20 Burst results for "Herman Melville"

"herman melville" Discussed on X96

X96

02:48 min | 2 months ago

"herman melville" Discussed on X96

"Because on this day in 1965 Richard Hall was born. Who's that? Moby? Moby took his name from. He's a descendant of Herman Melville. That's where he got his apparently. Okay. No. Ah, no, I got ah, DMD by Chainsaw guy Because he's right out. You might be able to hear chainsaws and beeping and worker guys outside my house chopping up Trees and and he he said. I'm writing, he said. Can I come in? For a drink. I'm thirsty. I'll don't worry. I'll wear my mask. And if you guys don't mind if I bring him in for a minute, just and he wanted to say hi, okay. Is it safe and well, can I see him? Where is he? X 96 dot com slash live. I can't see him. Where is he? He's right there. What Oh, there he is. He's apparently it carries. How can you tell with split split screen technology. Wait a minute. He's in my house. You're sure? Sure, as far as you know, Okay. Hi Chainsaw guy there. I bet he's been. I'll bet he's been really busy. Haven't you? Chainsaw guy? Well for home. Wait a minute. We have a group of Apollo blow the town about you. They say and guy. Ah, big trees came down in the big Winstone. What did I do? And I said, Well, you just get a chance to. Well, it seems pretty easy, doesn't it? You know what I do? I call somebody who owns the chainsaw. I call a friend who has a chainsaw and have them come over and do it for roll. Call me though. I'm too busy. I'm his business is a well on paper hanger. Haven't you have your chainsaw handy there, Chainsaw guy. Question for you. Well, OK, So if you ask a question, maybe I'll follow my chainsaw lets you want your question, Gina. Well, Chainsaw guy have this really big tree that fell down in the windstorm. Yesterday. That's blocking the road in front of my my house, and I can't get out to get the mail chain saw guy. What should I do?.

Moby Herman Melville Richard Hall Gina
Moby Dick Chapter Eight

5 Minutes in Church History

04:20 min | 5 months ago

Moby Dick Chapter Eight

"Welcome back to another episode of Church history. Last week we were talking about the pulpit that Latin Word Putnam, and that object that appears in so many churches. Well, we also find the pulpit, appearing in of all places that great American novel by Herman, Melville none other than moby. Dick Moby Dick has one hundred and thirty five chapters. They have fascinating names like the shark massacre and interesting names, two of the chapters in particular come early in the book that have great names chapter nine is entitled the sermon. Sermon, Chapter Eight is entitled The pulpit so this is Melville's description of a pulpit of a fabled new. England church, it's sort of a conglomerate picture that Melville is putting together. And of course they are about to go out to sea questing after the great white whale, and before they go, all the sailors will show up that. Sunday in church to hear that sermon before they're sent off to see, and they might not come back again well. This is chapter eight on the pulpit. Let's read Melville's description. He tells us how he's sitting there. In the Pew of the Church and Father Maple comes in, and then he starts walking towards the pulpit. Melville says like most old fashioned pulpits. It was a very lofty one and since. Our stairs to such a height would by its long angle with the floor seriously constrict the already small area of the chapel, the architect it seemed had acted upon the hint of Father Maple, and finish the pulpit without a stairs, substituting a perpendicular that is straight up and down side ladder like those used in mounting ship from a boat at sea. The wife of a whaling captain had provided the chapel with a handsome pair of red ropes for this latter. Halting for an instant at the foot of the ladder, and with both hands, grasping the ornamental knobs of those red ropes, Father Maple cast a look upwards, and then with a truly sailor, like, but still reverential dexterity hand over hand, mounted the steps as if ascending the main top of his vessel. Melville continues, nor was the pulpit itself without a trace of the same seat taste that had achieved the latter. It's paneled front was in the likeness of shifts, bluff bows and the holy. Bible rested on a projecting piece of scroll work fashioned after a ship's fiddle headed beak. What could be full of more meaning Melville asks. For the pulpit. Is Ever this Earth's foremost part? All the rest comes in its rear. The pulpit leads the world from thence. It is the storm of God's quick. Wrath is first descried, and the bow must bear the earliest brunt. From thence it is the god of breezes. Fair or foul is I invoked for favourable winds. Yes, yes, the world's a ship on its passage out not a voyage complete, and the pulpit is its prow. Well, that's from the pen of Melville. What a fascinating line he gives us. Did you hear it in that last paragraph I read and the pope it leads the world. Well. That's chapter eight. The pulpit from Melville's great novel. Some have called I. Know Dr Sprawl often called it the great American novel Moby Dick or The whale.

