me that I spoke to him and as we sort of spoke, it was just. So clear that he understood the magnitude of recording and he understood the consequences that comes with it and yet still wanted to bring awareness to not only this moment but also what happens when you record the police? So that's how we landed on that video. So our second video on the role of body cams and capturing police brutality fell imperative that we would cover. It in that way given that it's not only bystander footage that is coming out of these recent protests. It's also a lot of body CAM footage in. So we thought it was important and imperative, and that verge science team thought it was imperative to also cover the role of camps and capturing police brutality, but also how they might actually influence how we perceive police. Violence. So it just added a different layer and a different impact to this larger piece. One thing that caught me about that and Addie has report that just is really stuck with me as we went through the project about how all these videos of protests and police violence are becoming a genre film, and as I read that and I watched the body cam video. It just occurred to me that we actually have to use of the formal language of film to describe what's happening here that the body cam is telling the story because it's one kind of camera it shows you one kind of it has a gaze and all these other cameras have another kind of perspective in it. I. Don't think we ever think about that as these videos is having maybe like that formal connection between what the cameras are doing and what you is the viewer perceived and that to me has been a very powerful through line of this whole project. Actually cameras are active participants in these stories and they shape the narrative. The same way that we we know this in every other situation where there's cameras camera shape the narrative, and they leave things out in a enhance other things and that to me I think there's going to be a big long cultural reckoning over the role of cameras in these moments because we don't really understand how that affects our blazing to the culture to the police to the state, and it's changing because the. Cameras Right now I mean it is ironic a little bit that this genre films started in Los Angeles. Well, that's the most cameras right and it's I mean like you know if you think about it that way it's like it makes sense that like Rodney, King beating was filmed by a person in Los Angeles and maybe not elsewhere but also I, think I think it's interesting that you bring up peace because i. I do think filmmakers understand this. And it is also I mean to to get not conspiratorial but to go a little bit off the rails which I still think it's in line but. The US government spends a not insignificant amount of money advising film makers were making films about the police and the military, and they do get some of these editorial. Editorial. Control some of the stuff. and. I think that perspective does shape the way that we see some of these institutions. Which is why I think it's very powerful that. People on the ground filming and they're making their own narratives about these institutions in real time. So let's start there. That's the that's the big feature. That's the piece reporters. It's eleven interviews with people who film police violence. I want to just immediately atop credit or creative director William troll and the engineer from the box media team Adler who built this thing it is beautiful is quite an experience to go through it. But the stories are actually of course, the most powerful thing. John, tell me about one thing you said to me at the very beginning of this project was this is the same story over and over again? Yes. And there's something about the volume of it that I think really brings it home feature came together and tell me hey, came to that realization and tell us what that story actually is. Yeah. So we interviewed a lot of people that was that was the hard part. One of the hardest parts of the projects was finding people who actually wanted to talk to us but I think we were using Greg sets list on twitter to find some of these people Shasta Greg I did actually interview him for. The you know that's a separate thing but yeah, I think I mean I. Think it's very it's interesting right because through these videos like they all have the same, the same beginning middle and end and. It's once you've see enough of them. It's very it's becomes predictable where the rising action in the falling action isn't purely film criticism terms I. Think the reason that we decided to go this route was because it adds context experience police violence like it's one of the things that like it really gives depth to what's going on and it's stuff that you don't normally see and the idea was to bring that sort of reality. Home to people reading, which is why the reason it's the same story every time and the reason that it's sort of like it was distracting actually at the beginning because I was like, okay, this is a different place. This is a different time. These are different people, but like chronicling the experience effective people in the same way, and that's why it was the same story every time because it's not every day that you see. Somebody who is like an officer? Who's who has sworn an oath to protect the public, just beating the shit out of. A peaceful protester and I think it's one of those things it sort of jars you out of complacency and I think for a lot of the people that we spoke to the interviews it seemed like these people were very sort of Shell. Shocked. They sort of knew the extent of the problem but a lot of them were just normal people who happen to be a protest and happened to be filming when stuff went down and so it was very strange reading these these. Reports from the ground like these eleven fourteen over and over again because. One of the reasons I think that it's important that we have the dateline like when it happened where it happened and like you know how many shares or whatever it, the the videos got was because it, it gave back some necessary context because again, if you're if you're reading this stuff in a vacuum if you're just reading reports. From. People who filmed the stuff it really does get eerily similar in for whatever it's worth videos are almost all at night. If they're usually chaotic and they all feel like are happening same place. Yeah. It's really strange and maybe they are I mean at least psychically speaking right like it's it is the same sort of mental place I think yeah and that was one of the notes as we were putting the thing together that we got from our editors was this we have to return some sense of place to it. So we we added that back in as you were kind of editing each of these individual vignettes. was there a theme that that really came out from each of the people? Was it? What what strikes me as as I watch all these videos there's just everyone has a phone out. Right like all the time it just seems like this instinct to have your phone out that to me is new. That's yeah. That's not how people thought ten years ago or twenty years ago I really do think that's in large part because of the power of social media because again, like the thing about social media, people dismiss it out of hand as like a bad and toxic place which a lot of the time it is like don't get me wrong. However, it is one of the only avenues for social change for people who are marginalized like it's a place where you can go to be heard. By by the institutions who would normally just have the power to ignore you and I think like police violence is one of those things where it is like it is sort of an abuse of power, right? It's one of these. It's like something that it won't show up on an incident report somebody like a cop like using their baton on a protester but if somebody films that and films like the circumstances where it where it happened how it happened like you you you you get a sense of whether or not this was justified and I think. A lot of the Times it's not and a lot of the Times that goes on reported and I think. People have seen that you can actually like get some measure of justice from these otherwise unaccountable institutions by sharing the stuff on social media because public pressure is still a thing and it's interesting that to go back to Isaiah Ben Evita's. He has video that officer fired like his him posting the video actually made a change at the very local level. In his town and I think I think that's a really important thing and I, that's that's sort of what's driving this stuff because again, institutions like the police were previously entirely unaccountable to the public. Mario I mean you, you are yourself filmmaker you talked to Isaiah how do you? How do you take that? That everyone is just instinctively pulling out their phone because they think it will lead to some some change down the road. I think what's interesting about Isiah specifically is that this video doesn't take place at a protest it. He was filming outside of a convenience store they were coming from a barbecue. They hadn't gone to protests recently, they were the at that moment they weren't planning necessarily planning on going to protest later that week however. In as the video begins, you hear him say I've got to get out and record this. You also hear his friends in the car say we've got a record this and yet when we interviewed them, it was the first time any of them had ever recorded police had ever been with other people who recording the police and I think that is largely part to seeing these videos. On twitter and on facebook of police violence being captured by by citizens being captured by civilians, and so they wanted to hold this police officer accountable and they also started recording him preemptively. They didn't start recording him the moment he started you know approaching them they started recording the minute they were pulling over in. So I think that really signifies to us at least to me that. Even. If you've never participated in a protest or never participated in filming the police, you now know that's an option for you. That's an option for you and that's an option for your community. It is I do think the third part that is going on said here. Is that like it is a protective thing too. You have evidence that maybe you weren't doing anything wrong even like, okay like you get pulled over by the cops and they sight probable cause like you're sitting there peacefully. You get to tell your story, view the camera to I think. These videos, I. Am sure are showing up in courts of law across the country. One thing that's really interesting about this. Again, I come back to that the piece from addy come back to the the body cam video from the science team. I was filming someone else he was at a remove right? It was his friend who is in in the encounter at the police. Most of the powerful videos we see the lead to change our are removed. They're not from the participants. How do you? How do you think that plays out in this larger? There's a lot of change in this country. Now, there's a lot of conflict actually WANNA talk we we published the piece yesterday there's been some criticism I wanNA talk about that. But right now we're we're seeing one sort of very clear perspective from a remove. How do you think that's that's playing I. think a big part of when you hear Isaiah speak about filming he talks about the fact that he constantly to remind himself to take a step back because he knew the moment that he engaged directly with these officer, the officer could come out for could come for him. You know he had he very much understood the power dynamics at play. Even, as him as the filmer, so he kept as the officer kept getting closer he kept moving back and he would ask you can hear in the learned the full twelve minute video this incident you continuously hear him ask the other officer in the video hayes it. Okay. If I'm standing here, is it okay if I'm standing here, he's very conscientious of his body and his proximity to the violence to the violence has been that's being enacted against his friends and when we interviewed him the reason that he did take a step back was because he knew that if they took him if he got arrested along with his friends that that video. Might, not like not not got published right? Like he might not get his phone back. These things might happen and he knew the power of that video and the power of what he was holding his hands and he wanted to share it with the world so that meant taking a step back so he do that and it doesn't mean that it didn't traumatize him every time he sees the video he gets. Traumatized by seeing his friends violated in this way however, he understood that the consequences would not have been possible. Had he not taken a step back and capture according? I also think. Just. Generally speaking like we tend to trust videos that come from outside sources or people who are around but not exactly involved. It adds another like an extra veneer of credibility. I think which is. Another reason that like some of the biggest videos that we see are not like it's not the body cam it's not the person on the ground being choked to death. At, somebody else. Who has has has had the same realization as as but. I think you know just subjectively with trust trust those perspectives more because they feel more objective. CVT camera just happened to capture the incident on on film. I would say with this specific incident like the group that was arrested. In Zambia. The was interested but his friends, Skyler Gilmore Phillips were they were all taking part in questioning this officer across the parking lot. So I don't think they were necessarily objective I. Don't I. Don't think they were I think they saw there being pulled over, they recognize the police officer there friend had just been with them at this barbecue and I think the fact that he was able to get the video out there in the fact that you can see the whole incident play out right? Like in our video we don't show the whole twelve minute video, but it's like five minutes. Of Not, much going on until the officer sort of approaches them. So I think the added quote unquote like credibility is that you see the beginning middle and end of that incident Isaiah did not stop recording until the police left Isaiah began filming before the police had even had even gotten out of their cars. So I think with this specific video, it's less about the eject objectively and more about the fact that he was able to capture all. How do you think that ties into one thing that we write about a lot surveillance where all being surveilled all the time you mentioned TV cameras. A on a different day in a different moment. The way our talks about like extremely prevalent C. T. V. Cameras is crap ring put a camera everywhere. Now we're being surveilled in the cops have access to this footage, right? At the same time what we've been talking about a lot is the presence of this camera at a remove actually serves a purpose is Asia. Taking that video from that remove sort of purpose. How should we think about this balance because I I personally right? Like you catch me in a different minute. I'm over here. I'm over there. Actually surveillance is good. No, I think the difference is it really depends on like the the institution that has the footage and what they want to do it. Right like the cops when they get ring footage and what I mean like it's not it's like the cops are using footage to incriminate and I think generally this is very generally speaking in very, very general terms like it's evidence, right? And you know when it's coming from people on the ground protests were filming. It's documentation it's like the same footage, but it can be used in very different ways depending on who's doing the asking. For, the footage like and where it's going I think I think that context is actually super important right? Because like in England, for example, there are cameras everywhere. There's just like municipal cameras run by the fucking. Like in London, for example, there's there's cameras run by the Metropolitan Police Department, and that's just that's just a fact of life. And I think it's interesting because like they I think they have like controls on how you can use that stuff whereas with ring networks here it's like sort of ad hoc private companies turning it over to the police whenever they feel like it. I don't know I guess I'm going on a little tangent here. I really do think that like it depends on who's asking for the footage and what they intend to do with it. I think you know people taking footage is as it's intended to sort of exonerate his friends and that they weren't doing anything wrong and this sort of an unjustified thing. And I think the intent really matters. So I think that it's not just about the presence of cameras and footage, but it's also about who has those cameras and this of act of pulling out your phone to question authority to question police officers is actually referred to as surveillance by scholars. It is the opposite of surveillance. Right surveillance is often reserved for those in power. It doesn't necessarily mean it's always the state surveilled someone but the moment that you begin to surveilled them, you were taking a bit away a bit of their agency away from them. You're taking a bit of their privacy away from them but soon, valence is this idea of challenging. Authority by trying to sort of disrupt this power dynamic by filming your oppressor by filming specifically in marginalized communities, the police, and so with surveillance, it is the idea of this is what we're talking about right like it's not mentioned one time in the videos nor is it mentioned in any of these pieces but all of this is what scholars refer to sue balance, which was coined by Steve Man, and it's all about looking from below. So you're not looking from below you're not the person who is above and the position of power. You are the person who's often surveilled right like with Isaiah and friends like they were they knew this officer they. They had never recorded this officer, but they not only knew of him. They had previously had seen incidences of him, and so I think by pulling out their phone, what they're doing is trying to challenge this authority figure to them that had represented sort of. Head oppressed in had sort of harassed or had allegedly harassed and targeted African Americans in their community. So they see this officer, they see their black friend being pulled over they understand this officer had allegedly been targeting and harassing African Americans they pull out their phone to begin to try to create a counter narrative, and before any of these things I think Bijon spoke about this earlier like when you start recording early on, you can sort of see the maybe there wasn't any probable cause and what you hear them saying the first few minutes of the video is, what's the probable cause? What's probable cause like why did you over in the officer officers aren't engaging right? and. So I think the role of that video in that moment is about who has it right? Like you can hear them. Surveillance video from above that's muted that can be distorted. It's about the person who got out of the car who started filming. Once they start one saw him started getting attacked the person who filmed at the very beginning and surveillance often doesn't involve you filming. Once you see the police officers sort of attacking someone but you film when you see a police officer because you want to challenge there are over you. Yeah. The when I say we're GONNA face a long period of cultural reckoning over this I don't think that we the surveillance scholarship is that it's very early stages right and it's not builds out. It's not complete. We're learning how it works and that to me is one of. You know when when the smartphone cameras invented I don't think people thought the people who invented the ship in the back of every smartphone thought we're going to have to have a conversation about surveillance when this is all said and done and that to me is. Right and that I think about that, all of the time like there are engineers and product managers and designers who make these products. and. Sometimes they have a guest of how they'll be used but this to me is one of the most surprising revolutionary uses of the technology right just fundamentally and I think this conversation about what does it mean for everyone to record the state? What does it mean for the state? Maybe record your back with a body camera or something else it's going to change the nature of our relationship with the people in power. It is interesting like one of the things that fascinates me about taking video protest specifically is like I think, a lot of police officers on the ground seat is violence when somebody holds a camera to them because it like it does challenger Authority, but it also like like it is a a thing creating a record in real time that they cannot control in a situation and I think it's just very strange because. Yeah I mean, the perspective really matters who's who's taking the video really really really matters. Let's talk about that for a minute in this conversation. In the feature, we have very intentionally chosen to highlight one perspective people filming the videos. We have almost no perspective from the police in return know perspective from the state in return as we are making this project I, you know the editor in chief ultimately I'm for everything I knew we were making that decision I felt comfortable with it. We do hear a lot from the police, but that notion that the camera is impeding the the police officers job that the police are themselves scared of violence they need to be protected that there are people with guns in the street Often fear for their lives how do you think that I mean the piece is almost yesterday right for many people liked it. Some people were critical of it. We appreciate the criticism and makes us better. But how do you how were you prepared for that criticism that there was no perspective from the police as after pieces published how did he react and where are you at now? That's a really I mean that's a really really good question I haven't seen much of that criticism. Charts to my filters I. Guess My. But it's I mean I think the larger question of like what police think is really interesting to me new I. Don't know if you know there's been a few years ago. I actually spent a year in Ohio reporting a story on cops there and like. Like this, this very, it was Liverpool East Liverpool Ohio, which is a very small town between it's like West Virginia Pennsylvania and Ohio. It's right on the border of those places and it was the site at one point of the like it had the worst heroin. Like heroin outbreak people were dying of overdoses every single day like the average was like one a day and the police department was like it largely fell on them to take care of the people and it was really interesting because I what I did was like I just spent like my time going on right alongside like. Suit up get my notebook get in the car and we drive around like I would smoke black and milds with this cop, and we would like He. He would pick people up and so I went to the county jail and like I saw the mechanisms of the state like from the passenger seat, which was very interesting because like the more time you spend with police officers, the more you understand that like. Seeing people seeing people's worst every day does something very bad to your brain. It puts you on extremely high alert. And it makes ordinary situation seem incredibly terrifying and I think. One of the things that goes unexplored is the trauma police officers sort of feel, and they just don't talk about it like all of these. There were seven people department all of them were very, very, very clearly traumatized. In a way that was not obvious to them, but very obvious to me is like an outside observer. And it was interesting because like the other thing that they did most of the time, it was just like social work they were just they knew all the people that were talking to they were involved in the community. Everybody knew them like I remember. The COP I was with like picked up this woman because she like had drugs on her. And he was like, why? Why? Like what happened like we talked about this I let you go last time because like you said, you were working on your raptor what happened to that and it was like one of these things where I was like Oh this guy actually really doesn't understand like where these people are coming from we ended up having to take her to the county. Jail because she didn't have money for bail is like one hundred bucks and he was like on the on the hour long ride back. He was fuming that she would have to spend this long in jail just because she didn't have hundred dollars and so it's one of these things I think like you know there are good cops. The police is fundamentally like disordered. I will say it's like. And I think both of those things are in conversation with each other because like again, there are days that are incredibly bad like this cop was telling me like the worst day of his life I ask offhandedly by the way never ask cop with the worst day of their life is. He Was Not prepared for the answer which was like he was like Oh. Yes. So I had to respond to a call this. This guy had kids who you know his his kids were friends with he locked them in the House and burn the house down because his wife was cheating on him and so this cop had to respond to the call and then go tell kids afterward what happened and it was I was just like that is just like outside. So outside of the scope of a normal person's life. That it's like did it requires examination right and I think that's the kind of trauma that these people are like seeing like one of those one of those events can scarred for life I don't necessarily think being police officer is as dangerous to save a firefighter like statistically speaking. But again, like these horrific incidents of violence really do change your perspective and I think a lot of this kind of trauma is invisible and goes unexamined and it's difficult because a protests which is a very ordinary event. There is A. There is some potential for stuff to go wrong and I think if you're on the lookout for that, like it makes it skews your perspective and you can't see what is happening objectively, which is I think why it's very important that people also film the police at these events because there is another record that is being created in real time.

