17 Burst results for "Henry man Seaney"

"henry man seaney" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"henry man seaney" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

"And who's part of v a the turn of the film class yes episode at silver brought it up on a on a show we've done so many of yeah we just talk about favorite movies and he brought that up one day and we did a whole show about that yeah that was one of those movies i just code on tv years ago yeah and they were like you know it hooked fueling the blu ray just came out the brewers us just released the makeup of yeah well flowery wants to talk to us we certainly love to unfortunately i don't know the theme shot enjoy round you're in luck i do right that no as a writer don't know yeah but another nice story in the book too is when you first got out tele i think was your first day in hollywood you met henry manzini you know how they lose a dream 'em kenny starting who who could have imagined to get the big movers of her i remember seeing 'em fantasizing a see life magazine with with sandy manzini story you know and that team he started off in a recently army play the piccolo he played the piano and and they range and they got the movies and of course he was a horse king of hollywood you know and the nicest man in the world by the way so my very first day in hollywood they 'em i came out to goodbye columbus and paramount center limousine funny my family nfl totally impressive you know here we are again the limousine going to a farm and they got next shot up at studio and the guard says are you go through it through the studio find left turn in front of visibility you'll find a parking space and i pull up to my parking space center the left is neil hefty well we love it to the right as hadn't been seen i thought i had died and gone to held out saturday between those talked about at neil hefty what's odd couple and adam ernie or why a friend to delta reside man rodeo wonderful composer injure we love these one thing you have in common with henry maxine is like you've got past the green slime in henry man seaney i think made is child like living early on with these crappy cy fi films i don't know that but you know everyone could start at some courses and of course so when he used like this brilliant totally home she but his nicely so he came to accomplish our with the music editor and 'em the head of the michigan department kind of entertaining me a new composer in town my very first day in california and henry comes in he says they wave over come on over here hiking once you meet someone so we had lunch together and he turns to me after a few minutes and he and he says you in the motion picture academy i said no i love to be out on and how it happens they said well you need to have three pictures how many pictures of you've done i said this is my third merkin this is good he said someone has to you have to have two people signed few to bring you can't apply you have to be invited he said so olive voucher he says i'm happy they said we need new blood mcadam that's great why he said you know when he would also says understand when he when he said i'll let down their parents saying wow oh my god in hollywood i get invited to join the motion picture turned out that meal hefty elmer bernstein and henry manzini all at once and we should give us some context you're a kid from new york who used the governor the peer look out at the at the ships and hope that one day you would be able to see the world and dream about what i was doing you bet and you're living it at this point in the dream but honestly i still silom afraid of charles good perspective and 'em have had great parents you know they supported this all along they support my dream yeah they didn't think it was in any way crazy like.

one day
"henry man seaney" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"henry man seaney" Discussed on WGN Radio

"It you wanna give us a call or text we'd love to hear from you three one two nine eight one seven two hundred all right let's see so let's get to the weather for today it'll be warm and rather humid places it'll leave us vulnerable to an isolated afternoon or evening thunderstorm highs will reach the upper eighties by the lake it'll it'll be only about the seventies nearby four tomorrow summer heat humidity will build temperatures around ninety the thunderstorms are possible and the afternoon or the evening chance of thunderstorms overnight and let's see friday attempts hit the ninety mark against chance of thunderstorms on saturday partly sunny hot humid again highs possibly hit the nineties warm and humid overnight and then on sunday partly sunny a front may sleep inland across the part of it part of the area high may reach ninety in the upper seventies near the lake so stay near the lake is what we're saying currently seventy one at o'hare at seventy two seventy three at the lakefront all right let's take a break and we'll come back we'll talk more about the new cast of big brother twenty one and then now we're going to actually rank some of the winners from big brothers pass if your big brother fan join us at three one nine one seven two hundred bryant donaldson tonight m._v._p.'s collide in primetime as the cubs in battles in braves battle at wrigley tonight at seven on w._g._n. t._v. Plan tires road debris and express lanes that are anything. But. To work every day is a new adventure travel times. More with WGN traffic. I'm Steve Cochran show. Weekday mornings on seven twenty WGN. it's mattress firm's july sale and we're celebrating with our free friedman get free accessories like pre just will bend needs to memory foam pillows and every mattress protector Joining seven ninety nine that's available bringing hundred fifty dollars absolutely free. and on top of that you can save up to four hundred dollars on the best match of france storewide your budget stretches further at mattress firm offer valid woven purchase restrictions apply participation robert until from back home slash sale by our t. with caffeine from green tea leaves it's delicious energizing and comes in three amazing labor's with zero sugar and four calories it fit your life with its combat size and portability it goes where you go to the campsite the hiking trail the beach without weighing you down five our t. caffeine from green tea leaves release your natural side from the makers of five hour energy for more information visit five hour energy dot com try peach and raspberry five our t. today look for us at your local h._e._b. grocery store you'll do it right to make your home look its best indoors and out lows does it right to because we're the only national ho center that carries purdy paint brushes and rollers the number one brand preferred by pros so if it's good enough for pro jobs you can be sure can take on yours for your outdoors update your patio furniture and save big with up to twenty five percent off patio clearance items whatever your next project do it right for less start with lowe's offer valid through six twenty six election varies by location while supplies last u._s. only tired of thinking something's free only defined there's a catch at atlantic union bank are free checking is really free no minimum balance required no monthly fees no catches even better you'll receive a one hundred dollar cash bonus when you open an account before august thirty first at set up a qualified direct deposit so if you're looking to bank better and get one hundred dollar cash bonus open a free checking account today at atlantic union bank dot com that's atlantic union bank dot com the offer details and flat atlantic union bank dot com some restrictions apply Member FDIC. Okay. welcome back everybody nick gilio here on seven twenty w._g._n. who picked the henry man seaney pink panther theme come into from lake geneva dan geneva dan right i wonder where he is i think he might be in cleveland yeah that's right yeah welcome back everybody while card wednesday continue three one two nine one seven two hundred is the phone number and big brother debuted last night and that's what we're talking about big brother twenty one i am a big fan of big brother and now not alone in in in this show of being fan of big brother my producer tom happens to be a fan this is the first time i would.

atlantic union bank cubs caffeine WGN Steve Cochran tom lake geneva wrigley braves w._g._n. t._v FDIC nick gilio cleveland france friedman national ho center WGN. lowe producer one hundred dollar
"henry man seaney" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

14:24 min | 1 year ago

"henry man seaney" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Is always fun because never know where we're going to go. We'll start with Joe Joe in Des Moines on coast to coast AM Joe Joe. Hey, hey, can you hear me perfectly? Oh, hey. This judge Moore. Nicole. I hear you kinda digging. What's your what you got good? Good to have you welcome to the club. Oh, good. So I kind of asked about, you know, how energy native positive. You can't you can't g right? So what do you think? So are they? Bad people have good people. You know what I mean? I don't know that everything lives in duality. But I do think that everything lives intention. How about that? So I don't know that we're always just good or bad. But I think we just in a tension between poles. Paul between poles maybe but I mean, we are in that sense that. You know, maybe for the first half of our lives, we were more bad than good. And then we reach a level of maturity in it flips and we've become more good than bad. And then we spend the rest of our life cars still in there, too. Yeah. But what do you mean by that? I mean by the greatness, down to the elements of the little, what is less smallest. Little thing called me neutrons Adams. Yeah. There is there is always positive negative. It's a force to be reckoned with. Yeah, that's great. And I think again would even so right. There is our example, is those things exist in tension with each other. So they are just they don't exist, just simultaneously. They, they exist in space. Where to split them, creates enormous energy right to split an atom. You know, we get this amazing reaction to slam atoms together gives us the same type of reaction. So whether it's Fisher fusion. It all comes down to again. What happens when we attempt to pull those two things apart? And that's why I think it's better to be think to think of good and bad in anything for that matter is existing intention with each other. I was just telling this to a friend the other day, actually, my friend who's visiting who's one of the producers for Glenn Beck. And I don't have a gun, I may get a gun. I'm not anti-gun at all. But I don't have one and, and I, I, he said, why don't you just get a handgun to get over with? And I said, well, because everything exists in tension with each other. And I don't I haven't figured out yet. What's the other side of gun ownership? I don't know. I don't know what I'm giving up. I don't know what by trade off would be. And I thought that was kind of bizarre. But I that's exactly how I think about everything, sort of intention with each other. So I don't know does that help. Interesting question at expect. No less from somebody from demoain, because Iowa is a very literate state the most highest per capita book readership in the country, is in or used to be in the state of Iowa. Paul is in. But what else did you during those long winters? Paul is in Boston on coast to coast AM, Paul. I question shreds story. Good new way, memo you were on. I think was needed this past Christmas on his weekend. When you call one just lost his father, but he couldn't get any for Mason about it. Yes, the other one was a Vietnam veteran who had lost her son, who is a that turn it as latest buckle still talk to him. So aside, I still talk to him. He and I are in conversation with each other. Yep. I off by one and how they made out. Well, I call then. Yeah. I still I still talk. With the with one of them, and we spoke not too long ago, and we're trying to make arrangements where I'm gonna drive down to Wichita and and see him. We're just waiting. He wasn't comfortable yet doing that. And so I was just waiting for a time. That was good for them. So, you know, it's sort of, like what we had on earlier where we were talking about PTSD and the active forgiveness or self forgiveness. Even and we, we often think about that sometimes is like in existence like something that either does exist or doesn't when really it's just an ongoing process, and so I hope those people keep calling back and they keep. Attempting to be a part of that conversation as far as I know, Dennis is better, but I couldn't speak for him. And I wouldn't. But, you know who knows what's better when you've suffered such a huge tragedy. The fact that these gentlemen are still here and they're still processing their losses. I think that's better than the option of not being here and giving up, and I just hope if it's five percent better than it was last year than it's, it's better, maybe someday. It'll be more than that Walt is in Pennsylvania, but I appreciate your compassion. Thank you, Paul, wildcard line Walters in Pennsylvania on coast to coast wall. Hello, this freak you once. Again, buddy. Thank you, too. That's funny. Reiterate what the other call is said, you're great subsitute, those, the great George Noory. He's grabbed I like to suggest a joy yet. You know, he has he really doesn't need substitutes, if I may say, Mr. Dan is, is a great diverse. Seems to be very knowledgeable, and I would also I do have Donna Walker or Gina. I believe her name is Sal Vanni. Maybe they might us lower for George one night. And you know had ago. Yeah. I'll answer the phones. I'll answer the phones for Gina what do you say? I'll answer. Gina's calls. Gina cervetti. Yeah. I'll, I'll do her calls, and as long as I got you here. Hey, Tom com. Dan, heiser. Why don't you ever step in and host coast to coast? Well. I don't have you ever asked. No. I haven't. I should. You know, better than anybody. How the show is run. That's true. I you know, I actually for my birthday last year. I think it was George. Gimme our of open lines, which is really cool, which was really cool. So, you know, maybe I will good. I love that one of these nights. There you go. Good suggestion while I'm on you hundred percent on that one. And we'll get Tom to, to host in some night, while card line. Ron is that was Ron right in Pennsylvania. No to Pennsylvania's might confusion list. So Ron is in Pennsylvania to on coast to coast, AM broad. Or dictates with talk radio. So up on different stations, especially locally. But I wanted to talk about a doctor lorries presentation on the post traumatic stress disorder PTSD, and it's wonderful. You're honoring you know, a very significant cause of an ultimately now of, you know, a rash of deaths. Spice are members of the military who contract this disorder. It used to be known and World War One shell shock and World War Two is battle fatigue, but studies have shown in that first responders, and especially victims of the bread break-up of families by the very sinister shell protective services, human services and family court systems produce, greater instance incentives and some Vincent. All right. People suffering from from PTSD now I not it off. And I didn't hear what, what, what Dr lorries description of the symptoms, and treatment of PTSD. I know she said lasted a lifetime, but I not at all. Could you give please in a one minute summary church? She said about the symptoms, and treatment of PTSD. So let me add something that she didn't say, which is the least what I believe she would say, if he were here, and that is that shell shock battle fatigue, and PTSD are not a hundred percent synonymous, that each one of those things was consistent with the experience of that particular war. So shell shock is a type of PTSD, but it. Is not the exact same thing. And it was more related to the fact that there was so much shelling that was going on night and day night day that would just, just, you know, in the in World War, One that kind of trench warfare that they were just firing mortars at each other all day, long and shell shock was something that came as a result of the noise and confusion of, of that type of trench warfare, where people felt incredibly powerless stuck in a mud pit somewhere and then they'd get up for a few moments of terror, and they get down again, but that constant shelling was slightly different than battle fatigue, which in World War, Two was more common because of the length of time that people served that men served in these campaigns. And it was the experience of longer term service where they were marching over a. A longer area that created a sense of battle fatigue that. So there was still shell shock in World War Two and it wasn't exactly the same as battle fatigue, which is, again, a slightly different. Subcategory PTSD PTSD is a generalized anxiety. So lots of people suffer from post traumatic stress, one of the most common ways is brought on by moments of extreme terror that are related to war, and so people that served in Afghanistan Iraq or another places like Vietnam. It was it was a matter of like this incredible long period of nothing happened with that was punctuated suddenly punctuated by terror. And so that's the post dramatic. That's a traumatic event, as opposed to say a long-term battle fatigue. So she talked about about PTSD in a couple of different contexts that have focused on events and service in the military was one of them and what she was really saying was with regard to anxiety that we have to look at that the what we can do over time in how we can treat using like empathy. Like raising our level of empathy. Individually can also help us therapeutically. And so that was just an example of that. I don't think I did her Justice, but I it's an easy link. If you go to coast to coast, AM dot com, and take a look at our book and the synopsis. That's there, I think might be informative. I hope that helps Dan is trucking in Illinois on coast to coast, as we get up toward the top of the hour. Dan? All right. Just as a sidebar here. I knew a guy knee and it was in the SAS, and I don't think I I call him. Yeah. I give him any. No SAS is like, totally cool, though. Yeah. Big. When were you at WGN? God. So three years nineteen ninety three through ninety six I think. Wow. Yeah, I grew up with the WGN. I was there. And he just didn't notice. Arden me I said, I was probably there and you just didn't notice. Oh, yeah. We, we had a tour to there about that time. I just want to maybe have been. It's possible. I was I was a faint. They I was considered the bad boy of WGN. So go figure pets tell you something about, w I was the off all Torri blah of, of WGN. Oh boy. Yeah, I predated you lot when I was as a fact. Kid we listen to the horror horror movies on Saturday nights. Yeah. Creature features features. Yeah. But yeah. Henry man Seaney tune that. No, it was. It's Harlem Nocturne. I think was the theme, right. Deng. I love that intro for creature features on WGN. Okay. Anyway. Go ahead. Oh, what was that? Touching base with the PTSD thing and you got into the different the different forms of it. There George Carlin did a pretty good routine on that Diddy. Really? Oh yeah, it was pretty good..

