35 Burst results for "Herald"

Amazon Offers Free Bachelor's Degrees to Entice and Retain U.S. Employees

WSJ Tech News Briefing

00:56 sec | 2 weeks ago

Amazon Offers Free Bachelor's Degrees to Entice and Retain U.S. Employees

"Will be offering free bachelor's degrees to its us employees as it races to entice more hourly workers and reduce turnover. The program is set to launch in january amazon's more than seven hundred fifty thousand. Us hourly employees will be able to enroll after ninety days with the company other big employers like walmart and target herald up similar initiatives wall street journal reporter chip cutter has more amazon hired. Four hundred thousand people in the pandemic but it still needs tens of thousands more and as we reported continuously over the past couple of months. This is a super tight labor market. And it's no longer enough to pay fifteen dollars an hour which is amazon's base wage. Many companies feel that they need to offer even more perks. Even more reasons for people to one apply or wanna stay with the company. And so i think this is really an effort. Meant to not only lur new people to the company but to keep some of those existing employees for a little bit

Target Herald Up Similar Initi Amazon United States Walmart
NY Post Buries Facts About Covid Death of 15-Year-Old Kentucky Boy

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:53 min | 2 weeks ago

NY Post Buries Facts About Covid Death of 15-Year-Old Kentucky Boy

"I saw an article last night. He just broke my heart reading about this fifteen year. Old boy in louisville kentucky and all i saw the new york post new york post the entire article and why post dotcom dad makes emotional plea. After teams son dies recorded fifteen year. Old kentucky boy died of cove it his grieving father is urging others to take the virus seriously the boy just incline loved music whistling his ipad playing drums and swimming. The joy of the article says but the new york post article links to a small town paper the lexington herald leader article. Then you click on that link and you read about this poor kid and the grieving father and buried in that article comes this reveal. Jason had autism and was nonverbal. His father told the herald leader. He had extensive medical issues a weak immune system and had twenty five or more surgeries in his lifetime. Now that poor kid. I'm not trying to minimize or marginalize. A fifteen year old kids death but do you know how many millions of people probably read the article that went viral about the fifteen year old boy that appeared according to the new york. Post to be healthy fifteen year old teenage boy who loved his ipad and love to whistle. And you've got gotta dig you have to get you got to cut through the propaganda crap to realize this. Poor young boy was severely compromised. He was vulnerable. He had tons of medical issues including a weak immune system.

New York Post New York Post The New York Post Kentucky Lexington Herald Louisville The Herald Swimming Autism Jason New York
Dysfunction in the Desert: A Look at the Stumbling Arizona Coyotes

The Lead

02:05 min | 2 weeks ago

Dysfunction in the Desert: A Look at the Stumbling Arizona Coyotes

"Also katie the arizona. Coyotes haven't exactly been the most stable nhl franchise over the years there's been a bit of a revolving door of owners and the nhl even took control of the team for a while back in two thousand nine after a bankruptcy filing so given all of that. What was the feeling when. Alex murillo became the coyotes new owner in two thousand nineteen or so appealing on a number of levels on new era of arizona. Coyotes hockey began today the nhl. I ever hispanic owner was introduced to the valley and it was heralded as sort of Watershed moment i think for the franchise in the sense. That here could finally be that guy with uber. Deep pockets like he was reported to be a billionaire. And someone that had tied to the latino community what started this is alex enrolling arizona's cowpeas which is a market that is about forty forty two percent down and really showed a commitment to wanting to grow that level of connection with fan base. You spittle to this. But it will stand up delekta akin arizona but luckily latina. It asked us. He has a really interesting. I don't wanna say rags-to-riches tail but someone that really supposedly scrapped. His way to where he is now. His parents fled cuba in the sixties. They came to miami in college. He opened a location for a pizzeria that grew to become a chain. I had this knack for picking up. Visit our broken losing money and turning him around and make them successful. I'm very proud to be a part of the fifty five year. Old morello owns a chain of pizza restaurants in l. a. casino on the las vegas strip a construction company as well as tv and radio stations. No doubt his will in history of success. Some major win for the coyotes.

NHL Arizona Coyotes Alex Murillo Katie Hockey Alex Old Morello Cuba Miami Las Vegas
What Can Afghan Women Do To Get out the Country?

Woman's Hour

02:15 min | Last month

What Can Afghan Women Do To Get out the Country?

"You're a young woman in afghanistan who doesn't have joel nationality doesn't have particular money but is desperately concerned. What maybe wants to leave. What can what can you do right now. Well i spoken amin recently. Yesterday i spoken to three of them. One one of them already escaped to iran. And she's supposed to come back to afghanistan and she's absolutely desperate to go somewhere else because iran is refusing to keep her in the country and she has got relatives were in the taliban group and she has already been warned so many times to stop her activities as a women's activist and as a human rights activists at a but she didn't and she's a famous a women's rights activists and and she has been told that if you return you and your eleven year old daughter will be killed how huron she just escaped from the neighboring province herald in the west end western afghanistan and Now that's one example. Another example is another woman that i've interviewed her on numerous occasions and she's very active. She used to be very active in the northern city of mazaar-i-sharif and she told me yesterday and she sent me some voice messages on saying that To taunton have a blacklist. Oath all these People who were active and were Promoting women's rights and lgbt rights or a human rights and and they go door to door knock on the doors and search for these people but the taliban are say no. That's not true. Thus they use propaganda does the wisden propaganda against us. And we are not doing that. But what we to saint from the ground songs ghanistan from these provinces and from the eye witnesses and they are telling us a totally different story. They're saying note they even send us some video clips and images that they take secretly and On the ground the situation is different. is a chaos panic and every woman wants to were active. Wants to leave

Afghanistan Iran Amin Taliban Mazaar Joel Herald Sharif Taunton
5-Star Recruit Emoni Bates Commits to Memphis Tigers

CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

01:59 min | Last month

5-Star Recruit Emoni Bates Commits to Memphis Tigers

"Imani bates consensus top-five prospect. In the class of two thousand twenty one. The most heralded uncommitted prospect in the country is no longer uncommitted. He has announced a commitment to the university of memphis which means penny hardaway is now going to enroll the number one recruiting class in the country for the second time in a three year span in two thousand nine hundred nine. That class was headlined by james wiseman and precious a two of this class headline by ahmadi bates. And jalen darren cow. You had written about the amani situation earlier in the week and predicted like most other debates would woodland at memphis so no surprise but we did take a twisted path to get here for people who might be unfamiliar. It was reported by travis brand at twenty four seven sports yesterday on tuesday. That amount would be announcing a commitment on wednesday then debates father elgin baits. He woke up on wednesday morning and he was big mad at somebody leaked something. He was furious and suggested that the announcement would no longer happened instead. We'd be doing this on friday night. Which is fine with me. I got nothing else to do. So i was planning on friday night then at some point on wednesday afternoon a bates name showed up on the university of memphis white pages directory which suggested he was already enrolled at the university of memphis so we had this weird situation where a prospect who had not yet publicly committed to a school was theoretically already enrolled in a school at that point. I imagine they just decided. Let's go on and do this thing so money. Bates jumped on instagram. A little before six o'clock central and announced he will join his former teammate. Jalen dern at the university of memphis for those wondering. I have pushed the tigers into the top ten of the top twenty five in one. I've got him seven to be specific

Imani Bates University Of Memphis James Wiseman Ahmadi Bates Jalen Darren Penny Hardaway Travis Brand Memphis Bates Jalen Dern Tigers
Afghan Photojournalist Flees to Athens

Monocle 24: The Stack

01:38 min | Last month

Afghan Photojournalist Flees to Athens

"The images and stories. That are coming out of. Afghanistan are not only shocking. There've been taking by local african journalists and photographers. Many of whom are currently risking their lives and have been doing so for the last few months. One of them is the photo journalist. Masoud saini born in afghanistan masud has been chief photographer at the associated. Press and a photojournalist at funds oppress his won the pulitzer prize for his work in the country and a couple of days ago he and his colleague. Lena donna were in afghanistan covering the taliban takeover of the country fearing for their safety they flew out of kabul last sunday just hours before militants entered the african capco. He's safe in the netherlands. Now and he spoke to monaco's emma nelson who spoke to he. Now new show the globalist earlier in the week. Let's welcome to monaco. twenty four. it is good to know that you are alive and well and safe. Just tell us what happened to you. Well unfortunately i am experienced immediate trustful week when i was in kabul awhile before that we were Me and my colleague over covering Herald war and I so i feel that the war was really really a clothing to people. Our life and the government was completely disabled and already was broken and failed from inside. They couldn't fight and resist with taliban and we were witnessing a lot. And a lot of the things.