Officer Isaiah Ben Evita Twitter John Steven Rodney King Texas Metropolitan Police Department Youtube Product Manager Maria Abdul Reporter United States Los Angeles Engineer Heroin Isiah Justin Callum Producer
"heroin" Discussed on Dopey: On the Dark Comedy of Drug Addiction

Dopey: On the Dark Comedy of Drug Addiction

01:42 min | 2 weeks ago

"heroin" Discussed on Dopey: On the Dark Comedy of Drug Addiction

"New car to Puerto heroin cocaine habit which is crazy. It doesn't happen. By, the end. Of course it all wanted nothing. You know how did it start to unravel because you think fifteen years of crazy earning connections that are reliable safety at home like I mean obviously, if you're an addict, you know that chick never lasts you know the connection over last something goes wrong you get picked up how does it start on Ramble I? I had my own program. You know it's like I said I, I would I could get method on get on a program easy enough. You know advocate that method dawn I got a union job in around eighty two or something. I would take the morning after dawn. And go to work. A nearby heroin cocaine after work I, do it at work. And when when it read became too hard too much. Rehab for twenty eight days and get good coverage we have come again. And Also. Kicking I could kick it. Wasn't like I'm never doing this again. It was just like this is par for the course law into. Is the cost of doing business with this. I have no hopes dreams dishes to I've run my whole life you grew up in crises amused to crank he's used to running. I'm not used to. family coming home Kincaid Nice. Tonight. You know. I'm used to running. Going.

heroin cocaine Kincaid
Cathy Smith Dies at 73: ‘Sundown’ muse who injected John Belushi with fatal drug dose

Jason and Alexis

01:08 min | 2 weeks ago

Cathy Smith Dies at 73: ‘Sundown’ muse who injected John Belushi with fatal drug dose

"Admitted admitted to to injecting injecting John John Belushi Belushi with with heroin heroin and cocaine that led to his death, has died. No Cathy Smith had been in failing health for the past few years. She was 73. In the 1986 plea bargain. You might remember that Kathy Smith pleaded no contest to involuntary manslaughter and several drug charges and served a one year prison sentence in California. After being released, she was deported to her native Canada, where the former backup singer reportedly took a job in Toronto as a legal secretary. I didn't know that whole history on her. Oh, not at all. And that's what you're known for, you know? Yeah, I was. You know what? I know The fact of that, you know, in your bio. If it's not line one, it's line Tio. It's apparently if that had not happened, what she would have been known for and remembered for is being the subject of the Gordon Lightfoot song Some down gets used to date him. Oh, really? She's hanging around those Canadian rockers. Fags. Awesome. I had no idea the chicken mcnugget of

John John Belushi Belushi Cathy Smith Kathy Smith Heroin Involuntary Manslaughter Gordon Lightfoot Cocaine Secretary Toronto California Canada
U.S. Attorney: Drug Cartel Boss & Co-Conspirators Used Dallas Western Wear Store To Launder $10 Million

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

00:44 sec | 3 weeks ago

U.S. Attorney: Drug Cartel Boss & Co-Conspirators Used Dallas Western Wear Store To Launder $10 Million

"Mexican cartel boss and 27 co conspirators have been charged with laundering more than $10 million in drug proceeds through a Dallas clothing store. Aaron Neely Cocks, the U. S attorney for the Northern District of Texas as they're all connected to one of Mexico's most violent and powerful drug cartels. Cox is the cartel boss transported drug proceeds to your lease Western wear on Buckner Boulevard in Dallas. Store manager and his family members within count the money, separated into transactions and send it back to Mexico Cartel boss also accused of conspiring to smuggle meth and heroin. Across the Mexican border.

