17 Burst results for "Henry Timms"

"henry timms" Discussed on Something You Should Know

Something You Should Know

06:05 min | 3 weeks ago

"henry timms" Discussed on Something You Should Know

"The Internet. Were all part of this huge community and this connectivity has allowed the creation of smaller communities and businesses. For example, AIRBNB, and Uber. AIRBNB as a business that allows you to book a place to stay but AIRBNB doesn't own those places. They've just connected the community that allows people to rent places from each other. Uber doesn't own a fleet of cars. Instead, they've connected people who do have cars with people who need a ride. This ability to connect people creates power for those who do it? Well, it has been called new power and it's something we can all understand and benefit from. Henry Timms has studied this carefully and he's the author of a new book called New Power how power works in our hyper connected world and how to make it work for you. I Henry thanks for coming on. Thank you so much really appreciate it and we obviously. Thrilled to be pulled his own cost. You guys are amazing. So explain what you mean in more detail than I just did explain what you mean by new power. The argument we've made is there is this new skill everybody needs to learn, and that is the skill can harnessing the energy of connected crowd, and so you look across all world look the. Unexpected victories of trump or an Obama look at the amazing power of the platforms like facebook Yuba, look at the social movements like me to on own ever again. Well they all having call is a workout is critical skill which is building the power of the crowd, and that's what we cool new power. Now, we don't think Oh, power is on the way out. So power if you think about power set of skills that we all learn anyone who's who's been successful over the loss decades learn how to be manager and learn how to influence in top Leeann learn how to think about kind of raising money in on the attention writing right press releases. But that skills now needs to go alongside this avenue power skills and those people who can most old power m new power of the people who were winning, right? So this ability to harness this interconnected world I would imagine that people would hear examples like Uber and Airbnb, and the other people that you and your co author mentioned and think we'll, but I'm not them I. Well, how does this apply to me? Yet. That's right. So I think Wallace take a let's take a a small example. There was a group of go scouts in Washington and they will offer two hundred thousand dollars. By. The dentist one, hundred, thousand dollars just one thing none of the money can go to support transgender goes. and. So what they did was they launched a campaign. It was called Hashtag for every go and it celebrated how inclusive a branch of the go scouts were and not only did it make broad statement to the wider community about what they stood for but they ended up raising over three hundred thousand dollars from connected crowd. One of many examples of the kinds away the everyday people are grabbing the same skills. FACEBOOK will Yuba you so well and bringing him into into their everyday lives. and. What's the secret sauce for doing that? How why is it that some go fund me pages raise millions and others ray ten raise ten cents. Well, there's no question as in sometimes, but I think there's also something else go home, which is how ready think about community dynamics one of the. Dangers with new power is lots of organizations will try something once in a while. So once a year, they'll have a sweepstake to invite that communities to. Send in their ideas for new product tool once the will roll out, do kind of off me anything on Youtube, and then the rest of the will go back to business as usual. But the people who do new Powell well are those people who it all of the time day after day after day thinking about building these muscles around how you connect with the crowd but isn't the the essence of power. Is, that you have something other people don't you have power over them to some extent that if everybody is powerful than nobody's powerful because then we're all the same well, think about something like the me too movement. Now that began with with Toronto book the activists but has spread now to make many women around the world more powerful hasn't ended one person becoming super famous taking up the agency is ended up distributing power broadly throughout network I think often just in the mindset that we. Expect everything to roll up to the benefit of one leader one individual. That's how the power world worked and there wasn't real dangerous to that obviously effective strategy. But lots of times we saw these movements rise up all these innovations rise up where they built around the figure of one one, very powerful charismatic individual and when that path cars Masic individual stepped aside or fell out, favor the movement they lead fell over with but if more and more people are exerting this new power. The only way you can exert new power over a community is to get their attention to get their time to get their involvement. Will I only have so many hours in a day to give to all these people with their new power. So the more of them who asked me the fewer of them will get the less powerful they become. More people exert their new power I think that's a very good insight and I think the outlines actually the The great challenge of our time. So if you think about people is bending almost an hour day now facebook why are they doing? It's because facebook offering them in this very meaningful, very rewarding routes participation F- eating invested that feeling agency that feeding belonging, and that's drawing them away from along the traditional sources of power and all the appetizers. A lot of things had our attention before lost our attention books something facebook..

