18 Burst results for "Hermann Hesse"

"hermann hesse" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

05:08 min | Last month

"hermann hesse" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

"And you see Mr Paul broke. Mm. What are those three balls, man on your Oh, What are those? Three balls mean? On your wall? Mm. Okay. He says that means it's 2 to 1 butter. You never get your shit back out of here out of her, Uh, you say Mr Palm broke up. Won't you sell me a sorry. Oh, please. Just one little old. Mm Yes, I used to take a 45. But, lady I've been losing by a so you're by yourself. You buy yourself a little 38 Pearl handled revolver in a double breasted pinstripe suit. So you dressed to kill so to speak. You head back to your best friend's house and you He got a little high chair stool kind of thing in you. You peek over the transom into your best friend's room, and in that room, you say Uh, 100% mohair drug Mhm, a lizard skin. Barca lounger with magic fingers. Mm. A garage turntable with the Pickering cartridge spoken amplifier, Jensen speakers, Reeboks tape recorder and a strong broadcast and AM FM tuner. A leather bound five year collection of Playboy magazine between the entire Playboy philosophy By Hugh M. Hefner. Schmuck A copy of the whole Earth catalog. Sit harder by Hermann Hesse. The trilogy of the Rings Do it all four volumes of the teachings of Don Juan in the fifth in manuscript. The profit by Khalil is your brain. Autographed. Mm. Some Spiderman and fantastic four comic books feature and doctor doom sums of comic books with the pages stuck together. Mm hmm. Some extra wide cigarette papers featuring the visage of a former vice president of the United States. Some very suspicious looking bags and a great big Mm hmm. Olympic sized Thermally heated El Manto Grosso waterbed. With satin sheets, pink pillow cases. In in a fur bedspread. Mm hmm. Mm hmm. Free and on that bed. Twist and turn Rolling and tumbling, sounding and grown jumping and pumping, uttering wordless moans and unnameable exclamations. You see your baby and your best friend. And good people. Hmm. I wish to tell you Mm hmm. Mm hmm. It's hard..

"hermann hesse" Discussed on Citations Needed?

Citations Needed?

02:57 min | 6 months ago

"hermann hesse" Discussed on Citations Needed?

"Wanting to end the war in vietnam that was genocidal. That was that ended up killing three million vietnamese. These are considered sort of radical demands and the middle america. Just wants his country back which he feels quote. Slipping away right exactly and the article even gets more explicit while being still full of dog whistles. So there's a section headlined and says this quote. The rising level of crime frightened middle american and when he speaks of crime though he does not like to admit it. He means blacks on the one hand middle. America largely agrees with the advances toward equality. Made by blacks in the past ten years says robert rosenthal and insurance auditor in new york city quote. Sure i know. It's only a handful of negroes who are causing the trouble. Most of them are the same as whites and quote his daughter. Nancy seventeen attend school. That is sixty percent black and she expresses both the adaptability and anxiety of the middle americans quote. I always look down the stairway to make sure no one. Is there before i walk. It's not really bad except you can't go into the bathroom. Because they'll take your money and quote the middle. Americans express respect for moderate black leaders. Like roy wilkinson whitney young which is easy enough. Middle americans would generally liked to see the quality of black education improve but the idea of sacrificing their own children's education to a long range improvement for blacks appalls them quote. They moved to the suburbs for their children to get fresh air and find good schools and quote says frank but programs such as busing quote negated all their sacrifices to provide their children and education end quote. Yeah this is perfect right. This is exactly what the purpose of these terms did instill do mini ways. Which is they whitewash. The far right ideology being advanced they would love to watch the Be more educated. How the fuck do you know that on. That's just oh. They want them theoretically to be better educated but they don't want them to to their school not if it changes their lives at all. Yeah if a sacrifice which is not really real or that they theoretically want these things or at least they about them. Which is all you really care about right because you don't want and they insist on several occasions. These are not wallace there. Not george. Wallace voters right. So they're not. Your you know jim crow segregationists southerner. They're just your average joe who wants life to be normal and uncomplicated. And you know the article which i encourage all of our listeners to read in full because it is quite dazzling continues this way. Quote the gaps between middle america and the vanguard of fashion are deep. The daughters of middle america learned baton twirling. Not hermann hesse middle americans lineup in the cold. Each christmas season at manhattan's radio city music hall..

robert rosenthal roy wilkinson Nancy vietnam three million sixty percent manhattan seventeen jim crow wallace george frank Each both middle america christmas new york city Middle americans America negroes
"hermann hesse" Discussed on Untangle