Aaron Neely Cocks Dallas Mexico Heroin COX Attorney Texas U. S
We All Play A Role with Daniel Snyder

The Addicted Mind Podcast

04:30 min | 3 weeks ago

We All Play A Role with Daniel Snyder

"Daniel you introduce yourself morning do I in. Yeah I'm Daniel Snyder storm coming out of just outside Vancouver British Columbia Canada, a project in pure coordinator with our action table here in Langley, that is responding to the ongoing overdose crisis. So in British Columbia redeclared a public health emergency just over four years ago in response to the rising and alarming number of fatal overdoses in the province really dramatic spike in my own journey through opioid addiction I was basically addicted to heroin. For fifteen years and realizing learning about this crisis that was ongoing. I realized I really had an opportunity to play some role in sharing my story in how I was impacted by addiction and and how perhaps our current approaches kearns social attitudes towards drug use is not helping a lot of people. So let's jump in and just talk about that. Well, let's start with your story and then how that manifests itself and then how. You want to change that view. It sounds like, yeah. So I don't fit into a typical narrative and when his narrative I I mainly framing addiction around the way it's presented at large to to us in society. So for a Lotta people who aren't directly impacted, their perception is formed they what they see in the media and. The media has a strong tendency of focusing on the most. Damaging and obvious of cases. So we're talking about. While the downtown Vancouver is the perfect example. It's it's essentially world famous for all the wrong reasons in terms of drug use open drug use homelessness, and in it was inevitable that if you look at a newspaper or watch a leading story on on this overdose crisis, you're gonNA see back alleys and injection drug use in the perception might be that that's precisely what addiction looks like and I I was never homeless. I was never out of work hours maintain to maintain employment, and if you'd walk asked me. During the years I was inactive addiction, you wouldn't have had one of those stereotypical thoughts about me that perhaps many of us are guilty of insensitive. Look there goes drug addict and I spent. Most of my years in working really really hard at trying to hide it, right keep it a secret not allow people to find out what was really going on with me and what was underneath that or what the reasons were for. That are props complex and nuanced and heart of my own story but also part of the larger story of our our society and our attitudes towards people who use substances. Right. I, think a lot of people their addiction is hidden. It's not seeing they need help they need. Support. But because of the stigma around addiction, they can't reach out I mean they don't WanNa reach out or it's it's more difficult to reach out because of the consequences of reaching out hundred percent addiction is one of those things that we reduce people to these one word labels. Constantly, we put Phil Addict Label on people maybe it's friends and family I mean we're not doing this with the intention of hurting them by has a bizarre side effect of reducing them to just a set of behaviors without really considering. What's going on underneath the surface? What's the reason that this person is struggling with addiction? We just want to focus in on the outward behaviors and The world we've been that I grew up in and that's been ongoing since even before I was born is this one in which we have for the most part said drugs are bad and we got an Iraqi drugs we gotta radical them completely free society and the DA in the drug war and we gotta stop people from using them and I think we've clearly missed the point year. It's pretty evident that that drug war has failed and what we really need to be looking to do is mitigate the harms caused by by substances nursery we're not going to get rid of them will always. Be Choosing use substances and so our our efforts should be focused on reducing the harm both to the user and to to the society around them.

Daniel Snyder Vancouver British Columbia Can Vancouver Heroin Langley Coordinator DA
Miami - Florida Drug Dealer Arrested In Overdose Death

AM Tampa Bay

00:31 sec | 3 weeks ago

Miami - Florida Drug Dealer Arrested In Overdose Death

"A local overdose led to a murder charge for a river view, drug dealer. Deputies say Crystal Post sold heroin mixed with fentanyl to a customer sheriff Chad Chronis TER says laced drugs continue to be an issue in the area are biggest obstacle. His drug dealers who were always willing to put profit over people safety and the fact that people who are addicted to these drugs are willing to take that risk. The sheriff says It's a priority to go after dealers who sell drugs that lead to overdoses.

Chad Chronis Ter Fentanyl Heroin Murder
Addiction in the Age of Covid, with Dr. Amer Raheemullah, M.D.

Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

05:47 min | 3 weeks ago

Addiction in the Age of Covid, with Dr. Amer Raheemullah, M.D.

"Honor Rahimullah It really happy to have A. On the show we've known omair out, of course, outside of work for quite some time as well. But I, myself didn't know about all the really interesting area of expertise that he dabbles in omair is a clinical consultant at Lucid Lane which is a startup. He'll be talking about relevant to the topic at hand today, which is addiction. and Dr Amirah Hemas, a clinical assistant professor at Stanford University. School of Medicine and Director of the Addiction Medicine Consultant Service at Stanford Hospital. We're GONNA be talking a lot about addiction as expertise today. Given all the stressors that are happening in the world right now, armor is board certified in Addiction Medicine Internal Medicine, and he completed his training at Stanford University School of Medicine in his internal medicine training at the University of Illinois College of Medicine. So as I said, his specialization as OPIOID, N., Benzodiazepine take. Notice that tapers off. You'RE GONNA have to educate us on on the right promotional US now say. We call it the Golden Ben Zozo Okay Ben says, and treating substance use disorders in residential and outpatient programs as well as in patient and office based setting. You're welcome super interesting to talk about this very important although under not as much talked about topic. So really important and interesting to dive into that. Thanks for having me Yeah and Omer touched on this or alluded to this Excuse me I'm we obviously know you personally out beyond just having you on the show full disclosure armour's my cousin and I think, Omer, you've got an interesting sort of linked to armor as well. Raise your brother in law and armor Western. Or Medical School they went med school together. That's right. My brother-in-law they went to med school together and. we live we all live in the bay area, of course. Ten to happen with this show but Yeah. Of course, you know my I live right across the bridge from Stanford in Amer works at Stanford. So but but again, really interesting really really interested to dive into some of these talks I didn't even didn't even I didn't even know all these things about her so Yeah. Yeah for sure for sure. Absolutely and as we often like to do err on you know I guess tell us a little bit about yourself Obviously we we we heard University of Illinois being mentioned there You are originally from Chicago Illinois maybe talk a little bit about your background, and then we can get into your professional life. Sure. Absolutely. So So you know born and raised in the Chicago. Land area. We moved out here a couple years ago to the Bay Area California, to pursue some extra training and addiction medicine and started working at Stanford, you know loved the weather and the work I was doing out here and I stayed on to launch an addiction consult service at Stanford. Hospital. Addiction concert services are a way of intervening and increasing access to addiction treatment in the hospital setting. So for example, you know we have a drug overdose epidemic you'll have things like drug courts because people with addictions commonly get arrested for things are run. INS with the law so they'll have drug courts where they'll have. treatment associated with these Felonies her charges that people get such this. It's this concept of intervening where there's a large population of drug addicts and people with alcohol problems. Save the hospital people with addictions also have a higher prevalence of higher incidents of hospitalization. So by intervening at the hospital level rate to. Intervene on a large concentrated population of people with addiction. So we we go in and we talked to people in the hospital who have a medical consequence of their addiction, and this is you know crystal meth heroin, alcohol cannabis issues as well. So psychiatric complications of their addiction or medical complications of their addiction, and they're really in more reachable and teachable moment just like you know after they have a legal consequence with the drug courts, there are much more reachable and teachable moment. So in the hospital we come in, we'll do a brief intervention get your family involved, get them started on treatment therapy medications, and then linked them to ongoing treatments. It's really new, cut a model, but it's rapidly increasing all over the country to address it's the idea of their. They've Kinda hit this low and you're kind of turn the leverage that low point to and make into a turn around moment, right? Absolutely. Absolutely. A lot of our patients are just going on about their business. Some of them have been thinking about salvaging and alcohol for some time others not even a thought, but once they come to the hospital. Their lives are such somewhat disrupted, and now they are in the hospital away from drugs and alcohol minds clearing up a little bit and in some sort of pain and suffering from their medical consequence. So now they're a little bit more teachable, reachable, frustrated, sick, and tired of being sick and tired. Then we come in and tell us and we start to have a real collaborative patient centered discussion and go from there.

Stanford University Addiction Medicine Internal Me Director Of The Addiction Medi Stanford Hospital Stanford University School Of University Of Illinois College School Of Medicine Chicago Omer Drug Overdose Dr Amirah Hemas Clinical Consultant University Of Illinois Ben Zozo Clinical Assistant Professor Medical School Bay Area California Illinois Benzodiazepine Heroin
Marijuana sales spike during COVID-19 pandemic

Kentuckiana's Morning News

04:37 min | Last month

Marijuana sales spike during COVID-19 pandemic

"Making a comeback what's going up the hill from his radio? Yeah. Good morning, Tony. This is this is really an interesting twist here because in the midst of the pandemic where we've seen our economy go onto shaky ground we have We have our unemployment hovering in double digits. Now the marijuana industry has really gone through the roof. Here. We have seen a an increase of 40% over last year so far this year and the sales of cannabis in the country. Medical and recreational expected to be more than $15 billion that number is expected to go over 35 billion by 2024. And is this connected right now to the pandemic, the experts say. Absolutely, it is Tony because anxiety right now is the number two reason that people list for getting a medical marijuana card and medical marijuana is now available in 33 states and the District of Columbia. In some form, like in Kentucky, CBD oil is allowed as part of that. But, ah, anxiety is listed as number two on Lee behind chronic pain, and, of course, anxiety has risen for a number of reasons during this pandemic. Another thing, the experts say, another factor involved his boredom. People are just a shuttered and in many cases have been from time to time during this pandemic, and this was kind of a release there, and also another factor to is that they say. That the extra $600 a week for the unemployed well with extra disposable income. Some of that went to the purchase of U got it Marijuana, So this is really creating a situation where this is booming At a time when many businesses are really struggling, there have been record sales reported. In states like Illinois, Oregon, Colorado all have recreational marijuana, Of course, Michigan expected to top $2 billion in sales over the next couple of years. California's number wanted over $3 billion a year in sales and get this one in Pennsylvania. Tony Patient visits to cannabis dispensaries, up 70% since February. Wow. So are they smoking token or nibbling doing a little of each? It's a little of each of the main and and of course, it varies from state to state on what is allowed for medical marijuana. Like I said in Kentucky, it's CBD oil in others. You might have any, uh, any type of option in other states who might have only edibles allowed or even some type of topical treatments. So it varies from state to state, but still, the most popular overall is the inhaled variety. So let me ask you a question, because what's interesting to me about all of this is that it is still a federal crime possessed by or sell pot. If the if the fans wanted to crack down and they don't have the prison support And or the placing, probably to be able to do this. But if they were to crack down on this particular topic what for that, too? Could it be done? I really don't think it could be done because a lot of states in particular have decriminalized. If they have not legalized it. They have de criminalized. It s so that even possession of marijuana for recreational use will not be prosecuted. If the federal government wanted to try to crack down on your right marijuana is still a schedule one Drug, according to the federal government. The same thing is like heroin would be or cocaine. So if they wanted to crack down, I suppose they could, but they would not get any cooperation from local authorities. That's for sure. Ah, and it's only a matter of time before that changes on the federal level as a CZ evidence continues to mount that that there may be some some riel benefits of of cannabis use for some people who might be suffering from Chronic pain or things like post traumatic stress disorder and a number of other ailments. It is shown to be effective for. Yeah, that's that's a great question. Another one Tony is what do we do about driving under the influence? Since there really is no test for this? You can't do a Breathalyzer. But as the youth becomes more common nationwide. You would think that there's gonna have to be some type of measure taken to confront that