PTSD Paul WGN Mr. Dan Gina cervetti Pennsylvania Joe Joe Tom com George Des Moines Nicole Moore Glenn Beck George Noory Iowa George Carlin Adams
"henry man seaney" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

15:19 min | 1 year ago

"henry man seaney" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"On five seventy. K. L. I F. So open lines is always fun because I never know where we're going to go. We'll start with Joe Joe in Des Moines on coast to coast AM Joe Joe. Hey me. Perfectly. Oh, hey. This judge from the morning. I hear you. I'm kinda what you're what you got good, good to have you welcome to the club. So I kind of asked about, you know, how energy native positive. You can't you can't Easter right? So what do you think so are they? Facet as bad, people have been Deepal. You know what I mean? I don't know that everything lives in duality. But I do think that everything lives intention. How about that? So I don't know that we're always just good or bad. But I think we just in tension between poles. Paul between. Poles. Yeah. Maybe but I mean, we are in that sense that. You know, maybe for the first half of our lives, we were more bad than good. And then we reach a level of maturity in it flips and we've become more good than bad. And then we spend the rest of our life. Still in there, too. Yeah. But what do you mean by that? I mean by the greatness down to the element to the. Is a little what is that? Smallest thing called me neutrons. Adams. Yeah. There is there is always positive negative. It's a force to be reckon with. Yeah, that's great. And I think again, what even so, right. There is our example, is those things exist in tension with each other. So they are just they don't exist, just simultaneously. They, they exist in a space, where to split them, creates enormous energy right to split, an atom. You know, we get this amazing reaction to slam atoms together gives us the same type of reaction. So whether it's fishing or fusion. It all comes down to again. What happens when we attempt to pull those two things apart? And that's why I think it's better to be think to think of good and bad. And, and anything for that matter is existing intention with each other. I was just telling this to a friend the other day, actually, my friend who's visiting is one of the producers for Glenn Beck and I don't have a gun, I may get a gun. I'm not anti gun at all, but I don't have one, and, and I, I, he said, well, why don't you just get a handgun to get over with, and I said, well, because everything exists intention with each other. And I don't I haven't figured out yet. What's the other side of gun ownership? And I don't know. I don't know what I'm giving up. I don't know what my trade off would be he thought that was kind of bizarre, but I that's exactly how I think about everything is sort of intention with each other. So does that help? Interesting question. Expect no less from somebody from Des Moines. Because Iowa is a very literate state the most highest per capita. Book readership in the country is in I or used to be in the state of Iowa. Paul is in. But what else did you doing? Those long winters. Paul is in Boston on coast to coast, AM, Paul, I question I gotta shred story. Good newly memo on I think was either this past Christmas on doing his weekend. When you call one just lost his father, but he couldn't get information about it. Yes. Was a Vietnam veteran who had lost her son, who is a that turn it as latest tobacco still talk to him. So aside, I still talk to him. He and I are in conversation with these other. Yep. And I, I also wanted how they made out. Well, I. Yeah. I still I still talk. With the with one of them, and we spoke not too long ago, and we're trying to make arrangements where I'm gonna drive down to Wichita and and see him. We're just waiting. He wasn't comfortable yet doing that. And so I was just waiting for a time that was good for him. So, you know, it's sort of, like what we had on earlier where we were talking about PTSD and the active forgiveness or self forgiveness. Even and we, we often think about that sometimes is like in existence like something that either does exist or doesn't when really it's just an ongoing process, and so I hope those people keep calling back and they keep. Attempting to be a part of that conversation is far as I know Dennis is better. But I couldn't speak for him. And I wouldn't. But, you know, who knows what's better when you suffered such a huge tragedy. The fact that these gentlemen are still here and they're still processing their losses. I think that's better than the option of not being here. And giving up and I just hope if it's five percent better than it was last year than it's, it's better, maybe someday. It'll be more than that Walt is in Pennsylvania, but I appreciate your compassion. Thank you, Paul, wildcard line Walters in Pennsylvania on coast to coast wall. Hello. I just figure once again, buddy. Thank you, too. That's funny. And I want to reiterate what the other caller said, you're a great subsitute, great, George Noory. He's, I like to, I like to suggest a joy yet. You know, he has he has a need substitutes, if I may say, Mr. Dan, I is a great diverse as to be very knowledgeable, and I would also I do have Donna Walker or Gina. I believe her name is Vanni. Maybe they might us lower for George one night. And you know there you go. Guys sweat. I'll answer the phones. I'll answer the phones for Gina what do you say? I'll answer Gina's calls. Gina silva. D L, I'll do her calls and what got you here. Hey, Tom, Tom, Ben is our, why don't you ever step in and host coast to coast? Well. Have you ever asked? No. I haven't. I should. You know, better than anybody. How they show is run. That's true. I, I actually for my birthday last year. I think it was George gaming, our of open locking, which is really cool, which was really cool. So, you know, maybe I will good a love that. What are these nights? There you go. Good suggestion while I'm on your hundred percent on that one. And we'll get Tom to host sub night while card line. Ron that was Ron right in Pennsylvania. No to Pennsylvania's might confusion was so Ron is in Pennsylvania to on coast to coast, AM broad, or both addicted to with talk radio, so up on different stations, especially locally, but I wanted to talk about Dr Lori said, 'Presentation on the post traumatic stress disorder PTSD, and it's wonderful. You're honoring, you know, very significant cause of an ultimately now of, you know, a rash of. Best ice are members of the military who contract this disorder. It used to be known in World War, One shell shock and World War, Two is fatigue, but studies have shown in that first responders, and especially victims of the bread break-up of families by the very sinister shell protective services human services and family court system produce, greater instance, instances incidences or I began. People suffering from PTSD now I it off. And I didn't hear what, what, what Dr lorries description of the symptoms, and treatment of PTSD. I know she said it's lasted a lifetime, but not at all. Could you give please in a one minute summary short? She said about the symptoms, and treatment of PTSD. So let me add something that she didn't say, which is at least what I believe she would say, if he were here, and that is that shell shock battle fatigue, and PTSD are not a hundred percent synonymous, that each one of those things was consistent with the experience of that particular war. So shell shock is a type of PA PTSD, but. It is not the exact same thing. And it was more related to the fact that there was so much shelling that was going on night and day night day that would just, just, you know, in the in World War, One that kind of trench warfare that they were just firing mortars at each other all day, long and shell shock was something that came as a result of the noise, and the confusion of, of that type of trench warfare, where people felt incredibly powerless stuck in a mud pit somewhere and then they'd get up for a few moments of terror, and they give down again, but that constant shelling was slightly different than battle fatigue, which in World War, Two was more common because of the length of time that people served that men served in these campaigns. And it was the experience of longer term service where they were marching over a. A longer area that created a sense of battle fatigue that. So there were still shell shock in World War Two and it wasn't exactly the same as battle fatigue, which is, again, a slightly different. Subcategory PTSD PTSD is a generalized anxiety. So lots of people suffer from post traumatic stress, one of the most common ways is brought on by moments of extreme terror that are related to war, and so people that served in Afghanistan Iraq or another places the at Phnom. It was it was a matter of like this incredible long period of nothing happened with that was punctuated suddenly punctuated by terror. And so that's the post dramatic. That's a traumatic event, as opposed to say a long-term battle fatigue. So she talked about about PTSD in a couple of different contexts that have focused on events and service in the military was one of them and what she was really saying was with regard to anxiety that we have to look at that the what we can do over time in how we can treat using like empathy. Like raising our level of empathy. Individually can also help us therapeutically. And so that was just an example of that. I don't think I did her Justice, but I it's an easy link. If you go to coast to coast, AM dot com, and take a look at our book and the synopsis. That's there, I think might be informative. I hope that helps Dan is trucking in Illinois on coast to coast, as we get up toward the top of the hour. Dan? All right. Just as a sidebar here. I knew a guy knee and it was in the SAS, and I don't think I call him. I give him any. No SAS like totally cool. So, yeah. Big that. What were you at WGN? God. So three years nineteen ninety three through ninety six I think. Wow. Yeah. I grew up with the WGN. I was there and you just didn't notice. Army I said, I was probably there and you just didn't notice. Oh, yeah, we, we had a tour to their about that time. I just want to maybe who had been entirely possible. I was I was a faint. They I was considered the bad boy of WGN. So go figure tell you something about, w I was the off all Torri blah of, of WGN boy. Yeah. Predated year like when I was as a fact. I kid we what's or did or movies on Saturday night. Yeah. Creature features features. Yeah. Yeah. Henry man Seaney tune that. No, it was. It's Harlem Nocturne. I think was the theme, right. Unloved that intro for creature features. Commencing. He's okay. Anyway. Go ahead. Oh, what I was. Touching base with the. PTSD thing and you get into that the different the different forms of it. They're jerks Carlin. Did a pretty good routine on that city? Really? Oh, yeah. It was pretty good. And that, that's all. I I'm in conversation with Kelly Carlin, so I'll have to remember that because whatever I don't know about her dad's. She always fills me in so thanks. Appreciate the heads up. And let's see if we got time for. Yeah. We should have time for one more. If we keep it quick, Jim is in Pittsburgh on coast to coast AM, Jim. In how you doing? Good. I think you're gonna be our capstone buddy. That's awesome. Man. I'm gonna take us out. I just wanna make a comment on the placebo effect with what you have is mental it has to do with hypnosis and, and tricking the brain. That's all CBA.