Masoud Saini Masud Lena Donna Afghanistan Emma Nelson Monaco Kabul Pulitzer Prize Taliban The Netherlands
Fritz Haber: The Best and Worst Chemist in History

Everything Everywhere Daily

01:52 min | Last month

Fritz Haber: The Best and Worst Chemist in History

"The half of all the crops in the world today are fertilized by. Fertilizers created via the fiber process. With over one hundred million tonnes produced via this method every year. It's hard to stress. Just how important. The fiber process is literally. Our modern world couldn't exist and the lives of billions of people depend on it for taba was awarded the nobel prize in chemistry in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine for his work in this area. Despite the incredible benefits to humanity of the harbor process is nobel prize was controversial. That reason had to do with the other side of fritz harbor. If helping to feed the world was his best side than what he did. Next was his worst despite being born jewish. In what is today. Poland harbor very much identified as german. He converted from judaism to lutheranism primarily to help his academic career when world war one broke out. Harbor enthusiastically supported the german. 'cause he was one of ninety three academics who signed a document called the manifesto of the ninety three here are the first sentences of the manifesto quote as representatives of german science and art we hereby protests to the civilized world against the lies and calamities. A which are enemies are endeavouring to stain the honor of germany in her hard struggle for existence in a struggle that has been forced upon her. The iron mouth of events has proved the untruth of the fictitious german defeats consequently misrepresentation and colony are all the more eagerly at work as heralds of truth. We raise their voices against these claims. Unquote hubbard joined the army and was promoted to the rank of captain. He was then assigned to be the head of the chemistry section of the ministry of war. It was fritz. Harbor who almost singlehandedly was responsible for the use of chemical weapons in world war one.

Fritz Harbor Poland Harbor Taba Harbor Unquote Hubbard Germany Army Fritz
The USS Indianapolis: The Deadliest Shark Attack in US History

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:22 min | Last month

The USS Indianapolis: The Deadliest Shark Attack in US History

"At fifteen minutes after. Midnight july thirtieth. The ship was struck by two torpedoes from a japanese submarine. the torpedo. strike was totally unexpected and the indianapolis went down in only twelve minutes. An estimated three hundred souls went down with the ship. This left however almost nine hundred sailors floating in the water. There were few lifeboats and not everyone had a life preserver. They were floating in the middle of the ocean and no one knew where they were. Little do they know that their nightmare was just beginning stranded floating in the open ocean. There were several problems at the survivors. Were facing the first risk was obviously drowning. The longer you're in the water the greater the risk of exhaustion. The greater the risk of your life vests becoming waterlogged and the greater the risk of drowning. The second was dehydration. You can't drink seawater so everyone would. Effectively be slowly dehydrating especially considering that they were out in the open sun. Finally the most terrifying prospect was sharks. The location where the ship sunk was in some of the most shark-infested water in the world and the sharks. That were there. Were some of the world's most aggressive the oceanic white tip shark. The ship sank in pitch darkness while the sailors in the water could hear each other. They could barely see each other. The sharks were attracted by the sounds of the explosion and the movement of the men and of course blood in the water the first night the sharks mostly attacked the dead bodies in the water. When the sun came up most of the men began to join up and link arms with each other by joining a group in improve their buoyancy. They were able to give each other moral support and they could keep the sharks at bay and a group. The men could all clearly see the sharks. They were swimming under and around them survivor. Edgar herald recorded the scene in the open water as quote at any given time. You could look out and see big fin swimming around and around and around all of a sudden. You heard a blood-curdling scream and you look to see. The shark had taken him under and quote. The men in the water waited for relief to arrive but no one showed up. As the hours passed it went. In today's men became delirious from the sun exhaustion and dehydration. Some began swimming to illusionary islands. Off in the distance some would break away from their groups and started thrashing making them easy targets for the sharks. When someone in the group died they would often push the body away trying to placate the sharks for a while by offering up one of the corpses

Sharks Indianapolis Edgar Herald Swimming
Interview With Frank Marshall of 'the Bee Gees: How Can You Mend a Broken Heart'

Awards Chatter

02:11 min | Last month

Interview With Frank Marshall of 'the Bee Gees: How Can You Mend a Broken Heart'

"Thank you so much for doing the pike as great to have you and congrats on the nomination at thank you. My first verse. Wow okay. I can't believe that. Well so i. I as a director. Okay no well that's fantastic and of course Come to plenty of. Bg's related stuff but on this podcast. We go right from the very beginning. So if you wouldn't mind just telling listeners where were you born and raised in. What is your folks do for a living. I was actually born in glendale california I was raised out in the san fernando valley until we moved to newport beach for high school so i went to high school in newport and then i went to ucla. So i've never left the west side. And and i guess you were. Athletics have always been a big part of your life. Yes athletics and music. My dad was was a composer. Arranger played jazz guitars are grew up in a musical family He was under contract to capitol records on and my mom played piano so There was a lot of music in our house as i was growing up. All right so eventually you off to to ucla. And i don't believe it was with a specific focus on thelma. I so what was it. And how did we end up with you in on a phone bath. No i was kind of a normal teenager and had no idea what i wanted to do when i went to to. Ucla i started i. I did like a semester and engineering. And then i went into theater arts for a couple of semesters and then i ended up in pali cy but along the way i took a couple of classes in in theater arts and and one of them was Movies and a wonderful professor whose name a gray herald gray. Yeah forget his name but he had written this book on the history of movies so we had this little paperback book. And so you know. I thought great so i learned by just watching great old movies

Ucla Athletics San Fernando Valley Glendale Newport Beach Newport California Thelma
Haiti Earthquake Causes Several Deaths, ‘Enormous Damage’

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | Last month

Haiti Earthquake Causes Several Deaths, ‘Enormous Damage’

"Prime minister says there are several fatalities there after that powerful 7.2 magnitude earthquake hit sending people fleeing from their homes. Jacquie Charles covers the Caribbean for the Miami Herald. We are hearing reports of people being buried underneath the rubble. Churches have collapse. This is an area that is a rule section of Haiti's southern and western parts of Haiti. This 11 years after a similar quake killed hundreds of thousands and left much The island in ruins. More than 1.5 million Haitians were left homeless and the island is still recovering.

Jacquie Charles Miami Herald Earthquake Haiti Caribbean
The Executive Editor at the Miami Herald Responds Publicly to Racist Email

Morning Edition

02:05 min | 2 months ago

The Executive Editor at the Miami Herald Responds Publicly to Racist Email

"Are no strangers to receiving negative feedback on their stories. Recently, the Miami Herald's executive editor, Monica Richardson, who is the first black journalists to hold that position in the papers, 117 year history. Says she received a racist email. It was really brutal because of the language and the tone and and really the hatred that it portrayed and how this resonates with Different communities at different moments In that email, the sender expressed anger over the Miami Herald's coverage of recent Cuban American demonstrations, which shut down in Miami Highway. It noted that no one had been arrested despite a new anti riot law. In a message permeated with racist commentary, the sender referred to Richardson with a misogynistic slur. And use the phrase your people, Richardson wrote an open letter. In response in it, she writes, Like other moments of coming face to face with racism, it will sit with me for life. Martinez spoke with Richardson about why she felt compelled to respond. Now, these protests are there about something that we all care about their about fairness. And so that was not the question that I was trying to raise. It was really about people how they handle Being under pressure and that tension on issues of race and so this one was particularly as I said, the word I used. I like to think of was brutal. And so I decided to respond. Monica and you know, there's been a discussion last few years about how much of someone's humanity can go into their job when they are journalists. And it sounds like in this case your humanity came out when you read that email. It did. In fact, I wrote two versions of the column in the first version was very polite, and I came back to it and just wrote it strictly from the heart. Overwhelmingly the response that I got the positive response that I got was from the human community. So the it resonated not just with me as an African American woman, but it resonated with the Cuban community as

Miami Herald Monica Richardson Richardson Miami Martinez Monica
Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic Flight Opens Door to Space Tourism

Meet the Press

00:50 sec | 2 months ago

Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic Flight Opens Door to Space Tourism

"Virgin Galactic plans to take paying passengers, including the rich and famous to space starting next year for hundreds of thousands of dollars a ticket after his successful space flight this month. Current space investor and virgins. Former president Will White heart This day really heralds an industrial revolution. Elon Musk's SpaceX and Amazon's Jeff Bezos are also part of this revolution. Some investors have doubts but not virgin CEO Michael Cole glaze here. I think the financial model here is going to be very robust, Beso says, planning his trip further out into space than Branson in the coming days. Blue Origin also says it's windows are bigger. White Hart says space travel is way bigger than just the passenger business and watch for satellite space based data center, space cell phone service and solar energy to all skyrocket. Space has to be industrialized of 11. Billion people are going to survive on this planet in 15 years time.

