35 Burst results for "Herbie"

"herbie" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

03:38 min | Last month

"herbie" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"To observe exactly the same time this technique known as very long baseline interferometry will be. Bi effectively turns all the individual telescopes into one thing. We use the more sensitive. We'll be right in the world. The european network study on interesting of herbie which appeared to repeat in an unpredictable way. This enabled us to localize the furby to. I'd love galaxy in. Our young stars are form. Since then astronomers have legalized three more puppies but none have been observed..

herbie
Sarah Ferguson Defends Son-in-Law Jack Brooksbank Following Controversial Boat Photos

Daily Pop

00:57 sec | 2 months ago

Sarah Ferguson Defends Son-in-Law Jack Brooksbank Following Controversial Boat Photos

"Royal controversy is brewing and it sarah fogelson who's trying to shut it down now. The drama involves son-in-law jack brooks bank. He's married to princess eugenie. Well he was just busted on a yacht with some bikini-clad ladies do they were sipping drinks swimming and look at all kinds of happy. Eugenie is back at the castle taking care of their baby. According to daily mail it sounds bad. Herbie tells bbc one's the one show. There is nothing to see. Here is amount of such integrity so for them to make. This story is in fact completely fabricators. He works for for For kosovo makers and and he was on doing his job and so. I think it's important that we just terrified that suggests say as long as there was no toe-sucking involved. I think we're fine as long as doing.

Sarah Fogelson Jack Brooks Princess Eugenie Eugenie Herbie Swimming BBC Kosovo
Denis Valasek Tells Us What Voice Can (and Can't) Do Today

VOICE Global 2021

01:44 min | 4 months ago

Denis Valasek Tells Us What Voice Can (and Can't) Do Today

"Hello there who are you. Hello mona and hello everyone. My name is tennis version. i ever cofounder at. He had and cucolo expert for yugoslav. Stint nice to meet you. But why are you speaking on this topic. Because devi voice arcade herbie's of mine and this is a really nice way to combine them so grab some garner gets ready by the way. How come you are speaking. I am speaking thanks to talking heads from rosebud dada. Ai super kill. Where do you get from i. I would like to know what problems we will be discussing. Today they're two main points. I'd like this custody. The first one is voice is being totally overpowered in movies and tv series. We are talking like or on a supercomputer spaceships that fulfil every tasks text to speech is perfect speech to text as well. Nobody makes any mistakes in pronunciation. Everything is understood correctly when it's now it's huge problem to blocked so noteworthy we are experiencing today. This sets after analysts expectations in your minds of viewers of what voice can do today and as garcia problem and then on the complete other side of the spectrum we would waste can do today and dads being taken as a joke and some of the tv series in the movies were. It's been mostly portrayed at these things can do basically nothing and then why use them and that's obvious for our industry so let's talk about.

Cucolo Rosebud Dada Mona Herbie Devi Tennis Garcia
How to Tap Into Your Gut Intuition

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

01:49 min | 5 months ago

How to Tap Into Your Gut Intuition

"Light watkins. Welcome back to the podcast. It's a pleasure to have here. Thank you the last time. I was on this podcast. It was called the broken brain. Now it's called the trooper away so it's avid happy to be here for the second phase evolving time. Yeah yeah exactly where you know. The thing about that is that. I always felt broken. Brain was great. You know it came from this documentary that we did that. A lot of the people listening watched but it never really encompassed sort of what the vibe was and then somebody said what what would you want to name. If you can name it anything. And i said i don't know i don't have a good name but i know that will be doing podcasts for a long time so i'm just going to name it after myself and so here we are. We are the love. it I love a good story and your new book is filled with a ton of then. And there's one that. I love to actually start off with like just jump right in because it's a nice way to set the stage and it'll open up our conversation to some of these themes of self criticism self compassion other things that we want to get into and it's the story of herbie. Hancock and miles davis I know you don't have your book in front of you. But just from your recollection jumper that story and then let's extrapolate on some of the themes in there was a well known story that i heard herbie hancock. Tell a few times and just to give a little background on. Why and where these stories come from. So i've been writing daily dose of inspiration email for almost five years to my little list subscribers and stuff and so these stories that have been coming up with over those years. Were meant to invoke inspiration or just give someone a poke or nudge to kind of look in a certain direction to find the inspiration within themselves. So this story came from from that sort of Purpose

Light Watkins Herbie Miles Davis Hancock Herbie Hancock
What is Slow Living?

The Nordic Mum

02:03 min | 5 months ago

What is Slow Living?

"Talking about slow living. Do you wanna get started waste. What's i leaving mane's to you. Yes so coming from the nordic countries. I always make a point that we actually live very much slowly moving in in finland and all the countries and i think to me slow living is understanding business and watch what is causing the business for you and understand say no things that are not necessary or required and slowly is not just about an. I think the slow living. The slow life is started in italy about the cooking. The slow cooked meals and slow food. Yeah it's it's not just about food but it's just kind of a lifestyle choice that you opt out to stay away phone perhaps for someone it is digital devices and saying no the business and might even be more like herbie type of a lifestyle where you are in a country in a bush the farm living out of the great which is kind of like the extreme definition of of slow living slow life and is about being more present and creating spacing life of those things that matters like family and friends and yes having those slow meals with your family and sharing this really. It gets like the danish would say cozy moment. That's the kind of long winded answer would would for me slow living near. Yeah i totally agree with you that it's not it's not a it's not an easy thing to really define in one simple short thing because it goes against so much of what our culture is maybe not the not coach but definitely the the western culture of this idea that is a goal but we should be working towards should hustle for do whatever get to a point of bone out and i think that it's completely slightly being conveyed the opposite of what feels good for me. What am i values. How do i wanna live my life like an asking the question. Why i'm working towards that goal. Is it because i wanted to or is it. Because that's just what everybody else is. Doing what society is telling me to

Finland Italy Bush
"herbie" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Byte

Sci-Fi Talk Byte

05:01 min | 8 months ago

"herbie" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Byte

"Hi welcome to season two of bite. This is tony tomato and so parenting an apocalypse. It's it's not the same way that we would do. You know how it works. Any views usually two to four minutes long but sometimes they can be a little longer story. When you when you live long enough all kinds of strange things happen very right in saying that the greek heroes where the original superheroes in part because of the whole nature of genes vision but also because of its message of diversity and inclusion. I spoke to author herbie j. paul auto on his book on the essential. Elizabeth montgomery that herring samantha. Were very much alike. I'm sure she was a part of her. But i'm sure she was very different woman in some other respects as well. Well not really really do. She didn't do the magic. She had her own magic but really she was a very very similar to the character. It was one of the reasons why this show is a hit and she used herself into that role and it was so with a natural progression. She didn't feel Challenged by it. What made you to do this book on. Elizabeth montgomery I was. I loved bewitched as a kid. My parents didn't have a lot of money. It was a tough neighborhood. And so like many people in the sixties in general. I gravitated toward television for escapism. There was so much going on in the sixties anyway the riots at phnom these horrible so i gravitated towards all magic escapism fun. Tv of that era and there was so many wonderful shows wild wild west green acres. You name it puppy. Which struck me for whatever reason so years later when i was in adult working at nbc. I was at the page You get different assignments to page one of my. Simon was publicity promotion. So i was assigned the promotion for jim of jeannie fifteen years later which was a reunion movie right show And that kind of upset me. Because i thought well if there's going to be any reunion movie of a beautiful blonde magic woman with immortal darker guy should be a witch. Yeah so i wrote one and Elizabeth did not want to do a reunion. And then i it said well. Why don't we do a book about the original show. That's the short story. Oh long story had a bill asher her husband in this show's producer intervening for me and getting me to her. Oh i wrote about the show and i. I thought that it had strong. Were the darren You know didn't want her to death anything because whatever he bought for her he wanted to buy with his own money. And the important thing to remember samantha. Who was her choice to live. The mortal life try earned and forced her so in many ways she was one of the most independent women of the era. You know like along with that girl. In in pre mary tyler moore mary richards so there were all these different wonderful qualities that i saw on the show beyond the magic and when i sat down and met elizabeth she saw. I really had a great affection for the show. I knew it. You know i was talking about and that i respected her and the show so she opened up to me and she did not grant interviews to anyone about that series. Cincinnati ended and. I met her in nineteen eighty nine and the show ended and seventy two or so. She really moved on so after the first. But which book came out and then. I rewrote it as bewitched forever and nineteen ninety five. After she died. I knew there was just so much more to her story. Beyond the which that needed to be told and twenty years later you know i write twitch upon a star the bewitched life and career of elizabeth gummy which came out last year and that was a narrative biography of her life And i had written so much that my publisher said hervey wrote too much. So of course i talked too much i said well how about. We take the index to the book and make a second book next year. And that's what the the essential elizabeth montgomery Get the new one. You're saying in your dealings with her. She was her personality and such was very similar to samantha's very much so very much. Look for the essential elizabeth. Montgomery wherever you get your books for bite. This is tony tomato..

Elizabeth montgomery last year elizabeth Simon two Elizabeth next year elizabeth gummy fifteen years later sixties four minutes second book herbie j. paul auto Cincinnati page one hervey jeannie twenty years later nbc seventy two
Chick Corea, Grammy-winning jazz musician, dies at 79

Doug Stephan

00:25 sec | 9 months ago

Chick Corea, Grammy-winning jazz musician, dies at 79

"Tightened Chick Corea died from a rare cancer. Prolific pianist with dozens of albums. He replaced Herbie Hancock and Miles Davis's band before forming Return to Forever. Korea Want a staggering 23 Grammy awards and was up for Tomb or this year for his album trilogy to And This instrumental All Blues. Chick Corea was 79 years old.