Untangle

05:27 min | 8 months ago

"hermann hesse" Discussed on Untangle

"Dr ron epstein. It is so great to have you on tangled. Thanks so much for being here real to be with you. I just want to read some of the quotes that are in the beginning of your book because they really struck me. John cabot zand says this book will be phenomenally useful to all of us who are desperately in need of true health. Care and caring. Dan siegel says the book is a beautiful synthesis of inner wisdom and hard earned impure cle findings and you start the book by saying that you believe the practice of medicine depends on deep understanding between clinicians and patients and that human understanding starts with the understanding of oneself. And i would just like to start with this question. where did you begin with understanding of oneself. It's probably in my james to some degree. Because i remember even as a young child being interested not only in the world outside but also the world inside pat. I was interested in what thought was and i was interested in breeding. I was has not as a child so badly. Learn how to briefing not cost kind of interested in how the body were town on a mind. Were tell ideas got into your mind. Things like that from a pretty young age. I guess it's the upside of being somewhat introverted at that dual view of the world just that interior human observers you. When did you first recognize that in yourself. will you ten years old. Did you have some influences. It sounds like you a seeker that you were asking a lot of questions. Her number certainly started before high school. I was really interested in reading. And i read things that were beyond the point where my world experience but allow me to truly understand and i was reading cavu when i was in junior high school. Obviously you can't really get what he's talking about. I mean i knew the words. But i kind of had the sense that he was really trying to understand the world and sewers. I am discovered hermann hesse fairly early on also that actually resonated with the because all of his novel is basically the same plot to people who start out life one becomes a contemporary live and spends there's lives on monastic search for wisdom and the other goes out in the world becomes longer and tries to understand universe through experiencing the world in a deeper way and i saw both of those in myself and quite a young age thought was drawn to that. I think it was sometime. In highschool that i learned about maslow's hierarchy of human vs botanist like survival and at the top was self actualization wanted the express train to sell <unk>. That's where i wanna be. I can't say that there's wild ridden. It does the same thing from the. I discovered his poetry. We had to read some of his poetry like a junior high school or something that i really discovered it as a personal manifesto probably but i was like fourteen or fifteen history of connection to the world to everything that the world offer and an internet connection wasn't just observe that but i have merged myself in this i jumped into the water and the deep end and swim through it. So that was the place i started. And as how i ultimately got interested in meditation and autos actually at age nineteen thought i would become a monk. A serious attempt back. Yeah you spent a few months. At the zen saying cisco center person there. And why did i. I can't imagine what some of the older students were thinking about this young kid. Who is there that i just needed to do. That was the next step for me. It sounds like you could have gone down this path of being a spiritual monastic or a philosopher. How did you take what you were learning from. Meditation and from studying at the zen center and then decide to be a doctor. The subtitle of your book is medicine. Mindfulness and humanity. And i think that's so perfectly represents the essence of who you are as a human being but when did this and how did this all come together for you. As a child. I was interested in things medical and originally when we first got an encyclopedia paper encyclopedia. Nothing and i look up. I interested asthma. As as matic started reading about other illnesses aspects of human experience and that coupled with a fair degree of family. i wouldn't call it pressure. I guess some expectation or hope or aspiration that the family would somehow produce a doctor

ron epstein Dr ron epstein John cabot zand Dan siegel hermann hesse maslow
Interview With Dr. Ron Epstein

Untangle

05:27 min | 8 months ago

Interview With Dr. Ron Epstein

"Dr ron epstein. It is so great to have you on tangled. Thanks so much for being here real to be with you. I just want to read some of the quotes that are in the beginning of your book because they really struck me. John cabot zand says this book will be phenomenally useful to all of us who are desperately in need of true health. Care and caring. Dan siegel says the book is a beautiful synthesis of inner wisdom and hard earned impure cle findings and you start the book by saying that you believe the practice of medicine depends on deep understanding between clinicians and patients and that human understanding starts with the understanding of oneself. And i would just like to start with this question. where did you begin with understanding of oneself. It's probably in my james to some degree. Because i remember even as a young child being interested not only in the world outside but also the world inside pat. I was interested in what thought was and i was interested in breeding. I was has not as a child so badly. Learn how to briefing not cost kind of interested in how the body were town on a mind. Were tell ideas got into your mind. Things like that from a pretty young age. I guess it's the upside of being somewhat introverted at that dual view of the world just that interior human observers you. When did you first recognize that in yourself. will you ten years old. Did you have some influences. It sounds like you a seeker that you were asking a lot of questions. Her number certainly started before high school. I was really interested in reading. And i read things that were beyond the point where my world experience but allow me to truly understand and i was reading cavu when i was in junior high school. Obviously you can't really get what he's talking about. I mean i knew the words. But i kind of had the sense that he was really trying to understand the world and sewers. I am discovered hermann hesse fairly early on also that actually resonated with the because all of his novel is basically the same plot to people who start out life one becomes a contemporary live and spends there's lives on monastic search for wisdom and the other goes out in the world becomes longer and tries to understand universe through experiencing the world in a deeper way and i saw both of those in myself and quite a young age thought was drawn to that. I think it was sometime. In highschool that i learned about maslow's hierarchy of human vs botanist like survival and at the top was self actualization wanted the express train to sell That's where i wanna be. I can't say that there's wild ridden. It does the same thing from the. I discovered his poetry. We had to read some of his poetry like a junior high school or something that i really discovered it as a personal manifesto probably but i was like fourteen or fifteen history of connection to the world to everything that the world offer and an internet connection wasn't just observe that but i have merged myself in this i jumped into the water and the deep end and swim through it. So that was the place i started. And as how i ultimately got interested in meditation and autos actually at age nineteen thought i would become a monk. A serious attempt back. Yeah you spent a few months. At the zen saying cisco center person there. And why did i. I can't imagine what some of the older students were thinking about this young kid. Who is there that i just needed to do. That was the next step for me. It sounds like you could have gone down this path of being a spiritual monastic or a philosopher. How did you take what you were learning from. Meditation and from studying at the zen center and then decide to be a doctor. The subtitle of your book is medicine. Mindfulness and humanity. And i think that's so perfectly represents the essence of who you are as a human being but when did this and how did this all come together for you. As a child. I was interested in things medical and originally when we first got an encyclopedia paper encyclopedia. Nothing and i look up. I interested asthma. As as matic started reading about other illnesses aspects of human experience and that coupled with a fair degree of family. i wouldn't call it pressure. I guess some expectation or hope or aspiration that the family would somehow produce a doctor