facebook AIRBNB Henry Timms Yuba Obama Washington Leeann Youtube Toronto Wallace Powell
"henry timms" Discussed on Here's The Thing

Here's The Thing

07:29 min | 5 months ago

"henry timms" Discussed on Here's The Thing

"Subway it from one to five in the morning they both had to sell it. It was particularly controversial because it meant getting the homeless out of the subway. And that's a very politically charged issue. And they stuck together on that sharing the responsibilities between the city's public health system and the larger voluntary system that the state regulates they understand the importance of working together particularly as we start to reopen the economy. And bring people back. We have to sell confidence. That will not happen if we're a house. Divided city and state competing with each other. New York historically has been resilient because we were pragmatic during occupy Wall Street the WASHINGTON AFL CIO. Trumka tried to get the unions to March with occupy Wall Street to March down Broadway in protest and create a giant outpouring organized. Labor leaders refused to do it. They said we need the financial industry in New York. We need them to come back. And they rose above the ideological to come down on the side of New York. And that's the moral the lesson that we have to take forward. We've got to stick together. I I was thinking as you were torquing Kathy in the seventies To help the city get out of its financial crisis. The rudin family and members of the real estate community started prepaying taxes because they knew that the city needed the receipts immediately. You know right now. The big companies Bloomberg announced this some. The banks announced at Mastercard. They're paying their vendors within one or two days as soon as they can for the very Rayson just to keep the money in the system and to keep businesses going. Yeah which makes sense. Also just say on to take the regional perspective. Kathy will be shocked. Governor Cuomo has also been instrumental in pulling together the neighboring states and maybe laying the groundwork for creating more of an ongoing coordination between these states on investment policies and other things because if all the things come to pass where some people start to say. Let's let's leave accounts payable outside Manhattan? We'd like is for them to stay in the Metropolitan Region for for the businesses to see themselves as regionally based distributing their their workforce across the region as needs and costs. Make the most sense and that's beneficial for all of us and. I think that we're I think it's been tremendous leadership on the part of the governor's up and down the northeast working together. One question I had for you Kathy. You spoke out forcefully against the city's workers bill of rights. Granting sick leave and hazard pay for essential workers which of course put you at odds with Cory Johnson? And so for people like that. Why was that the case well? I testified yesterday that it's not a matter of lack of compassion. We all share that but the burden of some of these Of some these requirements and this is focused on essential industries. Well essential industries. Is Everything from the Securities Industry Wall Street to the healthcare workers to the grocery store workers etc. And there's a lot of difference in those and at the federal level. We have done a lot to get money to workers. With the enriched unemployment. There are issues of resources. Do we have the resources? The businesses that they're asking to pay essential workers and the hospitals by the way they are all stretched very thin financially. So it's not that you can just pass a law like you could do in the last twelve years when we had prosperity. These businesses have profit margins of five percent or less and a lot of those are gone Consumer spending year-over-year is down thirty seven percent in New York City since a year ago so that money has disappeared from our economy. There's a tendency to think. Well we can make a law and fix this along will not fix this. We have compassion for these workers. We all want to reward them. But you're not gonNA do that with a law. You have to figure out another way to do that. And in the case of the nineteen seventies crisis the unions. The workers sacrificed. They sacrificed their salary. Increases the public service workers. We can count on that again. That's what was my next question which was do you think that New York unions which are pretty tough. Unions can be relied upon to sacrifice again. I absolutely do I absolutely do. I think they care about New York. They've got a huge stake in the future of the city. Just as I think everybody has to sacrifice people have to see that business is sacrificing. People have to see funds that are being raised by the one percent to support the undocumented workers who don't qualify for the trump unemployment insurance. That's the kind of thing that's going on. In New York. Top End restaurants that are delivering meals to poor communities and to healthcare workers. I absolutely believe that everyone is going to make a sacrifice for the city because we all love. We've got to get that back. The question is timing and how much suffering is between now and then if I if I can agree with that in one of the things that we do have as an advantage in New York. Frankly is that we went through these tough times over the last twenty years between nine eleven. Two Thousand and eight Sandy. The city came together after each of those community started looking out for each other started to realize how how important those connections were 'cause I talked to Mike counterparts around the country and I don't think other cities and Metro regions. Have that kind of resiliency. That New York does because they haven't been tested over the last generation the way we have. I'm trying to focus myself on what we can control. What will we have the power to change in one thing? We're very concerned about his Broadway. Broadway is not a big cylinder in the city's converts one of them and I've been on line and talking to people a lot of what we're going to tell her. I suggest you talk to Henry Timms who's president of Lincoln Center? That's a very good point todd from the roundabout theater which I on the board of not to end on a downer. Put The arts and culture even more so than restaurants I. It's really hard to see what it's GonNa take for Lincoln Center and Broadway to come back. That's going to be really hard. Some of the big ones which have listened the philharmonic that I'm on the board of had reserves that they were piling up to renovation of David Geffen Hall and I mean I think they're going to be okay in terms of they're going to survive it just that they're gonNA have to dip into that money. That was capital approved money as operating cash. And we'RE GONNA WE'RE GONNA go back several stages on the game board in terms of raising money. Listen I'm very grateful. Not only for you doing the podcast. But for the work that you do on behalf of the people of the city of New York thank you so much thank you. It's always a pleasure. Stay safe and I'M GONNA to be sending you my proposal for the funding for therapy for substitute out of all at it in the fifth plan. Were you also have an important role as champion for the city that everybody would enjoy hearing from annual? Thank you Kathy. Wild and Tom. Right at least the private sector effort to bring the city back from this pandemic will be in good hands. I'm Alec Baldwin. Here's the thing is a production of WNYC studios..