PTSD Paul WGN Des Moines Pennsylvania Mr. Dan Gina silva Joe Joe K. L. I Tom Iowa Deepal Glenn Beck George Noory Kelly Carlin Adams tricking
"henry man seaney" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

15:19 min | 1 year ago

"henry man seaney" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Newsradio twelve hundred w o a. So open lines is always fun because I never know where we're going to go. We'll start with Joe Joe in Des Moines on coast to coast AM Joe Joe. Hey, thank you hear me perfectly. Oh, hey. Yano. This Josiah from the morning. I hear you kinda I'm digging. What's your what you guys? Good to have you welcome to the club. So I kind of asked about, you know, how energy native positive. You can't you can't use energy right? So what do you think? So are they? Bad people have good people. You know what I mean? I don't know that everything lives in duality. But I do think that everything lives intention. How about that? So I don't know that we're always just good or bad. But I think we just in a tension between poles. Between poles. Yeah, maybe, but I mean, we are in that sense that, you know, maybe for the first half of our lives, we were more bad than good. And then we reach a level of maturity in it flips and we become more good than bad. And then we spend the rest of our life. Too. Yeah. But what do you mean by that? I mean by the greatness, down to the element to the little, what is less smallest thing called. You mean neutrons? Adams. Yeah. There is there is always positive negative. It's a force to be reckoning with. Yeah, that's great. And I think again, what even so, right. There is our example, is those things exist in tension with each other. So they aren't just they don't exist. Just simultaneously. They, they exist in a space, where to split them, creates enormous energy right to split, an atom. You know, we get this amazing reaction to slam Adams together gives us the same type of reaction. So whether it's Fisher fusion, it all comes down to again. What happens when we attempt to pull those two things apart? And that's why I think it's better to be thinking to think of good and bad. And, and anything for that matter is existing intention with each other. I was just telling this to a friend the other day, actually, my friend who's visiting who's one of the producers for Glenn Beck. And I don't have a gun, I may get a gun. I'm not anti gun at all, but I don't have one, and, and I, I, he said, why don't you just get a handgun to get over with? And I said, well, because everything exists in tension with each other. And I don't I haven't figured out yet. What's the other side of gun ownership? And I don't know. I don't know what I'm giving up by trade off would be he thought that was kind of bizarre, but I that's exactly how I think about everything, sort of intention with each other. So I don't know does that help. Interesting question. Expect no less from somebody from demoain, because Iowa is a very literate state the most highest per capita book readership in the country, is in or used to be in the state of Iowa. Paul is in. But what else did you during those long winters? Paul is in Boston on coast to coast AM, Paul. All right. Shred story. You were on. This past Christmas weekend. Call one just lost his father, but he couldn't get any for Mason about it. Yes. The other one was a Vietnam veteran who had lost her son, who is a veteran of this latest of buckle. Still talk to him aside. I still talk to him. He and I are in conversation with these other. Yep. And I wonder how they made out well. Yeah. I still I still talk. With the with one of them, and we spoke not too long ago, and we're trying to make arrangements where I'm gonna drive down to Wichita and and see him. We're just waiting. He wasn't comfortable yet doing that. And so I was just waiting for a time that was good for him. So, you know, it's sort of, like what we had on earlier, we were talking about PTSD and the active forgiveness or self forgiveness. Even and we, we often think about that sometimes it's like in existence like something that either does exist or doesn't when really it's just an ongoing process, and so I hope those people keep calling back and they keep. Attempting to be a part of that conversation is far as I know, Dennis is better, but I couldn't speak for him. And I wouldn't. But, you know who knows what's better when you've suffered such a huge tragedy. The fact that these gentlemen are still here and they're still processing their losses. I think that's better than the option of not being here. And giving up and I just hope if it's five percent better than it was last year than it's, it's better, maybe someday. It'll be more than that Walters in Pennsylvania, but I appreciate your compassion. Thank you, Paul, wildcard line Walters in Pennsylvania on coast to coast wall. Hello pitched in. Pledge to speak. You once again, buddy, thank you, too. That's funny. I want to reiterate what the said, you're great subsitute, the great George Noory. He's I like to I'd like to suggest a George, you know, he has he really doesn't need subsitute of. I may say, Mr. Dan is, is a great diverse. Seems to be very knowledgeable, and I would also I do have Donna Walker or Gina. I believe her name is Vanni. Maybe they might slower for George one night. And you know, had her ago, guys. Yeah. Swing. To the phones. I'll answer the phones for Gina. What do you say? I'll answer Gina's calls. Gina Silva yell her calls and what got you here. Hey, Tom, Tom, Dan, Heuser? Why don't you ever step in and host coast to coast? Well. I don't have you ever asked. No. I haven't. I should. You know, better than anybody. How the show is run. That's true. I you know, I've actually for my birthday last year. I think it was George. Gimme an hour of open lines which is really cool, which was really cool. So, you know, maybe I will good a love that. What are these nights? There you go. Good suggestion while I'm on your hundred percent on that one. And we'll get Tom to host in some night, while card line. Ron that was Ron right in Pennsylvania. No to Pennsylvania's Mike confusion was so Ron is in Pennsylvania to on coast to coast AM run. Addicted to with talk radio. So on different stations, especially locally, but I wanted to talk about a doctor warranties presentation on the post traumatic stress disorder. PTSD. It's wonderful. You're honoring you know, a very significant cause of an ultimately, now, you know, Arash is death. Spice are of members of the military who contract this disorder. It used to be known in World War wanna shell shock. And World War Two is battle fatigue, but studies have shown in that first responders, and especially victims of the bridge. Break-up of families by the very sinister shell protective services human services and family court system produce, greater instance instances, and some business or. People suffering from, from PTSD now I it off. And I didn't hear what, what, what Dr lorries description of the symptoms, and treatment of PTSD. I know she said it's lasted a lifetime, but I not at all. Could you give please in a one minute summary shirt? She said about the symptoms, and treatment of PTSD. So let me add something that she didn't say, which is the least what I believe she would say, if he were here, and that is that shell shock battle fatigue, and PTSD are not a hundred percent synonymous, that each one of those things was consistent with the experience of that particular war. So shell shock is a type of. P. P. T S. But it is not the exact same thing. And it was more related to the fact that there was so much shelling that was going on night and day night and day that we would just, just, you know, in the in World War, One that kind of trench warfare that they were just firing mortars at each other all day long. And so shall shock was something that came as a result of the noise, and the confusion of, of that type of trench warfare, where people felt incredibly powerless stuck in a mud pit somewhere and then they'd get up for few moments of terror, and they give down again, but that constant shelling was slightly different than battle fatigue, which in World War, Two was more common because of the length of time that people served that men served in these campaigns. And it was the experience of longer term service where they were marching overall. A you know, a longer area that created a sense of battle fatigue. So there were still shell shock in World War Two and it wasn't exactly the same as battle fatigue, which is, again, a slightly different. Subcategory PTSD PTSD is a generalized anxiety. So lots of people suffer from post traumatic stress, one of the most common ways is brought on by moments of extreme terror that are related to war, and so people that served in Afghanistan Iraq or another places Vietnam. It was it was a matter of like this incredible long period of nothing happened that was punctuated suddenly punctuated by terror. And so that's the post dramatic. That's a traumatic event, as opposed to say a long-term battle fatigue. So she talked about about PTSD in a couple of different content. Acts that have focused on events and service in the military was one of them and what he was really saying was with regard to anxiety that we have to look at that the what we can do over time in how we can treat using like empathy. Like raising our level of empathy. Individually can also help us therapeutically. And so that was just an example of that. I don't think I did her Justice, but I it's an easy link. If you go to coast to coast, AM dot com, and take a look at our book and the synopsis. That's there, I think might be informative. I hope that helps Dan is trucking in Illinois on coast to coast, as we get up toward the top of the hour. Dan? All right. Just as a sidebar here. A guy named leeann it was in the SAS, and I don't think I call him. Yeah. I give him any. No SAS is like totally cool. One were you at WGN? God. So three years nineteen ninety three through ninety six I think. Wow. Yeah. I grew up with the WGN. I was there and you just didn't notice. I said, I was probably there and you just didn't notice. Oh, yeah. We, we had a tour to there about that time I just want to maybe would have been there when we entirely possible. I was I was a faint. They I was considered the bad boy of WGN. So go figure bet to tell you something about WGN. I was the off all Torri blah of, of WGN. Yeah, I, I dated you when I was as a kid, we what's horror horror movies on Saturday nights. Yeah. Creature features creature features. Yeah. Can think of. But yeah, we're Henry man Seaney tune that. No, it was. It's Harlem knocked turn. I think was the theme, right. I love that intro for creature features. Okay. Anyway. Go ahead. Oh, what I was. I such invasive with the PTSD thing and you've got into the different the different forms of their George Carlin did a pretty good routine on that Titi. Really? Oh, yeah. It was pretty good. And it's thought. I I'm in conversation with Kelly Carlin, so I'll have to remember that because see whatever I don't know about her dad. She always fills me in so thanks. Appreciate the heads up. Let's see we got time for. Yeah. We should have time for one more. If we keep it quick, Jim is in Pittsburgh on coast to coast AM, Jim. How you doing? Good. I think you're gonna be our capstone buddy. That's awesome. And I'm going to take us out. I just wanna make a comment on the placebo effect. With what you have is mental it has to do with hypnosis and truck in the brain. That's altruism CBO is..

PTSD Mr. Dan WGN Pennsylvania Paul Gina Silva George Joe Joe Josiah Des Moines Yano George Noory Glenn Beck Iowa Adams George Carlin Tom
"henry man seaney" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

14:38 min | 1 year ago

"henry man seaney" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Seven. So open lines is always fun because I never know where we're going to go. We'll start with Joe Joe into Moines on coast to coast AM. Joe joe. Hey, hey, can you hear me perfectly? Oh, hey. Yano. This judge from the morning. I hear you kinda digging what you're what you got good. Good to have you welcome to the club. So I kind of asked him about, you know how. Energy negative positive. You can't you can't Easter right? So what do you think? So are they? Bad, people have been people. You know what I mean? I don't know that everything lives duality. But I do think that everything lives intention. How about that? So I don't know that we're always just good or bad. But I think we just in tension between poles. Paul between. Poles. Yeah. Maybe but I mean, we are in that sense that. You know, maybe for the first half of our lives, we were more bad than good. And then we reach a level of maturity in it flips. We've become more good than bad. And then we spend the rest of our life still in there, too. Yeah. But what do you mean by that? I mean by the greatness, down to the element to the is a little, what is less. Smallest thing called b neutrons. Adams. Yeah. There is there's always positive. It's a force to be reckoned with. Yeah, that's great. And I think again, what even so right there. Our example, is those things exist in tension with each other. So they are just they don't exist. Just simultaneously. They, they exist in a space, where to split them, creates enormous energy right to split, an atom. You know, we get this amazing reaction to slam Adams together gives us the same type of reaction. So whether it's Fisher fusion, it all comes down to again. What happens when we attempt to pull those two things apart? And that's why I think it's better to be thinking to think of good and bad. And, and anything for that matter is existing intention with each other. I was just telling this to a friend the other day, actually, my friend who's visiting who's one of the producers for Glenn Beck. And I don't have a gun, I may get a gun. I'm not anti gun at all, but I don't have one, and, and I, I, he said, why don't you just get a handgun to get over with? And I said, well, because everything exists in tension with each other. And I don't I haven't figured out yet. What's the other side of gun ownership? I don't know. I don't know what I'm giving up. I don't know what my trade off would be that. I thought that was kind of bizarre, but I that's exactly how I think about everything, sort of intention with each other. So I don't know does that help. Interesting question. I'd expect. No less from somebody from demoines, because Iowa is a very literate state the most highest per capita book readership in the country is in. I used to be in the state of Iowa. Paul is in. But what else did you doing? Those long winters. Paul is in Boston on coast to coast AM, Paul, I question I gotta shreds story. Good. You were on. I think was eater this past Christmas on we as weekend. When you call, then one just lost his father, but he couldn't getting from about it. Yes. The other one was a Vietnam veteran with Las son, who is a veteran of this latest buckle. I still talk to him suicide I still talk to him. He and I are in conversation with these other. Yep. And I, I off by one at how they made out. Well, I. Then I still, I still talk with the with one of them, and we spoke not too long ago, and we're trying to make arrangements where I'm gonna drive down to Wichita and and see him. We're just waiting. He wasn't comfortable yet doing that. And so I was just waiting for a time. That was good for them. So, you know, it's sort of, like what we had on earlier where we were talking about PTSD and the active forgiveness or self forgiveness. Even and we, we often think about that. Sometimes is like existence like something that either does exist doesn't when really it's just an ongoing process. And so I hope those people keep calling back and they keep. Attempting to be a part of that conversation is far as I know, Dennis is better, but I couldn't speak for him. And I wouldn't. But, you know, who knows what's better when you suffered such a huge tragedy. The fact that these gentlemen are still here and they're still processing their losses. I think that's better than the option of not being here and giving up, and I just hope if it's five percent better than it was last year than it's, it's better, maybe someday. It'll be more than that Walters in Pennsylvania, but appreciate your compassion. Thank you, Paul, wildcard line Walters in Pennsylvania on coast to coast wall. Hello. Fled this freak you once again, buddy. Thank you, too. That's funny. Reiterate what the other callers said, you're great subsitute, great, George Noory. He's. I like to suggest a George yet, you know, he has he really doesn't need the subsitutes of I may say, Mr. Dan, I is a great diverse. Seems to be very knowledgeable, and I would also I do have Donna Walker or Gina. I believe her name is Vanni. Maybe they might us lower for George one night. And you know had ago guys switch, switch. I'll answer the phones. I'll answer the phones for Gina. What do you say? I'll answer Gina's calls. Gina Silva, yell her calls, and as long as I got you here. Hey, Tom com is her, why don't you ever step in and host coast to coast? Well. I have you ever asked? No. I haven't. I should. You know, better than anybody. How the show is run. That's true. I you know, I've actually for my birthday last year I think it was George. Gimme our of open lines, which is really cool, which was really cool. So, you know, maybe I will good I love that. What are these nights? There you go. Good suggestion while I'm on your hundred percent on that one. And we'll get Tom to host some night, while card line. Ron is that was Ron right in Pennsylvania. No to Pennsylvania's confusion was so Ron is in Pennsylvania to coast to coast run. Both dictates with talk radio so up on different stations so such locally. But I wanted to talk about about the warriors presentation on the post traumatic stress disorder PTSD, and it's wonderful. You're honoring you know, a very significant caused an ultimately, now, you know, Arash is best fights are. Members of the military who contract this this order. It used to be known in World War, One shell shock and World War Two is battle fatigue, but studies have shown in that first responders, and especially victims of the branch break-up of families by the very sinister child protective services human services and family court systems produce, greater instance instances incidences. Or people suffering from PTSD now I not it off. And I didn't hear what, what, what Dr lorries description of the symptoms, and treatment of PTSD. I know she said it's lasted a lifetime, but I not at all. Could you give please in a one minute summary church? She said about the symptoms, and treatment of PTSD. So let me add something that she didn't say, which is at least what I believe she would say, if he were here, and that is that shell shock battle fatigue, and PTSD are not a hundred percent synonymous, that each one of those things was consistent with the experience of that particular war. So shell shock is a type of PA. PTSD but it is not the exact same thing. And it was more related to the fact that there was so much shelling that was going on night and day night day that we would just, just, you know, in the in World War, One that kind of trench warfare that they were just firing mortars at each other all day, long and shell shock was something that came as a result of the noise and confusion of, of that type of trench warfare, where people felt incredibly powerless stuck in a mud pit somewhere and then they'd get up for a few moments of terror, and they give down again, but that constant shelling was slightly different than battle fatigue, which in World War, Two was more common because of the length of time that people served that men served in these campaigns. And it was the experience of longer term service where they were marching. Over a longer area that created a sense of battle fatigue. So there was still shell shock in World War Two and it wasn't exactly the same as battle fatigue, which is, again, a slightly different. Subcategory PTSD PTSD is a generalized anxiety. So lots of people suffer from post traumatic stress, one of the most common ways is brought on by moments of extreme terror that are related to war, and so people that served in Afghanistan Iraq or another places the Phnom it was, it was a matter of like this incredible long period of nothing happened that was punctuated suddenly punctuated by terror. And so that's the post dramatic. That's a traumatic event, as opposed to say a long-term battle fatigue. So she talked about about PTSD in a couple of. Of different contexts that have focused on events and service in the military was one of them and what he was really saying was with regard to anxiety that we have to look at that the what we can do over time in how we can treat using like empathy. Like raising our level of empathy. Individually can also help us therapeutically and so that was just an example of that. I don't think I did her Justice, but I it's an easy link. If you go to coast to coast, AM dot com, and take a look at our book and the synopsis. That's there, I think might be informative. I hope that helps Dan is trucking in Illinois on coast to coast, as we get up toward the top of the hour. Dan? All right. Just as a sidebar here. I knew a guy may knee and it was in the SAS and I don't think I yeah, I give him any. No SAS is like totally cool. So yeah big. When were you at WGN? God. So three years nineteen ninety three through ninety six I think while. Yeah, I grew up with the WGN. I was there and he just didn't notice. Pardon me. I said, I was probably there and you just didn't notice. Oh, yeah. We, we had a tour through there about that time. I just want to maybe would have been entirely possible. I was I was a faint. They I was considered the bad boy of WGN. So go figure to tell you something about, w I was the all fall Torri blah of, of WGN. Yeah. Well, I predated predated lot when I was a kid, we what's or did horror movies on Saturday night. Yeah. Creature features features. Yeah. But yeah, we're Henry man Seaney tune that. No, it was. It's Harlem knock turn. I think was the theme, right. Unloved that intro for creature features. Okay. Anyway. Go ahead. Oh, what was that? Touching base with PTSD thing and you've got into the different the different forms of it. There George Carlin did a pretty good routine on that did really. Oh, yeah. It was pretty good. And.