Virgin Galactic Elon Musk Spacex Jeff Bezos Blue Origin Michael Cole Beso Amazon Virgin Branson White Hart
Old Tweets Expose Anti-American Athlete Gwen Berry as a Racist

Mark Levin

01:57 min | 2 months ago

Old Tweets Expose Anti-American Athlete Gwen Berry as a Racist

"Believe what's her name? Gwen Barry. She won the bronze. And of course, she got all the headlines. Because she hates her country. Because she She was involved in an antique, which she knew would draw the attention. The media and everybody else. Well over at PJ Media. Rick Moran. Writing the other day, he says Olympic athlete who disrespected the flag turns out to be a flaming racist. The real surprise there. Let's see when bury the Olympic hammer thrower who turned her back to the flag during the playing of the national anthem, calling it disrespectful of black Americans. Has a history, making racist tweets and making light of rape. Mr. Producer. I didn't see Jeremy Bar right about this. He's the media guy for the for the Washington compost. Quote this little white boy being bad as he as hell, unquote. I would smack his ass, then stop him. SMH White people's kids. Hello, voyeuristic, respectful, she said in 2011. I can barely understand that. However you translated, Moran points out. It's racist has also threatens violence against white people, which is a hate crime. Quote just saw this girl G U R l wearing heels with White Sox. What the hell? Hashtag. Chinese people always try to start new trends. SMH girl. She said that in 2011 Don't forget the Mexicans. One right called Mexicans just don't care about people, unquote, she said in November, 2012 And she was heralded. Is another growing iconic figure in the

Gwen Barry Pj Media Rick Moran Olympic Hammer Mr. Producer Jeremy Bar Olympic Moran Washington White Sox
Samsung Shows off New Google-Based Watch OS

Android Central Podcast

01:21 min | 3 months ago

Samsung Shows off New Google-Based Watch OS

"I'm gonna put you on the spot nick because you are. Where less expert for this purpose. Run us through. What samsung announced at iso at at Wc which was a thing. This year was actually a physical vamp. Nobody showed up to herald it so it ended up. Being virtual and samsung was one of like three companies that made announcements of that pertains to android stuff. The other was tcl. And i mean there was some lenovo stuff which you might get to and qualcomm but samsung's nwc presentation was was pretty interesting especially around the where west of so give us a rundown of what they announced what we know about the upcoming galaxy. Watch from what they said. All right so I guess one of the things. We don't know whether or not it's called where. Os re point. Oh are not yet but at the very least as you said before it is called one you. I watched by samsung which That's definitely a big departure from previous where versions because now. Oem's can skin us We saw i think on these. Then watch and i'm not sure. How many other watches did this. But they had different like color varieties of wear us in the past. But i think that was the biggest of skinning we've ever seen

Samsung TCL Nick Qualcomm Lenovo
Prosecutors Will Ask Grand Jury to Probe Building Collapse

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 3 months ago

Prosecutors Will Ask Grand Jury to Probe Building Collapse

"Officials say prosecutors in Florida will pursue a grand jury investigation into the deadly collapse of the ocean front condominium building in Surfside Miami Dade County mayor Daniele Levin Kaba says she endorses a grand jury investigation I've been in close touch with our state attorney Katherine Fernandez Rundle and I am very supportive of the grand jury investigation but she has announced I have pledged my full cooperation as she moves forward the state attorney told the Miami Herald that she would bring the matter before the grand jurors soon to take a look at the case criminal charges in such matters are possible the investigation would examine factors in decisions that led to Thursday's building collapse I'm showing a blur

Ocean Front Condominium Buildi Mayor Daniele Levin Kaba Katherine Fernandez Rundle Surfside Dade County Miami Herald Florida Miami
Plane Crash in Eastern DR Congo Kills 3

Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

01:57 min | 3 months ago

Plane Crash in Eastern DR Congo Kills 3

"First item in the news is a crash akin opera l. Four ten at bukavu our book book. Bukavu i think on june sixteenth twenty twenty one loss tight after departure due to a load shift. This is from. Simon rats keys Wonderful of va aviation herald website of web now herald dot com okay Probably easier just to say okay. Yeah can't now now. I think about it Kanowa let l. e. t. l. for ten registration. Nine sierra gulf road. Julia performing flight. From the cavu to sean bunda and the democratic republic of congo with one passenger and two crew and one point six tons of sheet metal crashed about thirty six seconds after take-off from kabul mom. Aerodrome at about you have to say like eleven fifteen Which is nine fifteen. All three occupants perished in the crash. The aircraft has been destroyed. No i was just at the spilling their yeah not not could spilling. But that's okay. We know they may. Yes in the evening Dr congo's ministry of transport released a statement. Reporting airplane departed bukavu with three occupants at one point six tons of cargo about three minutes after takeoff at about eleven fifteen local. The aircraft began deviating from his initial trajectory and impacted the ground an investigation investigations being set up on june. Seventeen twenty twenty one. The airline reported that the airplane was involved in the crash. Nine sierra gulf romeo juliet the aircraft carried fifteen hundred kilograms of iron ruth roof sheeting preliminary information suggests a load shift caused the aircraft of pitch up less than thirty seconds after takeoff and to enter a full aerodynamic stall

Bukavu Sean Bunda Dr Congo's Ministry Of Transpo Democratic Republic Of Congo Simon Julia Kabul Nine Sierra Gulf
Stephon Gilmore absent from Patriots' mandatory minicamp

Schopp and Bulldog

00:14 sec | 3 months ago

Stephon Gilmore absent from Patriots' mandatory minicamp

"To be good indicator. He is in Buffalo for camp. Around the NFL in New England cornerbacks to fine Gilmore will not participate in the team's mandatory minicamp this week. Boston Herald's Andrew Callahan reports. Gilmore wants a new contract The

Gilmore Buffalo New England NFL Andrew Callahan Boston Herald
Frontier Airlines Plane Overshoots Runway at Reagan National

Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

00:55 sec | 3 months ago

Frontier Airlines Plane Overshoots Runway at Reagan National

"Frontier a three twenty at washington. Dc a washington national on the fourth of june twenty twenty one runway excursion on landing. This is from the aviation herald Let's say they were. It's a three twenty dash two hundred registration november. Two one three foxtrot romeo performing flight five thirty eight from denver to washington national with one hundred fifty one passengers and six crew was on a visual final. Approach to run a ronald reagan. Airport's runway zero one with the instruction to maintain one hundred and seventy knots or greater until five demi which is a pretty common thing actually touchdown at about twenty two fifteen local time kind of late But went right off the runway coming to a stop to the right of the runway with all gear on soft ground and the nose gear. Just beam the end of the runway.

Washington DC Denver Ronald Reagan Demi
"herald" Discussed on Herald

Herald

11:29 min | 3 years ago

"herald" Discussed on Herald

"The heralded news news learn is now. Empowering the community. So the news, your news now with falls, Oregon. Podcast, empowering the community and serving mclamb basin. This is the URL the news facing these top. Readings in welcome to base and views a herald news podcast featuring interviews with local experts discussing issues important to the climate basin. I'm Cridland key with the herald news this week. We are joined by Linda tapper business manager for the crater lake claim at the regional airport here to discuss a wide range of issues related to aviation and the climate basin. Linda, thank you for taking time out of your day. Does to join us in glad to be here. We will get into all kinds of aviation related topics, but I, I have to ask about the airport name itself because how often each day do you have to correct people? Because I people just called the claim with airport, right? But it's the crater lake regional airport. It is. And when I first started with the airport, it was the Klamath falls international airport. So then we dropped in became the Klamath falls airport just for concise purposes. And then a number of years ago, we actually went to the crater lake Klamath regional airports which is quite the mouthful, but it was done too tight of tie in with a major attraction. We have. Hearing Klamath county, which is the crater lake national park and to gain some additional tie ins and traffic. Hopefully, as people looked at planning to come visit that park, how they would get here and be able to use the airport to do so. Well, before we delve into issues related to the airport ongoing right now, I always like to get a little bit of background on our guests. So could you tell us a little bit more about who Linda Tupper is? Sure. So I grew up for the most part in Oregon. Moved here when I was not yet to. So I'm almost an native Oregonian. I grew up in the Willamette Valley went to Oregon state university and then on to Portland state university where I got my MBA degree and then moved down to Klamath falls in ninety five. Oddly enough. My background is in animal science as an undergraduate degree. And then I have the my business administration degree from Portland state. So I was looking for a job in agriculture and unfortunately, I didn't find one, but the airport department had a department. Pretorial position coming open and my background. My father was a commercial airlines pilot for United Airlines for thirty five plus years. So aviation is kind of second nature to our family. So seemed to good fit and I applied for it and received the position. And I've been there ever since enjoying it immensely. It's very exciting field always something new going on, and I enjoy interacting with the public in all aspects of aviation that we encounter at our airport from generally VA, Asian to usually commercial aviation and military as well. We'll some of that roundabout stuff. I, my major in college was earn article science and so I- studied aviation now, Emma journalist, you started animal science and now you're in aviation, so however it works out, right. So how did you go from animal science into being involved with the Asian industry? So like as when I moved down here to Klamath falls, the airport department position came open. And it was seemed a good fit for me with the background. My family has an aviation and I recognize that probably for myself, it's a certain skill set that I enjoy using. So it didn't matter the industry, whether it's agricultural animal science or aviation or even medical. It was a certain skill set that I enjoyed using, which is organizational. Business skills, communication, writing, and things like that. So I sort of happily took to the aviation field, and as I got more involved in it really expanded that different types of duties that I was doing at the airport in became the business manager at that time. So what does your role as a business manager entail for a public airport for our airports since way are as small department. There is a staff of six. There's the airport director, the operations manager myself, the business manager, and then we have three operations maintenance positions that oversee the airfield upkeep. So for myself, I tell people that I pretty much manage all the paper that comes through the office. So everything from answering the phones to doing accounts payable, counts receivable to managing grants to public relations marketing. Those are all items that I take on on a daily basis. I'm also. Charge of some of the regulatory items that we are in sponsor for doing at the airport when it comes to the FAA for annual reports to meet our regulatory or grant assurances that we have through the FAA's. So a lot of paperwork sounds