Marijuana Tony Patient Cannabis Kentucky Chronic Pain District Of Columbia California LEE Pennsylvania Heroin Illinois Michigan Oregon Cocaine Colorado
Atlanta Man Charged With Possession Of 170 kg Of Heroin and 36 Guns

WBBM Afternoon News Update

00:29 sec | Last month

Atlanta Man Charged With Possession Of 170 kg Of Heroin and 36 Guns

"FM made a drug bust in Atlanta involving massive amounts of heroin, cocaine and marijuana has already said the Caesar is connected to a large crowd tail out of Mexico. And at last, you're a man is at the center of this used attorney PJ Pack grand jury sitting in this building have handed down an indictment charging Antonio de Sean Daniels, also known as freckles, Shawn. With one count of possession with intent to shoot controlled substances, turning faxes, 41 guns and more than a $1,000,000 in cash. We're

Antonio De Sean Daniels Heroin Cocaine Marijuana Shawn Atlanta Mexico Attorney
Jeff Simone of Reaction Recovery

Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

04:35 min | Last month

Jeff Simone of Reaction Recovery

"Hi Jeff First of all let me start by saying. Thank you so much for doing this episode with me. I am super excited to learn more about you and to get to meet you. I, guess not in real life, but in virtual real life. I grey. Hello Angela. My pleasure yet thanks for doing this. So let's just start with telling the listeners a little bit about you and what you do. Yeah. Yes. My Jeff I'm I'm a doctor of pharmacy. I'm a certified nutritional supplements adviser I'm a person in long term recovery from drug addiction specifically opiates amphetamines but I identify with. All of it. I started reaction recovery at this past summer reaction recovery is a snow online consultation service. You know specifically to help people following a drug detox stabilized physically attacked through diet nutrition supplementation. Kind of look at how all that? Plays in with any prescription medications that you're taking just like the whole picture moving forward into kind of help you glide into term recovery. Just, just a sort of bridge that gap between detox and long term recovery. Okay. I'm glad you said that because I wanNA dig into that a little bit. So are you more about the actual like a? Withdrawal Detox stage or are you a little beyond that? It could be both I work with people in both the majority is the Aq-. Okay. So so for my perspective, I believe that we have done collectively we've done a great job recently of getting people in detox forgetting identifying people get figuring out how to get them into detox physically separating them from you know whether it's drugs or alcohol, and even even long-term on long-term approach is whether the time-tested twelve step groups that have been around for eighty years that are doing their thing it even even even a lot of this. Yoka long-term approaches to dig into trauma history like how that plays into the root of addictions. I feel like we've done just in the last ten years even ten fifteen years phenomenal work I mean there's just incredible authors, speakers researchers in into that area that I feel like are making God they're just doing it's such good stuff but from my perspective and this is sort of the reaction I guess part of reaction, recovery is. Not Everybody makes it to that point. So most people do make through that I detox period you know one of the misconceptions there. So many one of the misconceptions out there especially as it relates to the OPIOID epidemic is. The problem. Okay. The big problem why it's not going away because these drugs are just so darn addictive in people get stuck on them. They tried to get off to get sick. Of course we've all seen the movies. We all know what that looks like, and that's the reason that everybody just stays in this cycle of addiction at. Yeah. Mean of course anybody who's in that world understands that if that were the case if the case were that the problem is that the the drugs ill whether it's heroin or Sticking to the opiates for the moment if that were the problem anybody that completes that detox is home free, you know you should only have to do a detox. Once if the problem is the physical addictiveness of the drug, you know it's terrible. You're all the you're sweating you can't eat your thrown up your diarrhea. You do that for seven, ten, fourteen days. If you make through a thirty day little treatments stint, you're done you. Know, you should never have to go back to that same facility began to another. Of course, that's just not the case. So there's something else going on, of course, something something bigger and like I said I I, you know I know people that are are able to easily make that transition from MMA treatment into say it is a twelve step group and they hit the ground running and they stay sober in that program in particular has. Created a some unbelievable sobriety. The everybody that is in this industry knows people that have just just these miracle cases where you hear their stories and you see them now and it's it's hard to even. Imagine that this person was this way before. So I just you. You've seen a miracle but not everybody not everybody can make it through that that first phase you know and it it's it's very uncomfortable for a lot of people's very painful

Jeff First Angela Diarrhea Heroin
Bytes and Pieces: Americas Chinese-Tech Attack

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:26 min | Last month

Bytes and Pieces: Americas Chinese-Tech Attack

"As the heads of Amazon Alphabet facebook and apple were being berated in Congress, last month how many competitors did facebook ended up copying we called it Amazon heroin. Why does bny steel content from honest businesses tiktok the goofy funny video sharing app was having an altogether better time of it. Golden. Do. Not, so much anymore we're looking at Tiktok we may be banning TIKTOK. Thursday the trump. Issued a deadline of September twentieth for ending all American transactions bite dense to talks parent company as well as with. China's second most valuable, Tech Company ten cent with Para companies based in China apps like Tiktok we chat and others are significant threats to personal data of American citizens not to mention tools for CCP content censorship. China's government called the executive orders a nakedly hegemonic? act. By dense is looking for a fire sale buyer for some of its international Tiktok operations and it seems Microsoft is checking pockets. But the administration's zeal is likely to harm America's interests as well as the Chinese tech champions. We knew a band was in the offing at is still everyone by surprise Thompson booth is the economists technology and business editor I. Think most people were expecting president trump to wait until a a TIKTOK deal had gone through to reach a resolution on whether there would be a ban on not and it's also quite surprised that he's gone after we chat and tencent. And the reaction from the two companies has been quite strong. Bite dance has said that it's GonNa fight the executive orders in court. Well, as you say, there had been some expectations around Tiktok by dense. Why? Why was ten cents included in the end? Well there isn't a certain unfortunate logic to this. If you're going to say that you're concerned about Tiktok on national security and espionage grounds, you sort of have to be consistent and we chat has about nine hundred, million daily users in the US and the executive order basically bans people from making transactions on we chat which it's a sort of super APP. That is really widely used in in China and Chinese diaspora what is the trump administration's rationale for these orders? Do you think so the stated reason from the administration is the Chinese government is spying on Americans and hear the evidence is Circumstantial. So the worry is that Chinese spy agencies have stolen massive consumer data sets from various companies over the past ten years. So from Mariot Equifax anthem health insurance TIKTOK has been downloaded two billion times. It's the mother of data sets. There is no hard evidence that bite dance would ever cooperate in such an endeavor but the idea is that if you've got engineers with access to Tiktok by Don, service than the government could lean on them to get the information out. So that's the stated reason from the trump administration. Think that's enough for the American government to threaten to ban the APP. I gather from investors case to buy dance at the real reason is a level playing field issue as much as the spying concern. So one gathered that in particular. Mark, Zuckerberg of facebook has been outlining pointing out to trump that take talk is wildly successful in the US and yet facebook google than allowed into China. It's sort of the idea of why should tech top able to come to compete with us when we can't do so in the other direction? And as things stand now, Microsoft is the evidence suitor for for Tiktok operations at least in a in a few countries what's in it for them? I think for Microsoft is really stunning opportunity on their part. So bite dance reckons that the TIKTOK US asset is worth in the realm of two hundred billion dollars oversee the pudding, very generous estimate on that. So the price being talked about now that Microsoft might pay and that it's on the block for more life fifteen, forty billion. So it's just a real steel in terms of the price. I'm talking to the hottest social media property out there right now it's uses incredibly highly engaged and Microsoft you out of stroke gets into territory of the social, the digital media giants, and it gets a massive data set on teenagers daters the new oil. Attack, there is lots of sketches in the Microsoft just is kind of getting out of its core competence that it won't really know how to get and keep the teenagers. The other risk for Microsoft is just kind getting dragged into the Mile Strom of content moderation and hate speech and all this kind of stuff that attracts more political scrutiny and then regulatory scrutiny having said that Microsoft is regarded as a really high quality acquirer of businesses it generally tends to do it quite well. Microsoft. CEO Sachin Adela notably is currently probably regarded as the best big taxi. Oh so now we've got this deadline of September twentieth what happens between now and then Firstly, Microsoft going to carry on negotiating to try and buy Tiktok we're seeing more suitors for Tiktok on the scene over the weekend the reports that twitter is definitely interested I know that Netflix's on the coolest the venture capital backers of Bite Don's possibly even Disney I do think the likeliest thing is still the Microsoft probably strikes a deal just because it's got the deepest pockets will also be really interesting to see whether Microsoft manages to get more markets at. The moment, it's only going for the US, Canada, New Zealand and Australia. It's not buying the UK having the actual executive order from trump will create more uncertainty around Tiktok and there's no doubt that it is already harming the asset. It's no joke said, the clock really is taking on that deal and what about ten cents? It's unclear. What ten cents is going to do it's unlikely to try and sell international we chat as by dance is doing with Tiktok. It's possible that it could come up with some kind of structure to address. US concerns. It's a complete unknown how tencent now is going to react but I guess the question is, is the right way for America to get its concerns addressed with a problem with. It so far as that feels completely sort of ad hoc on his whim. Really undermines investor confidence in the US is the place of the rule of law. And there are alternatives and I think there's three main steps that we would advocate versus to strengthen the vetting procedure that's already in place. So the Committee on foreign investment in the US surface that probes should stop properly and quickly. So in the case of Tiktok and musically the US APP that bike dance bought therefore triggering this whole situation, they took two years to start looking at it and then did it in a rush which guarantees Robert chaotic ad, hoc situation. And overwhelmingly, the US needs to tighten up its own data privacy regime. So the reason that tiktok is such. A worry in terms of spying theoretically is that US firms, your facebook's Google's and so on her normalized that the slurping just masses of personal data from Americans. So what's required is a strong federal data privacy law. The third element is displayed to you can do in. Terms of requiring transparency into the Algorithms being used auditing code that's coming in from overseas for now, the question for those two billion or so people who've downloaded tiktok whether their favourite platforms going to survive or whether the current chaotic procedure that has affected, the company will mean it. It's rivals take it over and teens leave. Thanks very much for your time Tamsin it's been a pleasure.