Melville Dick Moby Dick Father Maple England Church Herman
"herman melville" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

01:32 min | 7 months ago

"herman melville" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

"The last thirty minutes of Batmans live where he's like. I was trying our editorial everybody's like we didn't buy the subscription that was I had. I had used my five articles. Ugh sorry why did we waste all the time? In that movie with that broach when we could have been following this guy's exploits as he ran around the and of course when this famous spiritualist went down on the Titanic. The biggest news worldwide tele telephones and paranormal people around the world went nuts all saying that they saw him. They appeared to him in dreams. He made hundreds of appearances the following year in the paranormal press. He was big after his death and before I wish I had been his agents. One of my very favorite nineteenth century accounts of of death by iceberg was written by none other than Herman Melville who wrote Moby Dick Fame. You know America's greatest see story in eighteen eighty eight. He wrote a poem called the Byrd which is a very beautiful kind of dreamlike. Look at how calm it might be. If the ship had iceberg in the iceberg. Just didn't care which is kind of accurate. That's that's pretty much. What happens is one of the characteristics of ICEBERGS? The iceberg has a very good crunch zone. It's like a Prius. It just doesn't care that much and normally it's just John and me speaking on this show and we know that gets tiring I mean. I have to think how hard it is for us to listen to each other talk. It must be hard for you to read this poem. We'd brought a special friend of ours. One of our favorite people..

Herman Melville Batmans America John
Stephen Wright on 'Processed Cheese'

Bookworm

08:07 min | 9 months ago

Stephen Wright on 'Processed Cheese'

"Is the show most excited about. I've been excited in anticipation of it for a long time. The author Steven Wright has been on bookworm twice a four. I love his work and it takes him the Gourd zone time to complete it. I've been waiting for his newest novel which is called processed cheese and which is published by Little Brown. Oh for around seven years and as I read it I wanted it to never be over. I wanted to be reading it forever. I think like Stevens other books. It's made out of sentences and a feeling about the world that's completely his own knowing. No the title processed cheese. Stephen has been with you for a while. I've been wanting to write a book with that title since I can remember so. I finally did the title game before the Book Way. Back when I was sixteen. One of the things my father did was to make cheese board sees pieces of wood which cheese was attached under plastic at first when it started out like most American things they were real genuine supreme vintage cheeses but as things had to be less and less expensive to be made. These cheeses were replaced by process cheeses and the expensive store. The same bloomingdale's that sold the cheese board was replaced by five and ten where you could get. The junk is on the junk board in the junk rapper. And that was what growing up in. America was light during that period that was UAE. May Be we needed the sixties so when. I saw your tunnel processed cheese. It meant so much to me about the end of quality and the beginning of junk in my child he read it exactly the right way. That's terrific now. Tell me this is a book about as one of the first chapter says money money money money money money money. It's about the replacement of everything by the need for money. And more money and under funded coppell find that the husband has been hit by a bad. Were walking down a street. The bag is filled with hundred dollar bills. Which are wrapped in plastic packets? He suddenly got more money than he or his wife. Ambience know what to do with his name is graveyard. Her name is Ambien. Stephen Word of these names come from. I wish I knew they just. I don't know where they came from. The thing is that when they occurred to me it just seemed absolutely right that these were the right names for these people so they stock all of the names of the people in this book are based on industrial processes or Johnke. The city's the places are named things like random Burg this is the world that's died down and been replaced by the equivalent of processed cheese. John Exact has replaced everything. Yeah that is the theme of the book. Yes now the book is so funny. I mean you'll pardon me laugh out loud funny I laugh out loud myself sometimes thinking about phrase or line yes so that's pretty pleasing when he can laugh at your own stuff even years after you wrote it. It's a hung aureus book but a book. That's hilarious about a tragedy of life. That life does not feel like life anymore that life feels like its own version of processed cheese. Yeah exactly how do you live while riding such a book? It's Day by day. You just get through the day like everybody else. You know you get through each day as best you can but. I need to tell my listeners that Steven Wright our guest is the author of five books the first one was called Meditations in Green. It was the first major who Gustav Nation of Vietnam. The second book M Thirty One was a family romance. I pointed out when reading it that it seemed to be based on the nightmare. Gatherings in Faulkner's novel sanctuary. But you don't have to know that it's a Family of people who believe in Outer Space Aliens going native was a book. Oh Stephen I really was barely out of my twenties. I was given this show to do and I asked someone. I think it was an beady. Who SHOULD I meet in New York publishing? Who would help me to know how to go about doing books on my show and she sent me to the man who turns out to have been your life long friend and editor Michael Pietsch. Yes he gave means three chapters of the then unpublished looney tunes novel going native. I say gooney tunes novel because it has on its original edition a big looney tunes series of circles you expect bugs to be poking his head through And I then spoke to Stephen when going native came out the amalgamation Polka imagined that southern scientists were able to change the color of the skin of the people that they wanted to amalgamate. It's a bizarre disturbing novel. That reminds me of Herman. Melville's peer or the ambiguities. Steven Wright did me the favour of teaching me. What the word in that. Some title Pierre or the ambiguities means. Tell US Stephen. The subtitle is Pierre or the ambiguities and it turns out that in the nineteenth century. That was a phrase that was used for someone who lost their mind. He's got the ambiguities. Isn't that amazing? I did not know that 'til I was done with the book. If I had known that I would put it in

Stephen Word Steven Wright Pierre John Exact Little Brown Stevens UAE Burg Michael Pietsch America Gustav Nation Faulkner New York Editor Vietnam Melville Herman
"herman melville" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:10 min | 9 months ago