New York City Kathy AFL Lincoln Center Trumka WNYC Mastercard Cory Johnson Governor Cuomo Alec Baldwin Manhattan CIO Bloomberg rudin David Geffen Hall
"henry timms" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

18:21 min | 7 months ago

"henry timms" Discussed on Ideas

"Thank you so much. I am so glad to be here. You know when. Cbc Your House of an Ansi told me that we were going to wait horse for the Massey lectures. I felt like I'd won the lottery. Honestly I felt it was a great privilege for me to launch the Massey. Lectures Twenty nineteen here in White Horse? So thank you for welcoming me. My assignment for the selector. Twenty Nine Thousand. Nine hundred was to find out why women were oppressed in the first place. Who did it? And how did they manage to sustain that hurt thousands if not millions of years and we're women today and what do we have to do to get to tomorrow? Well I can tell you it has been a gigantic but deliciously revealing task and the first lecture that I will deliver tonight is called in the beginnings because there have been many many beginnings so many beginnings from delicate handprints on those cave walls to God asses in ancient Mesopotamia and to the political tyranny that came in the guise of a message from God to that convoluted journey toward emancipation. The story of women is absolutely the longest revolution in history. So many times change within the wind so many times the finish line blurred and so many times hopes sword but from Toronto to Timbuktu. Half the world's population with still being left behind equality was alluding the women but now there's been a power shift a power shift that I have been watching and I can tell you that there's never been a better time to be a woman you see. Despite the blowback from misguided politicians and leftover chauvinist and those hyper masculine misogynist. Women are closer to gaining equality than ever before and the journey ahead is bound to epic. It's going to affect everything we do. It's going to affect our wallets. It's going to affect our jobs. It will affect our very future. So why now you ask. Why didn't it happen when the suffragettes were busy? Trying to get us the vote between about eighteen. Forty eight and nineteen twenty. Well they did get us the vote but we didn't get liftoff and why not during the second wave of the women's movement between about nineteen sixty three in one thousand nine hundred eighty one remember. We put our faith in the pill and we had consciousness raising groups and we were going to change at all and everybody wanted to be an astronaut. Well we demanded and got a lot of change but we didn't get liftoff and that's the third wave which is really marked at nine hundred ninety two to two thousand and ten. But it's the wave that started when Anita Hill. Remember her the American lawyer and academic was called to testify on television at the hearing. For Clarence Thomas who was to be appointed a Supreme Court justice in the United States and need a hill accused Clarence Thomas of sexually harassing her and she was excoriated by the all male judicial committee. They didn't believe her. Thomas was appointed to the Supreme Court and that followed became a watershed moment especially for American women but all women began talking about the fact that sexual harassment was not getting any attention even so the long-term status of women did not change at that time but then the fourth wave hit and it hit pretty much around twenty twelve to coincide when social media took off and they're that fourth wave provided a huge focus on intersection -ality. This was the time we were pushing for all women to get involved. This was the time we realize we're not going to get to the finish line. Unless we include all the women the women who had been marginalized indigenous women women of color. Lgbtq people disabled people poor people people of different social classes the push for greater representation in politics and business was the move. The fourth wave feminists realized had to happen and they said once we had more equitable policies and practices we would then be able to incorporate the perspectives of all people. You know earlier feminist to shake off the ties that bound us to subservience but this new wave calls for justice against discrimination against assault against harassment. It calls for equal pay and it certainly calls for individuals having choice over their own bodies. Where's like six gender non binary poly-amorous reflect the new vocabulary of these changing more diverse times? And now there's a clarion call for inclusion as being heard around the world you know this is the wave that created hashtag feminism and this is the way that put powerful abusive men on notice and by all accounts. This is the way that got liftoff. That symbiotic relationship between social media and individualism. That's what's driving the bus for change today you know. The Internet is all about instant twitter and facebook. They