Portland FAA Cossiga Klamath falls traffic manager Oregon Doug Cunningham Konami US FedEx Clemson l. a. n. c. business manager Bob Ness Penn crater lake Klamath Phil Batt
"herald" Discussed on Herald

Herald

04:36 min | 3 years ago

"herald" Discussed on Herald

"I remember one year we didn't have the nutcracker. That was very disappointing. It's a staple. Everybody wants to go. We're having it twice in one day this year we'll have a matinee and then we'll have an evening performance. And typically we sell out so that I remember as a child going to see the nutcracker, I think it's kind of one of those cultural by Connick events that everybody let's experience around the holidays. Red Tyron is are quintessential event every year. It's we have theme tables based on different musicals, so it's really fun for everybody to go and do. That it's a great fundraising event for us, but it's also a fun event for our participants, all kinds of games and prizes to be won. We haven't live auction. We have a silent auction and all of the pro season funds go to our children's programs that we run in throughout the year here in the Klamath basin with the schools after school programs in camps. There's also the classical music series. There's always musicians of excellence clam with symphony, and some classical artists come in perform. Can you tell me about some of the classical music that we're going to have this year at the Ross Ragland ensemble of four point one, they are the world's only guess win tat so they're all win instruments with when pianist they're coming over from Europe actually. So they are going to be really great. They're also going to do a residency in the schools with the children. So we're excited about that. We have Mark Valenti. A pianist. He has performed throughout the world basically and actually even performed for former first lady Barbara Bush. We have the young musicians of excellence that showcases highschool musicians and all their talent. The best are chosen by professional judges from competitions and last, but certainly not least we have our Klamath corral again, showcasing some of the basins best eighty. Multi talented individuals getting together under the direction of Robin Schwartz, and they have an incredible draw. We've filled the auditorium when they play. One thing that is always on the schedule each year as well are what are called tribute acts. I remember this past season, we had a performers that did the music of heart. I think there was a Beatles and a beach boys one. If I wrote remember correctly this year, you've got several tribute accident that are coming in. These are really great for people who love those conic songs, but you can't necessarily get the original artists here. So the next best thing is the people who oftentimes actually do the song better than the original artists. Sometimes it to be a tribute act. You really have to know the artist inside and out. And sometimes I've seen tribute acts are actually better than the original artist when I've seen them. So we've got three really great ones coming this year, right? Yes, we do. We have Texas tribute midst does z. z. top. We have jukebox heroes, which is a foreigner tribute fan, and we have grand illusion coming, which is a regional band and extremely popular. They played at hair fest actually recently up over a new team. Fantastic. So again, that's something that we're not certainly on the I five corridor. We can't. Always bring in the originals, but you can still enjoy the songs that you grew up on and led by bringing in these tribute acts, which is always fantastic now, and the other aspect is legacy artists. I remember this past season. We had John Ford Coley this year, bringing in another name that people will definitely remember and recall songs from from yesteryear. Richard Marx is coming to Ross Ragland, yes, along with Josh Turner, Richard Marx's. Another one were extremely cited to have. People have been asking, when is he going to be here? We're still working on determining that, but he has an incredible following and people are surprised at the amount of hits that he had going back to the eighties and he's going to be an extremely popular one when I had a chance to talk to Mark mccreery before he left. He couldn't tell me the entire schedule. We waited until end of July for the big unveiling, but there was one act that he couldn't stop. Stop talking about, and this is one that I hadn't heard of, but I'm looking forward to it just based on the enthusiasm that he brought across..

Richard Marx Klamath Ross Ragland Josh Turner Mark mccreery Beatles Mark Valenti John Ford Coley Connick Red Tyron Europe Robin Schwartz Barbara Bush Texas one year one day
"herald" Discussed on Herald

Herald

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"herald" Discussed on Herald

"So we talked a little bit about this whole digital experience thing, and I want to delve back into that just a little bit of the next upcoming event is going to be a Beatles event deconstructing the Beatles, a sergeant, Pepper's of tell me about what that is. Exactly. Well, it's a closer look into it down a bit into the Beatles lives, but it takes a look at all the ingenuity and creativity that went into producing the sergeant Pepper's hearts. Club band and that album that they did. It's really an interesting I I've been able to watch some of it is really interesting film and very entertaining you get to see, you know the different aspects of the Beatles and how they pulled it all together. And I think the producer of the film did a wonderful job of creating all the vignettes that go into it. So that will be one of the newest RDX digital experience, film presentations. There's some other may coming up and I know that's also going to be utilized for things like the Klamath independent film festival and bit September. Some of the others that I saw on the schedule that you announced in late late July, an American in Paris castle in the sky l. Inca for all to tell me about some of those presentations through the RDX experience that are going to be happening. Well, the American in Paris is going to be the musical. It's about a World War Two veteran that moves to Paris and meets young Parisian shop girl who has a somewhat of a secret, and he is so in love with her. But he soon realizes that maybe he's not the only one that's. Engaged with her so to speak. Now there's an aspect of the Ross Ragland that has been expanded in recent years, and that is the second stage. In addition to the main theater, you now have a second performance area that holds events that may not be big enough for the main stage, but still has a core audience. And I know there's things that have become traditional there the the annual rat pack. Christmas event always sells out way in advance. I know that you've got some dinner theater experiences, karaoke piano bar. How is that second stage developed during the time that you've been with the board and now as as the executive director and told me about some of the events that are happening? Well, it it went from maybe one or two events year..

Beatles sergeant Pepper Paris Paris castle Ross Ragland Klamath executive director producer
"herald" Discussed on Herald

Herald

04:27 min | 3 years ago

"herald" Discussed on Herald

"I'm kirtland q at the herald news this week. We are joined by Teresa silver, interim executive director of the Ross Ragland theater and climate falls hear, discuss what's happening at the Ragland from the wizard of Oz, to falls recently announced event calendar, Theresa. Thank you for taking time out of your schedule to join us. You're welcome, Kurt. Before we get into what's happening at the raglan hours, like to start these things off, getting to know our guests a little bit more. Could you tell us more about yourself? I've been living in Klamath falls since two thousand eleven moved here because my husband's job brought us here worked at jadwin for quite a while, became involved in the theater at the request of somebody who I knew from the base who knew I was interested in arts and like theater. And so she asked me to be on the board which I agreed to do, and I was on the board for four years the last year of which I was the chair of the board. So be on the board for several years. You had the opportunity to step in when the previous executive director Mark mccarey chose to take a job in Salem. I know that he had actually wanted to leave earlier and there was a search for two five replacement and couldn't find one. So you've now stepped into that role. So how did that come about of you being picked to be the interim executive director? That's a good question. And I had a couple of board members come to me and say, would you consider doing this while we do our search? I think the nature of wanting to get somebody in the in there as quickly as possible since he was going to be leaving to be able to just guide things until we were able to get an executive director. They knew my love for the theater. Ter- they knew my last experience on the board and I guess they figured I would be a good pick at the time or the Roz Rog with is a great historic theater carries on the tradition of clam with falls great past where this was a place before the I five corridor was created that a lot of the big name artists came through and there was a whole line in main street of grand movie theaters and perform performance halls. I love the fact that we have a arts epicenter like the Ross Ragland in a community like Klamath falls that provides such a wide variety of experiences. What do you like about the Ross? Ragland theater. Oh my gosh, it's it really is incredible. When I moved here, one of the things that really struck me was that we had this availability of cultural events. I was very excited about it. I had a friend invite me to come to when the community productions the summer that we got here and I saw it and I was so impressed. And I was so excited to know that we had this gem here in little old climate falls, you would not expect it, and I think it's something that helps with you know, we have people coming to visit other people coming to stay moving here, say because of the base, you know, we have people moving here from the the hospital from IT. I think that makes it more attractive for them to be here. I love the Roz Ragland because of the variety of events that come in. I've thoroughly enjoyed the acrobats last year and yet magician. And musical acts and community theater. It's great. The variety of content that comes in and I, I know that's a conscious effort that Mark mccreery had and that now falls on you for the time being. So what does the job entail in overseeing management of the Ross raglan while trying at the same time to plan for this great variety to appeal to as wide an audience as possible? Well, it takes a lot of research. We also get a lot of producers and distributors coming to us and showing us what performers they have. So I actually have a little file on my desktop that I sit there and put everything in their possibilities for the twenty nine thousand nine twenty twenty season, and we just get an incredible variety. And so then you sit and pick, what do you think would appeal here and like you say, the circus is a great win. The magician is another one feedback. It's been like we'd like to have some comedy..