PTSD Paul WGN Pennsylvania George Joe Joe Adams Gina Silva Tom com Mr. Dan Moines Yano Iowa George Noory George Carlin Glenn Beck Boston
"henry man seaney" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

14:25 min | 1 year ago

"henry man seaney" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"So open lines is always fun because I never know where we're going to go. We'll start with Joe Joe into Moines on coast to coast AM. Joe joe. Hey, hey, getting hear me perfectly? Oh, hey, Yvonne. This judge Moore. Nicole. I kinda dig digging what you're what you got. Good. Good to have you welcome to the club. So I kind of asked about, you know, energy negative positive. You can't you can't Easter right? Are the fans. Bad, people have been people. You know what I mean? I don't know that everything lives in duality. But I do think that everything lives intention. How about that? So I don't know that we're always just good or bad. But I think we just in tension between poles. Paul between. Poles. Yeah. Maybe but I mean, we are in that sense that. You know, maybe for the first half of our lives, we were more bad than good. And then we reach a level of maturity in it flips and we've become more good than bad. And then we spend the rest of our life. Two. Yeah. But what do you mean by that? I mean by the down to the element to the little, what is less smallest thing called me neutrons. Adams. Yeah. There is there's always a positive native. It's a force to be racking with. Yeah, that's great. And I think again, what even so, right. There is our example, is those things exist in tension with each other. So they aren't just they don't exist. Just simultaneously. They, they exist in a space, where to split them, creates enormous energy right to split, an atom. You know, we get this amazing reaction to slam Adams together gives us the same type of reaction. So whether it's Fisher fusion, it all comes down to again. What happens when we attempt to pull those two things apart? And that's why I think it's better to be thinking to think of good and bad. And anything for that matter is existing intention with each other. I was just telling this to a friend the other day, actually, my friend who's visiting is one of the producers for Glenn Beck and I don't have a gun, I may get a gun. I'm not anti-gun at all. But I don't have one, and, and I, I, he said, well, why don't you just get a handgun to get over with? And I said, well, because everything exists in tension with each other. And I don't I haven't figured out yet. What's the other side of gun ownership? I don't know. I don't know what I'm giving up by trade off would be. He thought that was kind of bizarre, but I that's exactly how I think about everything is sort of intention with each other. So I don't know does that help interesting question at expect. No less from somebody from demoain, because Iowa is a very literate state the most highest per capita book readership in the country, is in or used to be in the state of Iowa. Paul is in. But what else did you during those long winters, Paul as in Boston on coast to coast AM, Paul? I. Shred story. You will on Zita this past Christmas. Weekend. One just lost his father, but he couldn't get any about it. Yes. Was of ESPN veteran would lost her son, who is a veteran of this latest a buckle still talk to him suicide. I still talk to him. He and I are in conversation with each other. They made out. Well, I. Yeah. I still, I still talk with the with one of them, and we spoke not too long ago, and we're trying to make arrangements where I'm gonna drive down to Wichita and and see him. We're just waiting. He wasn't comfortable yet doing that. And so I was just waiting for a time that was good for him. So, you know, it's sort of, like what we had on earlier where we were talking about PTSD and the act of forgiveness or self forgiveness. Even and we, we often think about that sometimes is like in existence like something that either does exist. It doesn't when really it's just an ongoing process, and so I hope those people keep calling back and they keep. Attempting to be a part of that conversation as far as I know Dennis's better, but I couldn't speak for him. And I wouldn't. But, you know, who knows what's better when you suffered such a huge tragedy. The fact that these gentlemen are still here and they're still processing their losses. I think that's better than the option of not being here and giving up, and I just hope if it's five percent better than it was last year than it's, it's better, maybe someday. It'll be more than that is in Pennsylvania, but I appreciate your compassion. Thank you, Paul, wildcard line Walters in Pennsylvania on coast to coast wall. Fled this freaky once again, buddy, thank you, too. That's funny. Said, you're great subsitute, the great George Noory. He's. Suggested George yet, you know he has. He really doesn't need subsitute of may say, Mr. Dan, I is a great diverse. Seems to be very knowledgeable, and I would also I do have Donna Walker or Gina. I believe her name is Vanni. Maybe they might us lower for George one nine ago, guys. Swim. I'll answer the phones. I'll answer the phones for Gina what do you say? I'll answer tina's calls. Gina Silva yell her calls and got you here. Hey, Tom, Tom, Dan, Heuser? Why don't you ever step in and host coast to coast? Well. Have you ever asked? No. I haven't. I should. You know, better than anybody. How show is run. That's true. I you know, I actually for my birthday last year. I think it was George. Gimme an hour of open lines which is really cool. Really cool. So, you know, maybe I will good love that these nights. There you go. Good suggestion wall. I'm on your hundred percent on that one. And we'll get Tom to host some night, while card line. Ron is that was Ron right in Pennsylvania. No to Pennsylvania's confusion was so Ron is in Pennsylvania to coast to coast AM, Ron. Addicted to with talk radio so up on different stations, especially locally. But I wanted to talk about Dr Lori said, presentation on the post traumatic stress disorder PTSD, and it's wonderful your honoring, you know, a very significant cause an ultimately now you know, a rash of deaths. Are members of the military who contract this disorder. It used to be known in World War, One shell shock and World War Two is battle fatigue, but studies have shown in that first responders, and especially victims of the bridge. Break-up of families by the very sinister shell protective services human services and family court systems, for deuce greater instance, instant incentives and. Vincent people suffering from from PTSD now, I, not at all. And I didn't hear what, what, what Dr lorries description of the symptoms, and treatment of PTSD. I know she said it lasted a lifetime, not at all, could you give pleasing in a one minute summary church? She said about the symptoms, and treatment of PTSD. So let me add something that she didn't say, which is at least what I believe she would say, if he were here, and that is that shell shock battle fatigue, and PTSD are not a hundred percent synonymous, that each one of those things was consistent with the experience of that particular war. So shell shock is a tie. Type of PTSD, but it is not the exact same thing. And it was more related to the fact that there was so much shelling that was going on night and day night, and day that were just, just, you know, in the in World War, One that kind of trench warfare, that they're just firing mortars at each other all day, long and shell shock was something that came as a result of the noise and confusion of, of that type of trench warfare, where people felt incredibly powerless stuck in a mud pit somewhere and then they'd get up for a few moments of terror, and they give down again, but that constant shelling was slightly different than battle fatigue, which in World War, Two was more common because of the length of time that people served that men served in these campaigns, and it was the experience of longer term service where. They were marching over a you know, a longer area that created a sense of battle fatigue. So there was still shell shock in World War Two and it wasn't exactly the same as battle fatigue, which is, again, a slightly different. Subcategory PTSD PTSD is a generalized anxiety. So lots of people suffer from post-traumatic stress. One of the most common ways is brought on by moments of extreme terror that are related to war, and so people that served in Afghanistan Iraq or another places the at Phnom. It was it was a matter of like this incredible long period of nothing happened that was punctuated suddenly punctuated by terror. And so that's the poster Matic. That's a traumatic event, as opposed to say a long-term battle fatigue. So she talked about about PTSD. In a couple of different contexts that have focused on events and service in the military was one of them and what she was really saying was with regard to anxiety that we have to look at that the what we can do over time in how we can treat using like empathy. Like raising our level of empathy. Individually can also help us therapeutically and so that was just an example of that. I don't think I did her Justice, but I it's an easy link. If you go to coast to coast, AM dot com, and take a look at our book and the synopsis. That's there, I think might be informative. I hope that helps Dan is trucking in Illinois on coast to coast, as we get up toward the top of the hour. Dan? All right. Just as a sidebar here. I knew a guy may NIA and it was in the SAS, and I don't think I call him. Yeah. No SAS totally cool. Are you at WGN? Oh, god. So three years nineteen ninety three through ninety six I think while. Yeah, I grew up with the WGN. I was there and you just didn't notice. Army. I said, I was probably there and you just didn't notice. Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. We, we had a tour to their about that time. Maybe you would have been entirely possible. I was I was a faint. They I was considered the bad boy of WGN. So go figure. Tell you something about, w I was the off all Torri blah of, of WGN. Yeah. Well, I dated year when I was. I can't we listen to or did horror movies on Saturday night. Oh, yeah. Creature features create your features. Yeah. Yeah. Henry man Seaney tune that. No, it was. It's Harlem knocked turn. I think was the theme, right. Unloved that intro for creature features. No. Anyway. Go ahead. Oh, was that? Touching base with the PTSD thing, and you got into the different the different forms of it, there, George Carlin did a pretty good routine on that Diddy really. Oh, yeah. It was pretty good. And.