"herman melville" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Moby Dick by Herman Melville nothing more happens on the passage worthy of the mentioning so after a fine run we safely arrived in and talking man chalk it check out your map and look at it see what a real corner of the world it occupies how it stands there are way off shore more lonely in the out of stone lighthouse look at it Amir Hilux elbow of sand all beach without a background there is more sand there then you would use in twenty years as a substitute for blotting paper some will tell you that they have to plant weeds there but they don't grow naturally but they import Canada thistles that they have to send beyond sees responsible to stop a leak and an oil cask that pieces of wood and then talk good or carried about like bits of the True Cross in Rome that people there plant told stools before their houses to get under the shade in summer time that one blade of grass makes an oasis three blades in a day's walk a prairie that they were quick sand shoes something like lap landers No shoes that they are so shut up belted about every way in closed surrounded and made on other island by an ocean that to their chairs and tables small clams will sometimes be founded hearing as to the backs of sea turtles but these extravaganzas only show that Nantucket is no Illinois wonder then that these man talkers born on a beach should take to the sea for our livelihood they first caught crabs in call hogs in the sand grown bolder they waited out with nets for mackerel more experience they pushed off in boats and captured card and at last launching a navy of great ships on the sea explore this watery world put an incessant belt of circum navigation is rounded end up bearing strengths in all seasons in all oceans declared everlasting war with the mightiest animated mascot who survived the flood most monstrous and most mountainous that Himalayan salt see mastodon clothed with such portentous notice of unconscious power that his very panics or more to be dreaded than his most fearless and malicious assaults and also these naked man talkers the C. hermits issuing from the hill in the C. over run and conquered the watery world like so many Alexander's marshalling out among them the Atlantic Pacific and Indian oceans let America and Mexico to Texas then pile Cuba upon Canada let the English over swarm all India and hang out there blazing banner from the sun two thirds of this to rake wheels globe are the man talkers for this CD is his he owns it as emperors own empires other seamen have but a right of way through it merchant ships are but extension bridges armed ones but floating forts even pirates and privateers the following the C. is highway man the road they but plunder other ships other fragments of the land like themselves without seeking to draw their living from the bottomless deep itself the man Tucker he alone resides in riots on the C. here alone in Bible language goes down to it in ships to and fro plowing it as his own special plantation there is his home their lives his business which I know was flood would not interrupt he lives on the sea he hides among the waves he climbs like show more hunters climbed the Alps for years you know it's not the land so that when he comes to it at last it smells like another world more strangely than the moon would do wonders someone with the landless goal but at sunset folds her wings and is rocked to sleep between bills so at night for the nan Tucker other side of the land furrows his sales and lays himself to rest well under his pillow rush herds of walruses and whales removed from the program reporting as.

Moby Dick Herman Melville
"herman melville" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"herman melville" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"Herman Melville was a fascinating writer who published one absolute masterpiece when he was thirty two a a big slightly insane book so far ahead of its time it keep showing up in the work of all sorts of storytellers and artists this week is Melville's two hundredth birthday which seem like the perfect pretext for rebroadcasting our peabody award winning our okay if I call it a deep dive all about the making A. and meaning and Enduring Influence of a truly great and deeply American novel. Please enjoy American icons Moby Dick Thank you so I'm sitting in a starbucks sipping.

Herman Melville peabody award starbucks writer
"herman melville" Discussed on No Ego

No Ego

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"herman melville" Discussed on No Ego

"Of discovered had had had gone through New York all the way back to Walt Whitman and her Herman Melville, and it just seemed to me like a place where writers were because I didn't know any writers around me. So again, as a something I always had planned for myself. But was just set aside, as you know, it became unrealistic because I had a an apartment and a job in all of this life built up in Minneapolis, which the Apple's is a great city, by the way, I still love it very much. But there was this calling. I had inside of of needing to be in New York. And I I realized that like if I kept putting this off. And kept down the path. I was on. I knew that ten years fifteen years twenty years was going to go by the blink of an eye. When we don't make a change we blink. And we are decades into a life. We. Intend to choose. So. Yeah, I knew I had to do something. So I basically sold and gave away my possessions gave up my apartment quit my job. I was in a relationship that was not going anywhere. And that ended as well. And I cut all the ties that were kind of keeps me where I was and just took a leap of faith, and I trusted the universe to kind of guide me in the right direction and bought a one way plane ticket to. To New York City and. Didn't have a lot plan into. You know arrive and see what the spirit led me. So to speak. And it's a struggle to to live in New York. I mean, everyone knows that everyone knows it's not exactly a cakewalk to move here from the midwest from anywhere. And I was struggling to make ends meet. I was applying for a bunch of jobs that are like all your career experience is in places. We've never heard of because you're not from around here. And I wasn't having any luck. Finding a job or even finding the right apartment and was running out of of money fast. And basically, I finally found an apartment and. I was I was scheduled to move in on a certain day in late October of twenty twelve and the day before I was going to move in. Hurricane sandy New York City, which was the biggest storm in the history of of New York and. There is huge flooding everywhere and many buildings and apartments were underwater, including mine. So are just arrived in New York. I just arrived in New York was struggling to find my way and just like that. I was homeless. Verse. And at least in the middle of the story is seems like the universe kicked in the cheese. Exactly. I mean, I just been reading before I moved All right read. read. The alchemist by the famous book by by Polokwane low..