Ross Ragland theater executive director Ross Ragland Ragland theater Mark mccarey Roz Ragland Ross Klamath falls Kurt herald news Klamath Roz Rog Teresa silver Theresa Ter Mark mccreery Salem four years
"herald" Discussed on Herald

Herald

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"herald" Discussed on Herald

"I think it's important that we all stand together. We all believe in where we're trying to take Klamath falls. We're all. On the same page when it comes to reducing victimization. Klamath falls. But you know, you've heard the analogy. It takes a village to raise a family, right? That's kind of how I look at policing. We. We're all in this together and we've got to work together to make sure that we've got an amazing place to live so be the best witness. You can be let us take care of the enforcement piece, but help us do that. Well, and near three years with the climate falls police department. You mentioned earlier some of the changes that you've implemented. Is there anything new coming up that we can expect with the climate falls police department, any new patrols or new officers or what? What's going on with climate falls? PD right now, we're in the midst of a hiring process right now. We've just made an official job offer to a young man who started with us this week his his name is also Robinson. So you'll see some more about him. He's we're gonna swear him in on Wednesday. And when we do put some stuff out on social media and introduce him to the community, I'm really excited about this young man. He is incredible. He's going to bring something or agency. That's just awesome. He's just a great great guy. We talked about bringing a good person to the table and train them to be a good cop. I'm not just saying this because he'll probably hear it some day and I'm as chief, but he's he's a great man. That brings a just an incredible foundation for us to build upon some excited about that. I've made a tentative job offer to another female. I can't release her name yet. We're still in the process there, but all is going well through the process and she's doing really well. So I anticipate welcoming her to the community here shortly. And then we're going to hire a third. We have third job opening, and we've got a another gentleman that we're looking at right now, and he's going through that process and we'll see how that turns out. I have. Not even made a tentative job offer yet. They're still some things that we need to do there, but so that will get us to one hundred percent where we're looking at the possibility of some retirements in the future. So we are holding a perpetual opening. We don't close our police officer recruitment at this point. We're just leaving it open and taking a look at people as they as they apply. So if you're interested in law enforcement, now's a great time to get involved because our agency is there's going to be significant changes in our agency over the course of the next three to six years as far as personnel with retirements and whatnot. So now's a great time. If you're interested to take a look at Clem fall speedy, David Hensley is the chief of police for the climate falls police department. Thank you so much for tickets at time out to speak with us about a a wealth of issues involving police. I feel more educated in terms of if I ever screw up what to do and what not to do. So I appreciate the time. Thank you. I appreciate you letting coming..

Robinson Klamath falls Klamath Clem official David Hensley officer one hundred percent three years six years
"herald" Discussed on Herald

Herald

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"herald" Discussed on Herald

"There's different ways that people can get a taste board if they're feeling that. Maybe the sign that they might wanna. Do you have the explorer program for teens to be able to ticket involved in it? There's ride alongs for those who are thinking about, hey, maybe I want to be a police officer. How do they get involved in? What do they have to do to pursue that as a career? You know, it's really quite easy to get involved. Number one, we have the citizens academy that we do annually. We get a lot of people that sign up for our citizens academy and it's a ten week program, or we give you an end an in depth, look at what we do and why we do it and how will enforce it works and Klamath falls. So a lot of people really love that we talked about, we have an explorer post for kids that are under twenty one who are interested in law enforcement. We have a reserve program, so people that are over twenty one that necessarily don't want to be a cop, but they would like to somehow be involved in law enforcement, but keep their day job if you will. They can sign up to be a reserve and go through that process. People can come in and do ride alongs, and that's open to the public. So people can fill out a form to do a ride along with the police officer to see if they like, if. They like that or just maybe they don't wanna be a cop. They wanna get to know the officers in their town or they wanna see why we do what we do. Those are all great things as well. So there's lots of ways to be involved. We have citizens just stop by say, hi, you know, they wanna see what we're up to or get a tour. We have groups come through and do tours all the time, and we're always open to that are building is your building so many people stop buying. They wanna see it. We try to brag about who you are and what we do and why we do it and give people taste. What are things that the average citizen can do to help police and what shouldn't they do? The best thing you do is be a great witness, know where you are, what's going on, get a good look at the suspect. If there's a suspect involve or the vehicle get a license plate. All of those we talked briefly about my Facebook post the other day. We're looking for this truck and somebody from climate falls called in and helped us out. We solve that case because of a community member..

officer Klamath falls Facebook ten week
"herald" Discussed on Herald

Herald

03:12 min | 3 years ago

"herald" Discussed on Herald

"There's a lot of new technology out there. We've talked about a little bit. One thing that is has ever changing rules and it seems to be growing. Popularity is drones and drone us. Now I make. She license drawn out on one of the few in the community of climate falls, who has a commercial drone license, and I'm also a private pilot as well. There's a lot of people that are now buying drones that are in toy store aisles, and thinking they can fly him over the military base or anywhere they want anytime day or night. It's been a little frustrating from a pilot perspective seen people just flaunt the rules and or simply not take the time to understand what the rules are. But in talking to some officers, they didn't really understand what the rules were either. So this is a growing trend and it's becoming a growing problem. In the last thing anyone wants to see is someone fly a drone into an f. fifteen and caused a big crash. That would be a bad day. So from an officer's perspective, how is the department dealing with a legal drone use and what do you need in order to to be better at it? So education is going to be key, the officers and and I, I'll be honest with you as well. I don't know everything there is to know about drone use and what is and what is not legal. I know some of the basics you and I were talking earlier about the five mile rule around an airport, and it's illegal to fly drones within five miles. I mean, I know that that's kind of a big thing, but as far as heights and in where's that geographical boundary, those issues, I don't know as well, so it starts with education. We need to make sure that we educate our officers well enough to to know what those laws are. But the bigger issue that we're going to have is it's it's a federal regulation. That we don't enforce. So we're going to hand it off to the FAA or we're going to hand it off to a federal agency to look at those violations. But we were not gonna have the ability to address them. So it's going to we're going to find ourselves in a position one day where somebody's going to call nine one one and report illegal drone, use the officers. Gonna go out and and not even have the ability to enforce it. So even though the officer may know, hey, you can't fly here. All we're going to be able to do is say, you can't fly here. Let the FAA take care of it on the back end. That's when you put on the mean face. Just about everyone at some point or another has been pulled over by an officer. Obviously it's not fun thing. No one likes getting tickets, whether it's speeding or if you're going to signal or or something worse than that. But in my interactions with officers, I've heard from many of them that their scariest part on the job and their most stressful part on the job is when they've pulled someone over and they're approaching vehicle because it's the matter of the unknown. They don't know what to expect. So not asking, how'd you get out of a ticket, but if you ever do get pulled over, is there a certain protocol that people should know? Is there a process that people should go through to help ease the process weather. They're getting a warning or a ticket or arrested, just make it so that it, it doesn't get escalated because going back to a few of those incidents that we've seen nationally, there's been things that started off as someone just getting pulled over for speeding thing and it's turned into a shooting. You know, that's a great question. And I've addresses question several times and actually. I like this question. It's a good educational piece for our community. I was trained a long time ago..