can elevate people into extreme popularity and celebrity and they can propel movements some of them like me too and time suck have been amplified by attention from places like the New York Times and the Hollywood film industry. But you know I have been a witness to others. That have been simmering for more than a decade as a journalist. I've watched human rights and women at the rights of women and girls become the focus of conversations whether we're in the forest the Democratic Republic of Congo or on a Savannah in Kenya or the desert of Afghanistan or on university campuses in North America. And I saw something happening that I'd never seen before. Let me explain. We always dependent on political will to change up the agenda. You know to get that politician to sign the paper so we can get the stop sign or build a shelter or change the law and indeed. We depend on public will to push the politician to take that action. All the petitions. We sign in the marches. We took place in. It took that to move things but now what I see happening I call personal will and that I believe is the driving force behind both political and public will today Malala Yousafzai. She would be a perfect example. Remember she was fifteen years old living in the Swat valley and she wanted to go to school John to learn to read it right so she could think for herself and not if someone else telling her what her beliefs were supposed to be. But that cowardly collection of thugs called the Taliban said to her. If you go to school shoot you. Well she's a girl who chose to think for herself and indeed. She defied the cowardly thugs and she did go to school in October. The eight twenty twelve. She boarded the school bus and the last words she heard were which one is Malala. It could've it could've have been such a tragedy in in another direction but what happened was Melissa's story got picked up and the world didn't let go. She was moved around and finally to England where I mean I think we were all reading about the surgery. They were going to do on this girl in our daily newspapers and Malala recovered and she started a movement. She spoke out for girls. She was only a girl herself and today everyone knows her. You know her. I know her my grandchildren know her. Malala has become the world daughter and she got there not because the politicians in the Swat Valley said I insist the girls go to school. Not because the people in the Swat valley marched around demanding that they open those those schools for girls. She got there because she said that's what I'm going to do. It was personal. Will that propelled Malala? You know the other telling cited this episode. Is that atrocities like this happen a lot. They happen all over the world and they happen practically on a daily basis but as I said earlier this time the grabbed onto this story and they didn't let it go and I believe that is powerful proof of the fact that we now have liftoff for women that the rest of the world understands people realize dismissing half. The world's population is dangerous. It's expensive and it's wrong. But how do we know which movement is going to lift off? How do we know if we're going to be able to sustain it? So the Holy Grail for social innovators today is knowing which one will create a rise in personal power which one can be sustained so there are two authors of a book called New Power. The authors are called Jeremy Hymens and Henry Timms and they think they know the formula for which movements will fly. And which ones won't they call the difference between old power and and new power words like currency and current? Let me explain. They say old power is like currency it's held by few and once it gained its jealously guarded and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend it's closed inaccessible leader driven it downloads. And it captures someone like Harvey Weinstein might be an example of old power but as for the new power that's exemplified by the metoo movement. It's like a current it's made by many. It's open is participatory. It's peer driven. It uploads and distributes. It's like water or win when it surges. It gets even better. The goal with new power is not to hoard but to channel channel it and the conclusion of these authors is that need to give a sense of power to the participants and that each individual story was strengthened by the surge of a much larger current. You and I know that to be true. We've been taking part in it in ourselves. And today that empowerment is taking on everything from date rape to those old lingering mores that cling to the lives of women. The way barnacles cling to ships. They attach themselves to ship slowing them down. Denying Fair passage and it is that change. That is fueling what we need to do in the world today. And it's producing enormous life altering change so my own voyage on this equality caravan began with a kipper. I don't know if you know what a kipper is. But it's a fish that's been split salted and