Dr Ron Epstein John Cabot Zand Dan Siegel Hermann Hesse Maslow Cisco Zen Center Matic Asthma
"hermann hesse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"hermann hesse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"On movies they brought me to movie scoring and then the also a farm leading documentary and into the very off I could find much more opened forms you know you can make a the truck that lasts forty minutes zero all like one hour or two days it's possible so do you think that something like with the fact we have social media and everybody can use visuals and sound we have you chip has not helped your work for you search yeah yeah in the February two oh five YouTube was treated and I was I was living in that at the time in the not center thank you and the residency for two years and I have time and money and so I experimented a lot you know and you to came and I I could download so many interviews videos of but of directors that I lack composers or movie except you know and I was born in seventy six so I use the VHS zero it would have been impossible he sat with taping it for Olivia Hugh millennials villages okay boomer okay you've created pieces using footage from trips to New Orleans not to need to India tonight's the premise of your project new team what are you exploring hair the film of the game was a female playing let's world to play there's a connection to this piece and of the German or th the Hermann Hesse's the glass bead game the guys balance pedia is book thank you it was so moved by this book is this is a story so you to tell you know it's a fiction and is the life of a guy in the measures if next which is invalid he's been taken since very early as a kid to this place where you have only searchers and he grows and becomes the loony measures to the master of the glass bead game this game is never described in the book you know but it is getting you can imagine like people seeking full moms like imitation you know and using well the spiritual values the faults of for your mentee they use that to make the best possible game filler I would like to do my own guys with game but we knew that you're so the concept to play is something that returns throughout your work because for example a loop of yours can start of his things something quite playful and comical and then it can become something really poignant and meaningful Y. is play so important to what is it about play I guess is important for everyone that came I have to play the issue I think they do I think we play all the time like you know to let them go to work so I'm gonna do is consult in unpaid for that it's it's my job you know as we say sure this week I'm going to play you know I'm playing the piano so it's it's everywhere it makes you think of this classification so your competition like chess we all take the side of you have chance like Casio yes they have to go which is you know when kids to earn a living around looking down or being on the road because stuff on the roller coaster yes not just I am interpreting his lovely hounds nations the workers the response of the that the transportation and you have the the role playing just similac for the lost revenue last acting in a and dislike for categories and this movie's taking about avoiding competition when you talk about the movie I understand that you're working in a different way this time because your using a mix of animation and live footage and chroma keying is that right like the green string yes yeah yeah service we shot things like for instance which are the basketball game we showed the arcade room in Japan we shut the playground with kids in school in Paris.

"hermann hesse" Discussed on Dazzle Dudes

Dazzle Dudes

10:03 min | 1 year ago

"hermann hesse" Discussed on Dazzle Dudes

"Hey sorry I'm late. I assume crazy news gary down sounds pretty ominous year. You're scaring me what's going on serious. Everybody's around Rally Kimmy you. I'm the drummer jade or pen to be always send down okay. Oh Hey you guys really I mean we're I'm just a message or you're not supposed to say kill messenger talk already a hey I I wonder in a car roll sound because I wanna get it. Why Dr Doors or lock would change and Mel really ways mud Garni Studio thirty dollars? Smells smell like smoke. Like Osama Bin Burn now look on Charlotte's not I'm not capable of front door. No yes it's right here this yes they know who's no from her bide. Well Shit Jayder they just want us to ask you a series of probing questions and then speculate on the contents of the know based on our finance or would you just read rated term rates. Found decision they are gator eyebrow that as you mentioned the show hey let me see really hard. You've really hairy and have created me and I sure I can't read. This is here to me. You've filthy hair heads Ed's have changed me. Nobody cheats me bad carney by God you have not paid me the money which he only I use of my studio aren't able sounds my studio by God because you would not pay me the money you owe me Hours not able to keep carnival sounds which is owned by May Bird Karn Cottam to the safety standards to which it should be kept. A fire broke out sometime in the night and now my studio carnival sounds cannot be I used anymore by filthy. Hair has and slobber mouths who don't know how to record music that decent Christian men A. and women would like to buy and then listen to but carney studio carnivals sounds as recorded famous Christian Christian country and Western man and women singers like Spam Bali and the Yodel in Yunnan's and will no L. longer be recording this vicious and dirty Harry Liars lack your band and your devil monster thing that plays the guitar who had better not come near by Kearney. Also your tapes that have you your takes also your your tapes that you have recorded your debut album on have probably burned up in the fire. What the fuck what? Witnesses mine hand but what. Harney owner of world-famous Carnival sound studio. What the hell would ever love and Shit Shit? Our all music burned in a fire. Only now where a star this is bullshit Loria. Terrible Carol Valence bad luck. Don't happen our or doing wrong. I just made it. How polly talking about doing wrong? Billy Graham has been telling me for a long time playing with keeping me away away from Lord shoot it out. The bullet church Mar a lorry. Were you mean is kind of music are you. You kidding me. Affect is crazy as a year but car ride in a way this music we got darkness. Do y'all know it does has. It's not right Billy that's not true. There's a lot of spirituality and our music knew what about music the spheres or your you know spaceship lovin their sterns spiritual stuff in those song years ice out. But I thank our music's it's getting US wife not other. We all know deep down that the devils are mere man. That's crazy talk. I can't believe you're saying all this stuff. There's there's no devil here yeah I would say that I mean all new to curl can't come off a little dark and say town. What the fuck? No offense intended Carl. I think it's a groove and all but you know it's talking about Karl. He and mayor good friends and I know he loves lower Jimmy's pre excitable. But you know talking about May I ask how you mean jeers he just really digs black salad member making Macedo either man. I none of them. I'm talking about you Jesse knee. Yeah Jesse I'm sorry. I think you've lost your way. I have lost my way. Hey my consciousness has been opened up further than ever remember when I used to say you and your Daddy Church. Free Rider bows. How's longtime ago? You quit don't the first baptist. Since which church challenge. This is say that I've been exploring other. There are spiritual options. That's what I'm concerned my own. You know there's a lot of other philosophies out there billy lots lots of different points of view. Like have you ever read Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse or the Prophet by Khalil Gibran. And now I haven't read none of that but what I have read is my Bible and I think you're not careful you might be reading. A book is Satan wrote Nadi no in year yeah one question concept of good versus evil anyway and we talked about profits religion while our damn music is done. Burn up in a fire. What the hell are we gonNA do now? Well you know they say going is tough the tough get go. Yes he year. No one damn thing. Think about half donor being tough. Nothing so why. Don't you just put a damn live on Jimmy. You're dead wrong. They're just so happens. There's a lyle whole lot plot you know. I've known he said second grade so I'm finding that a little while mom knows was TD survey server based gaming store as as your asshole to serve all Keio Kariya a yeah against Wade church with bud and find out what's going on Haji May I'm not thinkin drunk. He already sheltering author knee and my daddy conest caters and he can thought off you. Talk to Cassie Hurl. Mo- he doesn't even remember mine. Name mm-hmm Bernie Mac Shit where ecology funny man watch 'em top diamantis. Funny man very coral ought to go talk to these scary you no. That's not such accuracy in world. Junior obvious choice hell lab. Who is shops? Your Dad's liquor stories seem all time is so suits youth something really. Just what would that be Mr Smart Genius Jesse Firkin Liquor obvious leads like his oxygen. God Yeah Yeah Gas Sameness Store Gas Akkad. Ask Him what the Hell No. If you won't give you a straight answer just refused the servant Yay. Yea that's really work but then elect that happened. He got a clue what Carney spends in. One Wake Daddy package store war zone Somali. We need to get some answers. I agree. It Ain't right. We're good are back when eight applying WII fucking plan plan for sure. I mean we need to share. Get off the table so Shit or get off. The table is the plain guilty. Dammit you mean we're up on a table we should go eddine poop up their ore. If were gods yes year stupid stupid. You're stupid fucking plan. Sorry Carl any make a play on. We need one a plan where anybody got now dares I mean I guess could play okay a tree county how well let me say I know I can tell him. I fire carries a lurker in one of the front loaders over to John on their work and last week in does he want it and so what will happen when he gets there need. Don't have no case Liquor Bailey. Real Mayor Bribery Birdie Birdie mad probably as anybody crawl his face off. He talked.