Chick Corea Herbie Hancock Miles Davis Cancer Grammy Awards Korea
Chick Corea, jazz great with 23 Grammy Awards, dies at 79

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 9 months ago

Chick Corea, jazz great with 23 Grammy Awards, dies at 79

"Musician Chick Corea has died of a rare form of cancer that was discovered only recently according to his website he was seventy nine I marches are a letter with a look at his career chicory is sung Spain is considered a jazz standard along with five hundred miles high love fiesta and windows he had twenty three Grammys and is nominated for two more this year Correa put out solo albums before replacing Herbie Hancock and Miles Davis's group in nineteen sixty eight Karelin or form the groups circle and return to forever Korea's style including classical jazz Latin jazz and solo piano he told the Associated Press last year like a runner runs because it feels good he plays piano because it feels good

Chick Corea Karelin Grammys Cancer Correa Spain Herbie Hancock Miles Davis Korea The Associated Press
Dating with Herpes: Disclosure, Stigma & Healing

Sex with Dr. Jess

05:26 min | 9 months ago

Dating with Herpes: Disclosure, Stigma & Healing

"Welcome back courtney. How're you doing doing almost like guilty. Well despite how things going for a lot of people at this point right now There is a lot of overwhelm on my end in a positive way so Just this past week was two weeks ago While something positive positive people now is a nonprofit organization in a met with my board about me paying myself salary in being able to partner working to raise more money so that we can extend the services that we provide which were providing mental health related services for people who have experienced sexual trauma. That's what i want to eventually be able to say but right now for where we are. I'm basically paying for people to get their if he if they needed so Where we are right now. I got that approved in now. I mean conversations with some sexual health related organizations about partnering with them on their grant applications in getting funding. So things suddenly got very real for me. That that's great. Congratulations congrats on some needed support because with a herpes diagnosis. Oftentimes your medical practitioner will focus on the physical side but not necessarily the mental health side. And one of the things that i've learned throughout just doing this work and recording the podcasts and all of the different conversations. I've had with people not only with hiv but also have hiv or who've experienced a media gonorrhea. Syphilis diagnosis is that there is a direct connection between sexual health and mental health. And i think that that intersection is really wear stigma resides and until that gets addressed from that perspective. Like i think there's an over emphasis on the fact that someone has. Sei being Just like oh. This is sex related when it's also so mental related and then that part is completely goes unnoticed. Oftentimes like winds. Someone's being given a diagnosis well. Let's back up just a moment For folks who haven't listened to your podcast yet. But i know they will i. Can you tell us your story and why you started something positive for positive people. I will keep this as brief as possible. Because it's such a long story but The most important things that i've been positive for general. Hse to which is the virus that causes herpes outbreaks. For about eight years. Now and for the first four to five years of my diagnosis. I just kind of was doing things away that i knew to do them with. Just take care of abidi manage my stress And just keeping my immune system of his best i could. It was year four. Five into my diagnosis that i began to come across different communities of people. With herbie's in this is a in various social platforms as well as dating websites. And once. i got there. Like i was excited to be there because there were so many other people who were living with this when i get your diagnosis despite what the statistics say you're the only person you know who has virus unless someone has opened up to you pass or less than one opens up to you recently. After your experience you know for many of us were the only person that we know. And so i got into these communities in start socializing. I'm dating in. Life is great for me. But here and there i would find it. There was someone who expressed wanting to end their live after their diagnosis. So suicide idea even suicide attempts and after seeing that a few times it wasn't just like a one off thing was pretty calm and so i began to reach out to these people go. Hey you know it's not that bad and this is probably the worst thing you can say to someone who is having suicide at the asian. So what i started to do was a lot of these. People didn't look like means they didn't have my life experiences so to speak. So for instance like me saying that to a younger white woman or an older hispanic man or someone of a different ethnicity or age range or geographical location didn't really carry the same way as it would from someone may have looked like them or had like similar cultural background so i began just recording conversations with people that perhaps we otherwise wouldn't hear from These are people who are okay with their diagnosis. There's good days and bad days due to the stigma but these people who would probably never hear from about their experience were willing to just converse with me on a recorded platform for me to send to these people directly after a while To give you an idea like there's so many people that this was happening for that. I got overwhelmed with just sending emails and butchering the email address. Having the recent making sure they got it in all of that. So i decided to put all of these recordings up into one place which turned into something positive for positive people podcast platform

Syphilis Diagnosis Abidi Courtney Herbie
Getting Relative With the Inevitable and Catching Greenlights with Matthew McConaughey

Dose of Leadership

05:49 min | 11 months ago

Getting Relative With the Inevitable and Catching Greenlights with Matthew McConaughey

"Matthew mcconnahey on dose of leadership. I can't believe it what was show my friend good to be here. It's a great topic to talk about will never go out of style talking about this job. Yeah no can. I say i love the book i read it and i listened to it to different experiences and i'm glad i did both because the visual aspect of the book was i listened to it i because it is easier for me being on a plane and stuff but then i read it and i. It's like i got two different experiences. I got a lot out of it doing both ways. I he said that to you about a few bums. Somebody said to me. When i read it they they read it it with their own voice. Yeah in the hear me read it audio only for short hair my voice and hey heard laughed in places that they didn't laugh when they read it herbie point out certain things that maybe they'd skipped over and toast the reading same book but getting two different things out of it each. Yeah no it was just great. And i think it was. I don't know it was a great book. For the time i think for the year i mean it was profound a lot of ways in the sense and i thought well god this would be a good topic because there's so many areas of leadership and i don't know if you've ever looked at it that way but at least it's a big umbrella a lot of stuff you talk about in here and this show is about like how to kind of navigate through life and that's what the book is rate and i love the concept of the green lights but to me the i talk a lot about on the show and i used to come from the marine corps. The biggest thing i learned is like how to be a composed forcing a chaotic situation. And that's what your book was to me was like you seem to embrace this idea. That look man. It's never smooth. It's never a straight line it's jagged it's up and down and those red lights and the yellow lights that we come across. There's a that's the stuff that kind of shapes us and there's green light assets. I think is the term that you used that are inside of those things that resonates with me because i think life is about. You can lead a significant life if you can learn how to be composed force in a chaotic situation. And that's what i got out of your book. How does that resonate with you. I say i love that term to please remind me that i got to write it down now but i really like composed force in chaotic situation. Yeah i mean you know. I don't care what your i don't think it matters what someone's beliefs are whether they're a believer in another life after this or if they're sort of hey life's all about cruelty. We're just dying every day. That's all that's all fine or if you're an eternal optimist you know every day great. We've got another son rose for me. That wasn't guaranteed ever way. Jeter ever end of the spectrum anyone's from either way the more proactive the more constructive. The more the more healthy more fun choice is to go well by believe in that you know we're just dying off every day in the world's cruel and it sucks to be here that's fine shake hands that so now we might as well do it with pleasure in it with dignity. Is that bring that that that that line later in the book right. Say in those times where we feel like. It's all for nothing more. The math of the world adds up to say. Oh tall for nothing. What it's in those moments that are part and parcel with only. It's all for everything right. The alternative you know. And i'm wishing hallmark card delusion i'm trying to. I'm not a fan of that stuff. I'm not a pep rally. Cheerleader guy. i'm trying to find practical stuff. I've tried to find it my own life and of it is to pull another line for the book. If you do have an island point of view okay well then purchased this once. you know. it's a near dawn right. So if you're going to say oh. It sucks within go. Well okay gonna make the best of it however so i think that's what you what you're loading to in certain times where my red and yellow lights in the l. All having when. I bring up something as simple as sense of humor being default emotion on not within the contradictions that that i'm not i'm not i'm using bring that up. Say that doesn't deny the crisis now. It's just another tool to help you deal with it. It's more survival. And some of these things maybe thrive but at least can use to help better survive. And how little more satisfaction getting through this rodeo. We're all in right. you know. it's not. It's not even fair to say it's a a a typical book that i mean it does. It does have things that you can apply to your life. But it's not a how to book is a memoir sweat slash. These are the things that worked for me. Take it if you like it. If not i don't i don't you know this is what this is. What my life is did. You is that i guess. What was the intent when you set out to right. It wasn't to help people like myself or help other people or was it just to kinda get your authentic self out. There was a deleted legacy for your kids. it was all the above. What was it. I mean i mean somewhat all the above started off i thought it was gonna be before i opened up that big trust of journals to see what i had in them ones. I've been keeping for the last thirty six years i i. I had an idea of what i thought i was gonna find. You and i thought it would be very academic. I thought it was going to be very self help. I thought it was going to be sort of. If then if then and i like some of that but again back can start to lean into that hallmark or world and self has got. You know we've all i've got. I've got a decent relationship with with with self help. But i like i like my sort of wisdom to have little more context and allow me the individual to have the power to go rhino acting. Apply this in a different way and my position and this is i can apply in a particular way that no one else can. We each can do that.

Matthew Mcconnahey Marine Corps Jeter
Closing prices for crude oil, gold and other commodities

Bloomberg Surveillance

01:28 min | 11 months ago

Closing prices for crude oil, gold and other commodities

"Let's get some more color on those equity markets. We can't do that with Bloomberg Markets reporter Pretty Gupta critic. What you looking at this morning? Well, Good morning, Paul. Good morning, Bonnie. It is very low volume today also sing very low volatility, so it's slim pickings were talking about individual equity movers. But I'm gonna give it a shot under the hood here. The big story here is gonna be in biotech and sage Therapeutics. Ticker s a G partnering with Biogen. Take Herbie II be to develop and commercialize their depression and movement disorders. Drugs Iran alone now Excuse me if I pronounced that wrong, but you really saw Sage Therapeutics really skyrocket in the pre market share's going up 15%. Also to the upside AMC networks that film the Cinema Company, Of course, Take a M C X. Joining the small cap 600 Index shares up 6.5% in the premarket on I do want to go to the downside because those stories seem to be a little bit more interesting for me. But crypto Link stocks really declining here with Bitcoin declining for its third day as well, You're seeing the likes of riot Blockchain ticker R I O t down about 17%. Marathon patent Group M A. R A. Is the ticker another 17% drop there and Big Digital Beaty Beaty down 14% Once again, those are those crypto link stocks and we huge mentioned that decline in gold as well. Paul. Those gold stocks is gold mining stocks were down by Newmont and barracks gold under a little bit of pressure this morning, Newmont down 1.4% of the pre market very scold down about a percentage and a half

Herbie Ii Sage Therapeutics Cinema Company Biogen Bloomberg Bonnie Paul Marathon Patent Group AMC Depression Iran Bitcoin Beaty Newmont
"herbie" Discussed on The Besomebody Podcast

The Besomebody Podcast

05:50 min | 1 year ago

"herbie" Discussed on The Besomebody Podcast

"The podcast studio with you. Today you've had you've had a few interesting things come in the DM. Then the past few weeks. Yeah. Man Just just walking in today I had another one Herbie like another random message from a random stranger posting some crazy stuff on my account. You know it's been. It's been weird. We were talking about it the other day in the office Herbie that it's so much how anyone can post anything anytime anywhere on social media with really no repercussions not at all what you get, you get reported or you can report other. Accounts but I mean, as we've found out the past couple of weeks, it takes a whole lot of reporting apparently and then nothing happens right and I understand. If you're a celebrity, if you're someone that's large in the public eye in some ways that's part of the business. It's part of the price of entry of that level of fame and notoriety. It's not right and it sucks at that happens but you you some ways expect that and you see it and every time you read any comments on any social platform. And then if you're not as public with your life and your your content than you typically don't get any that and we're kind of like right in the middle. You know we're we're we're not celebrities or anything like that. But we're putting out content and we're still getting that that negatively and and some of those comments again, if people were saying the show was in great or you know we need to do better or hey, like I hate your business model or even like, Hey, you look funny looking at my haircut right now. I'm going like three weeks deep. Without a fades understand on that one but it's when it crosses the line of accusations or again hate speech things like that discrimination where you know it gets disturbing and for me, you know obviously like you know nobody special but I live my life pretty publicly. For the last ten years you know ever since twenty eleven, we got the original blog out in two thousand thirteen building a community and twenty four team when we raise money in two thousand fifteen when we started a scale and twenty, six sixteen when we on Shark tank I mean be somebody and myself have been out there publicly we've got hundreds of videos lots of social content, and along the journey we've had an welling amount of positive support which I really appreciate and I'm always grateful for it. I was. Trying to interact and respond to those people that send those positive messages but it ties we get some hate to, and if you look back at our journey, whether it was a speaking session that went awry or someone not believing in our business model or after shark tank, and if you will listen to episode two of the PODCAST, you'll, you'll hear the background of.