New York City Herman Melville Walt Whitman Apple Minneapolis Polokwane Hurricane fifteen years twenty years ten years
George Orwell Gets an Apology for a Rejection Letter (but Not for His Marmalade Recipe)

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

George Orwell Gets an Apology for a Rejection Letter (but Not for His Marmalade Recipe)

"Twenty four. Well, every writer gets rejection letters odu they, but they almost never get read policies for them. That though is exactly what George Orwell got this week. Just a little late times reports a British Council, which promotes intercultural relations, ask him to write an essay talking of British food in nineteen Forty-six only to turn him down and to insult his recipe for orange marmalade. The original editor later admitted. It was a great essay, buddy. Didn't like the marmalade. They apologized this week in all of that probably puts it close to the rejection hall of fame right next to the guy who turned down Herman Melville's Moby, Dick. With the words. Does it have to

George Orwell Herman Melville British Council Writer Editor
"herman melville" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

07:11 min | 2 years ago

"herman melville" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Cd all the music. You're hearing tonight is from freedom songs civil rights played in honor of Martin Luther King. Dr Martin Luther King junior's. Day week from Monday before we get back to my buddy. Jessica in her book secrets Chicago guide to the weird, wonderful and obscure we're going to talk about bughouse square, which is the because score debates because I want to tell you about next weekend is a reading marathon of that Herman Melville masterpiece Moby Dick, there are dozens I can't do it. But they're dozens of people who are going to read all weekend long that amazing amazing book such people as Paul to Rica, Sarah Peretz, he's going to be reading blur Thomas, a number of people actors from the Shakespeare project of cargo my colleague Mary was new ski. It's all day just go to Newbury dot org and you'll find Moby Dick redefine I wish. I could. Be there. I was going to be that. I can't be you have in here. Jessica in your book. She could Chicago guy to the word, wonderful and obscure you do have the bughouse square debates. Don't you I do. And I only attended for the first time a couple of years ago, although it had been going to the book fair and the book fairs amazing. It's. You gotta Mark your calendar. Now, usually Judy roughly June around. June or July, and I have been in the book fair I've walked through the park and probably seen people gathered there, but I don't think I knew what was actually going on that day and bizarre. It does look I've hosted it for about the last studs terkel died ten years ago. Hosted an I guess to the passer by would look bizarre. Look, like, some strange protest or something. There are people in costume all time Calcio all kinds of costumes somehow green party in the middle. But it is a great event. And that too is included in your book. You also have another place that is a place of my childhood couch mausoleum, which sits in a very prominent spot between north avenue and was Sal drive on clerk street sort of in front of what's called the Chicago history museum, which I will always call the Chicago historical society. I will tell you that as a child coming over from old town where I grew up from the time we were about I don't know eight until we were about fifteen bunch of us would go over there with hammers and chisels and anything because we thought it was there was treasurer in king Tut's tomb. And I don't know if they've fits the outside of it. But there are dense their marks are hammered drivers. What is that thing? I know but tell the tell the listeners what that is. Well, if anyone doesn't that's a good example. Sorry to interrupt you Jessica. But that's a good. Example of something that people would run by people millions of people I would hazard to say have seen it and a very small percentage of those have ever had the curiosity that you innately have to say what the hell is that? Why the hell is it here? You answer those questions. We'll for anyone who doesn't know there. Our bodies in Lincoln park. Yes. Still a lot of people don't know that it was formerly a cemetery, and they decided to move a lot of the bodies that didn't give them all. So there are still several who are who are there. This was one grave that is visible the only one that's visible that was not moved and a hotel magnet named IRA couches buried there. But nobody knows who else exactly. Liam. Above ground. You can see it says couch on it. But by the time his brother passed away. Nobody knew who was in there. And some of the relatives are buried. I think it's is it Rosehill cemetery. I think you're right. Yeah. And it's the cemetery records don't line up, and none of the family members know exactly who there's a debate over how many people it's like from one to eleven people could be there, and the thing is rested shot. So as you experienced it's just a mystery. Now, it has a little nice little decorative fence around it when I was a kid. It was overgrown with bushes and trees we could easily sneak in and try to try to break down what we needed. Then was a genius engineer might have explained to us how to actually get in the place. You also have you go little not far afield, but you get denials and do the the leaning towers is sort of notable people know of the leaning tower. But for those of you out there who don't what is it? Jessica. Well, yes, there are ninety places in the book. Eight of them are in the suburbs surrounding Chicago. The rest are in the city proper. So the leaning tower of PISA in Niles, what is it doing? It is disguising a water tower. So the gentleman who put it up he needed to water tower for the pools for the nearby YMCA, and he decided to make it pretty will you take good pictures in here to color pictures, are very nice as a section of of the colored pictures in the middle of it the Russia's in black and white. Were there any you? You must have had to at some point call. This was down from you know, the hundred or something. Yeah. What were the ones that were really were there couple that were very very difficult to wind up on the cutting room floor there were and my hope is that I can keep covering all of these that did make it into the book that made either wasn't enough to say and put them on my blog so to keep the story, and I've got a newsletter. So I mean, the Kelly fisheries is one that I love, but it gets a lot of press on the travel channel. One of the things you're up against in. Any do we break at twenty seven or go all the way to the half hour? We're breaking now. Because my my great great new producer, Ernie skeleton is telling me to do. So we're going to break for commercials, but I'm gonna keep Jessica after the news and talk a little bit more about her book. They're saying really interesting to do a book like this in the internet age where everybody is is bowled over with information. That's a let's talk about that. After the news here. Ladies and gentlemen,.