Billy Graham carney devils Carl Garni Studio Osama Bin gary Liquor Bailey Jesse knee Charlotte Dr Doors Hermann Hesse Daddy Church Mel Jesse Carol Valence Bribery Bernie Mac Harney Ed
"hermann hesse" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

13:46 min | 2 years ago

"hermann hesse" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Us a call our number eight four four seven two four two five five eight four four site talk or tweet us at sei, fry Maryanne wolf is director of the center for dyslexia, diverse, learners and social Justice at UCLA. She's author of the new book reader, come home. Welcome to science Friday. It's my pleasure. I even a hero of mine. With prost. I mean. Yeah. Not at all. But I've had to recover it. So I'm a recovering raider you've had to recover. Tell me about that you write in your book that you've had this experience happens to you where your your turn to a book you've loved many years leading. And you couldn't read it anymore. Yes. I have written a series of letters in this new book, and let her for I acknowledge one of the more humbling experiences in my scientific life in which I made myself, the the single subject, and what happened was I decided since I'm telling so many people about how their brain is changing when they've read I thought I would simply look at myself. And that was the beginning of a rather terrible experience. I picked up Herman Hess's glass bead game, which once was one of my most favorite pieces of literature and IRA. I simply couldn't read it. It was like it's really felt like I was pouring molasses over my cerebrum, and it was so humiliating. I thrust the book back until I realized Hermann Hesse all these people have been the friends of a lifetime. They have made me who I am. And so I determined to go back and read very differently just re twenty minutes a day. And I read took ten days for me to return to that mode of reading in which I could immerse myself and not be distracted by sin, tactic density or length or even the complexity of the arguments there, but it took a good a good ten days to to return home. If you attribute that to to the fact that you're you're doing more reading online versus reading in a book. I mean, the sort of one of the thesis of your of your book. Yeah. We are wrecking our reading habits and wrecking a lot of other stuff because we're reading online now instead of reading from a paper. Well, it begins with a statement. And it's very important that your listeners in my readers understand that I'm not making a binary argument. I am saying however that because the reading brain is plastic, you know, we never were meant to read we had formed this beautiful new circuit. But because it's plastic it reflects things like the writing system a Chinese reader is different from an English alphabet reader, but it also reflects the medium, so the dominant medium is going to be reflected in the style of reading even when you're not reading on the screen. It will affect you as you read print, and there are good reasons for that quite literally our circuit is it's. Like a mere held to the processes needed by any medium. So if a print medium is giving us precious, though, imperceptible time to allocate milliseconds to inference the the scientific method processes critical analysis immersion. That's that's the advantage of print that we think will be just continuous. No matter how we read elsewhere. But it's not the case the the advantages of the screen, which are hastening us along multi-tasking being ready for the next novel experience that ends up making a skimmers and skimmers literally skim what I call the deep reading processes that involve critical analysis, and empathy and even insight, and you say all those of that. That whole idea about skimming. And because we're not doing critical analysis and insight you say that's actually a threat to democracy. It was the last thing in the world that is a cognitive neuroscientist. I would be thinking I'm actually confronting implications for democracy, but three -ality is that one of the most precious aspects of deep reading is that we give time to inference we give time to critically analyze and evaluate the truth of what we're reading and also, and this is often the collected in understanding reading reading gives us an opportunity to engage. Our feelings, of empathy and also our engagement with alternative viewpoints. And one of the things that I I will never forget was an interview between Barack at former President Barack Obama and the beautiful novelist. Maryland Robinson about the power of reading to give empathy. And Obama said the novel is. What has taught me moral and ethical development. It taught me about other to which Maryland Robinson set the trend towards seeing others as center stir others is one of the greatest threats to our democracy. And I'll end this. This little part of our discussion IRA with a quote from Jane smiley or a paraphrase in which she was asked about the novel, and empathy, and she said the novels not going to die, but it may be sidelined. And if it is sideline we will be led by people who do not read who do not understand fully the feelings and the minds of others leading us to a potential new era of barbarism. So we're you say reading online you're making a distinction between reading websites things places like that. And reading a muck that might be a kindle e book or something like that. Correct. You know, this is a really important distinction IRA. There are different modes of reading, and we need to understand that even the kindle, which is far better than reading in a distracted internet type, computer environment screen environment. Even though that's far better. You still have three problems. You have a set towards the screen, which is the set or anticipation of evanescence of transitory images. So you end up still having this set towards speed hastening along. And in addition, the the second and third parts, are you don't have that concrete kinesthetic element that actually is activated in your brain in slows you down to allocate more time to these other processes, and you do not ever have what is called recurs. You can't return to. Monitor. What you what what might not have made sense a few minutes ago in in a screen. Even in a kindle, even though it is possible to return, you do not therefore your comprehension monitoring on screen while far better than a computer actually has some of that transitory images stick element that makes you speed faster than you would in a print form. A lot of a lot of folks wanna comment on this. Let me see if I can get a caller to in. It's got Andrew and Cleveland, high Andrew. I, wow, it's one of those moments where I'm listening on the radio, and I have worked with, but I work in a variety of schools all over north east Ohio as a substitute teacher. And I'm often seeing students who the one thing they lament is especially at the high school level is reading their literature assignments Middle Eastern with those books are harder to get through. I'm a big advocate with them freezing audio books as a means of of getting getting their material covered. And I'm curious as you guessed sees that as a another step down, the slippery slope, or if reading having a human voice reading to you is is a step in the positive direction. And while I was listening. I was curious. What do we know if? Data on on students that are taking tests by a computer as opposed to test on paper. They're read their reading and retention of those questions. And is there any is there any indication that one is better than the other or more harmful? Right. Andrew, thanks for that. What about being read to like in those right? This is a beautiful question that I'm often asked and I like an are are many of our young as not necessarily deep readers, but deep listeners, and I think it's a wonderful aspect because we're getting so much information that they might not they might not read. And so I consider it a good, but still insufficient alternative for the same reasons that involve comprehension monitoring on any screen, and that is with the audio again though, you can go back to check yourself to monitor your comprehension to remember the details. You don't do it as easily or it's very unlikely that you do. It. So even though I consider this is a positive. I don't consider a replacement and indeed you're you're listening to the teacher couldn't be more. Correct. So many of our professors of high school, and and college are lamenting that their students are no longer willing or have the cognitive patience to read long form, text, and there's this common. Little aphorism TLD are too long. Did it read and the reality is that our professors are so worried that our students are are really neglecting some of the nineteenth century hell Melville our twentieth century James there people who are writing me often in saying they are no longer having people coming to their seminars because of the density and length of books are off pudding and their students. Don't have. What I'm calling the cognitive patience to invest in retraining themselves to be able to read that and their implications. Not just for literature, but for referenda for contracts for for dealing with the complexity of worlds that can't be reduced to Twitter, our Twitter, brain, you know, we don't we don't want that for our young. Can you offer any remedy for this trend? Well, I I certainly have been thinking a great deal about what would it take to develop deep reading skills across every medium because that's really what we're talking about. It's it's cognitive choice to preserve what we know. We want our next generation to have at the same time not just allowing but propelling them to expand their their twenty first century skills. Their visual intelligence that goes so much beyond ours. So. We want both. And here's where I I tell your listeners is the perfect show in the world to say this. It is a hinge moment in which knowledge from science needs to be yoked with the designs from technology to be able to read dress this and to create children who are really capable of by literate and by digital brains that have equal skills. Now, you may know this an IRA new readers would your listeners wouldn't, but I have proposed a way in which our children move from zero to ten on print and carefully. Use that kind of sensory motor concrete kind of cognitive skills of children to learn deep reading over time with print and then have our teachers explicitly trained to teach deep reading skills. On the screen. So it's not this willy nilly assumption. That you read the same on each mode, but rather students are trained to ask. What is the purpose? What am I better at students? Don't know what they're better at I better get an break in here. This Friday from WNYC studio. So sorry, we have to..