Herbie
"herbie" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Byte

Sci-Fi Talk Byte

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"herbie" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Byte

"Hi Welcome to season two of bite. This is Tony till auto. Parenting in apocalypse it's it's not the same way. You, you know how it works any views usually two to four minutes long, but sometimes they can be a little longer. When you when you live long enough, all kinds of strange things happen. Very right in saying that the Greek heroes the original superheroes. In part because of the hopeful nature of genes vision, but also because of its message of diversity and inclusion. I spoke to author. Herbie J. Paul Auto on his book on the essential. Elizabeth Montgomery that. Harran Samantha were very much alike. I'm sure she was part of her, but I'm sure she was very different woman in some other respects as well. Not really really. She didn't do the magic. She had her own magic, but really she was a very very similar to the character. It was one of the reasons why the show is a hit and she used herself into that role. And it was so with a natural progression. She didn't feel challenged by it. What led you to do this book on Elizabeth? Montgomery I'm I was I loved bewitched as a kid. My parents didn't have a lot of money. It was a tough neighborhood, and so like many people in the sixties. In general, I gravitated toward television for escapism. There was so much going on in the sixties. Anyway, the riots yet Phnom horrible assassination, so I gravitated towards all magic escapism fun TV of that. Aaron was so many wonderful shows, wild wild west green acres. You name it. Buffy which struck me for whatever reason. So years later. When I was an adult and I was working at NBC. I was the page. you get different assignments as a page. One of my assignments was complicity promotion. So I was assigned the promotion for Jim of Jeannie fifteen years later, which was a reunion movie. Right show And that kind of upset me. Because I thought well, there's going to be any reunion. Movie of a Beautiful Blonde Magic woman with immortal dark-haired Guy should be a witch. So, I wrote one. And Elizabeth did not want to do a reunion. And then I it said. Why don't we do a book about the original show? That's the short story. Long story had a Bill Asher her husband in the show's producer, intervening for me and getting me to her good I wrote about the show. And I thought that it had a strong work. The Darren you know didn't want her to Jeff anything because whatever he bought for her, he wanted to buy with his own money, an important thing to remember cement. Was Her choice to live the mortal life. That's right earned. It forced her. So in many ways. She was one of the most independent women of the era. You, know like along with that girl. In in pre Mary Tyler Moore Mary Richards so there were all these different wonderful qualities that I saw the show beyond the magic and I when I sat down, and I'm met Elizabeth, she saw that I really had a great affection for the show I knew it. You know I was talking about. And that I respected her and. this show, so she opened up to me and she did not grant interviews to anyone about that series. syncing ended, and I met her in nineteen, eighty nine. And, the show ended in seventy two. So you know she really moved on? So after the first, which book came out, and then I rewrote it as bewitched forever and nineteen ninety five after she died. I knew there was just so much more to her story beyond the witched that needed to be told. And twenty years later you know I write twitch upon a star, the bewitched life and career Elizabeth Montgomery which came out last year. And that was a narrative. Her Life.

Elizabeth Montgomery Samantha Herbie J. Paul Auto Tony NBC Mary Tyler Moore Mary Richards Jim Bill Asher Guy Aaron Buffy Darren producer Jeff
"herbie" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

Sci-Fi Talk

05:16 min | 1 year ago

"herbie" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

"A little bit of characterization, but to sort of make you recognize who these characters were, but the rest was all like action action action, and I think at the movies getting doing. Worse and worse, and the reason is because people wanted. That thing I will say I'm hopeful I strange new worlds, the Captain Pike. Adventures with the young spock. I don't know if you saw some of that but Anson Mount and impact. Are. are just perfectly cast and. An Anson mount kind of channeled. More, he's a little bit more of a combination of Kirk and picard a little more thoughtful captain. It doesn't WanNa just rush in. But. He's done some good things on there. And now they're getting their own show because the fans want it and I want to see it, too. There's a lot. There's a lot of the Captain Pike story that really needs to be filled in. I. Think that'd be really neat well. No, I, I never watched discovery I just a couple of minutes of it and I just couldn't take it. I same thing with the car couldn't do that either so I, heard you know that. In the later part of the second season, the discovery that they were churning it really just essentially beck into the star trek that we all really want it. However, everything is so messed up with that franchise, and who owns it and house divided I. Really and I. Don't in Tier I. Am an optimist even. I don't just see I. don't see a stranger in world happening I think I just don't think it's going to happen. They don't have the finance imports from what I understand It was just an announcement to get interest in it, so it's just a mess and the the franchise is just a mess because they tried to do something that had nothing to do they. They ignored the fans. The core fans they ignore the mythology of the series and they wanted to do their own thing. Well, that's okay. If they wanted to do their own thing, then they should have done their own thing and not call the Star Trek. You. Know it's just disheartening..

Captain Pike Anson Mount beck Kirk picard
"herbie" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

Sci-Fi Talk

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"herbie" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

"I think we're GONNA be okay and I think gonNA be stronger than than we were. Life is never ever going to be the same. and so but I think that we will come out of this with more humanity in our hearts and more understanding You know also considering everything else going on. It's just in the long run. It's going to work for humanity. Absolutely. So. Is there anything that you're working on now? As far as a writing project. Well I have I finished classic. TV, history, book. actually about a year ago and I'm working. I'm getting a contract for that, but I also have a Christmas for that. I've completed like a life's little instruction. Christmas book based on my Christmas is growing up and then third third project, which is very different from anything I've ever done that. I can't even talk about. So. There you go! I know recently. You wrote an article on the original star. Trek is well. That's right for for a medium DOT com. Yeah, I mean I and I. Read for Medium Yes, all the time. I, love the original star, Trek more than anything, and the way I feel is I know this is probably controversial, but the other shows are just. In the movies will never ever. Ever compare in my opinion, the original series and the crazy thing is you know that all trekkers which are more sophisticated fans who are concerned with the philosophy of of this show as well as trekkies who you know, talk about the ears and stuff all we've ever wanted, and I consider myself, trekker always ever wanted his kirk spock and McCoy. Back on TV played by Shatner, Nimoy and Kelly and as well as the original cast. That's now never ever going to happen, but never all we ever wanted. No one wanted a next generation. Nobody wanted voyager. Nobody wanted to be spaced. Nobody definitely wanted discovery. Starts with turn nobody wanted to aw. Nobody wanted to movies, Oh, we wanted. Was Star Trek back on.

spock Shatner McCoy Nimoy Kelly
"herbie" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

Sci-Fi Talk

04:57 min | 1 year ago

"herbie" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

"You know it really is yeah yeah. Yeah actually we just watched contagion, and we also just watch outbreak, and always teasing my wife, saying I don't think Dustin Hoffman is gonNA. Come rescue US anytime soon. What can Lindsay Wagner did a similar titled Movie Contagious? I yes. Yeah. Yeah that's funny, but yeah, however. Contagion the movie was. Hit a lot of things spot on some things I got wrong tank guide and this virus, which much worse than the movie 'cause you have to compress the time. I mean you can't do it. Whereas a fourteen day lag a movie 'cause I wouldn't go over big, but But. This was. It was very accurate in a lot of ways. And it's it was a little frightening to watch it and we. My wife and I can looking at each other like wow, this is. This is a little too close to home here. So I I mean. How has it been for you personally to to deal with this? We all. have different emotions about everything going on. As far as you know stained home, I've been staying home for forty years. Oh so it really hasn't affected like you say the writing and you know because as a as a writer you're. It's an isolated life in general. So I. I've been used to having to stain home but I can imagine how difficult it is or people who are used to getting out of the house. If going to a job job, you know, and not on a daily basis, the one thing that really affected me I mean I'm, I'm a Catholic and I tried to go to mass. Every morning is very important. Part of my life and I have wonderful friends that we all have breakfast with You know every. Every other day at least and so that we missed out on. You know I've missed that, but they've just started going back to church again this week. So that's good, but that was the one routine that I looked forward to every morning to help balance things out and stay grounded was going to serve this every day. You know that's that's how I mean I'm not trying to you know, preach about. Everybody should be a Catholic I'm just saying in my experience that works for me. So that's what I that's what I've missed. I'm sure you're not alone. There are lot of people that that go to religious services that have had to deal with it and kind of amend sayings It's just been very strange for all of us and we've had to adjust our lives and. Frankly. The end doesn't seem to be insight I mean. It just seems like this is going to go on into the fall easily because. There are other areas of the country that are still. Not is really not under control until it is I can't see things getting normal so.