officer FAA one day
"herald" Discussed on Herald

Herald

04:12 min | 3 years ago

"herald" Discussed on Herald

"There's been incidences in this country where officers have been seen on camera, doing what many would people what many people would consider to be excessive. There's been incidences where unfortunately, someone in custody has died as a result of injuries or has been suffocated. And that can create sometimes a perception of a systemic inherent problem with police as a whole rather than perhaps just a few bad apples or or something got out of hand, how do you deal with that in terms of monitoring officers reminding them don't be that guy that kind of makes the entire department look bad. So we get complaints every now and then regarding officer conduct. And I think it's important. The first thing that I do is take a breath and I recognize there's two sides to the story, and I want to base any decisions that we make me personally or the agency on fact, purely fact in fact alone, and it reminds me of a time I saw video. It's been a long time ago. I was probably a new administrator as maybe a new Lieutenant at the time, the spent a long time ago, but I watched a video of a police officer shooting in another city. It wasn't anywhere I worked and I can't even tell you what city it was, but it was a dash Cam footage of an officer involved shooting in a guy is walking away from an officer and the officer shoots him in the. Back and he dies, and I watched his video and thought, how awful is that? That was terrible, that officers wrong, that officers should be indicted. That's murder. That is terrible. And then I watched a second dash camera footage of the exact same incident from vehicle parked in a different location. And in that video, you see, you see the suspect turn and fire a handgun at the police officer, and then quickly turn around for the police officer fires back. And I thought, wow, two sides to every story. I came to judgement wrongly, and I should have known the whole story. So I always try to approach it like that. Look at the facts, determine if officer did something wrong. And if the officer did do something wrong, fix it, just fix it and tell the story. It's okay for a law enforcement agent in agency to say, we made a mistake where human we made a mistake, and I think sometimes agencies try to protect themselves too much. And if they do make mistakes. Don't. They just should say, I made a mistake. It's okay people that make mistakes are often forgiven. If you move on, if you make an ethical mistake, you know you did it with the right intentions, but it was still wrong, admit it move on. So I think it's important. Number one know all the facts number two, if you didn't do it fine. Great, you know, move on life, but if you did own up to it and and and be accountable, I think that's important. There's been an ongoing trend for feels like maybe the past decade or so of a militarization of police departments across the country. There's been a couple of high profile incidences where officers were outgunned in a very dangerous situation and it seems like more weapons manufacturers are now trying to cater towards police departments, not just military's in terms of distribution of equipment and arms. How much of that is just pure fluff in cool toys to have and how how much of that is is important for the job? You know, it really depends on the situation an incident you and I spoke with. Before we hit the recorder was the shooting in LA the Bank robbery and l. a. where the Bank robbers just flat out gunned law enforcement law enforcement didn't have the resources to deal with that. They didn't have assault weapons. They didn't have rifles they, they didn't have the firepower to deal with that situation. And that was really kind of a a very pivotal point and law enforcement, we're agency started looking at the realistic fact that we were outgunned and if we are called upon by our community to solve a problem like that, you expect us to solve that and you expect us to solve it quickly without people getting killed. And if we can't do that, we have a problem. I think today, what if those guys had that Bank? Robbery. What if we were to back up to that day, those guys went into a school? What would that look like? This was a Bank robbery, but what if there was actual children in significant casualties and we couldn't stop it, that's a horrific place for a law enforcement agency to find themselves..

officer robbery administrator murder assault LA the
"herald" Discussed on Herald

Herald

02:45 min | 3 years ago

"herald" Discussed on Herald

"Well, you're sure right about that. This is a very complex project with a lot of moving parts. It's amazing at any given time how many things we're working on. But you know, at the end of the day, we really have to focus on controlling the things that we can control. Certainly, there could be legislative action or litigation or other kinds of things that might come up a, we can't control those things. Again, as I mentioned earlier, we really are responsible for implementing the decision that has been made to take these dams down, and so we're going to be focusing on the things that we can control. But yes, at the end of the day, there are a potential for a lawsuit. We will end -ticipant that and be prepared to to to do what we can to address that you. Typically mentioned water rights, and I just want to be very clear on that that nothing that this project is doing. We'll have any effect on anyone's water right whatsoever. Again, the operation of the river will continue to be controlled at link river dam by the bureau of reclamation and others, and nothing has anything to do with dam removal is going to affect anybody's water, right? So that really is a non issue. Water isn't just used around here for environmental and irrigation. It's also a matter of recreation. A lot of people enjoy boating, canoeing, kayaking fishing is obviously big out here. How might this change recreation and the climate base and as a result of changing water levels and some reservoirs tornado into rivers. Yeah. Well, we're certainly going to have a big impact on the reservoir based recreation that people enjoy today, and we're certainly cognizant of that and we're working diligently toward replacing that lake based reservoir base recreation with river based recreation. We've. Undertaken a significant outreach effort to engage members of the public, the rafting community, the fishers, the RV ears and others to help us develop a plan for recreation facility a replacement. So through that process, we've begun to get really good input from folks on what sorts of facilities they liked to see where they would like to see those facilities constructed. So we very much will be focused on the the replacement of those recreation facilities at the end of the day. Again, we think that this project will have positive impacts on the fishery and create significant new opportunities for people who enjoy river fishing and river recreation to have abundant opportunity to do. So when you're changing things this much, there's always a cause and effect or a domino effect that can occur with things downstream, our communities going to have to modify things in terms of water access or waterlines or pie..

link river dam lake based reservoir
"herald" Discussed on Herald

Herald

04:12 min | 3 years ago

"herald" Discussed on Herald

"Got disease in the river that affects out migrating salmon and so by removing the dams and creating a more natural hydrologic condition, we have the ability to hopefully reduce that disease condition in the river and and improve conditions for fish and other other aquatic resources that are important to the to the river and to the communities that rely on it. No, it's it's an important first step in addressing the larger resource management issues in the basin. And I think that folks acknowledged that this project needs to move forward to allow a other discussions to be fruitful as we work toward providing more certainty for irrigators on water supply and more certainty for downstream interests that there will be ample flows in the river to support fish and other important resources. So I think those are really the main reasons why this is the right time for the project to proceed. What are some of the arguments against the project that you've had thrown your way? Well, we certainly get the argument often as you know, on the basis of a lot of misperceptions about the benefits of the dams. And I've mentioned a few of those of there is perception that the dams provide flood control benefits or that there is your Gatien or other diversions for water users. And that's just simply not the case. Again, these dams exist for the purpose of producing hydroelectric power. And so some of the opposition to the project really involves that. I think there is no opposition that we've got workable dams and they produce clean hydro electric power. And why would we remove an existing facility? The fact of the matter is that these dams are approaching their lifespan. They were installed between the early nineteen hundreds in the mid nineteen hundred. So like. Any infrastructure. They've got a fixed life cycle and we're coming up on the end of that life cycle for these facilities. And so they're going to need significant work from a regulatory perspective, the Pacific Corp, the current owner of the dams was looking at the alternative of relicensing those, but in the interest of providing cost certainty and protections for their customers, they didn't evaluation and the public utility commissions agree that this approach is in the best interest of the of the customers. And so for a variety of reasons, the decision has been made that we're going to go down this pathway of removing the dams. I just wanna be clear that the k r c does not influence the decision, whether the damn should be removed or not. We simply implement that decision and we're going to do that to the best of our abilities, but we really can't change this outcome. Recently, you submitted a monster homework project last month. I've written some long term papers before in college, but a twenty. Three hundred page decommissioned plan was submitted. We don't need to go over all twenty three hundred pages, but can you at least give us the cliff notes of what that plan encompassed? Yeah, we sure did. They pulled a lot of all nighters to get to this twenty three hundred page definite plan for the lower Klamath project. This really is our proposal to the Federal Energy Regulatory commission to detail out every aspect of how we would go about decommissioning the dams. So we've taken a very close look at all of the technical elements of drawing the reservoirs down, removing the dams, restoring the environment around the dams, and we've made our proposal to Firkh on how we would go about doing those things. In addition to that, the definite plan looks at a number of other issues of importance, including how we will address risk and liabilities associated with the project and also takes a close look at the the cost estimates for the work so that we have shirts. That we have sufficient funding to do the project. We very much look forward to putting this definite plan in front of the independent board of consultants that we are convening at the direction of for this is a group of subject matter experts in dams and dam removal and environmental restoration and insurance and risk management who.

Federal Energy Regulatory comm Firkh Pacific Corp Klamath
"herald" Discussed on Herald

Herald

03:54 min | 3 years ago

"herald" Discussed on Herald

"So I would get like you I get called, I would get calls all the time of your too liberal or too conservative. And at the end of a week, if I had roughly fifty fifty than I was probably in good shape. But you know, if you think about just reporting and it seems to have increased in tone and tenor in the last year and a half really people would say, you're, you're reporting bad things about the presidential administration, you, it's all the bad news and all the bad news. The reality is there hasn't been a whole lot of good news and so when you're reporting facts, you can't just kind of you can't just ginned up good things to make it look like things are. Okay. I mean, you have to report the the real truth. And under the previous administrations, we would get a lot of complaints about reporting, the Bush administration, the Obama administration. You know, you're putting too many good things about the you're right reporting about the Affordable Care Act. You're too liberal. You supportable. No, it's it's a story about the Affordable Care Act and how people use it. It's not. Supporting one way or another. But you know, I think where where it's kinda fallen down as people being willing to accept the opinions of others and say, respectfully, disagree, and then move on it is it's, it seems to be if if you don't agree with my opinions than I am, you are my opponent. And I think that's unfortunate because what we really strive to do as a as an industry newspapers in particular is educate and inform and help provide people with information that will help them lead their lives better. And you know, that's it's a lofty goal, but I think you know our, our staff, our reporters here, our reporters and all of our markets do that every single day and, and in all candor, and in all honesty, none of our reporters deserve that kind of abuse. I mean, these are folks who are working long hours reporters in general. They are not paid very much and they don't need. I mean, they don't need that kind of abuse on top of, you know, all those other factors going into it. So overseeing our western division now of atoms, which covers news. Papers from Utah, the way up into Washington, Idaho, Montana, as part of this greater veil of this national conglomerate of atoms publishing. What are you working on these days? Well, for me, that's a, that's a good question. So we're always trying to find ways that we can be. Well, we can do a couple of things one that we can financially performed to the degree that allows us to continue to support our newsrooms continued to support our community efforts. And a lot of that is through developing new sales programs, finding ways to become more operationally efficient, you know, saving money where we can. We've done a lot of that through our region. We've centralized a lot of different functions of our operations and and it's proven out to be very effective. You know, having been a journalist, I'm very sensitive to our resources in our newsrooms. And I mean, I wish I could hire, you know, dozens more reporters, but until we can kind of build a stable foothold with, you know, revenue sources and kind of stopped some of the challenging economic conditions that's gonna be hard to do. But that's what our goal is. I'm at the end of every day the beginning of every day in the end of every day, my goal really is, how can I work to better support the efforts going on in Klamath falls in bozeman in Nampa and and I think. Those are again, it's it's a day to day thing, but I think that we are making strides more and more newspapers. The herald news included are putting more emphasis on multimedia content as people are turning more towards digital. A lot of people are cutting even cable for TV, and going to things like sling, fewer people are picking up physical print and they're more reading things on their phones or tablets or computers. What is Multimedia's importance associated with print journalism engagement, and what are some of the kind of innovative things that are coming down the line to connect with those audiences that are looking for digital versus print? Sure. A great question. We kind of have this rare situation where we're trying to serve two masters..