Barack Andrew Robinson Herman Hess Maryanne wolf Twitter prost UCLA WNYC Jane smiley IRA Maryland director Ohio Cleveland President James ten days twenty minutes
"hermann hesse" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

03:35 min | 3 years ago

"hermann hesse" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Practical patterns, the air becomes a sea of mathematical formulas and your mind is opened up. Your heart's opened up your feel woman, the universe. That's that's a hero's journey. That's five grams. You know, you don't get that until going over three grams. She started getting into it, but so ten to twenty grams as the superheroes journey. I've never eaten these before. So I walked as walking into this place about an hour walk. I started consuming them drinking water because they were dried, and I saw. Tree that I love climbing in the street, how does limb so it was a perfect climbing tree to the very top of the hill. So I thought that's great place set and setting getting a good view. That's what I need. I could feel the mushrooms coming on as I climbed up the tree stem branch by branch. I got higher and higher. So it was kind of this ascending euphoria, kind of kind of went with everything was very cool, and I got the top of the tree and beautiful landscaping up there on just the mushrooms are coming on getting higher and higher. And I've realized I'm really high here in little dizzying, so I'm holding onto the tree and on the horizon is being lack Bank of boiling dark angry clouds. It was a summer storm coming in Ohio. When you see summer storms are terrifying. Lightning bolts coming down and thunder lightning off in the distance. But it's coming out me really quickly and I'm getting hired higher as thunderstorm lighting. Someone's getting closer and closer. I'm getting vertigo on my God. I can't get off the tree. I don't wanna fall. So I held on the tree for dear life and it became my access Mundi sort of my access right into the earth. And I just amazing experience. I mean, just beautiful experience, but also the threat of lightning coming closer and closer and every lightening strike it would hit Fratto patterns would just emanate out from every lightening strike and sinister occurred. You know where they're, you know. Sound and envisions were merging together and and sounds had visions and visions. That sounds and it was just an incredibly complex. The one of my favorite books, the glass bead game by by Hermann Hesse, also. Ludi and some other area night. He got the Nobel prize for nine hundred fifty five. But that was a deep dive into into inner space exploration. But I felt like I was part of the glass bead game, and there I was I was sending into this higher consciousness and I realized, oh my God, I'm Ana highest point in miles doing a lightning storm. This is not a good place to be, and and then I was up there. I was terrified and lightning storm came close closer. These empathic genyk just empathy for the universe. One, everything is fine. If I die here today I life is complete. Now I understand. I'm part of the fabric of all the matter this around me. I'm one with everything I made of stardust. Everything's may have started us. This is a continuum of nature. Death is natural. Birth is natural. Transitions are are just the way of way of existence. And then. The light on the wind came up. I'm washed with warm rain, and it was just terrifying a lightning storm. There and I'm thinking, I'll I'm gonna die, but if I don't die Paul, what are you going to learn from this experience challenges?.