PTSD Paul WGN George Mr. Dan Pennsylvania Gina Silva Joe Joe Adams Tom Moines Yvonne Nicole George Noory Moore Glenn Beck Iowa Ron Zita
"henry man seaney" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

14:24 min | 1 year ago

"henry man seaney" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Is always fun because I never know where we're going to go. We'll start with Joe Joe in Des Moines on coast to coast AM Joe Joe. Hey, hey, getting hear me perfectly? Oh, hey, Yvonne. This judge from the morning course. Geremia kinda, I'm digging what your what you got good, good to have you welcome to the club. Good. So I kinda ask about, you know, how energy native positive you can't you can't you start energy. Right. So what do you think so every facet has bad, people have good people? You know what I mean? I don't know that everything lives in duality. But I do think that everything lives intention. How about that? So I don't know that we're always just good or bad. But I think we just in a tension between poles. We're just pulled between poles. Yeah. Maybe but I mean, we are in that sense that. You know, maybe for the first half of our lives, we were more bad than good. And then we reach a level of maturity in it flips and we become more good than bad. And then we spend the rest of our life. Two. Yeah. But what do you mean by that? I mean buddy. Breaking it down to the element to the his a little, what is less. Smallest thing called me neutrons. Adams. Yeah. There is there is always a positive negative. It's a force to be reckon with. Yeah, that's great. And I think again what, what even so right. There is our example, is those things exist in tension with each other. So they are just they don't exist, just simultaneously. They, they exist in a space, where to split them, creates enormous energy right to split, an atom. You know, we get this amazing reaction to slam atoms together gives us the same type of reaction. So whether it's fishing fusion. It all comes down to again. What happens when we attempt to pull those two things apart? And that's why I think it's better to be thinking to think of good and bad. And, and anything for that matter is existing intention with each other. I was just telling this to a friend the other day, actually, my friend who's visiting who's one of the producers for Glenn Beck. And I don't have a gun, I may get a gun. I'm not anti gun at all, but I don't have one, and, and I, I said, why don't you just get a handgun to get over with? And I said, well, because everything exists in tension with each other. And I don't I haven't figured out yet. What's the other side of gun ownership? And I don't know. I don't know what I'm giving up. I don't know what my trade-off would be. He thought that was kind of bizarre. But I that's exactly how I think about everything, sort of intention with each other. So I don't know does that help. Interesting question. I'd expect. No less from somebody from damore, because Iowa is a very literate state the most highest per capita book readership in the country, is in or used to be in the state of Iowa. Paul is in. But what else did you during those long winters, Paul as in Boston on coast to coast AM, Paul? I question. Shred story good way memo you were on this past Christmas weekend. When you call one just lost his father, but he couldn't get information about it. Yes. Was Vietnam veteran who had lost her son, who a that turn of this latest Abaco. I still talk to him. So aside, I still talk to him. He and I are in conversation with each other. And I, I off by one in how they made out. Well, I call then. Yeah, I still I still talk with the with one of them, and we spoke not too long ago, and we're trying to make arrangements where I'm gonna drive down to Wichita and, and see him we're dissuading he wasn't comfortable yet doing that. And so I was waiting for a time that was good for him. So, you know, it's sort of, like what we had on earlier where we were talking about PTSD and the act of forgiveness or self forgiveness. Even and we, we often think about that sometimes is like an existence like something that either does exist or doesn't when really it's just an ongoing process. And so I hope those people. Keep calling back and they keep. Attempting to be a part of that conversation as far as I know, Dennis is better, but I couldn't speak for him. And I wouldn't. But, you know, who knows what's better when you suffered such a huge tragedy. The fact that these gentlemen are still here and they're still processing their losses. I think that's better than the option of not being here and giving up, and I just hope if it's five percent better than it was last year than it's, it's better, maybe someday. It'll be more than that Walt is in Pennsylvania, but appreciate your compassion. Thank you, Paul wildcard line Walters in Pennsylvania on coast-to-coast wall. Freak you once again, buddy. Thank you, too. That's funny. And I want to reiterate what said, you're great subsitute, those, great, George Noory. He's. I like to suggest a yet, you know, he has he really doesn't need subsitutes of. I may say, Mr. Dan is, is a great diverse. Seems to be very knowledgeable, and I would also I do have Donna Walker or. Gina. I believe her name is saw Vanni, maybe they might slower for George one night. And you know. You swim. I'll answer the phones. I'll answer the phones for Gina. What do you say? I'll answer Gina's calls. Gina Cervetti, I'll do her calls and what got you here. Hey Tom com, Dan, Heiser? Why don't you ever step in and host coast to coast? Well. I don't have you ever asked. No. I haven't. I should have. You know, better than anybody. How the show is run. That's true. I you know, I've actually for my birthday last year. I think it was George. Gimme an hour of open lines which is really cool, which was really cool. So, you know, maybe I will good I love that. What are these nights? There you go. Good suggestion while I'm on your hundred percent on that one. And we'll get Tom to host in some night, while card line. Ron is that was Ron right in Pennsylvania. No to Pennsylvania's might confusion. So Ron is in Pennsylvania to on coast to coast AM, Ron. Addicted to with talk radio, so up on different stations especially locally, but I wanted to talk about Dr Lori said, presentation on the post traumatic stress disorder. PTSD. It's wonderful. You're honoring, you know, very significant pause. An ultimately now of, you know, a rash of deaths fights are members of the military contract this disorder. It used to be known World War wanted shell shock and World War Two is battle fatigue, but studies have shown in that first responders, and especially victims of the bread break-up of families by the very sinister child protective services human services and family court system for deuce greater instance instances incidences. All right. People suffering from PTSD now I it off and I didn't hear what, what, what Dr lorries description of the symptoms. And treatment of PTSD. I know she said it's lasted a lifetime, but not at all, could you give pleasing in a one minute summary church? She said about the symptoms, and treatment of PTSD. So let me add something that she didn't say, which is at least what I believe she would say, if he were here, and that is that shell shock battle fatigue, and PTSD are not a hundred percent synonymous, that each one of those things was consistent with the experience of that particular war. So shell shock is a type of PTSD, but it is not the exact same thing. And it was more related to the fact that there was so much shelling that was going on night and day night, and day that would just just, you know in the in World War One that kind of trench warfare. Air that they were just firing mortars each other all day, long and shell shock was something that came as a result of the noise and confusion of, of that type of trench warfare, where people felt incredibly powerless stuck in a mud pit somewhere. And then they get up for a few moments of terror, and they get down again, but that constant shelling was slightly different than battle fatigue, which in World War, Two was more common because of the length of time that people served that men served in these campaigns. And it was the experience of longer term service where they were marching over a longer area that created a sense of battle fatigue. So there were still shell shock in World War Two and it wasn't exactly the same as battle fatigue, which is, again, a slightly different. Subcategory PTSD. PTSD is a generalized anxiety. So lots of people suffer from post traumatic stress, one of the most common ways is brought on by moments of extreme terror that are related to war, and so people that served in Afghanistan Iraq or another places the at Phnom. It was it was a matter of like this incredible long period of nothing happened with that was punctuated suddenly punctuated by terror. And so that's the post traumatic, that's a traumatic event, as opposed to say a long-term battle fatigue. So she talked about about PTSD in a couple of different contexts that have focused on events and service in the military was one of them and what he was really saying was with regard to anxiety that we have to look at that the what we can do over. Time in how we can treat using like empathy. Like raising our level of empathy. Individually can also help us therapeutically. And so that was just an example of that. I don't think I did her Justice, but I it's an easy link. If you go to coast to coast, AM dot com, and take a look at our book and the synopsis. That's there, I think might be informative. I hope that helps Dan is trucking in Illinois on Costa coast, get up toward the top of the hour. Dan? All right. Sidebar here. I knew a guy knee and it was in the SAS and I don't think I. Yeah. I give him any. No SAS is like totally cool. So, yeah, big time. When were you at WGN? God. So three years nineteen ninety three through ninety six I think. Wow. Yeah, I grew up with the WGN. I was there. And you just didn't notice. Pardon me. I said, I was probably there and you just didn't notice. Oh, yeah. We, we had a tour to their about that time. And I just want to maybe you had been there is in Charlie possible. I was I was like, I was considered the bad boy of WGN. So go figure bet to tell you something about WGN. I was the off all Torri blah of, of WGN. Oh boy. Yeah. I dated year. Lot when I was a kid we what or did. Or movies on Saturday night. Yeah. Creature features create your features. Yeah, yeah. Henry man Seaney to no. It was. It's Harlem, knocked turn, I think was the theme, right. Unloved that intro for creature features. Okay. Anyway. Go ahead. Oh, what else I touching base with PTSD thing and you got into the, the different the different forms of it. There George Carlin did a pretty good routine on that Diddy really. Oh, yeah. It was pretty good. And.

PTSD WGN Gina Cervetti Pennsylvania Paul Mr. Dan Joe Joe Tom com George Des Moines Yvonne Glenn Beck George Noory Iowa George Carlin Ron Adams
"henry man seaney" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

14:29 min | 1 year ago

"henry man seaney" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Seven. So open lines is always fun because they never know where we're going to go. We'll start with Joe Joe in Des Moines on coast to coast AM Joe Joe. Hey, getting hear me perfectly. Oh, hey. This judge in the morning. I hear ya and kinda digging. What you're what you got good, good to have you welcome to the club. So I kind of asked about, you know, how energy native positive. You can't you can't user, right? So what do you think, though, are they have bad, people have good people? You know what I mean? I don't know that everything lives in duality. But I do think that everything lives intention, how about that. So I don't know that we're always just good or bad. But I think we just in a tension between poles. Paul between. Poles. Yeah. Maybe but I mean, we are in that sense that. You know, maybe for the first half of our lives, we were more bad than good. And then we reach a level of maturity in it flips. We've become more good than bad. And then we spend the rest of our life. Still in there, too. Yeah. But what do you mean by that? I mean buddy. Right down to the element to the his little, what is less. Smallest thing called b neutrons. Adams. Yeah. There is there is always positive. It's a force to reckon with. Yeah, that's great. And I think again, what even so, right. There is our example, is those things exist in tension with each other. So they aren't just they don't exist. Just simultaneously. They, they exist in space. Where to split them, creates enormous energy right to split an atom. You know, we get this amazing reaction to slam atoms together gives us the same type of reaction. So whether it's Fisher fusion, it all comes down to again. What happens when we attempt to pull those two things apart? And that's why I think it's better to be think to think of good and bad. And, and anything for that matter is existing intention with each other. I was just telling this to a friend the other day, actually, my friend who's visiting is one of the producers for Glenn Beck and I don't have a gun, I may get a gun. I'm not anti-gun at all. But I don't have one and, and I, I, he said, why don't you just get a handgun get over with? And I said, well, because everything exists in tension with each other. And I don't I haven't figured out yet. What's the other side of gun ownership? And I don't know. I don't know what I'm giving up. I don't know what my off would be. He thought that was kind of bizarre. But I that's exactly how I think about everything, sort of intention with each other. So I don't know does that help interesting question at expect. No less from somebody from demoines, because Iowa is a very literate state the most highest per capita book readership in the country is in Iowa used to be in the state of Iowa. Paul is in. But what else do during those long winters, Paul as in Boston on coast to coast AM, Paul. I question. Shred story. Good new memo you were on this past Christmas on his weekend. When you call one just lost his father, but he couldn't get any Mason about it. Yes. One was Vietnam. Veteran would lost her son who say that under this latest Abaco. I still talk to him. So aside, I still talk to him. He and I are in conversation with each other. Yep. I one how they made out. Well, I. Then yeah, I still I still talk. With the with one of them, and we spoke not too long ago, and we're trying to make arrangements where I'm gonna drive down to Wichita and, and see him we're dissuading he wasn't comfortable yet doing that. And so I was waiting for a time that was good for him. So, you know, it's sort of, like what we had on earlier where we were talking about PTSD and the act of forgiveness or self forgiveness. Even and we, we often think about that. Sometimes is like an existence like something that either does exist or doesn't when really it's just an ongoing process. And so I hope those people keep calling back and they keep. Attempting to be a part of that conversation as far as I know, Dennis is better, but I couldn't speak for him. And I wouldn't. But, you know, who knows what's better when you suffered such a huge tragedy. The fact that these gentlemen are still here and they're still processing their losses. I think that's better than the option of not being here and giving up, and I just hope if it's five percent better than it was last year than it's, it's better, maybe someday. It'll be more than that Walt is in Pennsylvania, but appreciate your compassion. Thank you, Paul, wildcard line Walters in Pennsylvania on coast to coast wall. Thank you, once again, buddy. Thank you, too. That's funny. And I want to reiterate what the other call said, you're a great subsitute, great, George Noory. He's. I like to suggest a George, you know, he has he really does the need substitutes of I may say, Mr. Dan is, is a great diverse. Seems to be very knowledgeable, and I would also I do have Donna Walker or Gina. I believe her name is saw Vanni, maybe they might us lower for George one night. And you know there you go. Swim. I'll answer the phones. I'll answer the phones for Gina. What do you say? I'll answer Gina's calls. Gina Cervetti, I'll do her calls and what got you here. Hey, Tom combines are, why don't you ever step in and host coast to coast? Well. I don't have you ever asked. No. I haven't. I should. You know, better than anybody. How show is run. That's true. I you know, I actually for my birthday last year. I think it was George. Gimme an hour of open lines which is really cool, which was really cool. So, you know, maybe I will good. I love that. What nights? There you go. Good suggestion while I'm on your hundred percent on that one. And we'll get Tom to host some night, while card line. Ron that was Ron right in Pennsylvania. No to Pennsylvania's might confusion. So Ron is in Pennsylvania to on coast to coast AM, Ron. Or both addicted to with talk radio so up on different stations, so, especially locally. But I wanted to talk about a doctor lorries every patient on the post traumatic stress disorder PTSD, and it's wonderful. You're honoring you know, a very significant pause. And ultimately, now, you know, a rash of deaths fights are. Members of the military who contract this disorder. It used to be known in World War, One shell shock and World War Two is battle fatigue, but studies have shown and that first responders and especially victims of the bread break-up of family by the very sinister child protective services human services and family court systems produce, greater instance instances incidences. People suffering from PTSD now I thought it off and I didn't hear what, what, what Dr lorries description of the symptoms. And treatment of PTSD. I know she said lasted a lifetime, but not at all. Could you give pleasing a one minute summary shirt? She said about the symptoms, and treatment of PTSD. So let me add something that she didn't say, which is at least what I believe she would say, if she were here, and that is that shell shock battle fatigue, and PTSD are not a hundred percent synonymous, that each one of those things was consistent with the experience of that particular war. So shell shock is a type of PTSD, but it is not the exact same thing. And it was more related to the fact that there was so much shelling that was going on night and day night day that would just just, you know in the in World War One that kind of trench warfare. Air that they were just firing mortars at each other all day, long and shell shock was something that came as a result of the noise and confusion of, of that type of trench warfare, where people felt incredibly powerless stuck in a mud pit somewhere. And then they get up for a few moments of terror, and they get down again, but that constant shelling was slightly different than battle fatigue, which in World War, Two was more common because of the late of time that people served that men served in these campaigns. And it was the experience of longer term service where they were marching over a, you know, a longer area that created a sense of battle fatigue, that so there was still shell shock in World War Two and it wasn't exactly the same as battle fatigue, which is, again, a slightly different. Subcategory PTSD. PTSD is a generalized anxiety. So lots of people suffer from post-traumatic stress. One of the most common ways is brought on by moments of extreme terror that are related to war, and so people that served in Afghanistan Iraq or another places like the at Phnom. It was it was a matter of like this incredible long period of nothing happened that was punctuated suddenly punctuated by terror. And so that's the post dramatic. That's a traumatic event, as opposed to say a long-term battle fatigue. So she talked about about PTSD in a couple of different contexts that have focused on events and service in the military was one of them and what she was really saying was with regard to anxiety that we have to look at that the what we can do over. Time in how we can treat using like empathy. Like raising our level of empathy. Individually can also help us therapeutically and so that was just an example of that. I don't think I did her Justice, but I it's an easy link. If you go to coast to coast, AM dot com, and take a look at our book and the synopsis. That's there, I think might be informative. I hope that helps Dan is trucking in Illinois on coast to coast, as we get up toward the top of the hour. Dan? Just as a sidebar here. I knew a guy named leeann it was in the SAS, and I don't think I call him. Give him any. No SAS totally cool, though. Yeah. Big. When were you at WGN? God. So three years nineteen ninety three through ninety six I think. Wow. Yeah. I grew up with the WGN. I was there and you just didn't notice. Pardon me. I said, I was probably there and you just didn't notice. Oh, yeah, we, we had a tour to their about that time. And I just want to maybe you would have been. Only is entirely possible. I was I was a faint. They I was considered the bad boy of WGN. So go figure tell you something about WGN. I was the off all Torri blah of, of WGN boy. Yeah. I. Predated yet, a lot when I was as affect, I can't we what or did or movies on Saturday nights? Yeah. Creature features create your features. Yeah, but yeah, we're Henry man Seaney tune that. No, it was. It's Harlem knocked turn. I think was the theme, right. I loved that intro for creature features on WGN. Okay. Anyway. Go ahead. Oh, what I was touching base with the PTSD thing, and you got into the different the.