Jessica Chicago leaning tower Martin Luther King bughouse square Chicago history museum Chicago historical society Herman Melville Rosehill cemetery Lincoln park ski Russia Judy treasurer Thomas Mary Paul Sarah Peretz Liam
"herman melville" Discussed on The Kindle Chronicles

The Kindle Chronicles

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"herman melville" Discussed on The Kindle Chronicles

"And the boy school that I attended outside of Boston. And this is a time of replying for college and high aspirations where I was going to go to college, and I was really besotted by the whole progress of getting good grades and getting into college so Moby, Dick. It was sort of like a great white whale for me because our English teacher. Mr. Duncan was a really smart wonderful teacher and he'd loved that book. And he wanted us to get something. When important out of that book. I just wanted to get an A, and I figured that. It was going to be challenging because I knew his expectations of what people were getting out of the book where we're going to be so high so this there was just a lot of anxiety about what is this book about it? And what am I supposed to be able to pair it back? I'm not proud of this. I think compared to have a good friend Bill home. So I visited this week, and he also went to pill hill, he was there to learn, you know, when I told him that I had trouble with Moby, Dick. He he looked at me appalled. And I I know what he did. So anyway, this is sort of a confession about my relationship to now with a book by Herman Melville end. I'm gonna put it on my list of books read pretty soon, a dive back into Moby Dick on its own terms. And I'm sure it will be a rewarding reading project have a couple of comments share with you before we close. I. Dean prosser. He was writing about my conversation last week with Michael c Grumbly. Actually, both comments about that interview. Dean wrote this was a great interview for the first time I had read the author's books before you interviewed him. His humility is interesting one more reason to like his books. Thank you. For your podcast. Dean, I had that same impression listening to the interview with Michael I think we're driving down from ocean park early in an I and I found that very moving in the context of how potion that book was made possible by kindle direct publishing in the wholesale publishing movement, and it's a good book. And and it's a book, that's obviously touched people's lives and to hear the humility with which he has embraced the reaction to that book. I did find that removing as well from Dan Campbell enjoyed the interview with Michael Gramley, you asked all the right questions. I will give his book a try as an aside. I thought Mr. gremlin voice. Was very rich. He may have a second career as a podcast or discharge. I pass it along to Michael. And he got a kick out of that ten Dan rights, also like the new kindle video. But for now, we'll stick with my voyage still waiting for complete whisper sink immersion for audible books on kindle don't know why they do not have that. As yet. I think what he's talking about. There is if you're doing whisper sink on a fire, you can hear the audible version, and then watch the words get highlighted as they're being read and don't think that's possible yet on eating kindle, Dan closes with good news on your mother and my prayers continue. Thanks very much for that..

Moby kindle I. Dean prosser Mr. Duncan Michael Dan Campbell Michael Gramley Herman Melville Boston Michael c Grumbly Bill Mr. gremlin
"herman melville" Discussed on Trumpcast

Trumpcast

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"herman melville" Discussed on Trumpcast

"It's openly said by the president of the United States. You know, there's been efforts to silence me in the briefing room. There have been efforts to discredit me. But you know, who I've been in who I am is who you know. I, you know, I'm an open book anyone who knows me knows me. And what you see is what you get from me. A number of public statements made by Whitaker including saying there's no criminal obstruction of Justice charge to be had against President Trump that seems president prejudicial too many. He was a former US attorney, which is probably something. He does actually have to remind people about him a loss because he doesn't like a US Tony so much as he looks like Ken more refrigerator that somehow escaped from a ceus. Hello and welcome to Trump cast. I'm Virginia Heffernan. So whenever I find myself growing grim about the mouth whenever it's a damp, drizzly, November in my soul whenever requires a strong moral principle to prevent me from knocking people's hats off. Then I accounted high time to see some indictments from the office of the special counsel, Robert Muller. Okay. So I'm no Herman Melville. But I do have the enthusiasm for indictments of Trump's circle that Ishmail had for willing ships. There were rumors of indictments last week. When Trump saw Democrats cleanup at the midterms Nedeli fired. His nutty AG Jeff Sessions who recused himself from the Russian investigation and hired it true escapee from happy firms sub literate dirty. Judge Matthew Whitaker who couldn't find the law on a map and thinks the bible should serve as the US constitution as hopefully future. Governor of Florida. Andrew Gillam said Trump. Seems nervous. Indeed, he has no shield from house oversight now that the Democrats control that chamber. So he's hoping to shield himself from Muller, which is well don't fool with the office of the special counsel. It's like mother nature that way and Trump is right to be nervous. So we'd heard indictments were coming maybe related to that Trump Tower meeting, if it's what you say we love it sent American citizens, but no indictments last week, and none this week so far, but hope springs eternal sooner or later will be back in that sweet heavenly retreat from reality my castle on a document cloud. A good old DOJ indictment of someone in Trump's circle in the Russia investigation. Document clouds. My guest today is Jimmy Will Smith. He's a senior writer for Rolling Stone. His latest column Trumpism is racism, so things will get worse. We'll be out in December's print issue. It's available now unrolling stone dot com. I'll.