Ludi Hermann Hesse Nobel prize vertigo Ohio Paul twenty grams three grams five grams
"hermann hesse" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

05:34 min | 3 years ago

"hermann hesse" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"In you owe. Magna. I'm embarrassed to report that I literally questioned why the Nobel prize for literature have ever been given. And then I thought, I wonder if Harper Collins would ever publish this book today, I just thrusted back into my alphabetized h shelf and then thought about what have I done books. This book was one of my friends of my of my youth of my graduate programs. It was it was Hermann Hesse was a friend to my intellect. He had been a part of the contribution of my background knowledge, and I had just rudely thrusted away suitcases. Oh, sorry to keep interrupting. You hear just one of the drawbacks of being three thousand miles apart as we have this. Yeah, but, but I see, I'm curious though because the very immersive nature that drew you into this book to begin with was the thing that it seemed as if your brain was rebelling against the when you went back and reread it, you are absolutely correct. What I could not do was. Find that reflective contempt of mode of reading which had been for me how I read years ago in my in, not just my youth, my young adulthood, and it was as if it had been replaced in use that word, verse elective -ly replaced by a motive reading that could certainly read other novels. I, I'm not. I read as much fiction is not fiction, but this very dense, complex sin tactically and conceptually demanding novel was not being there was no es in me entering it. So here is the good news Meghna and that's really, I know why you asked me. I, I decided I cannot desert a friend and so I went back and I, I simply made a discipline of reading twenty minutes. A night for what took almost ten to twelve days almost two weeks. And then it was as if a switch was re replacing the other mode that had rebelled against it. And here's why impart I gave the title to the book. It was as if I have come home to my former reading self, I felt the holding ground the sanctuary has been refound, and I realized if this happens to me who knows all the, if you will, the idiosyncrasies of our present reading styles it can will affect many people. Now I hear, I hear the hope and I hear the passion in what you're saying, but I just wanna be clear you. You're not. I wouldn't wanna talk in a second about with you about how the brain changes when it's reading digital versus long-form books, but but you're not calling for us to smash our iphones and thrown the tablets out the window because I mean, look, most many people do most of their reading online or their information processing online these days, so. So is it, is it your? Are you saying that there's some sort of middle way some sort of way we can train our brains to have the same immersive experiences online or not? What are you saying? Juno Meghna. This is a question that I'm asking myself and that I am hoping to develop if you will do proposals for people to examine in a much more systematic rigorous research context would I am aiming for is for the development of. Of a reading set of styles, not one, but a set of styles that we can intentionally us after we have discovered our own purposes for whatever were reading. In other words, the screen reading mode is appropriate for much of our reading, but for that which is requiring and this is very intentional, which we know is requiring our fullest concentration and the desire to consolidate that information into knowledge. I believe we must be vigilant about allocate ala re allocating time to what I call the deep reading processes. And there is no question in my life that I had changed as much as the readers I am writing for. But what my real worry is is that it's one thing for. For adults who have long built up this deep reading brain. It's one thing for us to return to it. It is another question for those who have not yet developed such a deep reading circuit, and we're going to talk about that because I know a lot of people listening are probably thinking of their kids right now, but, but I'm curious, the win, you see this. This is something that I think would benefit us if we just got your definition of when you say deep reading?.

Hermann Hesse Juno Meghna Nobel prize Harper Collins Magna twenty minutes twelve days two weeks
"hermann hesse" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

05:22 min | 3 years ago

"hermann hesse" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Details that story in deed magnet. The last thing I ever thought was that I myself who am aware of all the weaknesses that can happen would be similarly affected like everybody that I try to caution on my weekend. It's so what I did Magda, I just out of pure curiosity. I decided to do a single cell design with myself as the subject. And I decided to read a book that in my graduate days had been one of my absolute favorite books. It was Herman Hess's glass bead game, which is a very dense complex book, not Hermann Hesse, Siddharta. Way too simple. But no, I chose has his glass bead gain also called Marcus Ludi would is when you plot? Oh, sorry. Sorry, if forgive me for interrupting, but when you first read it in your in your younger years, what is it that you loved about it? Then? I love the very complexity. I loved the idea of how we might think about the future in ways that I had never imagined before. And so the very appeal initially to me was that it was one of the more intellectually stimulating thought provoking books and going interactions that I myself would never have imagined. So it was with no small glee that I thought it's the perfect experiment. It's complex, it stints. I know the plot and so I can just immerse myself but Meghna as you already have have wetted the lis-. Listener's appetite. It was like pouring molasses over my cerebral cortex. I couldn't read it. I couldn't focus. What I was doing was literally using the motive reading that I used six to twelve hours a day. So I was using my screen mode of reading which was absolutely incapacitating me in terms of entering it. What can I ask you? So, I mean, it sounds like you couldn't even bear to read the book. I mean that this thing that giving you so much pleasure was eliciting the exact opposite emotions in you owe. Magna, I'm embarrassed to report that I literally questioned why the Nobel prize for literature had ever been given. And then I thought, I wonder if HarperCollins would ever publish this book today. I just thrusted back into my alphabetized h shelf and then thought about what have I done books. This book was one of my friends of my of my youth of my graduate programs. It was it was Hermann Hesse was a friend to my intellect. He had been a part of the contribution of my background knowledge, and I had just rudely thrusted away with suitcases. Oh, sorry to keep interrupting. You hear just one of the drawbacks of being three thousand miles apart as we have this show. But but see, I'm curious though because the very immersive nature that drew you into this book to begin with was the thing that it seemed as if your brain was rebelling against the when you went back and reread it, you're absolutely correct. What I could not do was fine. Find that reflective contempt of mode of reading which had been for me how I read years ago in my in, not just my youth, my young adulthood, and it was as if it had been replaced in. I use that word verse elective, -ly replaced by a motive reading that could certainly read other novels. I, I'm a not I read is much fiction is not fiction, but this very dense, complex sin tactically and conceptually demanding novel was not being there was no es in me entering it. So here's the good news Meghna and that's really, I know why you asked me. I, I decided I cannot desert a friend and so I went back and I, I, I simply made a discipline of reading twenty minutes. Night for what took almost ten to twelve days almost two weeks. And then it was as if a switch was re replacing the other mode that had rebelled against it. And here's why impart I gave the title to the book. It was as if I have come home to my former reading self, I felt the holding ground the sanctuary has been refound, and I realized if this happens to me who knows all, if you will, the idiosyncrasies of our present reading styles it can well affect many people. Now I hear, I hear the hope and I hear the passion in what you're saying, but I just wanna be clear you..