PTSD WGN Paul George Noory Pennsylvania Joe Joe Mr. Dan Gina Cervetti Tom Des Moines Iowa Glenn Beck Ron Adams Boston Mason Henry man Seaney
"henry man seaney" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

14:22 min | 1 year ago

"henry man seaney" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"So open lines is always fun because I never know where we're going to go. We'll start with Joe Joe in Des Moines on coast to coast AM Joe Joe. Hello. Hey, hey, Jeremy perfectly. Hey. This judge from Ramona course. I am digging. What's your what you got? Okay. Good to have you welcome to the club. So I kind of asked about, you know, how energy negative positives. You can't. You can't jeez. Right. So what do you think? So are they facet? Bad, people have been Deepal. You know what I mean? I don't know that everything lives in duality. But I do think that everything lives in tension. How about that? So I don't know that we're always just good or bad. But I think we just in a tension between poles. Paul between poles maybe but I mean, we are in that sense that. You know, maybe for the first half of our lives, we were more bad than good. And then we reach a level of maturity in it flips and we've become more good than bad. And then we spend the rest of our life still in there, too. Yeah. But what do you mean by that? I mean by the greatness, down to the elements of the his little, what is less. Most thing called being neutrons. Adams. Yeah. Yeah. There is there is always positive and negative. It's a force to be reckoned. Yeah, that's great. And I think again, what even so, right. There is our example, is those things exist in tension with each other. So they are just they don't exist, just simultaneously. They, they exist in a space, where to split them, creates enormous energy right to split, an atom. We get this amazing reaction to slam Adams together gives us the same type of reaction. So whether it's Fisher fusion. It all comes down to again. What happens when we attempt to pull those two things apart? And that's why I think it's better to be thinking to think of good and bad. And, and anything for that matter is existing intention with each other. I was just telling this to a friend the other day, actually, my friend who's visiting who's one of the producers for Glenn Beck. And I don't have a gun, I may get a gun. I'm not anti gun at all, but I don't have one, and, and I, I said, why don't you just get a handgun to get over with? And I said, well, because everything exists in tension with each other. And I don't I haven't figured out yet. What's the other side of gun ownership? And I don't know. I don't know what I'm giving up by trade off would be. He thought that was kind of bizarre. But I that's exactly how I think about everything is sort of intention with each other. So does that help interesting question I'd expect no less from somebody from demain, because Iowa is a very literate state the most highest per capita book readership in the country is in used to be in the state of Iowa. Paul is in. But what else do during those long winters, Paul is in Boston on Costa, Costa, Paul? I question. Shred story. Good knew you were on. I think was either this past Christmas on his weekend. Call one they just lost his father, but he couldn't get any in about it. Yes. Why's Vietnam veteran who had lost her son, who is a that turn it as latest Abaco still talk to him. So aside, I still talk to him. He and I are in conversation with each other. Yep. I wanted how they made out. Well, I. Yeah. I still I still talk. With the with one of them, and we spoke not too long ago, and we're trying to make arrangements where I'm gonna drive down to Wichita and and see him. We're just waiting. He wasn't comfortable yet doing that. And so I was just waiting for a time. That was good for them. So, you know, it's sort of, like what we had on earlier where we were talking about PTSD and the active forgiveness or self forgiveness. Even and we, we often think about that sometimes is like in existence like something that either does exist or doesn't when really it's just an ongoing process, and so I hope those people keep calling back and they keep. Attempting to be a part of that conversation as far as I know is better, but I couldn't speak for him. And I wouldn't. But, you know, who knows what's better when you suffered such a huge tragedy. The fact that these gentlemen are still here and they're still processing their losses. I think that's better than the option of not being here. And giving up and I just hope if it's five percent better than it was last year than it's, it's better, maybe someday. It'll be more than that Walt is in Pennsylvania, but appreciate your compassion. Thank you, Paul, wildcard line Walters in Pennsylvania on coast to coast below. Hello, stan. Figure once again, buddy. Thank you, too. That's funny. And I want to reiterate what the other call said, you're a great subsitute, great, George Noory. He's I like to say, just a joy yet. You know, he has a need substitutes may say, Mr. Dan is, is a great diverse. Seems to be very knowledgeable, and I would also I do have Donna Walker or Gina. I believe her name is Sal Vanni. Maybe they might lower for George one night. And you know there you go. Yeah. I'll answer the phones. I'll answer the phones for Gina. What do you say? I'll answer Gina's calls. Gina Silva yell her calls and what got you here. Hey, Tom com Heiser. Why don't you ever step in and host coast to coast? Well. Have you ever asked? No. I haven't. I should. You know, better buddy how the show is run. Yeah. That's true. I actually for my birthday last year. I think it was George. Gimme an hour of open lines which was really cool, which was really cool. So, you know, maybe I will good I love that. What are these nights? There you go. Good suggestion while I'm on your hundred percent on that one. And we'll get Tom to host some night, while card line. Ron. That was Ron right in Pennsylvania. No to Pennsylvania's confusion was so Ron is in Pennsylvania to on coast to coast run or both addicted to with talk radio so up on different stations, so especially locally, but I wanted to talk about about their lorries freeze. Impatient. On the post traumatic stress disorder PTSD and think it's wonderful. You're honoring, you know, very significant cause of an ultimately now of, you know, a rash of vast fights are members of the military who contract this disorder. It used to be known in World War wanna shell shock. And World War Two is battle fatigue, but studies have shown in that first responders, and especially victims of the bread break-up of families by the very sinister shell protected. Services human services and sadly, court systems produce greater instance, instances, and density or. People suffering from PTSD now I it off. And I didn't hear what, what, what Dr lorries description of the symptoms, and treatment of PTSD. I know she said it's lasted a lifetime, but I not at all. Could you give please in a one minute summary shirt, she said about the symptoms and treatment of PTSD? So let me add something that she didn't say, which is at least what I believe she would say, if he were here and that is that shell shock battle fatigue. And PTSD are not a hundred percent synonymous that each one of those things was consistent with the experience of that particular war. So shell shock is a type of PTSD. But it is not the exact same thing. And it was more related to the fact that there was so much shelling that was going on night and day night, and day that would just, just, you know, in the in World War, One that kind of trench warfare that they were just firing mortars at each other all day, long and shell shock was something that came as a result of the noise, and the confusion of, of that type of trench warfare, where people felt incredibly powerless stuck in a mud pit somewhere and then they'd get up for a few moments of terror, and they get back down again, but that constant shelling was slightly different than battle fatigue, which in World War, Two was more common because of the length of time that people served that men served in these campaigns. And it was the experience of longer term service where they were marching overall. A longer area that created a sense of battle fatigue that. So there was still shell shock in World War Two and it wasn't exactly the same as battle fatigue, which is, again, a slightly different. Subcategory PTSD PTSD is a generalized anxiety. So lots of people suffer from post-traumatic stress. One of the most common ways is brought on by moments of extreme terror that are related to war, and so people that served in Afghanistan Iraq or another places the at Phnom. It was it was a matter of like this incredible long period of nothing happened that was punctuated suddenly punctuated by terror. And so that's the poster Matic. That's a traumatic event, as opposed to say a long-term battle fatigue. So she talked about about PTSD in a couple of different content. Acts that have focused on events and service in the military was one of them and what he was really saying was with regard to exile that we have to look at that the what we can do over time in how we can treat using like empathy. Like raising our level of empathy. Individually can also help us therapeutically. And so that was just an example of that. I don't think I did her Justice, but it's an easy link. If you go to coast to coast, AM dot com and take a look at our book and the synopsis that's there. I think might be informative. I hope that helps Dan is trucking in Illinois coast to coast, as we get up toward the top of the hour. Dan? Just as a sidebar here. I knew a guy named leeann it was in the SAS, and I don't think I call him. Yeah. I give him any. No SAS is like totally cool. So yeah big. What were you at WGN? God. So three years nineteen ninety three through ninety six I think. Wow. Yeah, I grew up with the WGN. I was there. And you just didn't notice. Army I said, I was probably there and you just didn't notice we, we had a tour to their about that time. I just want to maybe he would have been entirely possible. I was I was a faint. They I was considered the bad boy of WGN. So go figure. That's tell you something about, w I was the off all Torri blah of. Oh boy. Yeah. Predated you when I was as a kid, we listen to the horror horror movies on Saturday nights. Yeah. Creature features features. Yeah. I could think of. But yeah, we're Henry man Seaney tune that. No, it was. It's Harlem knock turn. I think was the theme, right. Okay. I love that intro for creature features on WGN commencing. Okay. No. Anyway. Go ahead. Oh, what I was touching base with the uh PTSD thing, and you get into the different the different forms of their George Carlin did a pretty good routine on that. Really?.