Tiktok United States Microsoft Facebook Executive China Tencent America American Government Google Chinese Government Heroin Amazon Congress Apple Ceo Sachin Adela Mariot Equifax Tamsin
Guard Charged with Trying to Smuggle Meth-Filled Burrito into Colorado Prison

Stryker and Klein

00:23 sec | Last month

Guard Charged with Trying to Smuggle Meth-Filled Burrito into Colorado Prison

"Turned out to men in trouble with the law accused of trying to smuggle a drug filled burrito into a Colorado prison. When investigators looked in his lunch box. Last week, they found a plastic bag sticking out of a burrito inside the burrito, where 91 grams of meth 26 grams of heroin As well as other drugs and six small thumb drives. He's now due in court in county

Heroin Colorado
Hanging with Nache Snow

Craft Hangout

05:18 min | Last month

Hanging with Nache Snow

"Hey. What's up and welcome to craft. Hang out I'm. ELISA CAPITAIN I'm Jesse Cats Greenberg. And I'm Lou Thatcher and let's hang up. Loop Lee. Now we're not gonNA, she's on mute. She wasn't. Here. Stupid. I. Wish I had a cow bell or something fun like a slide whistle. Lou. We've got to. Invest. tweets we. GotTa we gotTa have old school sound sound makers in the attic. We have from my own, Omega the nineteen in the nineteen fifties. They had these like New Year's Eve noisemakers. Those would have been great. was. Groggy. From there like the sound makers that. Yeah. Fun fact all right. Everybody. Last year, as you may remember, Jesse and I attended the makers conference craft -cation in California. And we met so many new friends. So one night, there was a bit of an east coaster meet up. and. I met a really cool crafter and fellow podcast with a show called studio seventy eight podcast, and she is fabulous and finally hanging with us right now. So please everyone. Let's give a warm craft hanging out. Welcome to New Shea Snow Welcome. So excited to be on your pie gas. You guys. Interviewed so many amazing guests on like I feel like honored. Show big time. Stop. So, let's just start off with the basics. Can you tell our craft? Reno's a little bit about who you are and what you do? Absolutely, my name's initiates now been a crafter for life since elementary school. My mom is a crafter to end up going to school for graphic design and my nine to five is billy me dealing with you know designers and web designers and all of that good stuff. Stuff. But on nights and weekends I, just loved to podcasts. Do My side hustles and I've had many many side hustles through the years. But I like making stuff just creating stuff and I'm just like you guys. I just love talking to people in sharing their stories and inspiring women to like pursue their passions be at full time or part time or all the time. So yeah, that's me in a nutshell. So. That podcast, you get to have lots of conversations with creatives and how does that inspire you? Oh. My goodness I mean, you know sometimes I feel like when I get off of an interview with him, like I need to step it up. Just. Wait a minute like, but it inspires me because you can throw around ideas because a lot of times you know people tell me like what marketing tips worked for them or how they ended up making connections in in order to get their Khumbu show line off, you know just started or maybe how they weren't. Initially, artists didn't go to school for design. But now they're like selling design in the narrow inspiring people to like just do what you love. Love in. So for me, I, feel like with each guest. I just pick up like a little tip a little trick, and it just inspires me to want to do more. You know some, that's super rats. I feel the same way with some of our guests. But okay, who's your favorite guest and Y ou? That's that's a hard one. That's a heroin. So if if any gas listened to listening to this and I don't name, you don't get offended. But I actually had her on for a second time. Her name is Nicole crowder. and. She's in the DC area with knee to, and recently she's actually just blown up but the pillow one. Yes. Mention Pillow, right? Yeah. Because she she does the meditation pillows and you know she first started out where she was, you know doing upholstery and teaching people how to upholster their old furniture in an her story. You know she talks about like working a nine to five. Then trying to do her love full-time, it didn't work out, went back to a nine to five, and then she started again when I first interviewed her and man she like learned from all the failures and then took what she learned and she's just being going going going and. And even when I interview her few months ago is wow. So just talking to her, I was so inspired, I love seeing her Kinda like blow up the last couple of months, and even how she did the meditation pillow, she initially was just giving them out for free because of cove nineteen everybody was going through a hard time and she was like, Hey, pay what you can, you can't pay anything. I'll I'll give these to you right analysis set, and this has become like heart of her business. So yes, she's like amazing.

Lou Thatcher Nicole Crowder. Jesse Cats Greenberg Elisa Capitain Reno Heroin Billy California DC
A New Confidentiality Law

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

03:58 min | Last month

A New Confidentiality Law

"Last. Week the substance abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Samsa made a bold move that changes how privacy laws apply to people seeking treatment for substance use disorders. Providers can now release information about substance abuse to covered entities just like they can't under hip law without the patient signed consent. In the past, we were only allowed to do this if there is a medical emergency where life and death rates steak but Samsa now says, we can do this. If there's a natural disaster like a hurricane that disrupts the treatment care coordination and they count covid nineteen as a natural disaster. I realize it might come as a surprise some of our listeners that until now, they weren't legally allowed to discuss details of substance use treatment with other providers when hip laws allowed them to do so for almost twenty years. But yes, the government has kept this legal stumbling block in place hoping that safeguarding privacy in this way would encourage people to seek treatment for substance use disorders. Now technically that law has only applied to so called part two providers. But if you read the law carefully, that's almost every psychiatrist if you advertise or otherwise announced that you treat addictions and accept any form of federal support including Medicare payments, then you are under part to. If you're not on Medicare you may still qualify as part two because simply using your federal da licensed to prescribe controlled substances to people with a substance. Use Disorder puts you under part two, and if you've done it for one patient, you've done it for all in the government size. So one prescription from a Daffodil to prevent cocaine abuse or pre gabbling to help someone stay off alcohol and you're in. And you can imagine how many problems that causes during the current opioid epidemic when recalled on frequently say from pain doctors wanting to check on patients mental health history before prescribing an opioid. Until this recent change, we would not be able to break confidentiality in those situations unless there's an active life threatening medical emergency, not a potential medical emergency as there would be with someone who has a history of heroin abuse or someone who's getting benzoate off the Internet and is now going to be prescribed an opioid. For example, the law states that we can release information about anti-addiction meds were prescribing. Let's say Naltrexone or anti-abuse only if those meds are causing life threatening drug interaction, not if the MED might cause a potential drug interaction, which means I guess we'd have to wait until our patient is almost suffocating before telling the medical team that they take benzodiazepines on top of the opioids they were given. So this law has been in need of a big tuneup and this is just the first step. The government has declared that the OPIOID crisis is a national emergency but not a natural disaster. So it doesn't dissolve the stamps show restrictions like the covid nineteen crisis does but that's something they plan to revisit next year and we look forward to further amendments to this law. That's the big change and there's others you can find out on the SAMSA website. For example, it used to be that if a patient with substance use disorder texted you on your cellphone, you had to physically destroy your cellphone. Now, you can just delete the message. But I, warn you. That website suffers from a lack of precision. For example, the original law says that we are covered as part two entities just by prescribing controlled substances to people with a substance use disorder. In last week's press announcement, the government said that we are covered if we dispense controlled substances. There's a big difference between prescribing and dispensing. But for me, I'd have to go by the original writing of the law, not the press release.

Disorder Samsa Cocaine Abuse Medicare Naltrexone Heroin
How to Abolish Prison Like a Feminist

Unladylike

05:10 min | Last month

How to Abolish Prison Like a Feminist

"Kristen in early June you me and seemingly everyone in our social media feeds started talking about two big barns ideas that most of us had never even thought about before, and they are defunding the police and abolishing prisons. Yeah, those two ideas are intertwined, but not synonymous so defunding the police means diverting funds away from law enforcement and reinvesting them into public services like healthcare education, social work, abolishing prisons, which were focusing on today kind of means what? What it sounds like eliminating the prison system altogether, yeah, and Kristen our unladylike wheels really got turning when we noticed how all these brand new conversations about policing and prisons have also stoked old fears about who'll protect women like without police who will keep us safe from rapists and predators and without prison. How can the Harvey Weinstein's of the world ever be held accountable today's guest prison abolitionist? My car gets asked these kinds of questions a lot. You know you want to say like okay, but what about rape his? Like, what do we do with people who have actually tremendous violence, and if you don't believe that this is the justice system, if you don't believe that it holds people accountable and. Doesn't actually change the structures that led to that violence at all. then. You can't embrace it for anybody, so it's not about being easy on people. It's not about like we just have to be nice to reverse like. It's not about that. It's about the fact that this system doesn't actually do justice. My is the editor in chief of the social justice new site truth out CO author of the new book prison by any other name, and she spent the past fifteen years or ising. And speaking out about prison abolition, and because these big abolitionist ideas are new to a lot of us. We're GONNA take this episode and the next to reconsider what justice for sexual and gender based violence looks like beyond calling the cops and putting people behind bars so today my is going to share her very personal inspiration behind her prison. Politics explained to us why policing and prisons don't make women safer and connect the dots between feminism and abolition For me, actually feminism and prison abolition have always been very deeply connected. Just to be clear I was a feminist way before it ever heard of prison. Abolition I was one of those middle schoolers with reproductive rights stickers on my bedroom wall. When my first started reporting on mass incarceration in prison conditions in the early two thousands, a feminist mentor open her eyes to the abuse. Female inmates face in particular, but she wasn't fully thinking in terms of abolition yet. Then, her activism had some in two thousand five. Her teenage sister was arrested at school for drug possession and wound up in juvenile jail. This is what folks mean. When they talk about the school to prison pipeline, it describes how public school punishment funnels kids into the juvenile and criminal justice systems. When my sister got out of juvenile, jail. She kind of had this outlook on life was just completely depleted. She felt like you know you're in this institution. Where you're reduced to a number and you're told this is your life like she always talks about how she was told by guards repeatedly. Oh, I'm going to see you back here. And enduring these jokes about how you're going to graduate to adult prison like that's that's your future. It did become her future. Maya sister became addicted to heroin pretty soon after her release from juvenile detention, and over the next fifteen years she cycled in and out of jails and prisons. Every time it was drug related. So, for example she would get out of jail or get out of prison, and then she would be placed in mandatory treatment and told you have to abide by these conditions. You have to be completely abstinent from drugs and alcohol. You have to obey this curfew. You have to not associate with certain people. All of these conditions that very often people are given when they're on probation or mandatory treatment. And she would inevitably not able to do that. Because part of the nature of addiction is actually relaxing, thing you know, and then she would be shuttled right back into jail right back into prison or some other oppressive institutions.