Dustin Hoffman Lindsay Wagner US writer
"herbie" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

Sci-Fi Talk

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"herbie" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

"Virus situation. But as a writer, you could still right so. It probably impacts that TV show more than you're riding. Yes and you know it's strange the way it's working out because you know once this pandemic and God willing that will be soon. GV and communication is just GONNA change in general. I mean, no one's GONNA! Stop doing zooms. They're. Eligible to a new level and all all different technologies will work together so strange how it all happened. Very strange It's been a very surreal time. I'm here in New York City and Kind of like you know we've had we've. I would say this March, April are probably two of the worst months I've ever experienced. Know I mean it. It's I've been. I'm very lucky were were my wife and I now have been indoors for the most part for ninety seven days has been the work and ninety seven days and It's been very surreal quiet times when you usually hear traffic, and then, of course we've had the protests, and rightly, so what's a little alarming that people are not following social distancing, and we definitely will see some blowback from that as people get sick. From being together like that, so yeah, it's been a very strange thing, but. The only thing that's changed for me as usually I've gone to. Film Festivals and covered the TRIBECA film festival that has been postponed kind of indefinitely for the year. Frankly I think it's done. They're supposed supposed to be New York comic con in the fall I just walk submitted in my credentials, but honestly I. Just can't see. Clearing up between now and October so until there's a vaccine. I don't know how that's GonNa Work I. Think they'll do something virtually on like, but it's A. It's an adjustment for everybody. Of course, we've lost a lot of people. More than Vietnam War which is. S Beyond Tragic. Just just awful, but I think what's chant which I remember very well 'cause. I'm sixty five. I remember very well during the Vietnam War. How they have the death. Count's every night of who died in. That day, and it was like an instant replay. deja Vu showing the debt counts of the people that are dying from the virus and the number of infections, and they all look like numbers, but of course with social media and the media coverage being when they put a face. Tom, those people that's when it really hits home. And Yeah. We lost too many good people. And it's like a horror movie..

New York City deja Vu writer New York Tom
"herbie" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

Sci-Fi Talk

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"herbie" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

"I think it's somewhere in the book. And I know if it was just amazing, 'cause the sound effects were so much a part of the fun part of the show that everybody remembers I still to this day. They did a recent video about by annex. I still running slow motion. Maybe did it did it did it did the? Sounds of the is Yeah, there was some particular thing That? I explained in the bucket can think of a right now, but I also think it somewhere online the explanation of somewhere online. Yeah way before the Internet. When the empire strikes back came back, and of course, darth vader cuts off Luke's hand. I remember friend of mine saying we can rebuild him. We can make him better than he was. By so the bionic men and women. Have totally held their place in pop culture, which is. which is absolutely and the great thing about it, too? Is that they? have done because of those shows that were scientists who became scientist doctors who became doctors you know. Astronauts became astronauts and what they've done in science with cybernetic you know rebuilding of of synthetic arms and whatnot were inspired by the six dollar, man and woman, so there are actually you know. Lives have been saved because of that show of those shows in, and actually it was kind of prophetic, because they are people with artificial limbs that are walking around in using them now and even winning with them, so it's. Really kind of predicted something that. These probably don't cost six million dollars or not. But they're not cheap, but but still it was really interesting that a lot of what they predicted has come to pass. Well not only just predicted, but influence directly. You know as I, say it. I mean those things happened because somebody was inspired some. Scientists as a young boy or girl was inspired to be to get into a prosthetics and studied prosthetics and help people re physically rebuild their bodies them just to make it..

Luke darth vader scientist
"herbie" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

Sci-Fi Talk

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"herbie" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

"My carry a tremendous amount of guilt and shame on Alex. Zahara played read. God's Zales to. Iron Shirt, the one I own US freaky leaders. Allman Kokatay. sci-fi talk. A typical. Behavior. Effects. What's it like for you both to kind of the things that aren't there? Well, sometimes, you have an experience anyway with people. Like gone. In part because of the whole nature of genes, but also because of its message of diversity and inclusion. Long and prosper. This is Tony. Tomato, and welcome to sci-fi talk and today we welcome back Herbie. Jay Pelota, who is also era, even has a talk show on television, and I'm sure with what's going on. Recently. We'll talk about how affected that. We're GONNA talk today about a lot of things, but he does have an interesting book on a on bionics and Meinie, mainly the six million dollar, man, and so I guess Herbie between the two of them there were about twelve million. Would you say? Well actually the book. The book covers both the Jamie's. Daime Summers Vinik woman apparently her parts were smaller, so they were only five five and a half million. Oh, wow, see women at short changed again. I'll tell you see. That's terrible. That was actually stated on the show so. Yeah I know, I'm just. I'm just picking it. you know one other observation is Richard Anderson was. For a while the hardest working man in show business jumping between both shows. I don't know how we did it. Absolutely that way and that was monumental. He was the first character he played Oscar Goldman boss both Stevens Jamie. He was the first character in history that play or the first actor in history, the played the same character on two different shows, and then when the bionic woman left ABC in the final season and went to NBC, he was playing the same character on two different shows on two different networks. So that was very significant, and when he played with Steve He had the tie, and the the more formal look and say things like Pale. Then when he would show up with Jamie, it would just be in the sport, Chek or without a tiny call her babe. Usually will your books I mean the Elizabeth Montgomery. Just amazing, the the access to her and all that is press stuff. With this, you I'm sure you were able in your research, also talk to the stars of shows. I did it on as a matter of Richard Anderson, wrote the foreword to the book and Lee Majors I went to the set of biannic after I was blessed to be on that set, they filmed it in Charleston. South Carolina and Lynn we and Lee were there and Richard, so I interviewed Lindsay before that on the phone for extensive interviews met Lee at that day and then interviewed. After when I got back to my then. A home in Rochester New York so and then heart people like our Bennett Martin. Cayden who wrote the novels cyber. Interview Him. He gave me the blessing. So is really was really wonderful. It was a neat show. and. Idea I mean he was kind of combination of..

Stevens Jamie Richard Anderson Herbie Jay Pelota US Steve He Zahara Lee Elizabeth Montgomery Allman Kokatay. Daime Summers Vinik Alex Cayden Tony Oscar Goldman ABC South Carolina Meinie Rochester Bennett Martin
"herbie" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"herbie" Discussed on KTRH

"He died in Johnson took over as president and he moved the manned spacecraft center to Houston Texas because he was a Texas so I've taken a course still was there and they launched the missiles from there however the manned spacecraft center where they controlled the whole thing was Herbie was working on a pilot project and he was unafraid programmer then doing some very important things we live here but we didn't like Texas Herbie decided to interview and another job he'd been the chief for three years now to see what what he would be worse than the open market is a program that and there was an ad in the paper and we were on our way to go swimming at a friend's house and they invited us for dinner and to go pull and I had on my maternity bathing suit because now I was pregnant with their second child and my little son was in his swim trunks and my husband wore a suit to do this interview left me in the car downstairs so he goes up to do the interview comes back down and says they want to talk to you please look at me anyway I went and they wind in dying to me online did they knock themselves out to try to get me to get him to accept this job it was in California and he had been to California for jobs for G. that were debugging jobs emergency kind of jobs and he come here and work through the night sometimes the bugging programs and stuff like that he signed a mountains and the crime isn't he loved it anyway I was settled by that.

Johnson president Texas Herbie programmer California Houston
"herbie" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"herbie" Discussed on KTRH

"And I met my husband when I was seventeen still in high school I had a boyfriend when I was sixteen and we broke up and I was heartbroken my first boyfriend ever end so that first love always you know is painful when it breaks up and it usually does anyway so I go to look for a job and it was at the beach and I and I signed a job advertised in the newspaper that they were looking for a babysitter I applied for the job NGS the lady interviewed me and get me the job to be the babysitter for her two boys and she was expecting a third and she needed help and she I lived at the beach in the summer managing that package that rented rooms to vacationers so she needed to help her with the kids I was in turns out that that lady what is my husband's sister and came to the beach to visit his sister and met baby sitter well what happened was my future sister in law ended up being the baby sitter with her husband when he came on weekends while Herbie and I went out they stayed home in baby steps and so I don't know how well that went over but that's what happened anyway the relationship continued for about four months and we also got me a job I'm the only one allowed to calling her B. it's a family his family costume Herbie Rangers it's her but it turns out.

Herbie
"herbie" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

Sci-Fi Talk

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"herbie" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

"Hi Welcome to season two of bite. This is Tony till auto. Parenting in apocalypse it's it's not the same way that. You you know how it works any views usually two to four minutes long, but sometimes they can be a little longer. When you when you live long enough, all kinds of strange things happen. Very right in saying that the Greek heroes the original superheroes. In part because of the hopeful nature of genes vision, but also because of its message of diversity and inclusion. I spoke to author Herbie J. Paul Auto on his book on the essential Elizabeth Montgomery. That Harran Samantha were very much. Alike I'm sure she was part of her, but I'm sure she was very different woman in some other respects as well. Not really really. She didn't do the magic. She had her own magic, but really she was a very very similar to the character. It was one of the reasons why the show is a heck, and she used herself into that role. And it was so with a natural progression she didn't feel. challenged by it. What led you to do this book on Elizabeth? Montgomery I'm I was. I loved bewitched as a kid. My parents didn't have a lot of money. It was a tough neighborhood, and so like many people in the sixties in general I gravitated toward television for escapism. There was so much going on in the sixties. Anyway. The riots at Phnom Horrible Fascination so I gravitated towards all magic. And Fun TV of that era, there was so many wonderful shows, wild, wild west green acres. You name it. Buffy, which struck me for whatever reason. So. Later. When I was an adult, and I was working at NBC. I was the page. you get different assignments as a page. One of my Simon's was complicity promotion. So I was assigned the promotion for Jim of Genie Fifteen years later, which was a reunion movie. Right show And that kind of upset me. Because I thought well, there's going to be any reunion movie of Beautiful Blonde. Magic woman with immortal dark-haired Guy should be a witch. Yeah, so I wrote one. And Elizabeth did not want to do a reunion. And then I it's. Why don't we do a book about the original show? That's the short story. Long story had a Bill Asher her husband in the show's producer, intervening for me and getting me to her good, I wrote about the show. And I thought that it had a strong work. That Darren You know didn't want her to Jeff anything because whatever he bought for her, he wanted to buy with his own money, an important thing to remember cement. Was Her choice to live the mortal life. That's right earned. It forced her. So in many ways, she was one of the most independent women of the era. You know like along with that girl. In in pre Mary Moore and Mary Richards, so there were all these different wonderful qualities that I saw the show beyond the magic, and I when I sat down, and I'm not Elizabeth. She saw that I really had a great affection for the show I knew it. You know I was talking about. And that I respected her and this show, so she opened up to me and she did not grant interviews to anyone about that series. syncing ended and I met her in nineteen eighty nine. And the show ended in seventy two. So you know she really moved on. So after the first which book came out and then I rewrote it as bewitched forever and nineteen ninety five after she died. I knew there was just so much more to her story beyond the witched that needed to be told. And twenty years later you know I. write twitch upon a star. The bewitched life and career Elizabeth Montgomery which came out last year. And that was the narrative..