Obama administration Klamath falls Idaho bozeman Utah Nampa Washington The herald Montana
"herald" Discussed on Herald

Herald

03:31 min | 3 years ago

"herald" Discussed on Herald

"This self shaming spiral what's really troubling even more so than the than the verbal attacks are. What happened in, you know, in the capital capital gazette capital gazette just ten days ago where someone who actively, you know, violently attacked reporters for reporting that was completely factual years in the past, but who held clearly grudge. And you know, as a journalist yourself, and I have, you know, certainly kind of casually brushed off threats from subjects of stories. You know, I would take photos of people who are arrested in prostitution stings, or, you know, who are arrested for DUI, who would call the newsroom and threatened to beat me up or, you know, I've had guns pulled on me and things like that. And I kind of casually brushed him aside is they're really not serious, but we can't. We can't take that casualty anymore. I think as journalists in America, we've been blessed with a society in a civility. The respect what we do. If you look at countries like Russia or. Mexico, South American countries. There are a lot of journalists who are targeted and killed their SAS innate because they're reporting against the government and the or whomever. And these people feel that they can eliminate the problem by eliminating the source of the information. It's it's scary to think that especially in a culture that is so polarized and it, you know, it's, it's, you have to be careful talking about many topics with people anymore just because everybody seems to have an opinion and it goes from zero to one hundred zero quickly. You know, working for a newspaper of always been very aware of. Being as moderate and middle of the road as I possibly could. Because you know, they saw me as a newspaper Representative you, you know, you're not supposed to have one side or the other lessons on the to'real page. And even then it's the institution, not the person, but for people to take out personal vendettas against reporters is it's terrifying. And I think you know, our society should be should be outraged by those kinds of attacks. The sad reality is, I personally haven't met a single reporter at this point that hasn't received at least one veiled threat at some point or another before it was something. Yeah, we laugh about staff meetings, but it's not something to laugh about it anymore. The other thing that we hear quite often, which is frustrating from a reporting perspective because our job is to report on what's happening not to interject ourselves into the matter. But just within the last couple of weeks, I received a phone call of someone saying that they wanted to cancel their subscription because they couldn't stand how liberally slanted. The herald news was and the next day I got a phone call from someone saying, I can't stand. -servative your paper is when we're trying to tread the middle path. So. There is a matter of knowing your audience, but within that. How do you go take the approach of being neutral while still not knowing the audience when people are coming into it with such bias per perceptions? Well, it's more pronounced now than it ever has been where where, again, this is this perception of, well, I guess we could say that as a society, we've lost our objectivity and we've lost our ability to rationally comprehend opposing information. So if you have a particular belief or feeling, you tend to gravitate towards those media sources that will confirm your beliefs and so-. TV does this a lot hate radio. They've got a lot of talk radio and internet websites and things like that. Newspapers are still in this world of we need to be objective sources of information..

prostitution America Russia Mexico Representative reporter The herald ten days
"herald" Discussed on Herald

Herald

03:21 min | 3 years ago

"herald" Discussed on Herald

"They just don't have the local support perhaps that they did in those markets where I do believe that markets like the herald news and in Lakeview, they'll continue to serve communicate communities very well. And I think that's why Adams who acquired pioneer looks for markets like this to buy because they see that there is a longer term future a market like Klamath falls. Believes in or needs the newspaper more than a market. Like I would say Dallas, and here's an example when I was a publisher, I would have friends of mine ask, don't you get crazy with people calling you? Was the publisher saying, I didn't get my newspaper, or I've got complained about the newspaper, and my response was always the same. I'd be more concerned if they stopped calling. And I think here in Klamath falls. We know for fact, if somebody doesn't get their paper, chances are they're going to call on complaint, which they absolutely should do because we want to provide top-shelf customer service. But if they stopped calling, that means they don't really care if they got it or not, and that's a problem. And so we want to really make sure that people still care about getting that product. It's been a fascinating time to be a journalist lately in the last year or two. There's a new phrase that has caught on like wildfire of people making accusations of fake news. And just recently, we had the president actually referred to the media as public enemy number one at a rally as an executive who oversees multiple newspapers. This new added hostility towards journalism and media in general, how do you deal with that in a realm where suddenly there's so much open hostility towards people who are trying to provide facts and information, you know, that's a great question, and, and that's a hard question I it's disappointing to see this level of vitriol coming from our from the president of the United States and from elected leaders throughout the country. It's. The the media and journalists have never been and should never be the best friends of elected officials. It doesn't work well if they are. But if you have the government actively an aggressively condemning what really is an important part of democracy. Then I think that ultimately erodes what our communities have come to depend on us for. And I think that this whole this whole thing with fake news that's a, it's a smokescreen. It's a diversion tactic. It's a way for to bang the drum for you know, whatever you read is not real. I think in dealing with local markets like Klamath falls. It's really going to be quickly identifiable. If a story about a local city council meeting is core, unquote fake if there's inaccurate facts because the people who live in this market, no it to be true or they know it to be false. And if they call us if they call the editor than if there's a fact that's wrong, we'll fix it. We'll correct it. That's what we do. When you talk about larger scale national stuff, you know, they say, well, that's fake. Well, you know, I probably wouldn't know whether it's true or not. I mean, honestly, I don't believe most of what I read on the internet unless it's coming from a credible news source, like the herald news Wall Street Journal, excuse me, Washington Post New York Times. I mean, I'm very skeptical of the sources of information. I've almost completely eliminated Facebook from any level of of either accuracy or credibility in my personal line because everything on there is it's a confirmation bias circle. So if somebody believes it, then they read what they believed in there for they know their right and therefore they and then they posted and then they read it, it's it's, it's..

Klamath falls Adams herald news publisher president Lakeview Dallas Facebook United States Washington Post Wall Street Journal the herald executive editor New York Times
"herald" Discussed on Herald

Herald

03:36 min | 3 years ago

"herald" Discussed on Herald

"I'm Cridland key with the herald news this week. We are joined by one of our own Eric Johnston, western division president for Adams, publishing a large national newspaper conglomerate, which among its properties include not only the herald news, but also the Lake County examiner in Lakeview, Eric, thanks for taking some time to speak with us about media today. You're welcome. Thanks for having me. Well, before we get into the state of media today, I always like to start these off with getting a little bit of background on our guests. So can you kind of in on who you are a little bit of your background? Sure. So I started thirty years ago almost as a as a photo journalist, I've got my degree in photojournalism and I worked as a working photographer for small newspapers, community size newspapers, the herald news for a long time and back in the mid nineties. When everything was new about digital, I kind of started working through website development and spent the next fifteen. Building websites and web site business models for newspaper companies. And then back in two thousand nine, I was promoted to publisher of a community newspaper and then became essentially immediate bureaucrat and moved to pioneer. Now Adams about four and a half years ago. There was a merger last year. Some of our readers may recall that herald news and other properties under what was then called pioneer news group was bought by Adams publishing. Now you were involved with pioneer now you're still a part of atoms. So can you tell me about that relationship little bit? Sure. So I've been with pioneer for four years as the chief operating officer essentially overseeing the operational efforts at each of our newspapers, about two dozen in the north west. And after the acquisition was fortunate enough to be kept on by Adams publishing as the western division vice president which is about is roughly the same footprint that we have prior with pioneer plus a couple of additional newspapers in places like Idaho falls. So the transition to this point has gone really well. We've had a lot of changes in the corporate side, but. You know, the the changes I think have been good. So pioneer before had if I remember about twenty twenty five newspapers in that range, how big is atoms? Well, that's a really good question. Last week, ten days ago, Adams announced the acquisition of a group in Florida called the sun coast media group. So I have to admit, I'm not exactly sure of the number, but I'm pretty confident that it's over one hundred and fifty titles at this point across the country. A lot of those newspapers are in more regional and rural markets like the herald news and Klamath falls where people are somewhat limited in terms of options. We've seen the way that people access media drastically changed just over the past ten years or so with the advent of social media's popularity and more online sources. But in places like this, where there's limited amounts of TV coverage in newspapers, how important is newspapers in market in markets with limited media base? I think they're critical newspapers in markets like Klamath falls are really the only primary source of consistent information. I think that that our communities have and not only are they sources of information, but their engagement platforms so letters to the editor or even through social media channels and Twitter and things like that. They can participate with the newspaper, very actively and newspapers reflect the community people like to see themselves in the pages of the paper and at the at the most macro or micro level, I should say. Newspapers are the the preservation of democracy at the local level. If it wasn't for the herald news who would be going to the city council meetings the school board meetings to high school football games regularly. There really wouldn't be anybody. Yahoo wouldn't be there who doesn't exist. Google wouldn't be there. Facebook wouldn't be there. You know, it's really the herald news that preserves and protects the communities access to that information..