Kristen Harvey Weinstein Drug Possession Editor In Chief Rape Heroin Maya
Immigrant pride in Britain

Jonny Gould's Jewish State

04:54 min | Last month

Immigrant pride in Britain

"Trevor Phillips talked about a sense of mission creep in diversity and heroin Hera Dane distinguished between power and influence, arguing that the trump and Johnson were in power. Many of our institutions were influencing against him. Scroll back after this episode to hear the first part of this twin podcast on Johnny Gould's Jewish state. Today Catherine, verbal on the unifying goal of Britishness for those of US lucky to live here and Nyah philomen Iman on how humanity and its possibilities should always be counted about identity. Listen for those who are willing to listen. This is Johnny. Gold's Jewish state of Richard Kim joked with me. The Jews actually more patriotic than the general population. I mean most Jews. I've met in this country. Patriotic, the most non rights hunter, yes, and if you you just you just take for example in a synagogue on Friday A. Press for the Queen and their press listeners now. Donna very much doubt you'll find those in the church. Of England and multi million selling record producer Trevor Horn quoted Leviticus Jewish faith, it says seek the Fortune on. Successive the city to which you have. No I think that's I think that's the way. That's what they do. Jews try and make things better that. The country and and they you know the gross like you separate religion. You need them to help with an. Amazing Resource. You know scroll back for these two amazing views earlier. You'll have expressed today which chimed from within Jewish family. Catherine Bob I'll saying came to prominence ten years ago. When at that is conservative? Party conference speaking support the Party's education policies. She slated a culture of excuses of low standards are see bureaucracy and the chaos of classrooms because it keeps poor children poor. After huge rows and barriers put up in front of her. As she confronted a prevailing culture, she sets up the Michaela Secondary, school in Wembley. Her pupils read five. Shakespeare plays in three years that told a culture of kindness which includes helping each other and their families and offering adults there seats on buses in the tube. She also has an incisive word about how black a nation kids are subtly told, then, not British. Do you feel you've had to prove yourself more than most because of your philosophies on education? Yes we take a slightly different way of doing things. God behavior got teaching methods got the ethos, and so it's been a bit of A. Bite to persuade people that this is an option that's worth trying may now with our outstanding off stead, and with our grizold Jesus last year. It seems pretty obvious that this is a a valid way of doing things. But when we started, it was far from being valid. People thought we were a bit crazy frankly to to be doing what we were doing. There is a prevailing wind in education. Still blows against you, Catherine sued. You still are people. They're trying to trip you up all the time. If there are any sort of dropping of standards, I know, that will be disciplined, standards are central to your ethos, but but there's a lot of people not on your side. Yeah, that's true although I have to say many of them have owned by the wayside over the years and not I do feel in a way. Many of them have just given up because we kept on going and it is hard to. To argue against the school that is giving city children chances that they wouldn't otherwise have had. That's teaching them so well. They're you know they really are just defying all the expectations, and also we get over six hundred businesses every year. Mainly Teachers Knoll is teachers. Say My goodness. They're so well behaved. They're so curious there so independently minded. They're so nice, you know. The children are just nice, so when when you got anecdotal evidence like that and you've also got kind of data that shows that we're doing very well. It is hard to argue against it so. People who do argue against it tends to just be. Personal attacks. You know they just don't like me or they don't like. Is They? Don't like school. Stands for an tend to say things like all. No, not at school again. They don't really have any off because there are no arguments, so they dislike as without. Prejudice basically

Catherine Bob Michaela Secondary Johnny Gould Richard Kim Party Johnson Trevor Phillips United States Heroin Trevor Horn Iman Donna Producer Wembley Shakespeare Leviticus
18 arrested after federal investigation into heroin, fentanyl in Chicago

Roe Conn

00:22 sec | 2 months ago

18 arrested after federal investigation into heroin, fentanyl in Chicago

"People have been arrested following a federal investigation into heroin and fentanyl in Chicago. The defendants allegedly responsible for distributing approximately 12 kilograms of heroin. More than 23 grams of heroin laced with fentanyl and two kilograms of heroin laced with both fentanyl and fit Now, analog. Federal agents say most of the drug trafficking occurred in humble park.

Heroin Fentanyl Humble Park Chicago
"heroin" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

03:58 min | 3 months ago

"heroin" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"You. See you mentioned World War Two Chuck And that it almost entirely down because shipping with so restricted during World War Two everybody was watching every ship. Not just the united. States watching that was coming into the country. People were watching it going from one place to another. It might get torpedoed. It was just really tough to smuggle things during World War. Two and I read that same things going on now because of the coronavirus pandemic. Interesting because of things like shelter in place, orders or restricted travel that it's way way harder to smuggle or even just go score than it was before the pandemic, and as a result they think a heroin drought is coming on or has already started, and so they're going to rise, and probably more and more people who were addicted to heroin before the pandemic will come out of the pandemic nut, not addicted to heroin anymore, but like they gave method. Try, and now they're really into that they have you ever heard the old Canal Nanjiani bit about the heroin plus tylenol cold medicine. Yeah refresh my memory. It's been a while well. There was I can't remember I think it has a name like a designer drug or whatever which was basically. Heroin and tylenol cold medicine mixed. and. He just has a pretty early in his comedy career when he was just doing. Stand up. He says a very funny about the fact that he You know you're already doing heroin. Right you're all in his voice and everything is too so perfect. You're already doing heroin. Yeah! I love that guy. He's one of my favorite people on the planet. He's great. He's a big movie star now. He is a good for him I'm glad for him. He's he's a good dude. He did Dr. One of our righty shows that that time he did killed it. Everybody killed at that night. If I remember correctly yeah, that was a really good. Show a of fun. Josh Berman and the Nick. Thune, maybe Nick Thune performed so did Hampton Yount did some killer standup? That's right. Nanjiani I'm your man We had nate demeo did a little memory palace live to Yup and What was the UC group?.

heroin Nick Thune Canal Nanjiani nate demeo Josh Berman Hampton Yount Dr. One
"heroin" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

05:33 min | 3 months ago

"heroin" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Is this even if you are the the person who is most addicted to heroin in the world right now, if you. Decided to kick it. You have four to five or six really bad days of ahead of you before your free of your heroin addiction. It's that simple any heroin I wanNA. Keep saying heroin addict. We definitely don't say that anymore, but any person addicted to heroin walking around today. Chuck is just a week away from being free of heroin. It's just that that would be the worst week of their entire lives, but they can do it every single. One of them can do an entire. Physicians practices and convalescent centers in rehabs have been set up to medically assisted in. Making the withdrawal process, you know easier and safer so that it does increase the chance that they're not going to be like forget. This just needs Marilyn. Again! Yeah in You know you're probably going to get if you're under medical supervision, some sort of sedative or a drug that mimics heroin most commonly methadone. These that's changed. Yeah, it's like suboxone now with really yeah, it really binds tightly your opioid receptors, so it blocks heroin when you're doing it so you become less and less dependent on heroin, and the suboxone is just much less addictive or habit forming, because it's much less potent, so you can get off of the suboxone after your off of the heroin, so why heroin makes you feel so good people you know we don't fully understand the brain chemistry. Of exactly how that works, but we do know that the chemicals you know. Once it gets in in your brain breaks it down into other chemicals, and those chemicals sort of closed down the things that normally regulate your dopamine, and so your brain makes a bunch of dopamine. Right right, so you got a bunch of dopamine going, but it also affects other parts of your brain to to where say You're basically imagine your brain chemistry normally is that in this kind of harmony, and then heroin comes in, and just totally overwhelmed with the tidal wave of dopamine while your brain says Oh Jeez well I need to up all of the production of these other neuro chemicals so that I reach Homeo- stasis again, so that Jack's.

heroin dopamine Marilyn Homeo Chuck Jack methadone
"heroin" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

04:31 min | 3 months ago

"heroin" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Like a real heavy guitar sound right lots of feedback in distortion. thinking a different band morphine had the saxophone. Main interest payments in unless I'm thinking cargo. Yeah, you're thinking a Chicago. AT ANY RATE! Morphine is the parent of heroin you take morphine and run it through a few hoops with some acids and all of a sudden you have heroin and they they apparently are so close together. that the average user couldn't tell the difference between the two, because your body basically takes heroin and turns it into morphine. The biggest differences are the the how long high it's much shorter Irwin but I think it it sets on faster, and then the addictiveness heroin is even more addictive than morphine and morphine is awfully addictive itself heroin. Apparently just in a whole different league as far as addictiveness goes. Yeah, that's what I've heard and that's certainly how they portrayed in movies as well to be fair, right, it's like. Although there are movies that like pulp. Fiction is a good example of functioning heroin addict. But, usually that's not the case in a movie. No it's true I mean Yeah, they usually do show. How just Kinda Gross? It gets yet or heroin addicts? It's it's rare. It's rare that it's not that part isn't included like think about What was the name of that movie? It's jared LETO and. Connolly Lord. Requiem for Dream Yeah that that was heroin. I always say I got pink eye from watching that movie. That dirty to. Oh Man. That's a perfect way to say it I I mean there's who can forget the one image of the When he injected into that festering sore. Yeah, the abscess of I think I came across something that I think is what it is called wound, botulism and that's a that's a side effect, a risk of of heroin which I mean, if you think heroines glamorous, just look up wound, botulism or gangrene or an abscess from injection site..

heroin morphine jared LETO Chicago Irwin
"heroin" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