President Trump Trump Tower United States president Matthew Whitaker special counsel Robert Muller Virginia Heffernan Jimmy Will Smith Andrew Gillam Herman Melville DOJ Florida Jeff Sessions Rolling Stone Ishmail Nedeli Ken Russia
"herman melville" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"herman melville" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Grandfather of herman melville all those years later whether they were very organized they marched down there and they carried along tomahawks they burst into the ship's unopposed and began unloading t the entire affair lasted some three hours and one eyewitness said not the least insult was offered to any person in other words no one was harmed they were very concerned not to damage the ships themselves in fact on one of the ships they broke a padlock and then they replaced it the next morning samuel adams himself dressed up as an indian gave directions there was a whole celebratory air people were jumping up and down they were excited and but guys were efficient they went down below they got out the crates of tea and there was a great deal of t to be dumped into boston harbor thirty five thousand pounds of t three hundred forty two chests and all and in fact the tea was so thick in the harbor that the piles of leaves were lying on top of the water and they were slapping up against the sides of ships and they had to be scraped off sides of ships the next morning you could see the t thirty five thousand pounds of it floating in boston harbor these folks were having a grand old time unfortunately some members of the crowd who came to watch them wanted to take advantage of the situation wanted to take advantage of the situation by getting some free t for themselves but the people who led the boston tea party were absolutely opposed to that a gentleman named george hughes recalls another attempt was made to save a little tea from the ruins of the cargo by tall aged man who wore large cocked hat and white wig which was fashionable at that time he had slightly slipped a little into his pocket but being detected they seized him and taking his hat and wig from his head through them together with a t of which they had emptied his pockets into the water in consideration of his advanced age he was permitted to escape with now and then a slight kick fortunately they didn't fro him into the water we're talking about boston in december it would have been very cold indeed meanwhile they go marching back to the sound of a fife no one remembers what the fife was playing but they're marching back and they're celebrating on the way back admiral john montagu who was commander in chief of the north american station in charge of his majesty's navy through open a window in the house of an american loyalist friend with whom it'd be having dinner and drinking some cups of wine and he set out to the mohawks out in the street fake mohawks well boys you've had a fine pleasant evening for your indian caper haven't you but mind you've got to pay the fiddler yet never mind squire one of them shouted back just come down here if you please and we'll settle the bill in two minutes while the admiral decided not to come down and mess with the mob but the next morning the impact of the boston tea party began to ripple across the known world and to change policy in london toward the colonies forever in a fateful and dramatic direction tell you about it coming back.

herman melville thirty five thousand pounds three hours two minutes
"herman melville" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

WDTK The Patriot

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"herman melville" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

"Grandfather of herman melville all those years later whether they were very organized they marched down there and they carried along tomahawks they burst into the ship's unopposed and began unloading t the entire affair lasted some three hours and one eyewitness said not the least insult was offered to any person in other words no one was harmed they were very concern not to damage the ships themselves in fact on one of the ships they broke a padlock and then they replaced it the next morning samuel adams himself dressed up as an indian gave directions there was a whole celebratory air people were jumping up and down they were excited and but guys were efficient they went down below they got out the crates of tea and there was a great deal of t to be dumped into boston harbor thirty five thousand pounds of t three hundred and forty two chests and all and in fact the tea was so thick in the harbor that the piles of leaves were lying on top of the water and they were slapping up against the sides of ships and they had to be scraped off the sides of ships the next morning you could see the t thirty i five thousand pounds of it floating in boston harbor these folks were having a grand old time unfortunately some members of the crowd who came to watch them wanted to take advantage of the situation wanted to take advantage of the situation by getting some free t for themselves but the people who led the boston tea party were absolutely opposed to that a gentleman named george shoes recalls another attempt was made to save a little tea from the ruins of the cargo by a tall aged man who wore large contact and white wig which was fashionable at that time he had slightly slipped a little into his pocket but being detected they seized him and taking his hat and wig from his head through them together with t of which they had emptied his pockets into the water in consideration of his advanced age he was permitted to escape with now and then a slight kick fortunately they didn't throw him into the water we're talking about boston in december it would have been very cold indeed meanwhile they go marching back to the sound of a fife no one remembers what the fife was playing but they're marching back and they're celebrating on the way back admiral john montagu who was commander in chief of the north american station in charge of his majesty's navy through open a window in the house of an american loyalist friend with whom it'd be having dinner and drinking some cups of wine and he set out to the mohawks out in the street fake mohawks well boys you've had a fine pleasant evening for your indian caper haven't you but mind you have got to pay the fiddler yet never mind squire one of them shouted back just come down here if you please and we'll settle the bill in two minutes while the admiral decided not to come down and mess with the mob but the next morning the impact of the boston tea party began to ripple across the known world and to change policy in london toward the colonies forever in a fateful and dramatic direction tell you about it coming back.