dried it's an unusual an ugly looking concoction that used to appear out of clouds of dense smoke over wrought iron frying pan at my mother stove on Saturday mornings. In my mother's kitchen the kipper with served like food for the Gods to my father who sat at the end of the kitchen table. It was a ritual that my maritime mother executed for my Scottish father while my sisters and I watched over our bulls wide. This broad flat dark offering was picked apart and devoured with Gusto so I thought the Kipper was about breakfast on Saturday morning or about being Scottish. I really didn't consider it with anything else until I was eleven. And that's when my little brother. Ten years younger than me was big enough to sit in a high chair and poke that high chair up to the table. And they're in front of. My astonished is my father was slipping tiny pieces of kipper to my brother. Here he was saying is rather lovely. Highland brogue with the patriarch. Here you are laddy. I thought what's that about I was never offered a piece of that frightful fish. Neither where my sisters and although I doubt we'd ever asked for a bite of it nor had this small male in the high chair who couldn't even talk and I thought what goes on here. How come this boy got something we three girls never got it wasn't about favoritism my father was guilty of adoring of for kids in our family but it was a ritual in the making. It was a father sharing his Scottish tradition with his beloved son. Probably as its own father did with him. I wasn't jealous really but I was perplexed and this moment marked for me the beginning of a long journey it would be followed soon enough by other telltale signs that always not equal between boys and girls for example in high school. I played a lot of sports and basketball. The girls were only allowed to play two thirds of the basketball court. The boys played the whole court. And when you tripled the basketball. The girls only were allowed to triple the basketball three times. The boys could dribble it all they wanted. There is no such restriction for them and when the weather turned nice we went outside for track and field with the boys ran marathons. We were not allowed to run marathons in fact. I learned later that although the marathon became an Olympic sport in eighteen ninety four it wasn't a sport for women until Nineteen eighty-four almost ninety years after men started running this twenty six point two mile race. There were no team. Sports for women at the Olympics until nineteen sixty four and the International Olympic Committee said that was because they didn't want women being hurt and volleyball was the sport they allowed because they felt the women couldn't hurt each other. I used to wonder what are they think is wrong with US journalism assignment that made me decide to devote the rest of my career to the lives of women and girls to the obstacles they face with sometimes horrifying consequences that they suffer simply for being female and the courageous steps that they are have been taking all along to alter the status quo in nineteen ninety two. I was sent as journalists to Sarajevo to do a story on the effect of war on children. Now you remember in the ninety s when the former communist state of Yugoslavia imploded in the civil war that split Bosnia and Croatia therby Macedonia and the world looked on in horror because remember Sarajevo had hosted the Olympic Games in. Nineteen eighty-four it. It was home to Muslims and Serbs and Croats and suddenly it erupted into ethnic conflict but it was Sarajevo that made most of the world headlines because this siege that happened in Sarajevo had turned into a bloodbath so this is what I was witnessing as. I tried to get my story in the day before I was ready to leave and I had my story. I began to hear rumors about reap camps. Now one of the things we need to know is as a journalist is one of the first casualties of war is usually the truth so you have to be very careful you have to double check everything you have to know that the facts you're being given the correct facts so my skepticism was running high but it's the day war on. I kept hearing for more and more credible sources that they were rounding up the mothers. The wives sisters and daughters of the so-called enemy and the Serb soldiers were putting them in rape camps and gang raping them. This was before Dr Ford. This was before Rwanda. I never heard of such a thing. I could hardly believe it was happening. But you know I was working little magazine at the time called homemakers. Perhaps you're familiar with it. It was a subversive little magazine that you had great recipes on one page and then the next page a blueprint to alter the status quo. We loved our work at homemakers magazine. We had these great readers backing us up but the problem with ring magazine's that takes about three months to get a story to press. That's that's simply the way it works at a magazine so I diligently gathered up everything.