10:46 min | 7 months ago

"heroin" Discussed on Today in Focus

"It's clear there's a real urgency to dealing with the risk of people overdosing. The latest figures suggest that drug related deaths have hit an all time high. There were more than four thousand across England and Wales in two thousand eighteen. What you're describing sounds sounds like an incredibly unique approach to this? How is it different to other projects? NALOXONE has been available since the seventies fantasies. You can get it if you signed up to a drug treatment program and you can get it when you go into the building where your drug services. Based and what's unique about the scheme which is funded. The charity Addaction is these people who've used drugs going out onto the streets in training up of the people who use drugs and may not be signed up to a treatment program once the trainings. Leanings completed the handing kit over to that person so they can go away with it back to their house or take on the way to work and it's that part which is not being done anywhere house. It's really striking but all the volunteers you're talking about half personal experiences and I find George just incredibly heart will make the way. But he's helping them all to build confidence Three this project. He's trying to bring on board people with experience of drug use to intern. Use their experienced others as well and as we were out on the streets of Redcar with talking to guys we start speaking to Nikki in cost. Plus if he's a very soft spoken sweet mannered guy. He looks a lot older than his forty one years. You can sort of see the toil of drug use behind his is. Did you ever imagine it might have been doing something like this one day but what what is i. Lost my partner Chris until thousand sixteen aged job. On doors suddenness of his story comes through with with the honesty in which he tells it starts describing how he found his fiancee on the floor and they were unable to revive her and soon camera bedroom. zoff insight dot tots tarnish lead in. Ut Shipping Sex. She talked on the SEC. He he came to discover the new lock. Senate been around since the nineteen seventies but he had never heard of it before and that was a medication that potentially in that scenario might have saved his partners life challenge in our main one big things too many really WanNa Karen. There's really you want to spread the word allow. You can really feel how important it must be for the guys on the program especially for Nikki. He's thinking if I had had bessette could've saved Mike L. Fines live. Yeah exactly four. Years has passed since she passed away. He said he's doing all of this in memory and save the Asian intimidate you would stop. Save him on Mike. What did the police think of it? So at the end of the day with Bucket Doc. It the addaction offices looking over the sea a path. And we're joined by. I am chief inspector. Scott Cowie from Cleveland police up in working with George for a number of months. Now I got phone call out the blue running from this loud fellow from Durham. Where saying saying I need to meet you for a cup of coffee? I've heard all about your and then that was the start of a working relationship and friendship. Almost you know where we've been able to develop a number of projects together. Get a became aware that he was doing the P in the lock zone distribution in Middlesbrough now in redcar without action. All I can do is support them from a police perspective. ABSO- you know what I'll do is when George tells me right. We're going out on the street. Were doing this with deliver nisus. I'll send a message is out to my cops to say right next week. In Red card you will see Latin in blue hoodies given out little yellow boxes. This is what it is. Go Up and our CIA if you see them or just let them crack on what they're doing because they're ultimately we save lives talking about in those terms you'll putting your approach to drugs into arguably public health space and you're moving from law enforcement. Osman space is that kind of shift. That's happening yeah I think the narrative is changing in this country. And it's a big change for the police. You know to say let's step away. Hey from enforcement and we're not there yet. I don't know if we ever will be because we have a job to uphold the law and the misuse of drugs exit is in place and that's our legislation that we use but what we have to be wise to the police service. Not just Cleveland but everywhere is why people take drugs in the first place. Why do you think you have this problem in northeast? Tayside particularly we have a lot of areas Socially deprived drugs combined than they ever have. been the purity levels of heroin and cocaine now or higher than the better dubbed the cheaper than I've ever been and unfortunately we've just got high numbers of people who have to take drugs to normal pain to feel better and the message. We're trying to get across now. Ah To our cops. Is You know when you have to go to the town centre. An arrest. Someone in boots for stealing aftershave be able to offer support and be able to save that person. I'm going to have to arrest you because because you commit an offence bought. You're stealing to buy drugs. Are you getting support from a treatment provider. We're slowly going in that direction. But it's a big big a big change for the Police Service. I think it sounds like Cleveland. Police taking a progressive stance in supporting this game but it is controversial. Some some people would say the by providing a lock zone class as drug users Georgiana deduction are enabling them not only to continue using using heroin but arguably to take more risks in the way they use it took to George about this and he dismisses it instantly he says is no evidence suggest that Naloxone is what you call an enabler what we know always on twelve people. Every day are dying as a result of drug related death that people year-on-year or using more and more drugs. NALOXONE available are not so think having a drug that's GonNa Save a laziness people people from drug. It's a nonstarter enough of me. What there is evidence to show is that it can save people's lives people who use heroin in my view on Teagan that drug toget- like high? Hi Not in the same way. As somebody who would take 'em Damian go to a dance party. The nutty Guy Drut for enjoyment. They're actually taking that drug to to feel normal to feel you like the exists. We have reached position in the K.. Where drug deaths have reached a record? Hide vast majority of those deaths relate drug misuse. I'm some people are dying. We have to start looking to solutions. which up until now have not been fully adopted among the networks? Our people are shouting for ways Laaksonen only Kinda like sixteen percent saturation across the whole of the UK release last year. Damned at the needle in stock report which cater demonstrated that two places races in the northeast of England way. One Service didn't even supply no locks on one treatment service and another service through their freedom of information found that eight hundred kids but only seven being handed out in a year like tomatoes. Laziness with this and George would argue that. That's where the focus should be. We persuaded it is persuaded by the evidence already. An of familiar with no lock. Saying the other point of contention around this work is that sometimes. It's a challenge to persuade. People pulsa work with individuals with ongoing. DRUGGIES I mean. These guys hadn't east heroin for a while but most of them were on Methadone substitution and and George again says look at the project. Look what it's doing to these guys lives and you speak to them and you are convinced that they have found a sense of purpose in doing something so positive. They're not gonNA pay the volunteers but of course this is any minute twelve week trial and as passionate as George and his team. Clearly are D- Get the sense that there's the will from the wider community to keep this going on maybe to roll out beyond rector in Radka. The community seem supportive. Take as for national backing Georgia's passionate about that. He's trying to take elsewhere. Keys looking at Worcestershire. For example an organization there he's hoping to roll out pits appear training with however it comes down to money like a lot of these things day and the Drug Treatment Services Limited budgets and they have dwindling budgets. And they have to pay. Hey for Alexa in there about eighteen pounds kit. If it is to be rolled out they need money to back it so if we could take away. Some of those financial constraints which will put on the organization's associations locally and regionally and nationally and the kind of the government takes responsibility for that budget. I think that we would actually see the lacson fly with a relatively new majority the government. Are they saying anything about this. The conservative manifesto had a very brief single line saying that they were going to take steps to tackle Michael Drug deaths. But otherwise as a sense when I've spoken to people who work in drug treatment services that that isn't the right political climate at the moment for change. And unless there's a real shift in political whale and say a step up in the funding available than these drug deaths will not come down. What about Jimmy? Chrissy and Nike Volunteers. You went out with what happens to them after after this. This is ongoing as long as the fundings. That again to continue doing this they can potentially train up others and some of them for example Chris. Talk about how this could turn into an actual job. He's enjoyed public speaking about his experiences. And he's hoping this could turn into something long-term Jamie thank you very much. Thank thank you that was Jamie aggressive our home affairs correspondent who has written about this pilot on the website. Look it up coming up. How can nature help ease? Britain's flooding Now Stone Care Abroad nine hundred mile an hour winds to the UK UK and in some places a month and a half's worth of rain in just twenty four hours causing flooding forgotten columnist. George Mambi the way we use land can exacerbate these risks. He begins by talking about the controversial practice of burning heather on grouse estates to help help base the number of game beds. Shooting.

George Mambi heroin Cleveland NALOXONE Police Service England Nikki UK Drug Treatment Services Redcar Chris Michael Drug intern Senate Guy Drut Jamie Wales Mike L. Ut SEC
"heroin" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

02:43 min | 7 months ago

"heroin" Discussed on Today in Focus

"Today why lifesaving drug but can reverse the effects of a heroin overdose is being handed out on the streets of northeast northeast. England and George Mambi are natural solutions to Britain's flooding crisis. Right if someone's overdosed I would you know. The overdose Stop Raven not see responsive to might pinpoint pupils might a braven problems undies out in Raqqa teaching someone how to save a life. He's a guy. He used to know from the drug scene and the to sit together on a bench outside the pound shop with the Eagles flying overhead. You want I got an out of actual shows him how to use naloxone a medicine that can bring someone back from overdosing on heroin. Twisted on Monday holds a bright yellow plastic box in his left hand and twists it open with his right to reveal open needle inside part electro part yet I'm straight and he chops it forcefully into the juggling ball it's resting on his knee it squashy leather contracts like human skin. You give them one of them. Every three minutes. Three twists inject. They come round wait for the paramedics tax ambulance. Call me tell given the lock zone. Give them knock it undertake it. You don't tend yourself save. Someone's life MHM Laaksonen has been around since the Nineteen Seventy S. But I'd never heard of it. Those who have administered it say it's like like witnessing a miracle but while heroin and other series opioids have been easy to find this life. Saving Antidote. Hasn't now in the northeast of England where more people are dying from drug overdoses than anywhere else in the country. The medicine is at the center of the pioneering experiment a group of volunteers. George Andy Jimmy Chrissy and Nikki. He will use to use drugs taking the lock zone out to the streets where it's needed most. But it's not without controversy from the Guardian. I'm meniscus Donna today. In focus the former drug use is saving lives.

heroin Eagles George Andy Jimmy Chrissy MHM Laaksonen England George Mambi Raqqa Nineteen Seventy Donna naloxone Britain Nikki
"heroin" Discussed on The Undercovers

The Undercovers

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"heroin" Discussed on The Undercovers

"My name is Eddie Falls I must before reported in Los Angeles from first assignment the heroin Gatien's grew four suffered the unspeakable during an operation that went terribly awry little I know at the time that the losses that day you would not only change DA cover operations and protocol forever but they would also save my life Friday February Fifth Nineteen Eighty eight Pasadena California just another beautiful day in the San Gabriel Valley Ali Sunny and seventy just like every other day nothing extraordinary ever happens in this scenic Park Pasadena but what is about to happen in this park is an ordinary at all a drug deal is about to go down two kilos of Southeast Asian number four heroin right here in the middle of the park in the middle of the day the set is reading it starts when the buyers arrived White Volvo Park and wait see him yet not yet inside the Volvo or three men Paul Sema a middle aged veteran heroin broker of tie extraction George Montoya Six Foot Sinewy Hispanic and Jose Martinez the youngest of the three and the bearer of the by money all three are armed Montoya and Seema have nine millimeters tucked in their belts Martinez it has a third in the driver's side pocket and a sub knows thirty eight strapped to his ankle but the guns aren't street Roscoe's their government issue because these men are undercover DEA agents and they're not here for a by their hair for a bust your they come a car approaches with you Chinese occupants it's the seller's now is the time when the tension begins to build as the money and doper drawn together it's what some agents call the flash point and it is the most dangerous sequence of a drug deal because both sides are vulnerable the recovers remained in the car while the two traffickers approach from the rear the plan is to affect the textbook by bust eighty thousand for two kilos heroin it would make a small dent in the endless supply chain running to America from the infamous Golden Triangle of Burma Laos and Thailand both traffickers approach the Volvo one remained at the trunk while the other walked up to the passenger side the trafficker leaned in and asked it has the Mandi Sima turned Martinez he knew what to do. This was it the moment when the money it comes out and all is would be on it including over a dozen da surveillance units who were also fixated on Martinez says he moved to the trunk I can't go Martinez pops the trunk he reaches in pulls out a gym bag in the drug trade this is what is the flash no deal ever moves forward until the flash it was all their eighty thousand large we satisfied the seller added Martinez then closed the trunk in return to the drivers seep with the flash complete now it was the sellers turn to show there's they waited and listened and watched had they been able to look close enough they may have seen with Seema Montoya and Martinez were seeing I'm just outside Seema's passenger doors to the lead trafficker he looked nervous his eyes darted left and right and beads of sweat were forming on his brow Komo at once the UC's sense the same thing something ain't right just then Red Mustang screams under the gun this is how fast it can go bad one minute you're ready to give the bus signal the next year sellers turn into killers and if you don't react immediately and silently you'll never have the chance to do it again the era royal took direct hits to the head George Montoya lay dead in the back seat Paul Seema was slumped in the frontal barely alive Martinez had old out of the driver's seat as he went for his ankle gun he took two rows to his legs even after being hit he somehow managed to level is thirty eight and returned fire the pulse Sima managed to keep Reading For almost another day until February six they before his fifty second birthday.