Elizabeth Montgomery Harran Samantha Phnom Horrible Fascination Herbie J. Paul Auto Tony NBC Bill Asher Guy Buffy Simon Mary Richards Mary Moore Darren producer Jeff
Ex-mayor who quit after criticizing Trump dies in crash

America First

00:21 sec | 1 year ago

Ex-mayor who quit after criticizing Trump dies in crash

"The sacrament of the reports that the former mayor of a northern California city who stepped down after he harshly criticized president trump and his supporters died Saturday in a plane crash officials told the the doctor bill Kirby who was the mayor of Auburn died in the crash Saturday morning here at the Auburn municipal airport Herbie criticized Mr trump's response to the growing virus pandemic and compared the president's supporters to KKK

Bill Kirby Auburn Auburn Municipal Airport Herbie Mr Trump President Trump California
Dog Stolen in DC Reunited With Owner

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

Dog Stolen in DC Reunited With Owner

"Now it has a happy ending after an unusual string of events in southeast Washington stolen bulldog has been reunited with his owner Harvey is back home the four year old English bulldog was stolen from his owner's apartment in Navy Yard early Friday morning and police say the suspect went into the man's apartment grab the keys to his two thousand four Honda in his dog he then went to the parking garage and took off in the man's car Herbie's owner turned to face book to help find is pop in Sunday they were reunited please also from the car please do have a photo of the suspect but no word on whether any charges will be

Washington Harvey Navy Yard Honda
"herbie" Discussed on Drum History

Drum History

13:15 min | 2 years ago

"herbie" Discussed on Drum History

"Cadillac issue can say whatever you you want a good way of putting it But so then so if we're moving forward here so then like Like on your website. It's cool to think like the remo crown logo go. Yeah it was the king it was. The crown was that whole team theme but wearing the crown king wearing the crown diplomat ambassador the emperor that was you know that was sort of the whole marketing strategy of it. And that's how the crowd came about sure you know. He was the king and so they have the crown so yeah. The crown wants to a number of variations in gotTa take a second because I I have a bunch of these old heads in my office I give a other collectors to some people as semi things that have been made original boxes. All these things Yoga's original weather team. Drumsticks even have some clarinet pads. Remote would did you know that renewal make clan pads. I did not what does he. What is a clear PAT? I don't even know what that is. Basically what it does is it You know when when you press the pads over an open hole like if you have a record or fluid yeah it stops that whole and and So there's these little mylar of pads with With almost like fell don by Tom. But you know at that time Rhema was. It was L. About Bannon and orchestras. From I said wasn't about guitars. And amplifiers like it was in the seventies and so- remo. He was trying to get remote incorporate involved in all these band and orchestra things and so he wanted You told me this we were talking about some of the old things that we've you know that collected. And he was saying that Yeah He. He had a number of people that were really bright. He an so knowledgeable in so many areas is that he wanted to sort of build the company into into stone a number of accessory products and so he had drunk stakes at practice pads. We you know said Setting is cleared up bads some other really sort of wacky things. You know in the beginning like I said he he was just so into what he did and at the time if those an accessory that he thought that that he can make that would be an improvement and it will be useful by then he wants to do it. It's cool to just think of the passion that he had right away now was remo and was an instant success. Was it just like instantly. This blew up and everyone adopted it very quickly and said I mean I can't see too many people say no I prefer Animal skinheads was it just overnight right money rolling in absolutely and that's what we what we plan to do. Eventually when we get this boat together when when when the when the corporation was created when Remo Inc came about remo attended the Tri State Music Festival in Oklahoma homer and After that show he came back would would sales totaled over twenty five hundred dollars and Just in that one show and the great they they grew enormously with like sales totaling over thirty seven thousand thousand dollars by the end of the month. He was just overnight and and they outgrew a five hundred square foot Quote factory and I say that Pictures Two Thousand Square foot a place in In Santa Monica New Vine Street and Dan After that he started hiring other people. They I should made You know these forming dies. They can do things fast. Initially they said diesel sort of heat strips that would go around the head and form and Anita was really no you know real big production and So yeah because because he had all the OEM sales as well as a dealer sales It was just overnight. Success you know is is like like say you know sell sell an APP today. You know. We'll say oh. Wow this is a two million dollars overnight was almost like that. Yeah and now the. Oem sales are referring to Reema selling to Ludwig and then Ludwig putting their name right got it got it which which happens all all the time I mean. That's that's happened today. Pearl and all these people they have. You GotTa have drum heads on your new drum set right and you know to this day. We've we've zone. We've got such a great relationship with all the OEM companies. You know whether it'd be Pro Drum Workshop Ludwig. Whomever Ludwig uses are Lash Ludwig? Stop a couple years ago making your own heads and they use our heads now and With their name are we put their name on it in they want you know some bloom the different Difference in the type of film that we use or the type of collar or the type of flesh shoots and we'll do it because we make jake you know tremendous amount means of fastening. Some now of crunched is we have a cramp lock. We have a four different kinds of temporary Insert rings we. We have all this because what we do is we look at the end news now and So yeah the OEM's were big part of this. Yeah getting off subject. Yeah no no no. Let's say let's move forward in the timeline. So we're in the sixties. So it's it's happened remo is getting popular it is popular. It's an overnight tonight success. What was going on in the sixties? Then obviously ringo plagued remo right. That's got to be a big deal. Oh yeah it was huge well and and see ask When when CS DOTS came about that in a becoming huge? Because you know it was a low too. I think even early on in the early days people were fascinated native that a transparent film could be so strong shirt and you had fives and some transparent drums be made and people just thought as all the jetsons absences like this really cool new kind of thing yes is transparent. Found that that I can hit as hard as I want to. I can't break it and So Hello Reno said that the whole cs thing really came Well it goes way way back to Taba drums really even P.. Three if you look at your way towel. Drums trump to made and the jobs that are put on there the the way it sort of keeps a film from twisting. It makes it more trampling motion so you get more of a fundamental sound. So what happened. There was a buddy buddy. Rich was using these Would beaters on his bass drum and it was denting ahead really bad in some cases in you know back then buddy and Louis they all US diplomat and So seven and a half mil film and so it will break so ringo put a patch on it and because it was there's a clear patch. Nobody could see it and so he said well. You know let's Let's let's make it worth blacks or you know like what he did with Pinstripe. Less accent accent. The fact lists. Don't try to hide it. You know and So anyway again he was a visionary as far as marketing these things and he he started doing the CBS flag dot and couple that with the transparent heads. And you know you have Bonham and you had Vista laid and you had all that stuff and Bam before before you know it again. It was another rave there and And another big wave of drum heads that will unique sounding and also a unique appearance. It's kind of one of those things where you know every kid in America or I should say every kid around. The world is watching a big drummer like John Bonham summer like Ringo Remo. That's like it's product placement. Basically that's you know exactly. I mean so so somebody drivers hours during that time. You know talk about just dreaming over the that Ludwig Vissali catalog and just that whole lot. That was it it but again the sound was great and then you you started getting a lot of recorded sounds at warranted more fundamentals. I Know Reno said that That tailplane and and Steve Gabar would like huge proponents of those heads. And all the recordings were done with those and and and everybody wanted that sound Hawaii five o soundtracks and you name it given righty one that sound and And in the Martin made a better too because it made it more durable you awesome watching snare and started. BNC's that really took off and seventies as well sparkled on. Yeah sparkled on. That was sort of another thing I wanted to address. Arrests may be. I don't know if I could Jump in your right now. Go for it but the way we do The the actual Graphic heads that we're done back in the day light sparkle tone and some of the other four color silkscreen. Those were innovative because they just had graphics. They want innovative because of the necessarily the process were necessarily sound what we have now with our skin. Deep is the Aviva unique process process that actually Tom and I both week. We own the patent for that. And that's a process. It's mainly like a tattoo on your skin it it it The inks actually go down into the pores of the found. You'll never get it off. And we put that on our tried and true films. I've tried and true Dupont films and so there's no change in sound so that technology is really different is not just basically painting the head with a Polyester Inc.. Got It so screen it is totally different cool. It's big as a hue light. It was something that we started back in nineteen ninety six and if you look at any of our the cores and college bands if you look at and listen to any of those heads There's just nothing can compare with the other companies still do surface surface printing and And Dilemma Nations. On top of that was changed. The sound of the heads and so I've process is totally different totally unique and In and it's not anything like it was back in the seventies but that showed back in the people weren't looking for something new and different sparkle tone came out people. Were looking for something that you know that when it was put on television that it made a splash. Yeah that is Definitely technology that. I didn't realize went back that that far. It's really cool to know that it was like I mean remote very innovative in that way and and as I'm looking on the time line here Something that I've always had a pair of and I think a lot of people have a pair of his the road. Tom's I mean there's such a cool technology. Yeah well in recording like I said they use those in I the early versions of white five. Oh people SORTA got that sound and do chancellor start using them and He he was like the guy to a lot of Phil Collins. Thank thank and some other people vic. Firth ended up on promoting them a some of the larger sizes of as practiced tiffany. When we came out with the pitch pedal that was made it to that and So yeah they would. They were definitely innovations in they had a unique sound because it was no shell You know for the head to resonate on it ahead of the unique kind of timber tour. Yeah and those. Those went through. Well I mean they're still around. Obviously but I feel like those were in the eighties. You See Tons of the people using them there which it's very very conic but Backing up into so Rotan's were as it says here in sixty eight so that seems early on the technology. What else is happening around that time? Mainly during that time it was more about a film thicknesses being changed in some of the some of the different kinds of films You know at the time there were. There was a three film final film in a seven. And a half mil film then we. We started getting ten no films which then became the ambassador a single ply ambassador and As people started you you know like I said as Amplify occasion came in and join us. Added Compete with guitars They needed something. That was really strong. Instead of ten film is is extremely strong. It has a nice tag two versus a two ply head. which is going to be more warm? Yeah sure you're not have have quite the punch so so a lot of that was about coatings for brushes different things like that. The remo did early on in the film thickness and improvements pretty much Ramos says And like I said these are some of the things that I was listening to argue things some of the earlier MM-HMM MYLAR that. We've gotten from Dupont In the late fifties wasn't as good as the mylar that they had in the mid sixties sixties because of mid-sixties actually opened up a new plant..