PTSD Paul WGN Pennsylvania Adams Gina Silva Mr. Dan Joe Joe George Tom Des Moines Deepal Ramona Jeremy Glenn Beck George Noory Iowa George Carlin
"henry man seaney" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

14:14 min | 1 year ago

"henry man seaney" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Lines is always fun because I never know where we're going to go. We'll start with Joe Joe in Des Moines on coast to coast AM Joe Joe. Hey, hey, Jeremy perfectly. Hey. This judge from the morning. Yeah. I'm kinda I'm digging. What's your what you got good? Good to have you welcome to the club. So I kinda asked about, you know how energy negative positive. You can't you can't Easter right? So what do you think so are they have? Bad people have good people. You know me. I don't know that everything lives in duality. But I do think that everything lives intention, how about that. So I don't know that we're always just good or bad. But I think we just in a tension between poles. Paul between. Poles. Yeah. Maybe but I mean, we are in that sense that. You know, maybe for the first half of our lives, we were more bad than good. And then we reach a level of maturity in it flips and we become more good than bad. And then we spend the rest of our life. Still too. Yeah. But what do you mean by that? I mean, by the breaking it down to the element to the his a little less smallest thing, called me, neutrons. Adams. Yeah. There is there is always positive negative. It's a force to be recognized. Yeah, that's great. And I think again, what even so, right. There is our example, is those things exist in tension with each other. So they are just they don't exist, just simultaneously. They, they exist in a space, where to split them, creates enormous energy right to split, an atom. You know, we get this amazing reaction to slam atoms together gives us the same type of reaction. So whether it's Fisher fusion. It all comes down to again. What happens when we attempt to pull those two things apart? And that's why I think it's better to be think to think of good and bad. And anything for that matter is existing intention to with each other. I was just telling this to a friend the other day, actually, my friend who's visiting who's one of the producers for Glenn Beck. And I don't have a gun, I may get a gun. I'm not anti gun at all, but I don't have one, and, and I, I, he said, why don't you just get a handgun to get over with? And I said, well, because everything exists in tension with each other. And I don't I haven't figured out yet. What's the other side of gun ownership? And I don't know. I don't know what I'm giving up by trade off would be. He thought that was kind of bizarre. But I that's exactly how I think about everything, sort of intention with each other. So I don't know does that help interesting question at expect. No less from somebody from demoain, because I is a very literate state the most highest per capita book readership in the country is in. I used to be in the state of Iowa. Paul is in. But what else do you do during those long winters, Paul as in Boston on coast to coast AM, Paul? I question. Shred story. Good you were on. I was eater this past Christmas on his weekend. When you call one they just lost his father, but he couldn't get any about it. Yes. One was a Vietnam veteran who had lost her son, who is a that turn of this latest buckle. Yeah. I still talk to him. So aside, I still talk to him. He and I are in conversation with each other. I off. I wanted how they made out. Well, I then yeah, I still, I still talk with the with one of them, and we spoke not too long ago, and we're trying to make arrangements where I'm gonna drive down to Wichita and and see him. We're just waiting. He wasn't comfortable yet doing that. And so I was waiting for a time that was good for him. So, you know, it's sort of, like what we had on earlier where we were talking about PTSD and the act of forgiveness or self forgiveness. Even and we, we often think about that sometimes it's like in existence like something that either does exist or doesn't when really it's just an ongoing process, and so I hope those people keep calling back and they keep. Attempting to be a part of that conversation as far as I know, Dennis is better, but I couldn't speak for him. And I wouldn't, but, you know, who knows what's better when you've suffered such a huge tragedy. The fact that these gentlemen are still here and they're still processing their losses. I think that's better than the option of not being here. And giving up and I just hope if it's five percent better than it was last year than it's, it's better, maybe someday. It'll be more than that Walt is in Pennsylvania, but I appreciate your compassion. Thank you, Paul wildcard line Walters. In Pennsylvania on coast to coast wall below pitched in. I think you once again, buddy, thank you, too. That's funny. I want to reiterate what the other call said, you're great subsitute, great, George Noory. He's, I like to suggest a George yet, you know, he has he really doesn't need subsitutes, if I may say, Mr. Dan is, is a great diverse. Seems to be very knowledgeable, and I would also I do have Donna Walker or Gina. I believe her name is Vanni. Maybe they might us lower for George one night. And you know ago guys. Yeah. I'll answer the phones. I'll answer the phones for Gina. What do you say? I'll at your Gina's calls. Gina Silva yell her calls and got you here. Hey Tom com, Dan, Heiser? Why don't you ever step in and host coast to coast? Well. I don't have you ever asked. No. I haven't I should. You know, better than anybody. How the show is run. That's true. I you know, I've actually for my birthday last year. I think it was George. Gimme an hour of open lines which is really cool, which was really cool. So, you know, maybe I will good love that. What are these nights? There you go. Good suggestion while I'm on your hundred percent on that one. And we'll get Tom to, to host some night, while card line. Ron. That was Ron right in Pennsylvania. No to Pennsylvania's confusion was so Ron is in Pennsylvania to on coast to coast AM run. Or addicted to with talk radio so up on different stations, especially locally. But I wanted to talk about Dr Lori said, 'Presentation on the post traumatic stress disorder PTSD, and it's wonderful. You're honoring, you know, very significant cause an ultimately now of, you know, Arash is best spice are of members of the military contract this disorder. It used to be known world will want to shell shock and World War Two is battle fatigue, but studies have shown in that first responders, and especially victims of the bread break-up of families by the very sinister shell protective services human services and sadly court systems produce. Greater instance incidents incidences. All right. People suffering from some PTSD now. I thought it off and I didn't hear what, what, what Dr lorries description of the symptoms, and treatment of PTSD. I know she said it's lasted a lifetime, but not at all. 'cause you give pleasing in a one minute summary shirt, she said about the symptoms, and treatment of PTSD. So let me add something that she didn't say, which is at least what I believe she would say, if he were here and that is that shell shock battle fatigue. And PTSD are not a hundred percent synonymous that each one of those things was consistent with the experience of that particular war. So shell shock is a type of PTSD. But it is not the exact same thing. And it was more related to the fact that there was so much shelling that was going on night and day night and day that we would just, just, you know, in the in World War, One that kind of trench warfare that they were just firing mortars at each other all day, long and shell shock was something that came as a result of the noise and confusion of, of that type of trench warfare, where people felt incredibly powerless stuck in a mud pit somewhere and then they'd get up for a few moments of terror, and they give down again, but that constant shelling was a slightly different than battle fatigue, which in World War, Two was more common because of the length of time that people served that men served in these campaigns, and it was the experience of longer term service where they were marching overall. A you know, a longer area that created a sense of battle fatigue. So there was still shell shock in World War Two and it wasn't exactly the same as battle fatigue, which is, again, a slightly different. Subcategory PTSD PTSD is a generalized anxiety. So lots of people suffer from post traumatic stress, one of the most common ways is brought on by moments of extreme terror that are related to war, and so people that served in Afghanistan, or Iraq or another places like Vietnam. It was it was a matter of like this incredible long period of nothing happened that was punctuated suddenly punctuated by terror. And so that's the post dramatic. That's a traumatic event, as opposed to say a long-term battle fatigue. So she talked about about PTSD in a couple of different context. Texts that have focused on events and service in the military was one of them and what he was really saying was with regard to anxiety that we have to look at that the what we can do over time in how we can treat using like empathy. Like raising our level of empathy. Individually can also help us therapeutically and so that was just an example of that. I don't think I did her Justice, but it's an easy link. If you go to coast to coast, AM dot com, and take a look at our book and the synopsis. That's there, I think might be informative. I hope that helps Dan is trucking in Illinois on coast to coast, as we get up toward the top of the hour. Dan? All right. Just as a sidebar here. I knew a guy knee and it was in the SAS, and I don't think I call him. Give him any. No SAS is like totally cool. So yeah big. When were you at WGN? God. So three years nineteen ninety three through ninety six I think. Wow. Yeah, I grew up with the WGN. I was there. And you just didn't notice. Army I said, I was probably there and you just didn't notice. Oh, yeah. We, we had a tour through there about that time. I just want to maybe you have been there when we entirely possible, I was, I was a faint. They I was considered the bad boy of WGN. So go figure to tell you something about WGN. I was the off all Torri blah of, of WGN boy. Yeah. I. I dated a lot when I was as a. A kid we listen to our horror movies on Saturday nights. Yeah. Creature features create your features. Yeah. Could think of. But yeah, we're Henry man Seaney tune that. No, it was. It's Harlem Nocturne. I think was the theme, right. I love that intro for creature features. WTN commencing. Okay. No. Anyway, go ahead. Oh, what I was touching base with the PTSD thing, and you got into.

PTSD WGN Paul George Noory Pennsylvania Gina Silva Mr. Dan Joe Joe Tom com Des Moines Jeremy Glenn Beck Iowa Ron Adams
"henry man seaney" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"henry man seaney" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Three point one af become. In Washington today. The US prim court handed down a landmark decision despite the growing number of death row inmates who've been exonerated due to DNA evidence. The court reaffirmed legality of the death penalty on the grounds that it is quote, totally bad ass for more on the case, we go live now to Washington correspondent, Jane Carmichael hygiene, Michael how did the supreme court come to their decision on this ruling? Well, Michael began this morning when the lawyers for the petitioner presented to the court videotape lethal injection that showed an inmate writing and pain before dying as the Tate played Justice. Kennedy said quote, whoa. Justice Alito remarked, quote, holy and Justice Ginsburg said quote, that's wicked the final ruling was eight to one in favor of the respondent. Tell us about the lone dissenting vote that one came from Justice, Anthony Kennedy. He stated that the death penalty is in fact, a too lenient punishment and that sentencing inmates to life without parole. Seemed quote way. More brutal. Because it's like they're on some sort of prison colony in the future where they just have to fight for the rest of their lives. Jane Carmichael reporting from the supreme court force again. Thank you. Jane? Thank you, Michael. Twenty three. Back to the show. Vic great legend. Legendary Henry men Seaney the great American composer conductor. Henry man Seaney born on this day sixteenth, nineteen twenty four you're talking about one of the top composers conductors of all time. Whereas this great Peter Gunn theme, but he had so many others. You're remember this one. I'm sure. The Pink Panther theme. Do. Man. Mrs Henry, man, Seaney also days of wine and roses, baby. Elephant walk. So many Mr. lucky love. Theme from the story. List goes on and on. His police in New York state, by the way, nine way, you listen to the pet Walsh show six nine to one fifteen thirty. He liked to call about anything. One eight hundred eight three four fifteen thirty police in New York state say that a driver offered an explanation for what caused her to lose control of her car. This reminds me of a story KENDALL of about. Four years ago on this very show. Something I kind of went through almost the.

Henry man Seaney Jane Carmichael Anthony Kennedy Michael supreme court Justice Alito Washington Justice Ginsburg US New York Mrs Henry Tate Peter Gunn Walsh Four years
"henry man seaney" Discussed on Blockbuster

Blockbuster

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"henry man seaney" Discussed on Blockbuster

"Movies. March twenty third nineteen thirty three Hollywood an orange sun is setting and there's an electric in the air in front of a newly constructed landmark of Hollywood Boulevard Grameen's Chinese theater. It is a spectacle the outside built to resemble a giant Chinese temple with ornate guardian lions to either side of its majestic entrance up close. The detail is overwhelming and already there's a new tradition of celebrities leaving their handprints in the concrete out front. The Chinese theater will become the most famous movie theater in the world in the forecourt in front of the entrance is ten foot tall paper machine bust an enormous eight. Of that tonight is the world premiere of radio pictures, King Kong, and crowds and 'paparazzi gather as cast arrived and infront they're greeted by Kong himself, a prop from the film. It's a spectacle. Like, no one has ever seen before. Inside is a Grand Palace adorned with rich golden engravings and long red curtains. The Chinese theater is built for the grandeur celebrity of Tinseltown. The first theater to have air conditioning. And tonight, it's hosting the debut of the most anticipated film of all time. King. Call is breathtaking. The stories epic the special effects are breakthroughs. They use clay stop motion animation for the giant apes climb. The Empire State building. And it's the music that steals the show a booming dramatic or textual score. By the great composer, max Steiner that makes Kong terrifying. When the lights go up. There's a thunderous applause. The film is a masterpiece and that music, but where's the orchestra? They're nowhere to be seen. Somehow found a way to fit the whole orchestra onto the dialogue track of the film. A breakthrough Hollywood escapism King Kong will become a spectacle making over two million dollars in the height of the great depression and become an inspiration for decades, particularly for a young Steven Spielberg and a young George Lucas. Summer nineteen Fifty-eight Twentieth Century Fox studios. Composer named Henry man Seaney has hired a talented young jazz pianist to record the theme for a television show called Peter Gunn. His name is Johnny Williams. Something like that. You think Henry perfect beautiful? Johnny is twenty nine years old happily married to a beautiful actress named Barbara Rick. Sorry. Sorry. Sorry. Hi, sorry to bother. You. Do you know where the studio cafe is? I'm supposed to be meeting. Some the studio lot is bustling. Johnny makes his way through the crap. He never considered show. Business is calling. But every show needed music and he loved to play over the years on the studio lot he developed friendships with other musicians. None more. So than Alfred Hitchcock's grumpy composer yard hermit way. Obeng Johnny the nod. I'm so sorry to keep you. Wait. Henry you work in late Harman will become famous for the shrieking musical horror of psycho, especially the famous shower scene. A similar technique that Johnny would echo years later on a film about a shark terrorising a beach Johnny loved Bernard because he was direct blunt a New Yorker never afraid to tell him what he thought Johnny and Barbara would often have Bernard over for dinner. Oh, God, it would be wonderful to someday right of real symphony. You know, instead of these little TV tunes, look, Johnny. If you want to write a symphony who stopping you, you just gotta go right it. It was simple guidance like that Johnny found most valuable soon he was orchestrating then composing for TV shows, then writing music for little movies that barely had a music budget. Little did he know his soundtracks were already being collected by an up and coming filmmaker named Steven Spielberg who vowed to one day work with this John Williams on a movie of his own.