Herman Hess Marcus Ludi Magda HarperCollins Meghna Nobel prize Siddharta Magna twenty minutes twelve hours twelve days two weeks
"hermann hesse" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

02:15 min | 4 years ago

"hermann hesse" Discussed on Overdue

"You are a vessel for like god's word or god's will or whatever like it's it's not it doesn't emphasize the self in the way that that buddhism does i don't share it like it doesn't it doesn't value or at least in my in my perception like it doesn't value the personal journey as much or like it yeah well and what you you also were you're saying like there is an inherent uh a kanombe gum mu i'm reminded of that earlier passage that you were when he's actually talking to a cow touma and it's like you there's no way to just like here this and go yeah that makes sense like there's only there's gonna be a period where you're like okay that sounds cool but like let me go work for twenty years and get rich and then like have a six soul then like half to go off and do the rest of the work share which also like there's a cool aspect of the forgiveness of the self they're like both under both frank selfreflection of like i did this to my dad which is what said arthur has done and also like yes i spent those decades being of greenwich merchant dude who was not living my best life but now i get it am here to do that again okay i don't know what is what is it like was it like for you reading it because i i've encountered a lot of like folks who've written about when they read this book and they're like all i read it as a young man in it like shaped like how i thought about what i was going to do with my life and i'll know exactly what you what people necessarily mean by that um yeah i mean it's clearly i'm not i'm not reading it at a particularly impressionable time in my life like i'm thirty one leg probably the stuff i believe now will remain substantially the same barring any major like upheavals and my light until the alien show up and until the aliensmuggling yeah right but it does put into.

frank selfreflection arthur twenty years
"hermann hesse" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

01:50 min | 4 years ago

"hermann hesse" Discussed on Overdue

"And so are those like well mike i went there and i look forward to good ties and now the next time i need to go there for anything like people are going to know me in they're going to think well of me and mike in the long term it'll be better okay that's a good as he's playing the long con so he's picked up the scale of the long khan is what you're yes which is essential like the leg when we start a podcast there was kind of a long con yes you're like like nobody's got listen to this at first but eventually it's gone bring bringing untold riches yes and go on hazardous gone pretend like we know about books for years and years and until eventually people find it in her that was the key on all yet i dislike scott punkt i like the idea of rolling into a town goin' well the things not here the thing i wanted to see here tom to make some birds and dislike him dole already bad kraft owner corona dislike chill man you know all works to my favorite song through my new best friends at hearth and and so he's he's succeeding in business but he doesn't really like care about it he he sees a as a bit of a game and he also sees himself as a bit above it all because he's not motivated necessarily by like the base sir instincts artists as you're like me yeah but as you know he's in this town he's he's guingona and instructions from kamala and their dislike in at all time and he's hanging out with his mircha is getting better business and he's gonna money aliens this he buys a housing has a garden he's doing really well and he is staying in the sound for years and years and years until he's into his middle age.

tom kamala mike scott kraft corona
"hermann hesse" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

02:17 min | 4 years ago

"hermann hesse" Discussed on Overdue

"And then he he goes on to talk a little bit about like oneseat when you try to put stuff in your brain into words there is like inherently a disconnect shuras vocabulary is only is a problem we have on the show time is because vocabulary is inherently limited and in expressing something you have like not only did is there that connection between your brain in your mouth that is may be shifting ideas but then also your words or heard by people and their brains are undo whatever with it yeah no that's that's good i i buy that it's it's why i think vis and thinking about this book as like a a thing that westerners have certainly latched onto and in the mid to late twenty century i cannot speak for why the teachings endured for thousands of years but dislike wide of this book register with a bunch of people who are looking for different answers in the sixties and seventies and potentially even now of dislike it's not a bow a bunch of things that you have to believe in it's about a bunch of like things that you personally have control over whether or not you are going to pursue right like the pasqua is the you know the the april path is a bunch of things that you commit to doing for yourself and nothing like it's not about whether or not you believe what someone else said it's not about whether or not you believe in a particular mythology it's like you think that these are these are things worth do ing which is debra it's it's it's it's i mean you can s their analogies to other belief systems other religions but it's about the work at least in this telling anyway certainly yeah yeah and i think that the the bit about like knowledge versus wisdom is important to more than just religious searches riot later it's like i've been thing think our friend catherine like just had a new baby and laying we are at the age where were like the you know we're both marion were both like thinking about it i'm i'm sure.

debra catherine marion twenty century
"hermann hesse" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"hermann hesse" Discussed on Overdue