Ringo Remo remo Tom Lash Ludwig Remo Inc John Bonham Reno Pro Drum Workshop Ludwig Cadillac Santa Monica Ludwig Vissali L. About Bannon Oklahoma Ludwig CBS Anita Pearl Rotan jake Dan After
"herbie" Discussed on Drum History

Drum History

12:12 min | 2 years ago

"herbie" Discussed on Drum History

"They tried to To solve as but nobody wanted into you know to buy the heads again because just because they didn't work and that includes the OEM's and So at that time remo had an accountant is name was sick girl who introduced him to an ill. Space chemist is named Sam much neck and he is is the very first remote dramatic. He's the guy's picture on there with like with like a chemistry beak Arain pouring some some stuff here you go in for his catalog. So you know when remote guidance saying that actually came up with the the actual idea of taking the Aluminum Lim Channel and important resonant because he was familiar with resumes. Mostly the other companies. Were trying to do some other sort of a Cryptic credited and not a glued head so anyway would sort of all the other stuff behind remo with with all the slain on the Ludwig and the The other companies in the gym. Or when actually Jim Irwin. I never really found any wine to To try to take the reins on his patent. Because does again what he had just didn't work in a May use one of the first guys to do it but it just didn't work so are- Moga back He they I started playing around with some other designs and and Sam ended up coming up with designed it it. Basically they filed for patent and fifty seven and and then at that point in time it was To other people that Oh premier actually had a head and fifty nine that they had a European pat right now and And it was a novel. UPN Patton in fifty eight. It was a crackhead to others and So other people again were trying to do this us but now that their designs were were still any good so lead we ended up going with this cliff style head that they end up getting from a guy over in Switzerland whistle run who was making basil drunks and Even Rameau said that The heads at he sat initial heads of the mylar that he got at had received from Dupont. They actually couldn't take the tension of the marching drums that they were doing over in In Switzerland so those guys Moscow Bauer. who was doing doing a dry cramped heads and Remorselessly saw that process when he saw that he still felt like that. That wasn't the best design and he still felt like that was the best design. Because it's still made the best sounding head even today. You can't make a good a two ply cramped head because because you could the two PLIES on Mylar SORTA stretch in them in different ways and you just don't get good sound so anyway. Ludwig think ended up basically taking that Switzerland designed bring coming back in the nineteen sixties. They started making their heads cramp but again interesting enough enough between that period of fifty seven in one thousand nine hundred sixty. It took a number of years for these patents to come through remind filed fourteen. I'm fifty seven but it wasn't actually granted until nineteen sixty. Wow so during that period yeah so during that period of time I'd you know the market had had grown so much that Ludwig initially bought a number of heads from remo as did Sloan as digression. Greg Brandon's impermanent on. So they were buying his from remote for for quite some time. And then Ludwig started making include head ahead on similar to re MOS and at that point time and ringling says in his own words. Don't turn the whole time. There was no love loss. All the companies it was like you know every man for himself because there was just such a demand you know for plastic drum heads. Yeah Yeah So. When Ramos Patent was awarded he he actually went back to Ludwig and sling in? Got Them to actually pay him Some royalties for the amount of kids. They had sold during those periods because they basically copied his design. Sure you know. Yeah and then getting back to the the the Evans Situation Asian. You know a chick Evanston decided that he would sell the business. Bob Beal's who was say The GILDA retail music story was actually an engineer. Uh He had actually sold that business to him and then they started making the polyester flesh. You design which to me was another bad design they want the forest and and they they certainly want the best and then they took on another design. That wasn't the best But that's what they use for years until later again they finally adopted you know the aluminum flesh hoop and which word acquiring uses today so the things that That Reiman Sam did way back in the mid fifties or were still often. You know some of the designs that we use today as far as making the best sounding hiring drumhead. Yeah and I think that's where that misconception came in of of of it was Like I thought it was this businessman remo coming in and stealing the little guys idea which obviously isn't true and that's one of those misconceptions but It sounds like right like what I've learned in multiple episodes here are are like things happen. Naturally like music progresses in a certain way And now to win. He's twenty minutes and I should have probably said for most people know list but the synthetic head came along because before that people were using animal skin heads that would be affected by weather. And that's why you get the remo weather whether king is because this situation of you're you're you're at the mercy of Mother Nature and when you're playing and your head would tighten and loosen so that's for that pursuit came from the things back. Then were real. Created the weather king. And you know Ludwig was weather master in Evans Evans was all weather. You know because they would they were trying to get that concept. You know in people's heads that hey this is new and gray. Material doesn't change Geno and so remote coin. Those sort of King wjm diplomat to the King Ambassador to the game and then emperor which meaning King King itself off to isolate denote the thickness of the mylar. So he would just way ahead of his time in in coming out. With sort of those marketing terms there is still used today. The unanimous yeah whether king was what he developed in and again depending on how you parse words I think everybody wants to be the first in everybody. He wants it to have a certain history in a certain brand loyalty but You know remorse me many times. You know we. He was never the I. He was never the first but he was the first one that that develop the system that world. Yoga said there's thirteen patents during the time of of systems that did not work and other people that didn't you know Evans never got a patent for his design and so there were other things that that were try but they just didn't work and that's why they didn't take off. Yeah yeah and it sounds like Like remo didn't give up not to say that Evans or these other people gave up but it sounds like he tried tried a lot of things and he saw that okay. This might be a little bit of a trial and error sister but but he didn't give up and he with it. I I don't know Indefatigable is is determined by use of always used for Reema leave never tiring and even in his eighties He would walk by my office every day we would meet and talk drums love drums and percussion and he. He was just like you said never tired a working with it doing things experimental plane. So yeah that was that was basically basically how it happened back then and just to go back I'm just for one one other quick second about the thing is that If anything I of nothing for remote a steal from Jake Evans Okay and if If if anything you know remo gave him I think more credit than what credit was due with the early samples. That that they they were trying to. Do you know Jerome City. It that they were trying to promote a drum stated because he tried to promote the heads and like I said they used them but it was like bill. Ludwig said if you put any tension on him whatsoever for any period of time it would just break in not to clarify that a little bit so then so so. Rima would be in the business of selling. Lean drums at drum city. And he approached Chick Evans to say. Hey let me try and distribute and sell this cool synthetic drumhead you've got working on here. It didn't work out right exactly but he was trying to say. Hey this is a good idea. Let's try and work together and I can. He was probably thinking. I can make money off of this just as a salesman salesman right. Exactly without that was he. He never intended to go into business. And that's why I say. Is that his his stories. In three parts I as a working drama Sackett as a as a as a distributor and a dealer at drum city in in the third part becoming a manufacturer because he when I started working with this chemist who came up with this idea Ramos said that he guided Sam but on the he's given credit where credit's due you know over and over and over or against it girl and came up with the name and came out with the remo name and Sam came really designed and remo was the one that was sort of guiding and directing and helping open him because he was the drummer out and they and he said that that he and Roy Learn so much over. The course is nice. Couple years ears at drum city because you know they were dramas and they were hanged without a gray drummers and all the players yeah so yeah he was able to to guide that an I and develop that whole marketing thing but but yeah believe me Nothing can be further from the truth. That Ramos took advantage of that situation. There it was just nothing to to take advantage of like I said they. They ended up doing their own thing. And they made the polyester flesh hoop for years again. Which I could are we talked to you for like days On on join head design films and hopefully we'll have a little bit of time towards the end To kind of talk about some of the other innovations that we've we have here and what we've done but Anyway you know that's that's the history and like I said I've talked personally. Talk about All these stories over the years Atomic Matt did they a series of interviews with remote like they were trying to publish history book and he went down meet with rim on a day-to-day basis and did a lot of recording. So he's really documented. The first thirty thirty years of our existence and and I'm trying to document the last thirty years of our existence here and so that's coming straight from the horse's versus mouth as well as other people that will cooperate beloit wages in his book. And other people you know. I think it's interesting that you know. We even have an audit our library. I'm looking at one of the nineteen sixty four Evans meany Cadillac. And they. I put in here the historical and present day fags and this was back in nineteen sixty four and they just stay right here. Schick was the first To discover mylar be an ideal was I would be an ideal for drum heads by taking a mile or two would flesh you. There's just so much history before that of people that had already received that already had patents and things like that that just completely negate that. But if you're right you're wrong..

Ludwig remo Evans Evans Reiman Sam Ramos Evans Switzerland Jim Irwin Jake Evans Aluminum Lim Channel Moga Bob Beal accountant King wjm UPN Patton Greg Brandon Mother Nature King Ambassador Evanston
"herbie" Discussed on Drum History