herman melville thirty five thousand pounds five thousand pounds three hours two minutes
"herman melville" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

03:33 min | 2 years ago

"herman melville" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Grandfather of herman melville all those years later whether they were very organized they marched down there and they carried along tomahawks they burst into the ship's unopposed and began unloading t the entire affair lasted some three hours and one eyewitness said not the least insult was offered to any person in other words no one was harmed they were very concerned not to damage the ships themselves in fact on one of the ships they broke a padlock and then they replaced it the next morning samuel adams himself dressed up as an indian gave directions there was a whole celebratory air people were jumping up and down they were excited and but guys were efficient they went down below they got out the crates of tea and there was a great deal of t to be dumped into boston harbor thirty five thousand pounds of t three hundred and forty two chests and all and in fact the tea was so thick in the harbor that the piles of leaves were lying on top of the water and they were slapping up against the sides of ships and they had to be scraped off the sides of ships the next morning you could see the t thirty five thousand pounds of it floating in boston harbor these folks were having a grand old time unfortunately some members of the crowd who came to watch them wanted to take advantage of the situation wanted to take advantage of the situation by getting some free t for themselves but the people who led the boston tea party were absolutely opposed to that a gentleman named george hughes recalls another attempt was made to save a little tea from the ruins of the cargo by a tall aged man who wore large cocked hat and white wig which was fashionable at that time he had slightly slipped a little into his pocket but being detected they seized him and taking his hat and wig from his head through them together with a t of which they had emptied his pockets into the water in consideration of his advanced age he was permitted to escape with now and then a slight kick fortunately they didn't throw him into the water we're talking about boston in december it would have been very cold indeed meanwhile they go marching back to the sound of a five no one remembers what the fife was playing but they're marching back and they're celebrating on the way back admiral john montagu who was commander in chief of the north american station in charge of his majesty's navy through open a window in the house of an american loyalist friend with whom it'd be having dinner and drinking some cups of wine and he set out to the mohawks out in the street fake mohawks well boys you've had a fine pleasant evening for your indian caper haven't you but mind you have got to pay the fiddler yet never mind squire one of them shouted back just come down here if you please and we'll settle the bill in two minutes while the admiral decided not to come down and mess with the mob but the next morning the impact of the boston tea party began to ripple across the known world and to change policy in london toward the colonies forever in a fateful and dramatic direction.

herman melville thirty five thousand pounds three hours two minutes
"herman melville" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"herman melville" Discussed on KGO 810

"To significantly lower creativity is young adults whereas time spent playing informal sports was significantly related to more creativity and as such as the organisation cetera but the lack of downtime if you've lived from age four on with the get in the car were going to this practice than we're going to that's where you would know any difference you would never say i don't want to do this because he would have no concept of a different life right now now i know i know that several moms i can think of particularly because i know them really really well um are just horrified by like a an afternoon where there is nothing going on how while what a huge in this is funny we talk about this sort of thing fairly frequently huge sociological changes that are nearly completely undiscussed yeah the of the very nature of childhood can you imagine puppies no longer roll around in nip at each other and run about in the space of two generations of puppies they now do nothing but sit quietly and look or or now poppies just out of what would puppies do i don't know but the behavior puppies as we've enforced a complete change in the way puppies poppies nobody would ever suggest that no animal scientists would say that's a good idea now for god's sake you got to let your puppies way like puppies and yet we do it to our own oh well human beings the smartest and stupidest species on earth and glad my wife and i agree on as we just got a text my wife and i have been arguing this lovingly for a long time can you be the title and author of the book starts screaming at each other's match the cades moby dick by herman melville butts correct that is correct the f you're not in agreement that's a that's a tough one because the man there's there there there are a lot of things going on in the summertime now i didn't even know all the stuff occurred because i i didn't grow up it's way i'm just cope com completely new with a four year old and six year old to this world in men there are a.

herman melville four year six year
"herman melville" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"herman melville" Discussed on KOMO

"The patch in the first like good morning to you going to have the war cast in a couple of minutes but first at his thirteen past the hour monday november 20th some things that happened past november twenty us 1820 an eighty tonnes sperm whale attack the whalingship essex two thousand miles from south america's west coast while this partly inspired herman melville to ride moby dick 1966 the musical cabaret all went on broadway then leave the was adapted from christopher isherwood novel goodbye to berlin about the de nightlife at the kit kat club hey you know russia has serial killers to and they don't all worked for the government in ninety ninety andrei chicoti low was arrested he eventually confessed to fifty six murders 1945 the nuremberg trials begin object is from the nineteen sixty one movie judgment at nuremberg the movie is about the real life trial of captured nazi war criminals the plea i was only following orders didn't cut it at nuremberg nineteen sixty nine the cleveland plain dealer published explicit photographs of the villagers.