"Well you're editing this episode so i can't put unrwa's song at the end is all i'll say you can't so come as you are and described this book decisive describe what you think enlightenment as it's it's when you could put all of existence in a little heartshaped bucks this free so you know nirvana munasinghe you'd inutero uh that's good i thought we were gonna be never mind this all time guys smells and here andrew uh huh like teen spirit now with in smell it so bad here we are now entertain me i know i know you're you're gonna make it though i'm so says it hard that goes through like let's call it half a dozen different phases of his of his search for enlightenment oh i think the okay whether you say well at another noorani joke no i think isn't the number like isn't twel like are there twelve chapters to this book or something because there's like that that might numbering is i mean there there are there are two books like yet jin looked more like two parts okay okay split up into several chapters but like going through his um little like many aarchs in his quest for enlightenment i count like five or maybe six depending on how you define thing school.

unrwa come as you are jin
"hermann hesse" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

01:49 min | 4 years ago

"hermann hesse" Discussed on Overdue

"We're speaking out against against like this this militant nationalism at a nazi ism in particular yes um and his books i don't think his books were banned in germany during this period but they were um hey were not recommended by the government let's just say i think the nazis may have ended up banning him a fish legs a i have this like many biography of him in the back of the kin okinawa's book that i buy it said not not banned but seen as like okay shirts actionable or i forget the specific term is but and that may have been because in wives people to find he did not publicly condemn nazism like he had been publicly denouncing forms of anti semitism and other things like that but i think out of his his personal beliefs about like when in what to say about politics he didn't want to condemn like on a hiding other read that has yet all yes gives a because like if you don't like anti semitism and you don't like nationalism like what is left dolt as he was m i i don't know that seems more to be about the like his own personal feelings about a public statement like that while what you say is like he was doing work and he was like you know trying to create and better work in the world well like maybe there's a and then i think we're we're seeing a little bit this now are there may be some some hesitancy like you want to condemn the movement by you also don't want to like condemn individuals who may supported or who may support parts of it or in like every every handwringing yet the piece about from the from the midwest's about like trump voters i think has a reflects a sort of.

okinawa germany
"hermann hesse" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

01:56 min | 4 years ago

"hermann hesse" Discussed on Overdue

"The all evangelism is a word evangelical is a word there's it's one of the two i'm just not sure what he'd me in a yeah i don't know but i think that lays the groundwork there is like a theology fee a theological tradition in his family that lays some groundwork for the like butting up against buddhism that we're going to get in this book yes sean at a very early age hesse identified his like aspirations to be a poets and to like didn't really do well in normal rigid education he spent a use the also showed allies signs of depression and other mental progress the treaty early on right yeah he he did spend a year at the seminary at meaubrun abby and eighteen ninety one um but he only made it like a year before he attempted to take his own life and spent time at several institutions before like fought like finishing up his education elsewhere he then went into a doing mechanic work and like working at a bookshop and he would spend like ten or twelve hours a day like organizing books and like packing them and stuff and then go home and like read philosophers which is like he was able to clear out his brain during the day cuts count feels like a move the coffee was like eight mile where life you build cars all day and then you get to go have wrap battles because you're saving you're saving your brain for the art and i said he's he have a law friends he wasn't like he wasn't rabbi hailing a by so much as he was just the thinking utah rattled a make friends andrew you rat battled destroy people looking y destroying the person your badly against but surely you want the people on the sidelines who are watching like if a battle happier knowing there to watch it did it actually happened i dunno quest these are the kinds of questions we're going to get into.

hesse meaubrun abby utah twelve hours
"hermann hesse" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

02:01 min | 4 years ago

"hermann hesse" Discussed on Overdue

"Yeah i guess it was a empire back there wasn't a country where he was trying to have an empire while his grandparents were like protestant missionaries in india i think even his parents had done some of that work i think his grandfather worked to compile an english dictionary for the indian indianlanguage of malawi him um which like has a cigar reminder there's a whole bunch of stuff in the world the i don't know like they're i've run across historical figures like this from what you did the that's impressive that's you did more work yeah on a thing i don't even know anything about that i will have him such as something i season on such a season world traveler now that you like you a b you could be forgiven if you think that i didn't know everything but i don't know everything found out that italy hag king's up until like seventy years ago and they actually mostly like his release the the modern like the last four of them who kinda closed out italy's king having like their best known for leading mussalini happen faysal good job king's i believe hes's mom was actually born in india another thing about this here words i didn't know we could peter says that has so was a swabian or maybe is was a swabian pa test what you're going to have to tell me what either of those words a yeah that's what i had and then also what they mean next to each other great so swabia is a is a region in germany in the southwest part of germany i imagine that if you pronounce prowse it in german it's all different and p it is a more pie it is a may is a subset of german lutheranism that was based on the individual piety you didn't need an organiz church or at least a lady should be involved in the governance of that church very controversial led to various forms of even jelko even gel evangelism even jelica ism.

india italy peter germany prowse seventy years
"hermann hesse" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

02:19 min | 4 years ago

"hermann hesse" Discussed on Overdue

"This is a head gum hut ask while andrew and craig believe the joy of discovery is crucial to enjoying any well told tale they will not shy away from spoiling specific story beats when necessary plus these are books you should have read by now but a third a that ended that added a hey welcome back i back back injury this is overdue it's a podcast with books even mean read my name's craig and my name is a andrew welcome i think he emma back from where emma back from italy the country ya ya sl italian how was it was good it was it was as good as a pizza pie ma i kissed my data zamora a dare is okay so here's here's what my travel wisdom is i gotta lot like i learned a lot of travel wisdom but here's what i learned about restaurants oakley glee italy but like i guess anywhere against like if there's somebody outside trying to get you come in don't go in there if the says free wifi don't go in there okay if they have pictures of the food don't go in there sure if they actually have red and white chequered tablecloths don't go in really that seems like like honey to you the fly i know it's a hunting because i want those at my at my wedding because we have pizza dr wedding and yet and it was not having it it was a bridge too far i guess he and as yasser that's that's the andrews travel tips okay did you see any anthony sport dane over there i didn't see any anthony's bore dane i probably saw lots of other just regular type anthony's or online at antony were at him yesterday.

craig emma wifi andrews anthony back injury italy zamora