Drum History

14:37 min | 2 years ago

"herbie" Discussed on Drum History

"Perks now onto the show. Hello and welcome to the drum history. PODCAST I I'm your host Bart van der Zee and today. We are talking about remo. I am joined by Herbie. May who is a thirty two year veteran of the remote company. Herbie how are man. I'm Greg Bart thanks for having me. I'm really excited to talk to you about drumhead me to annul A. I'll say that there has been a as we know. There's been a previous episode. That was was the history of drum heads which we we kind of focused more on Evans and This is sort of the opportunity to to get the remote side of the story and they're both obviously sleep. You know vital pieces of drumming history but Today talking remote so so yeah Herbie. Why don't we Why don't we just have you take us back to the Beginnings Beginnings of Remo and we can start at the beginning and go all the way through to modern day. Okay well Hopefully like I said this is actually is my first podcast so I have to say it's a different for me. I'm used to demonstrating physical things while I'm talking or sherm showing someone graphics so something so it's a little bit different but I'm good I'll try to stick to the agenda and try not to ramble too much because Our company is really a AH wait we have so much history have over sixty years and Yet we it. It's sort of divided into some segments. The first part of his is Remo Belli a touring drummer Moving la kind of to me. It's it's it's really a Cinderella story about about this guy who who was a drummer ended up. You know Do getting a drum shop together in a plan Hollywood doing things with with movie stars and and then starting his own company so I wanted to talk just for a second about the actual film. Because you know the film The polly There I said that is the That that's the actual of film that was developed L. Back in the In the the late thirties is really when it when it when it happened. Around nineteen thirty eight. There was a guy named Wallace. Alex carruthers who was who is a polymer chemistry. Were dead I dupont. He he is really credited For doing nylon but he first I started with polyesters and then I switch to nylon then There was these two of guys in the UK that had read all all of Wallis's notes and details on nylon and polyester who said he was working on and they actually developed This film which later later became They called it Terror Lane and So they they were the actual guys at developed it and they The the actual what they call p t now the polyethylene earth late so yes they were the ones that actually came up with it but but it was through Wallace carruthers You know who who sort of started a thing. Okay then They they worked for a small research is loud and they The company that they were for You know did not want to really Do any development to it so they license license it to To Du Pont in in the United States and so do pot Actually started making this film and then And in ICI ended up which which makes makes onyx by the way those two films Melanie has made by. mylar is is made by Dupont. Those Films Still Donald that we use today because they have certain sound properties. It avai unique and So so anyway I've worked with a number of their Over the years from around the world and Their help is just been incredible. Remo Belli said many times you know Dupont. Did some things for us to help improve Help improve our drum heads and They were intrigued. I think by the sound properties as well. I find it interesting that at that point that in the very beginning there was just nothing to do with drums. When this sort of film was was created? Well let me interrupt interrupt you there for second because you would think that but actually Dupont and Dupont's patent okay. So we're talking about these fats. died back in the Back in the late thirties. Early forties. Dupont had a patent for For Polymers in the forties and then ICI In the mid forties. So you would think that that no one knew about it. But actually and Dupont's patent application in nineteen fifty one The Eiffel potential products listed in that patent application in one thousand nine hundred fifty one was snowed german-based from his wow cool I had no idea I thought it was like nineteen fifty six was kind of the when when it really came to you ahead and that's when it became a let's use it for this but man they knew right away Y- yeah right they knew right away and it was a whole list. Grab the copy of the patent is a whole list of products that they knew that that this polyester film would work on and and like I said they they they actually put that in a patent in nineteen fifty one. Okay so the the idea that that these other people of the companies were I is just really not not true I'm looking at there. were thirteen patents between nineteen fifty one nine hundred sixty eight for synthetic films. I different different types of Fastening systems you know for for Synthetic Films Evans never got a patent for any of that. Reno's patent was one that was successful. restful and that's what Reno's always said you know he said we weren't. We've never been the first of so many people that tried and actually Ludwig had a of quite a bit more interaction with rim. Oh I think than than solar any other company at the time because it was a guy that had patented a synthetic the kid and Or actually I had an application in fifty one. Jim Irwin was the guy in one thousand nine hundred fifty five Dr who was really the first guy to do it. He worked at three M and he had already been working with a mylar for some eight years and so he he had Put together a drumhead back in. I think fifty two of fifty three interesting enough. There's a there's some great history three John Bags. Encyclopedia of Percussion is a great read for some of the history of mylar and talks about those early days days of bill. Ludwig make an of a drug company as another one but anyway this was Jim. Irwin was back in fifty five and he had made you know some sample apple drum heads Earlier than that and And so really. He was the first guy and then like I said there were about twelve or thirteen. Other people That had designs that they actually patented but remorse was one that was a must successful. What took off from there? Rima's was in fifty fifty seven so anyway. Let me backtrack a little bit. So realize a touring drummer he was doing a show Betty Hutton who was a A Hollywood actress actress He would go to Chicago and when they were Would they would make a stop in Chicago. He would go by Franks trump shop. He would go by Ludwig Edwige and he would go by swinging land and And this is again well documented. There's lots of information as far as the time line and when he did these things and and and again. I hope that one of these days Tom Stigma and I are going to be able to publish a arena history book but so what happened in this was I think about fifty three or fifty four. He he had Gone by frank strong shot when he was in Chicago and then he went by Ludwig anyone by sling land and at that time but slant on in had shown him a mylar drum had that he was working. On and Gem growl also worked at Ludwig and Selma. He was already working on Mylar drum his back in around fifty three. I think it was and So there were other people that were doing it but they just hadn't come up with the right fastening means for it in the head the film but they just come couldn't come up with the fascinating things. So while Reno was doing his his touring the thing he was also a part owner he and Roy Heart of drum city as a touring drummer and also a drum shop on her. He was welcomed in all all of these these companies. He was welcome to the factories as like. I said as a potential customer and as a player and So they knew him he knew them he would say and check out different things we're doing but at the time he wasn't interested in the plastic Drummad he had seen it he just just wasn't interested in it so he gets too drunk city and then he was they were doing this. Percussion Fair trump city and he had gone some mylar from a distributor later there in La and he decided that he was GonNa do this. display so he got so many tack that on a drum to put couldn't as a window display and he just used You know staples any tacked on there. But he realized that the film was a little bit Brittle led the time and the tax staples which were to tear the film and so he did the display. But you know felt like that. That wasn't gonNA be any in a great way of fasten. The you know the the material to the frame so then he gets a letter that was sent out by by a chick Gavin's Saying that he has his New Plastic drumhead so the letter reaches remo remote order. Some heads and Roy Hart was Iceland. A big session player at At you know in La at the time that was Reno's partner in Durham City. So Roy we hit actually used some of those heads some of the Evans heads on some gigs. And even though there were problems with remo said that they would they would split it would break break and they would crack but you know they would do enough to give people the idea of what mylar sound alike you know how would perform in different weather weather conditions so that when remo got one of the flyers he contacted a chick Evans and so he made in a An and ringlets. I told this story many times to me there was quite a bit of. There's you know I think everybody wants to hear the Tawdry tidbits of you. You know what happened but basically what happened. When remo got their chicken told him that he had quote a factory Reema founding living in a boardinghouse boarding house and he was in no condition to talk about business whatsoever remo they were actually doing a wholesale business at to address city as well as retail? So he was interested in buying the Evans heads as wholesale to become a distributor so so he went to talk about you know what type of volume he had and if they would be able to supply all customers because he was Brima was gonNA turn promote it and so when he got there he was completely disenchanted about the whole situation check. Ashley offered to sell his coat. Hello factory which was supposedly in the bottom basement of this boardinghouse. Raigmore never saw it but he offered to sell whatever he had on inventory the and and whatever else for like five thousand dollars and Remo when he got there and and chicken shown him the sort of tagged head he knew that that design wasn't any better than the stapled head that he had previously tried as a storefront window and He knew it wasn't going to hold up anyway. Anyway he got back in again completely disenchanted about them being any SORTA distributor for Evanston heads and then MM He he decided that You know what evidence had to offer. Just didn't work Evans. Already said heads to To Ludwig Ludwig lead we had tried them out. And they failed miserably and so- Reno head between he and Roy Heart they had initially purchased some then a protests. More the people that wanted to try them out and Reema said in his own words many times. Yeah we tried to make it as work you know we. We gave them out Autho customers. We used them You know Roy used them on sessions but they just didn't work they didn't hold up design was just no good and you you know they. They didn't have any sort of form collar. So what Basically what Chad offer just did not work and And I think that's the biggest this misconception there in this concept that while remo stole everything from chick chicken anything to steal it was it was really. There was nothing that shake. Had that the Jim Irwin the guy that created the Patton you know three years before togetherness created these heads. There was nothing there That he had that was different from Jim Irwin soon and you know and it just didn't work. They didn't hold up as they had. Everyone would have bought awed them and he would have been able to get a patent like I said there were thirteen patents held for drum heads during that period of time in Evanston had any so anyway remote goes back and fifty six and like I said they. They bought the heads..

Ludwig Ludwig remo Jim Irwin Evans Remo Remo Belli Reno Herbie Dupont Roy Chicago Hollywood Roy Heart Evanston ICI Synthetic Films Evans Greg Bart Ludwig Edwige
"herbie" Discussed on The Music Prophet

The Music Prophet

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"herbie" Discussed on The Music Prophet

"Kosovar? Jeff is just so much shutters considered Johnson so I I think there's something perfect so what's your go to then. What and was that like is that has always been year Goto? I mean generally uh most of the stuff I listen to his from celebrities to navy. Listen to as much modern Probably should but it happens. I mean there's also there's a lot it's coming out now that well being a modern I am going to see Mossy Washington on Tuesday in Toronto Discomfort together but suffered so cool. Do it would be kind of because I'd be sort of an old any legend fabbrica although some people some of the guys come AC- the Saving Ben's not the following the lineage of evolution of jazz concerts. So what's your stance on it. ooh I don't know if sounds the joy and like whatever it was always labels..

Melby, Herbie And Cole discussed on Jared and Katie

Jared and Katie

01:12 min | 2 years ago

Melby, Herbie And Cole discussed on Jared and Katie

"Because Melby had to go to the hospital for eyeball herpes. Oh, god. Oh, hearing it makes me sick. How do you. Don't ever been cancelled the whole tour, just that they just had to suspend the rehearsals, because Melby went temporarily blind in her right eye. How do you get herpes in your eyeballs? And I have to ask Dr hugs, how you got rid of? Studio. Melby went temporarily blind right eye her vision came back, and she returned to rehearsals. And it was confirmed that it was eyeball, herpes scary about that is. I don't think like a herpes coal. Saw cole. No. Yeah. There's different. Simplex is right. Yeah. So Herbie can be coleslaw, cold sore. Hold sore. Right. Yeah. And, and you can be spread to other like if the thing and your birthday and somebody has one of those can go do it can go. Okay. So somebody would have to spread it that way. But my point is there's no cure. So that means at any given time it could come back in. Why?

Melby Herbie Cole
Roy Hargrove, Grammy-winning jazz trumpeter, dies at 49

WBZ Morning News

00:29 sec | 3 years ago

Roy Hargrove, Grammy-winning jazz trumpeter, dies at 49

"Grammy winning trumpeter ROY Hargrove has passed away. His manager says Friday in New York of cardiac arrest stemming from a longtime kidney disease, regarded by many of his peers as the greatest trumpeter of his generation our growth collaborated with jazz giants like Herbie Hancock and Wynton. Marsalis? Also teamed up with mainstream artists such as Eric about do common and the Angelo incorporating sounds of Hornby, so funk and hip, hop gimmes work, jazz trumpeter, ROY Hargrove was forty nine years old.