herald news Adams Adams publishing Eric Johnston division president Lake County Lakeview Facebook Klamath falls Google chief operating officer Yahoo Klamath Idaho falls publisher vice president Twitter editor
"herald" Discussed on Herald

Herald

04:01 min | 3 years ago

"herald" Discussed on Herald

"We also reform other governmental functions, develop policies, law, and overall your best to protect the interests of the tribes. Of course, one of our responsibilities is to protect the treaty rights in resources in promote enhancing. Those for members to general counsel. We have a, we have a quorum of fifty people, and we have quarterly journal council meetings and special the general council meetings as required. So I chair that meeting also and joining you today. Mark has quite an interesting and extensive background in understanding fish biology, which is such an important topic right now market. You kinda give us your background. Yes. I've got my education as in fishery biology from Humboldt state university. I got both a bachelor's and master's degree upon completing my education. I began my career working with the US fish and Wildlife Service out of Reno, Nevada. Interestingly worked on a similar endangered fish in that area called the que- which is related to the to endangered suckers that we have here in the Klamath basin. So one of the reasons why got involved in the Klamath basin was because of my expertise with the que- and we were efficient Wildlife Service was invited to help the Klamath tribes in Oregon department fish and wildlife was some early studies on the endangered fish. And so I came to the base in one thousand nine hundred eighty seven and work closely with the on and some of the other tribal technicians to work on these fish better understand what was going on with. There populations what some of their biology was. And so then I continue to work in the basin for another twenty years working initially with the US bureau reclamation for twelve years in the early nineties through late nineties. And then for another eight years with the US fish and Wildlife Service in Klamath falls also working with these fish and habitat restoration and other projects retiring in two thousand nine, leaving the base in for about five years. And then seeing the fish weren't progressing like we had hoped and wanted to be able to contribute to, you know, getting the things on the right track. So I've been with climate tries for a little over a year. Now you have an interesting background on this in that you worked with federal and state agencies on water issues and species issues for so long, and now you're doing so. From the tribes perspective, so you can kind of see things from both sides. How does that help you do your do your job now in the role as representing the the Klamath tribes as as the official tribes tribal scientists. Having worked both on the research and the regulatory end. You know, I have been involved in participating in the different levels of management. You know, from from a regulatory standpoint working as a biologist for reclamation, you know, my role was to try to evaluate how the Klamath irradiation project affected these species and their habitat and try to come up with actions and management strategies that would minimize the impacts of project operations on the health of the species and then so you know, for quite a number of years, you know, I participated in trying to develop good science to base management decisions on water, water management restaurant. Nation, that type of thing working for the US fish and Wildlife Service, which has more direct responsibility and recovery..

Klamath basin Klamath Wildlife Service US general counsel Humboldt state university Mark Reno Nevada Oregon official twelve years twenty years eight years five years
"herald" Discussed on Herald

Herald

03:00 min | 3 years ago

"herald" Discussed on Herald

"I'm curt Blakey with the herald news this week. We are joined by Mark Butte near Klamath, tribes scientists and Don gentry. Klamath tribes chairman who detail cultural environmental and economic concerns from the tribes perspective regarding the ongoing water situation, the Klamath basin and survival of the endangered fish that call upper Klamath like home, Mark, Don. Thank you so much for joining us. Thanks for the opportunity. Thank you. We have a lot to cover, but before we do that, I always like to get to know people a little bit better. I so Don could you kind of explain your background and how you've become the climate tribes chairman, I was born a Klamath tribal number. My father Klamath my mom, non native born here falls and we throw travel. I've lived here most of my life. I was gone for a period of time, but I've been back here since nineteen sixty nine born in nineteen fifty five and load here for a time. The moved away. I worked in the climate tribes natural resource department for a number of years, and I've also done other things Klamath falls folks. No, we from when we had a music store, retail musical instrument, business and so forth. But I spent the majority of my career working for the climate tribes of the natural resource department. I worked as an in became the climatize natural resource specialist. Before I ran for travel council in two thousand ten. I worked for the tribes for twenty five years. Prior to that, I was around when we started actually our water sampling where theme and learned how to spawn suckers when Mark was actually new to the area or at least new to working with us in that capacity. So we have a long history together in. So I've been here. So after working for the tries for twenty five years, I came on and and ran for tribal government, which we have a referendum vote. We send meal out balanced all of our members. Yeah knows elected vice chairman and seated in twenty ten in Iran again. And as chairman in I'm now finishing up my sixth years chairman, elections are of begin again next year in February nominations. So what exactly does the chairman do other than get their face in the newspaper lot? Well, I cheer both the. Rival council, which is a ten member elected tribal council elected the same way as me the officers. We run for specific positions, but then they're six members at large. So there's six positions that are filled. And so I, I'm elected chair both the tribal council and also the general council, the general counsel are the voting members of the Klamath tribes. So we, we have every two weeks. We have a tribal council meeting of ten members to conduct business and are primarily primary responsibility is to serve. The climate tribe, says, provided through the tribal council. We oversee tribal administration of our programs..

Klamath vice chairman Don gentry chairman general counsel Mark Butte Mark curt Blakey herald news Iran twenty five years two weeks
"herald" Discussed on Herald

Herald

04:25 min | 3 years ago

"herald" Discussed on Herald

"Your friends so great opportunity for community building we have about seventy five vendors signed up so far which is more than we thought we were going to have and i'm excited about that i think it's great there's a little bit for everybody so it's an opportunity for people to come down a lot of our vendors are nonprofits so they'll be providing information about what they do so it's aside from the community gathering aspect it's also an opportunity to learn about more of those organizations we'll have food trucks we've got four food truck signed up they'll beat around the six main intersection we have stuff for kids we're going to have a bike rodeo between third and fourth on may street there will be a bounce house down there and they'll be you know the ponies are always a popular attraction with the kids kids love the ponies and then henley highschool actually be they're doing face painting and some portrait so the kids kids zone is kind of loosely what we're referring to it as can be at that third and fourth street and of downtown so this year we also have safija musical acts black cadillac king's a local favourite they'll be playing at at ninth street and then michael clinton cherry wine another local favourite they'll be playing it sherman's corner so great music one of the things that actually came together and we're going to be partnering with a couple of organizations during thursday is a ribbon cutting for the new separated bike lane that comes from oregon avenue up through ninth street and terminates right there in downtown at ninth and main lot of people have seen that i think it's great i think it's an awesome an awesome way to keep bikers safe as they're coming in from the north and west sides of town it's a pretty popular bike route i think he's going to be even more popular now so there's going to be a ribbon cutting at six thirty am right during thursday the band has graciously agreed to let let us take the stage and there will be a couple of speakers from the sponsoring organizations and we'll have a ribbon cutting during that so that's going to be great but the overall event is again is kind of the the healthy theme for june the theme is grab it here so misstate it that june theme is fun and healthy activities in the great outdoors so focused on walking hiking running swimming other outdoor recreation so we'll have a lot of we have a lot of vendors there representing those areas one of the things we're doing this year that's a little different from years past is that we have found ways to encourage some of our vendors to provide an activity particularly in the nonprofit so so for example the climate base and wildlife refuges will be here and they'll be providing it activity that's based around the theme so so a lot more you'll see a lot more interactive booths this year rather than just walk by and check it out you'll see a lot of activity going on near these booze and things like that and one thing for people to to remember is that even though this is a monthly event throughout the summer each event has a different theme and there's going to be different performers so don't go just once and then think oh i i've been there done that i've seen it because each time you go back it's going to be a different vibe yeah it's it's like specials on a restaurant menu it's going to be the same awesome experience three times but going to be a little different flavor each time so one of the things that were also doing throughout all three events is the cascade health alliance health challenge so you'll have the opportunity at the kfta blue zones project or cascade health aligns booth to pick up a pedometer for free and a health challenge card so you during the event you complete that challenge you bring your card back and you'll get a little free reward.