Sarajevo Swat valley basketball Clarence Thomas Malala United States rape Supreme Court Malala Yousafzai Massey Toronto Mesopotamia Anita Hill homemakers magazine New York Times Taliban ring magazine
"henry timms" Discussed on The Next Big Idea

The Next Big Idea

01:46 min | 11 months ago

"henry timms" Discussed on The Next Big Idea

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> in the spirit of <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Henry Timms Book. We'd <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> like to invite you <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to join the new <Speech_Music_Male> power community <Speech_Music_Male> that we're building around <Speech_Music_Male> life changing ideas. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> It's called <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the next big idea <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> club. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> And if you join now we'll <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> send you a free copy. Happy <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of new power. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Just go to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> next big idea club <Speech_Music_Male> dot com <Speech_Music_Male> slash podcast <Speech_Music_Male> Promo Code <Speech_Music_Male> Power. That's <Speech_Music_Male> next big <Speech_Music_Male> idea club <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> dot com slash slash. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> PODCAST <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Promo Code Power. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> If <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you like the podcast <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> please give us <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a five star review <Speech_Music_Male> and tell your friends to <Speech_Music_Male> subscribe. <Speech_Music_Male> Were available on Apple <Speech_Music_Male> podcasts spotify. NPR <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> One in <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> every major listening <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> APP as well as wondering <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Dot Com. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> If you're listening <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on a smartphone tap <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> or swipe over the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> cover art of this podcast <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you'll <Speech_Music_Male> find the episode notes. Send <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a link to the next <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> big idea <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a special. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thanks today to Daniel <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Pink who conducted <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the interview and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to Henry Timms and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> his co author. Jeremy <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Hymens <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> their book new empower. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> How <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> power works in our hyper <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> connected world <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and how to make it work <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for you is <Speech_Music_Male> one of my favorites and <Speech_Music_Male> it's available wherever <Speech_Music_Male> books are sold? <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> If you feel empowered right <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by new power <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> today is <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> giving Tuesday <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> if you can believe <Speech_Music_Male> it. visit <Speech_Music_Male> giving Tuesday <Speech_Music_Male> dot Org to <Speech_Music_Male> learn how you can do a <Speech_Music_Male> little good and in the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> process help transform transform <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> your community <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I'm your host Rufus <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Chris Kim. <Speech_Music_Male> This episode of the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> next big idea was written <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by Austin Cross. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Sound <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> design is by Kyle <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Randall. Our our <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> associate producer <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is Caleb bessinger <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> series producers <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> are Ama- Cortlandt <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> than Michael Cobb dot. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Our senior producer <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is Jonathan <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Miller. Executive <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Producers Are Stephanie <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Jen's Marshal Louis <Speech_Music_Male> and Hernando <Speech_Music_Male> Perez for <Music> wondering.