Roy Hargrove Herbie Hancock Kidney Disease Marsalis New York Angelo Wynton Eric Forty Nine Years
Leicester City coming to terms with tragedy

Correspondents Report

04:27 min | 3 years ago

Leicester City coming to terms with tragedy

"L correspondent Samantha holy hasn't been in London long, and she's still very much settling in but already she's had a major football initiation in the face of a tragedy that deeply affecting one of the clubs that club is listed city, which until recently was heading towards administration, then Thai billionaire put millions into the club, and there was a fairytale turnarounds. So after a helicopter crash at a match England's love of football became even clearer cement, the holy fouled is. Six degrees at Claven cottage little football stadium with a history. Dating back over three hundred years originally a Royal hunting lodge. It's now home for the Fulham football club on the banks of the river tames on the lung the twenty five thousand people who've come along to watch the match. The name. It's move for you experience. Rather than the superman. The crowds are noisy, but will behaved no alcohol allowed in the stadium. So most Gaza was much beer as they can before they enter and then again at half time. The passion is very real and the crowd enthusiastic. In the end it was an enjoyable after noon out, but at fifty pounds or around ninety dollars a ticket. I doubt I'll be back. But my deduction to England's love of football returns in the evening when I'm at home a helicopter owned by the head of list of city football club has crashed after a match in the city. I begin filing from helicopter crashed after a football. And we jump on a train and head to the city in a way, I feel my past and current life. Have for a brief moment collided. I'm reminded immediately of my time living in Thailand, the Thai billionaire bought the list of city club in twenty ten was down and out and hitting the administration. He plowed millions of dollars into the club and the community to bring about a fairytale turnaround. The club won the premiership in twenty sixteen and if. Was in any doubt that the Brits feel deeply about the sports outside the stadium where we stood in the freezing cold. They kept coming through the day and night, we've flowers balloons club t shirts and scarves, the makeshift memorial. Just hit on growing to see everything. You know, what it's because you know, such story pose at the game last night and of which will give a half an hour later on and I've been one of the tod stiles actually come out stadium from. So it's really sad is just as amazing for someone personally know yet the such a connection there. And how is because you part of the communities will do which hospitals around here, which is so sad because of the people involved to just pay respects for visits to the owner and the rest of people on board. Let's impeach Herbie impact on the community must've, well, unless it must have been passed same as when it came to the obviously we will lead. Where he's to the club is to shock to shocking. Who's is so much to the city the Termine and the the whole of firmly and awful. So with the firmly at this time, so that's basically from down two loss to the northern. How community everybody's feeling that so many people don't ever suppose, so many flowers, we've just put some flowers down in the shirt of it will shirt, you know, so basically the communities devastate further, and so I'm not a football lover. But I know is a journalist. It's important for me to understand why British people love football. And why it means so much to them? And I think I have a better understanding of that. This is Samantha holy in London for correspondence for.

Claven Cottage Little Football Football England Samantha Holy London Royal Hunting Lodge Fulham Gaza Thailand Herbie Termine Three Hundred Years Ninety Dollars Fifty Pounds Six Degrees
Hundreds of prisoners escape amid chaos in Libyan capital

Len Berman and Michael Riedel in the Morning

05:08 min | 3 years ago

Hundreds of prisoners escape amid chaos in Libyan capital

"To. Libya now and a country in the throes of terrible conflict there, have, been renewed clashes between rival groups in the capital Tripoli casting serious doubt as to whether the, war-wracked country is ready to hold planned elections later this year there is an official u n backed government known as the g. a. the government of national accord. And a rival government both have militia fighting on their behalf Nubia is of course where many migrants end up hoping to make the journey to Europe and some migrants have been caught up in this fighting and four hundred prisoners many. Who were supporters of Moammar Gadhafi have escaped from a prison I've been speaking to Fawad Gerges from the London School of economics, where he is professor of Middle Eastern politics and international relations not only four hundred prisoners. Have escaped hundreds of illegal immigrants and Tripoli were let go the authorities have made Clear they cannot protect them they cannot feed him there's chaos all of his city is. Not even a single neighborhood of Tripoli that has not really been, hit, by missiles it seems to me it's all out war but the most important point to keep, in mind is that the UN recognized government seems to have lost control of its own forces that is the militias under the control of the UN legitimate government. Basically is waging a war against the government itself and this tells you about the complexity and how dangerous and how grave the security situation is in Tripoli outside Tripoli as well so you'll you'll suggesting that some local militias who've been. Supporting the government of national accord have we've seen a lot of fighting between those militias and the militias of the alternative government, those militias have now turned against the government of national accord yes some of them in. The brigade number seven Which used to. Be the. Spearhead the national accord government now seems to be waging war against some of the forces still under the control. Of the national accord government the only word. Really that basically captures the essence at what's happening in Tripoli sky us no one seems to be in control the militias are changing. Alliances the hour and no longer the so-called Islamist and. Nationalist and neutral labels don't make any sense at all you. Have war in Tripoli you also have major fighting's in Donna you also have major fighting in other parts, of the country might. Fear and I hope I am wrong is that what we are witnessing really is a. Spark that could really plunge Libya into allow because it seems to me fighting spreading to most. Parts of Libya and militias are taking action into their own. Hands, everything that you'll suggesting seems to. Also point Due to the fact that the government of national accord declaring a. State of emergency is is somehow meaningless unless there is a call for active external intervention. Of some sort sadly the ceasefire which. The national government has called for really did not last more than an hour no one is listening to the national government the national. Accord government does not really. Seem to have the authority and the. Forces to basically impose order militias coalescing against each other and against basically imagine and real enemies fighting spread. All over Tripoli prisons refugee centres who is becoming various and yes it seems to me that only the UN and a force organized by the UN could impose order but I doubt it very much whether the. United Nations is basically willing and capable of Intervening in this, chaotic scene significant is, it that the four hundred prisoners who were held at the islands ARA prison who are supporters of the late Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi how significant is it that they are now on the news it's very significant because, this is not just a separate piece of information you're talking about the son of the cycle Islam. Is positioning himself to become the leader leave. Yet he has many allies in Libyan outside Libya in Africa and the Arab world people are saying that he is the only leader who's capable basically a bringing order into Libya but we should not, really make a, big deal out of the escape, of the four hundred political prisoners because hundreds of illegal refugees have also been released by the authorities. Themselves in the meantime it seems to me the danger is for civilians because missiles based Basically being fired all over Tripoli and this is a city that's inhabited by one or two million. People at this, particular moment

Tripoli Libya Jordan UN London School Of Economics Moammar Gadhafi Europe BBC Professor London Newshour Fawad Gerges Official United Nations Dino Donna Twenties Herbie
Madonna Criticized Over MTV VMAs Tribute to Aretha Franklin

The Jim Ross Report

01:28 min | 3 years ago

Madonna Criticized Over MTV VMAs Tribute to Aretha Franklin

"But without a doubt, ladies and gentlemen, these father knocker of the week goes to the Queen of soul, a wrestle mania alumni, Aretha Franklin who passed away just a few days ago, a voice from heaven. Amazing presence. And even though Madonna Konadu donor at the ward show that I didn't watch. I read about saw the exert Madonna was about putting over Madonna. He might have been a great idea and they're quote unquote, riders room, this ridicule. Madonna comes back. She's six years old. She's gonna put over Aretha she did put over Raith more on that. The goofy sexes. But our respect and our condolences to the three ends the fans of the Queen of soul who made more than one Mark in a WW environment. And we were sure and our fans nothing, but the very best she was treasurer to listen to the betting. Let me tell you something Aretha lacked her severe Retha Aretha liked being a diva she played her role. She was that was her character. When should miss Franklin came onto the set artery Hirsch run through sound checker, whatever he knew who the Bosh was, and I, I really admire that. She never lost that desire for perfection.

Aretha Franklin Madonna Konadu Retha Aretha Long Island Eagles Nassau Coliseum Okla Rosemont Twitter Mahoney Bill Watts Wrestling Shannon Baiser Gargano Ciampa Europe Jerry Lawler Herbie California Hirsch
Jets: Teddy Bridgewater trade possible as Sam Darnold impresses

00:45 sec | 3 years ago

Jets: Teddy Bridgewater trade possible as Sam Darnold impresses

"Square Garden I. Believe swift swift is stugatz Harry komo's got some. Some real fans as well The crazy people coma whites. I think they call them these. Our show with his two guys on ESPN radio Can't get to join the show at twelve fifteen talk, about his hair talk about the fact that he doesn't think jet fans will boost, Sam darnold after, four games. If the jets are off to a one and three start and darnold very good Here's what I want the jets do start, teddy Bridgewater stop talking about teddy Bridgewater Ed start teddy Bridgewater. Here's what you do teddy Bridgewater at one time many people

Jets Teddy Bridgewater Sam Darnold Greg Cody JOE Football Taylor Swift Madison Square Garden Harry Komo Raiders Booger Mcfarland Espn Herbie Darnold Broncos Stafford Coughing Brian Greasy Lions Detroit
Hawaii's best fighter: BJ Penn vs. Max Holloway

MMA Junkie Radio

02:13 min | 3 years ago

Hawaii's best fighter: BJ Penn vs. Max Holloway

"If max holloway defeats herbie number made off at uc to twenty three so they both make wait it is for the undisputed title connor get stripped and max wears gold now he has the tool belt the two the two belts simultaneously will he clip speed japan in the title of greatest hawaiian combat sports athlete ever or fighter ever we'll work up the dance that's the one that's going to probably matter the goes it's so tough because when you compare them i look at what's what to be depends signature moment i think and it's defeating matt hughes rides go down as one of the greatest champs of all time and he had his number and then you you kind of do max holloway side of it and taken down josie hall does pretty big too but a lot of people said joe's as kind of not the same since connor hollywood have to belts it's really really tough man i'm going to say no only because all of max hallway successes come in the ufc and bj penn is been able to sprinkle in different organizations different scenarios weight classes but i'm going to say it's right there and maybe even one more title defense would be what puts max over now i got j i will say that he did fight in other way classes a lot of people point to leo's wasn't that a draw was decision loss decision fight close it was a loss sorry i thought it was a draw so he did go up but he lost henze gracie was one where he said he was fighting middleweights but henza was really probably a while to wait you know he was just fighting a highway class and but still take nothing away from the fact that he went up during up said he it'll happen so fast that it almost felt like huge just underestimated him course bj proved that wasn't the case by winning trilogy although mad hughes took it to be j one time pretty hard in anaheim and that third fight was a little bit later in their careers.

Matt Hughes Josie Hall JOE Connor Hollywood Henze Gracie Henza Max Holloway Herbie UFC Bj Penn LEO Anaheim