america herman melville russia christopher isherwood berlin andrei chicoti cleveland eighty tonnes
"herman melville" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"herman melville" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"When ended up going to colorado college great liberal arts school that had the block plan which is you study one course at a time very intensely for for three and a half weeks so you don't have to be in a classroom are you can go anywhere to have your class so a botany class was up in the mountains and my pivotal class my melville class was held the newbury library in chicago with the melville collection and then i got hired out of a college to work at the melville collection in chicago and worked as a one of the contributing scholars on the authoritative tax of herman melville with northwestern newbury so i'm i'm a nerdy very nerdy herman melville i was i was i was the kind of girl got really excited about a semi colon but i think it was exquisite training for what i'm doing now because coming to gene i remember the first day that i started work there in chicago the one of the professors who was the main editors said never trust the printed word and that's just stayed with me because you see people they read something and they believe the seat at the checkout stand in the tabloids and they think it's true because it's in print and and do you really iit was really an eyeopening experience to see how even tax of moby dick are vary from one to the next because of various things so it train meets to go to primary sources which is what i did with gene try i interviewed as many people as i could who were the.

newbury library chicago melville collection herman melville colorado college
"herman melville" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:01 min | 3 years ago

"herman melville" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Another reason i wanted way you that with other things neither there in this piece of days be dazzles who is often considered the father died here uh is that it has the me that same kind of feeling that we yet moby which is that you have these maltese what they keep changing four uh more we big is largely and improvisation in which you observe herman melville following his ear taking the bull that is that uh moby dick is probably about as close to a spontaneous the ridden boca's your body count he is the out of its athens's okay what now okay i'll try there and then he goals with that he the the thing is all may the ladder form wise the book is an extraordinary exhibition of absolute bills yeah now his objective is to break now the single perspective i a chapter can start off in the first person as i each mail and telling you x y z then it can suddenly switch to a dramatic form that is in the style of a theater fees and characters leaving come in on the basis of stage instructions that are written in parentheses and to this day that still very unusual in aching fifty it was actually revolutionary long though it may be nothing than there uh purely to be there i mean it's all connected and all takes you into uh territories about the american life and by this the maker of life itself all men live and developed and quayle lines or born with holders round their necks but it is only when caught in the swift sudden turn of death that mortals realize the silent subtle everpresent perils of life and if you be a philosopher though seated in the way obote you would not at heart fuel one with more of terror though seated before your evening fire with a poker and not harpoon by your side and the other thing why are the whale slaughtered in the first place.

herman melville athens quayle
"herman melville" Discussed on Bookworm Banquet - a podcast featuring book reviews and author interviews

Bookworm Banquet - a podcast featuring book reviews and author interviews

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"herman melville" Discussed on Bookworm Banquet - a podcast featuring book reviews and author interviews

"And it was longfelt called air so close jaidee so close if you want another random fact he was also very close to herman melville till throughout moby dick on one of my favorite classics well lots of connections literary world was pretty small back then so i mean there's there's own feet obviously going to be some connections oh yeah and buoyant he was connected splendid fact i love it random recommendation years jaidee's bookworm well as i mentioned at the top of the show i've got this great tip for you and it is a tool called tiny cat and that cat stands were catalogue now way back in episode zero many moons ago i mentioned to tool called library thing now this is a tool which allows you to catalogue your own personal library it just basically a personal tool for you to just keep track of your own books you know i'm sure any avid reader has been atta a secondhand bookstore owner of thriftstore nearly oh do i have this book already a new you know and so it's like it's perfect because you can pull up the smartphone app and just doublecheck especially i love lulu more and so i got a ton of his books almost all of them but it'd be at a store night i can't remember which ones a missing i read them all by check him out of the library over the years but i wanted to own them you know and so it's a really great to a four.

jaidee herman melville
"herman melville" Discussed on Bookworm Banquet - a podcast featuring book reviews and author interviews

Bookworm Banquet - a podcast featuring book reviews and author interviews

01:30 min | 8 years ago

"herman melville" Discussed on Bookworm Banquet - a podcast featuring book reviews and author interviews

"We know their works in other writings but we never would have guessed that they were friends so i have today for you a list of literary on writers obviously writers who were friends someone to start with jrr tolkien we know him as the author of lord of the rings and he was a very good friend of cs lewis who we know about the chronicles of nadia on we also have percy bysshe shelley who has a poet end he was a very good friend of lord byron who also as a poet i'm sure you're recognizing some of these names also on a friend of theirs was percy bysshe shelley is wife who was mary shelley who wrote frankenstein okay some other poets would be william wordsworth and samuel taylor colorado they were very close friends as well as ralph waldo emerson and henry david throughout i thought that was kind of interesting but the one the kinda threw me for a loop was the faneuil hawthorn who we know wrote the scarlett letter and herman melville who wrote moby dick i have for never in a million years would have put those two together the writings are very different their concepts are very different young and yet they were friends um and the thing a hawthorne was also very good friend of henry wadsworth fellow who it you know as a poet also under literary friendship which doesn't really surprised me was ernest hemingway who we know wrote old man in the sea and for whom the bell tolls and he was a good friend of f scott fitzgerald who wrote the great gatsby and it was also a good friend of jedi salinger who wrote catch and the right.

nadia lord byron mary shelley colorado herman melville ernest hemingway scott fitzgerald salinger percy bysshe william wordsworth samuel taylor ralph waldo emerson henry david henry wadsworth million years