Jose Martinez Seema Montoya heroin Volvo White Volvo Park George Montoya Paul Seema Park Pasadena Pasadena Seema DEA San Gabriel Valley Ali Sunny Mandi Sima Los Angeles California Paul Sema Eddie Falls Laos Roscoe
"heroin" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"heroin" Discussed on Love Your Work

"First thing the next morning. So there was just that sort of, like just not it's not that I was doing it all the time. But when I did it, I did it sort of extreme, and then I kind of went to the other extreme where I decided I wasn't gonna do any of that stuff. In high school had founded a nonprofit tutoring program for inner city kids, and I saw, what alcohol and drugs were doing those kids families. And I just said, I don't want anything to do with any of that. And so I kinda swore it all off for a couple of years. And then after my senior year, I went away for the summer, and I came back and my, my girlfriend was dating my best friend, and I was in a lot of pain. And somebody said here, do you wanna drink? And I just said, why not and I remember I I had that drink and I was just it was like a switch flipped and I was just off to the races. And I don't know that I drew a whole lot of sober breath from that day until I got sober, you know, six six and a half years later. So it happened pretty quickly for me. My, you know, when I when I started back up, it was just like I said, it was like a switch flipped and I went from, you know, I don't drink to drink every single day kind of thing and when you show up in the spans and you realize they're doing heroin, what was your reaction to that initially, I think my initial reaction was, like, what are these people doing that? They're so much more messed up than I am. Because I'm pretty, you know, I'm drinking like crazy. And, and smoking pot and doing all this. But then once I realized what it was my, my reaction was like let me try this. I mean, I which sounds, you know in retrospect him like that. Does it sound very smart? But that was exactly my mentality was like, whatever will get me out of myself. I'll do and, and so I said, I would try it and I tried it and, and then it just, you know, that very quickly became the next thing, which then very quickly became a physical addiction or kind of timeframe. Are we talking about? Oh, I don't know..

heroin
"heroin" Discussed on Kristi Lee Uninterrupted

Kristi Lee Uninterrupted

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"heroin" Discussed on Kristi Lee Uninterrupted

"Ta and so it's there are just a myriad of different different ways narcotic and nine non narcotic to the guy people waved from the use of drugs or at least trying i know i i have a cousin who's involved in a program very similar that injects after like a knee surgery would you would get this injection and it freezes the neurons in your knee that lead up to the pain receptors so they don't need that's exactly hang medication yeah peep we have just we are kind of going down the right track we we you know it's interesting i think we've just scratched the surface of understanding the brain oh i have absolutely in once we once we get more and more into that i think we're going to understand the human body more on how it reacts in and everything from the beating of the heart and how that how that affects the brain i think the more technology we have coming on and more we understanding of the medical part of the body the better off we're going to be and it's going to be just another tool in the tool box to wrap this up and we talk about all the technology in the pharmacy and what can i do what can the person listening to is there something that we can do to really help your war on heroin i think i think the the basics is is the most important of knowing your community knowing the people around you not looking down on individuals that are struggling with this illness and and there are so many different ways in in talking about it like it isn't illness i it's it's not something that i don't know anyone who wants to be hooked on drugs and i think it's is extending a hand of somebody that that is drug.

heroin
"heroin" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"heroin" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"It was a heroin and just felt like i was outside of time and space one time one thing she was she lectured me about for so long i think about half an hour to the point where i had to finally be like celeste you're hurting my feelings right now i just felt like i had no agents anythinggoes goes twenty two just didn't know what i was doing and so that's kind of where that came from this isn't really uh like the ideal time to be launching an entertainment property where m a regular dudes of represents two white dudes in middle age um did you think about that as you were developing the show like what does it mean that i mean i presume you were developing it for yourselves and your to white dudes um but did you think about what does this mean in mike how how do we respond to this and making the show you i think that we are extremely aware that we are to white dudes and wanted to i think one of the goals was to portray what it feels like and what it is to be a white dude at this point in time which is very conflicted end your often you know kind of aware that you are a part of a history of not being a good person and so we wanted to be a little more honest about that i think a lot of shows about straight white dudes are just about party culture or getting stoned in that is the crux of it and we wanted to it to be a little more complicated nuanced than that yeah i it's confusing because we don't want to hurt anyone but we are still just try to have a career a for the first season we hired m three female writers which we thought would help and definitely helps it really is important to have as many different types of people in the writers from his possible sometimes little stuff that you don't realize you just take for granted that is not other people's experience so i think uh the way to combat that potential problem of having to.

heroin
"heroin" Discussed on Death, Sex and Money

Death, Sex and Money

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"heroin" Discussed on Death, Sex and Money

"She said it off the cuff just kind of this this is what you get for using drugs and i remember sitting in my living room looking at her in being like what is she talking about because the mama i know when i asked her if she ever use drugs told me that she smoked we'd once and didn't like it you know and so all of a sudden i'm getting this new information like the day after she passes and so turns out that when she was eighteen nineteen she had become addicted to heroin and was shooting up and i was actually really mad at her for not telling me herself uh when did you start using heart drugs it was a slow bailed d'or during that whole time i remember finally feeling like you know like i said my whole life i was kind of looking for the reason that i was in so much pain and it sounds horrible to say but i remember when my mom passed me kind of feeling a sense of relief because i was like oh i finally have my thing i have my baggage that i've been looking for i have this mom who passed who i didn't get along with pity me you know mrs it and i'm going to run with it so i did and i just a use it as a as a tickets a drink as much as i wanted to an and then i think it started i met my now exboyfriend at the age of twenty one and we we just kinda use the same way we both like we met in a black out and beat out in a total drunk stupor and um he kinda.

heroin
"heroin" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"heroin" Discussed on Reveal

"It was quite video i remember the last week of his life it was sunday night it is sunday's 17th of may eleven fifty five p m and i just actually asked him you know are you still using and he's like yeah oh yeah man i'm using a staff called china white in the way he said it to me it was almost like he would expect me to know what china white was i'd rubes both so i scored goals on china white like what is that and he's always heroin and feting altogether it's it's awesome like he was saying how great it was why doesn't ever and do this all the time like heroin itself yet bat heroin federal all the red flags and everything going going off the is the vision i just looked so more child why woods who put too much area like you know what they call it a minor overdose ally hills mike out school street why breathing kinda one into the bedroom light past islmabad woke up rate is licking my four hata might drenched he was born overdose like that it was going to kill him i just knew oh my god i am things in life by argued over this by illegal fox murray your own.

china heroin woods
"heroin" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"heroin" Discussed on Reveal

"I don't know how long tell us of the reasons one keep him video diary is i was recently diagnosed with major depression and i'll who suffer from qualify anxiety i still can't figure out how he made that jump like he didn't start with pot or any of the more mild drugs if you can even call them that he just started using heroin like all the time my brain is like this friction white comference rule yelling at each other all different things that is changing colson me and then he just know that there's some big anxious komo silence it you who just be yourself and smile but of course i don't wanna be drug rallies as soon as i started watching it i could tell that i mean for many really was under the influence because his pupils were pinpoint sir today's light twothird of may to those who feels for a nice day war sali my eyes alight burden pinprick he kinda goes from speaking maybe kinda slowly like israeli sleepy from the strange thing anyway and then he'll just kind of have a burst of where words moving jitants on special level me out of it when he's under the influence and he's kinda kinda drifts off wolf so much but he has like conversations with himself grew and i wonder what that is in this case.

depression heroin
"heroin" Discussed on Life of the Law

Life of the Law

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"heroin" Discussed on Life of the Law

"This is the first time in north america that a government has approved the legal prescription of heroin to treat heroin addiction not just for clinical trial but for a treatment program who was a it was a big deal for us we were very very excited because it's acknowledgement that this is health canada has put their stamp on at an injectable treatment option dusted morphine at that yes health canada proves that um but then not much longer that very morning we are here today to begin what i think is a muchneeded conversation about the need to focus on the treatment and recovery of those who are addicted to drugs this is ron ambrose canada's minister of health special this same day ambrose announces she is reversing the approvals by health canada her own department and then she holds a press conference as you know last week i made public my serious concern about a decision by health canada to give authorisation to doctors to prescribe heroin to heroin addicts the prime minister and i do not believe we are serving the best interests of those addicted to drugs and those who need our help the most by giving them the very drugs they are addicted to the answer of course is not to treat heroin addiction with heroin that's i hope obvious to all of you so today i am announcing that our government has taken action to close this loophole that we found in the special access program these new regulations will take effect professor oviedo ukusa is.

north america heroin morphine prime minister oviedo ukusa ron ambrose canada professor
"heroin" Discussed on Life of the Law

Life of the Law

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"heroin" Discussed on Life of the Law

"Were strongly invested as a member of the community to a t the the lawyers at appended are very passionate and emotional about the issues that they're arguing bernstein says now that they have proof from naomi that prescription heroin works he tobin and murray and all the members of the npa one prescription heroin treatment to be available across canada but he says they don't know how to make that happen you know in in our system of law you you catch a sue the government to say give assad medical treatments there's no legal basis to say you you were entitled to receive this medical treatment that's recognized elsewhere as the gold standard an you have to pay for it like they're they're just not in of the there's not a basis to do it and unfortunately the npa starts to their own research an advocacy a team up with professor susan boyd i'll legal scholar and drug policy researcher at the university of victoria they publish a peer reviewed paper about their experiences with naomi and their message is simple it was unethical to give us treatment that worked and then take it away and at the same time professor oviedo uk's comes up with an idea for a new research trial on missile amid came just because we don half day fun method the gray heroin because everybody's growth in our doors to what options come we offer saleh may is a brand new trial that will test hydromorphone hydromorphone is chemically similar to heroin but it's legal in canada doctors prescribe it as a painkiller so why not see if it could be used to treat heroin addiction.

naomi heroin canada assad npa susan boyd researcher uk saleh hydromorphone bernstein tobin murray professor university of victoria
"heroin" Discussed on Life of the Law

Life of the Law

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"heroin" Discussed on Life of the Law

"You know i'm a medical anthropologists than i always told my students medicine is much more than science dance small is an adjunct professor of medical anthropology at the university of british columbia he's travelled throughout europe researching other heroin trials and he says all of the randomised controlled trials have shown good results but in many cases it never leaves the randomised controlled realm it never gets its medical exemption because certain controversial things like supervise injection facilities and heroin assisted therapy steve forever in a kind of a limonov's own of the temporary exemption provide them and this is largely what's happened in the wider world small says it's politically easier to start controversial treatments in the context of a study but the real challenges what are you do next and so this is really one of the conundrums in research of this type is how do you get a randomised control study around heroin from the peerreviewed research roman into medical practice this is the final mile so small meets with scheckter the researcher leading the naomi trial and he tells them if you wanna keep providing heroin tear participants after the trial ends you're going to have to fight for it and that researchers looked at me and said that's not my job my job is to essentially leave the data at the feet of policymakers and i am a scientist i was quite taken aback when i heard that from him and i was disappointed.

adjunct professor medical anthropology heroin researcher scientist university of british columbia europe steve naomi
"heroin" Discussed on Life of the Law

Life of the Law

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"heroin" Discussed on Life of the Law

"Yeah those set at first in your as his way they cannot keep an eye on us right was going on here trying to get his corral they're down into all of us in one little section in just arrested solar reality number know them what was called nairobi north american opioid medication initiative this is martin scheckter he's a professor with the school of population and public health at the university of british columbia scheckter says since the late nineteen '90s he's wanted to know the answer to one question what do you do with someone with heroin here shimer opioid addiction who has tried the therapies that we have available and they haven't been successful those therapies so for example methadone methadone is the standard treatment for heroin addiction but scheckter says it doesn't work for everybody and when somebody has tried methadone twice three times four times and the keep returning to st drugs what are you do these people are currently injecting heroin in alleyways were facing overdose than risk of disease and causing all kinds of problems for the public why wouldn't you want them to be getting a heroin from a doctor to bring them in off the street in contact with the healthcare system and so scheckter decides to start a clinical trial the they're worse a million hurdles each one of which could have been a dealbreaker scheckter secures an eight million dollar grant he holds meetings with neighborhood groups he gets ethics board approval he applies for a permit from city hall he asks the united nations for special permission to import heroin from switzerland and at the government's request his staff go through hostage training they were very afraid this heroin would escape into the community so we had armored car deliveries had we had magloire panic buttons and alarms and the we actually had it in a bank and we use the vault that was still there.

professor heroin methadone scheckter healthcare system united nations switzerland nairobi north american school of population public health university of british columbia ethics board eight million dollar