Obeng Johnny King Kong Henry man Seaney Johnny Williams Hollywood Steven Spielberg Barbara Rick Empire State building Tinseltown max Steiner Alfred Hitchcock Grand Palace Bernard Twentieth Century Fox John Williams Harman Peter Gunn Little
"henry man seaney" Discussed on Hit Parade | Music History and Music Trivia

Hit Parade | Music History and Music Trivia

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"henry man seaney" Discussed on Hit Parade | Music History and Music Trivia

"Credence is second straight top ten hit was bad moon. Rising the song about a bad moon on the rise. And not for all you Monda. Green fans out there directions to a bathroom on the right? John Fogerty wrote bad moon rising as a gentle satire of the hippie generations fascination with horoscopes and astrology and in less than two and a half minutes. He packed in three verses and choruses and the tar Sola bad moon. Rising reached the top ten in June of nineteen sixty-nine at a moment. When the chart was dominated by the Beatles smash get back within three weeks, bad moon rising had reached number two matching the peak of proud Mary by then the Beatles had departed the number one spot, but the song holding CCR in the runner up slot was not a rock song. It was not only considerably milder than get back. It. Made Tommy rose dizzy sound like a wild hippie freakout by comparison. Now, let's give Henry man Seaney, his do one of the most decorated film and television composers of all time writer of moon river and the Pink Panther feet winner of four Oscars and twenty Grammy awards, and the freak chart topper of the summer of nineteen sixty-nine with his orchestration of love theme from Romeo, and Juliet one of his few recordings that he didn't write man Sienese love theme from Romeo and Juliet was a cover of Nino rotas signature melody from the nineteen sixty eight Franco Zeffirelli film of Shakespeare's romantic tragedy. It was so mild Manzini himself put it on the B-side of his single the windmills of your mind, not thinking, it terribly commercial. But piles of requests from listeners to pop radio stations. Turned man Sienese b side into an ACO then a smash and injected the Beatles from number one the same week bad moon rising reached number two. It was a stunning upset in a summer of peak rock by a song countless couples would dance to at their weddings in the next year. How do I know love theme from Romeo and Juliet was the nineteen seventy wedding song of Frank and Francesca Mouland fee. Creedence Clearwater revival were outmaneuvered on the hot one hundred again. But of course, Jon Fogarty had more arrows in his quiver. Bad moon rising was the lead off single to credence his third album and second of nineteen sixty-nine called green river when that album arrived in the summer. It's titled track was tapped as CCR's next single. Green river. Incidentally, the favourite credence song of your humble hip. Raid host was not only John Fogarty's most irresistible riff rocker. It was also surprisingly one of his most personal songs. A memoir in under three minutes. Green river tells of vacation spot where the Fogarty's would spend summer days in their childhood. The lyric up at cody's camp. I spent my days commemorated an actual campsite in the area around Petach creek in winters, California. Propelled by a blistering swamp rock riff. Green river made the creek of John Fogarty's youth sound like it belonged in the deep south. But unlike his imaginary ferryboat Queen or his vision of bio country on green river, Sean Fogarty was quite literally writing what he knew. Green river was another fast-breaking hot one hundred smash released in July nineteen sixty nine by mid August. The single was already in the top ten in only its fourth week on the hot one hundred it kept inching up the top ten for another month and a half reaching number two by late September CCR's most familiar chart position. And they're green river would peak because in the dog days of summer nineteen sixty nine bubblegum pop had struck again, and this time it wasn't from journeyman confectioner like Tommy Roe credence was stopped by a song from a group that didn't even exist. The

green river John Fogarty Beatles moon river Romeo Tommy Roe Sean Fogarty John Fogerty Juliet CCR Henry man Seaney Franco Zeffirelli Clearwater Petach creek Manzini Nino rotas Oscars California cody
"henry man seaney" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"henry man seaney" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"Credence is second straight top ten hit was bad moon. Rising the song about a bad moon on the rise. And not for all you Monda. Green fans out there directions to a bathroom on the right? John Fogerty wrote bad moon rising as a gentle satire of the hippie generations fascination with horoscopes and astrology and in less than two and a half minutes. He packed in three verses and choruses and the tar Sola bad moon. Rising reached the top ten in June of nineteen sixty-nine at a moment. When the chart was dominated by the Beatles smash get back within three weeks, bad moon rising had reached number two matching the peak of proud Mary by then the Beatles had departed the number one spot, but the song holding CCR in the runner up slot was not a rock song. It was not only considerably milder than get back. It. Made Tommy rose dizzy sound like a wild hippie freakout by comparison. Now, let's give Henry man Seaney, his do one of the most decorated film and television composers of all time writer of moon river and the Pink Panther feet winner of four Oscars and twenty Grammy awards, and the freak chart topper of the summer of nineteen sixty-nine with his orchestration of love theme from Romeo, and Juliet one of his few recordings that he didn't write man Sienese love theme from Romeo and Juliet was a cover of Nino rotas signature melody from the nineteen sixty eight Franco Zeffirelli film of Shakespeare's romantic tragedy. It was so mild Manzini himself put it on the B-side of his single the windmills of your mind, not thinking, it terribly commercial. But piles of requests from listeners to pop radio stations. Turned man Sienese b side into an ACO then a smash and injected the Beatles from number one the same week bad moon rising reached number two. It was a stunning upset in a summer of peak rock by a song countless couples would dance to at their weddings in the next year. How do I know love theme from Romeo and Juliet was the nineteen seventy wedding song of Frank and Francesca Mouland fee. Creedence Clearwater revival were outmaneuvered on the hot one hundred again. But of course, Jon Fogarty had more arrows in his quiver. Bad moon rising was the lead off single to credence his third album and second of nineteen sixty-nine called green river when that album arrived in the summer. It's titled track was tapped as CCR's next single. Green river. Incidentally, the favourite credence song of your humble hip. Raid host was not only John Fogarty's most irresistible riff rocker. It was also surprisingly one of his most personal songs. A memoir in under three minutes. Green river tells of vacation spot where the Fogarty's would spend summer days in their childhood. The lyric up at cody's camp. I spent my days commemorated an actual campsite in the area around Petach creek in winters, California. Propelled by a blistering swamp rock riff. Green river made the creek of John Fogarty's youth sound like it belonged in the deep south. But unlike his imaginary ferryboat Queen or his vision of bio country on green river, Sean Fogarty was quite literally writing what he knew. Green river was another fast-breaking hot one hundred smash released in July nineteen sixty nine by mid August. The single was already in the top ten in only its fourth week on the hot one hundred it kept inching up the top ten for another month and a half reaching number two by late September CCR's most familiar chart position. And they're green river would peak because in the dog days of summer nineteen sixty nine bubblegum pop had struck again, and this time it wasn't from journeyman confectioner like Tommy Roe credence was stopped by a song from a group that didn't even exist. The

green river John Fogarty Beatles moon river Romeo Tommy Roe Sean Fogarty John Fogerty Juliet CCR Henry man Seaney Franco Zeffirelli Clearwater Petach creek Manzini Nino rotas Oscars California cody
"henry man seaney" Discussed on Everything's Coming Up Simpsons

Everything's Coming Up Simpsons

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"henry man seaney" Discussed on Everything's Coming Up Simpsons

"In the crowd is going and they keep they hold it longer and the crowd finally stops. Tired? I love that gag because it's like every time of here comes the national anthem cringe. Yeah. Yeah. I I was watching this with a group of people last night who are all around, you know, twenties thirties, and, you know, for people that age it's kind of like, well, what's the joke here because that's all many of us have known the national anthem right of cour- be which was like all the vocal flourishes in pleading members played by Daryl Coley with because he sang a little bit differently than like, definitely when he speaks. It's like super guttural. And right. You know, this is the only time that we've ever really seen him sing just mostly been jazz may. Yeah, I I love all those little tiny nuances that exist in those especially in the early seasons of the Simpsons when it's not, you know, y-, you know, slap like slapping unique about funny. It is like it's it's very much like their little moments. That are just so they make you laugh, but it's also just kind of like sweet, there's something nice about it. Sneaked in elephant walk relief is heavily featured in. That's a great great song. Henry man Seaney wrote then. Yeah. And he also wrote though too. Not the. You know, and you tell the elephant walk if you didn't know the title of it, it would conjure up. Yeah. Like elephants in the jungle to me it did. And and then there was a reference to the natural. Yes. When when a ball got hit in the natural. Oh, yeah. Music would swell up, and it would be like, I don't know. It was Randy Newman who wrote that. It was very powerful realize that Randy Newman wrote that. Wow. I thought he loved LA. Yeah. I thought I'd never see a Simpson on a t shirt. Yeah. It's like, you know, selfie facing. But people were so into it. They got what that gag meant. Of course. I want to say that you know, this is second season. Of course, it is early early early. Simpson's. I may be earlier than a lot of our listeners checked into the Simpsons are considered the golden age. But every time I have a conversation with people about you know, like when do the Simpsons really start to find their footing. I feel like most conversations people point to dance in Homer as being like what they remember being the best episode of season two perhaps because Tony Bennett in Tony Bennett. Yeah. Tony Bennett giving the best weird line read. I've ever heard in my life on the Simpsons. This winging town call. Blue city. You know, it was so cool. Well, there's a moment when they're driving and March points, it's Tony Bennett. And he goes high nice to see you. And we had Martin on the show and he wrote that song and we asked him. What's that deal? I've always wondered because that track is featured on some of the Simpsons albums like why does he go up at the end. And I thought it was going to be some great mystery. Some big reason it was oh, that's just how he did. It. Movin on can't mess with like genius. And Frank Sinatra. He came across, you know, as one of these guys, you know, while you know, there was this Dame. We don't say Dame's anymore. Well, it was this skirt. Tomato. I can't say anything. That those guys were geniuses full different way. Yeah. They're art. Yeah. Like Sinatra was a genius at phrasing. This this like tough guy from Hoboken. You know jersey. Yeah. Yeah. Totally. And let's see all that great gag about. Oh, how margin I talked about it for years. We'd talk about it for years to come. She fell asleep before I did for the first time Marsh fell asleep before I did like that was paint such a picture that is of course, when you know, he's been recruited to go to capital city to be the new additional mascot as a bonus to the capital city goofball because you know, he's getting up there in age, and he's not able to you know, dance around in the same kind of way. Yes. So basically kind of to to walk you through the episode in case, it's been a minute since you've seen it the let's actually play that first clip just to kinda to to start us off..

Tony Bennett Simpsons Randy Newman Frank Sinatra Daryl Coley Martin Simpson Henry man Seaney Marsh Dame Hoboken LA
"henry man seaney" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"henry man seaney" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"The ocean by Led Zeppelin. I always forget to it has that little intro outfall ready, which is kind of like a bunch of drunk on the dock. I got another one of those coming, but it's your turn speaking of oceans, Jim, the artist named Frank ocean sang sung about a river. I think one of the greatest songs about a river ever written. I'm talking about moon river written by Henry man Seaney with lyrics by Johnny Mercer. The song is notable because it was originally performed by Audrey Hepburn in that nineteen sixty one movie breakfast at Tiffany's. One all sorts of wards an Academy Award the next year at one record of the year in the Grammys. But here we have Frank ocean now resurfacing. So to speak in two thousand eighteen were pining for new music from Frank ocean. And he gave us a cover earlier this year of moon river, which I think is just extraordinary. He does. You know, he's a great vocalist. He does a couple of tricks with his vocals on this. Tune double tracks them. He does that speed it up thing little bit of auto tuning. There's some alteration going on in one of the vocal channels, and it's almost like he's. Being a conversation with himself. This is song about these two drifters who are seeking adventure in this glorious unknown. You know, the moon river where where's it? Gonna take me and ocean himself is somewhat of a searcher. You know, in matters of identity in matters of, you know where his home. It's a beautiful song that suits a lot of the Matic concerns that Frank ocean has had throughout his career. This is Frank ocean with moon river on sound opinions. It is in. I'm crossing you in. Nigga. The young. She's. Of to see. Sacha. Great. We'll see. Has..

Frank ocean moon river Audrey Hepburn Academy Award Jim Johnny Mercer Tiffany Henry man Seaney