"henry timms" Discussed on The Next Big Idea

The Next Big Idea

11:14 min | 11 months ago

"henry timms" Discussed on The Next Big Idea

"If you have thoughts about what you're hearing today on the show or any ideas. We explore on the PODCAST. We'd love to hear from you. Join the conversation with me and many of the authors featured on this podcast at had next big idea club dot com. It's a Friday afternoon in November. Two thousand twelve. You're an English college student and just finish your last class for the week on your way to your apartment you get a text. It's a video from your friend. He's wearing a green hoodie. The video follows him as he carefully carries a full glass of beer out his front door and into his low rise apartment complex. He walks his neighbor's door four and rings the bell when she opens he silently downs. The entire beer then turns to the camera you saw. You've just been neck and nominated. It's the digital drinking game for millennials where you chug your video nominated friend. Who Do the same thing and then uploaded to the web? It's all the rage for a year or two in a couple of years later someone forwards you viral video posted by an American woman named Jessica. Legal girl it's a cold water challenge a new fad based on the neck and nominate model. I Tell Greg Kelly. We challenge last name Rebecca Walker. If you get nominated you have to donate money to a cause then jump into cold body of water and nominate someone else. You don't jump. You have to pay more in this case. The cause is any van Jellicoe mission into Africa pretty soon people all over the world are issuing similar challenges to raise money for everything from cancer treatments to fire. Trucks then comes the challenge heard round the world. I I've been officially called out by John. Bullets and the ice bucket challenge in return. I'm calling out Ginette Center. Chea Matt Dodson and Kevin Twenty four hours to respond to donate one hundred eighty dollars to the foundation. The ice bucket challenge is launched by a Semi Professional National Golfer named Chris Kennedy between June and September two thousand fourteen more than seventeen million ice bucket videos or shared on facebook alone in just one summer. The Association Raises One hundred fifteen million dollars four times. Its annual budget. So how did a silly drinking game came morph into this new power author. Henry Timms tells Daniel it had three special qualities. He even has an acronym for in Ace. So so actionable connected an extensible. There's three qualities if you want your idea. We use this phrase a lot of spreads sideways. So all Powell your idea you you dropped ideas down. They were top down. Everyone remember them right so it was like the sound by air in a new power area. You want ideas that are going to spread. That's how they propagate and if if they're going to spread and you need to do something actionable they need to connect people to their pays into a higher purpose connected and the needs to be extensible the need to change to something else. So so take the metoo movement me to actual right. You're doing something you're saying me to these women around the world we're prepared to step forward an a and share the testimonies connected. It connected you to pay group. Everyone who Shan me me. Too Story made everyone else's story more powerful right. Those collective testimony testimony spread sideways. Even the very phrases in some ways magnetic. It's like metoo and you adhere Homina. Exactly yeah me too. It's Addi- it's an ellipse. Ah Ads and ADS and ads so it was very connected both to a cause and other women and it was extensible so it was able to turn something else are the example earlier changes around around the world where whatever country in the frame itself can change but the spirit remains and I think that's important insight here is that if you're looking to spread your ideas you're running a local business is actionable people to do something. Are you connecting them to pay who feel excited to and is able to change something else. Those are the three qualities you need. Right okay okay. So let's let's talk about this at the unit of one. How can I use some of these principles of of new power again? This idea that it's a current not a currency that when you want is you want people you want your participants to actually create and construct rather than simply to comply that you WanNa have people uploading rather than merely downloading. How can I take these principles and become a better leader so I think the place to start to think about what? You're inviting people to do the we we we all in our lives have constituencies. We want to build communities and increasingly there are more people who could be pollens communities. We will have access to many more people if we were asking them to do. is to admire your work or to validate you never going to get very far in the old Powell. That's what we did right. We ought to comply into consumer products. The question is how you build them up to awesome to do more in their alive so think about. How can people do shale message? Not just your message but actually shape it themselves turn something new. How do you create other people who can own your message? Such a move and bring it somewhere else. How can you allow them a real sense that this is their idea? Not just yours so giving a good example of that right so. The people run giving Tuesday the University of Michigan. The whole community there has higher an ownership stake in that idea. As we do right we sti- but the reason is spread is because we would genuinely he committed to the idea of other people owning them idea often in the power world. We mean when we talk about our ideas sped. all-star movement is. We mean. We just want more fans. How and we won't? We won't even more people to Marisol to buy our products but already prepared to give some space up and let other people digging that I think is the key question. Let's say I'm starting a business right. How do I fold in these principles into the design of business into very business plan? Well from a business perspective. I think one one piece of work that we were very focused on the idea was how money is flowing differently. So how people think about transactions so in the in the new power we have this idea of the participation premium which says if you want to get people engaged in your product you approximate have three key elements to them. One needs is to be great products. There's an economic transaction you celebrate product to needs to have a kind of altruistic sense to it. You need to feel like you're part of a community by being appalled that products and then three green needs create ways in which people can actually come into this and bring their own ideas to the table so this is incredible story about in the book. A game called Star citizen right so this this this video game so this is essentially a startup video game and this this famous game designer. Who just pay of ten years comes back and he says I'm going to save the game? This is the age of angry birds and candy crush and people have stop playing games. I'm going to save this game. He conned any money from from traditional backers. He goes to the crowns and helped me back this game. Let's Co create this universe together called Star citizen and he says to all these fans that we can imagine what it could be like royal ships could be like they had a lot of message boards early on a lot of fan fiction fiction lots of creativity fan stock creating their own radio stations and they start raising all this money so very quickly to get three minerals which is pretty good for for game game that they thought they only needed to to make it but they keep raising money they get a fifteen million dollars keat raises money the fans. Why don't you buy ships for this future? Will by ship now in the win. This game exists. You'll have ship and your hanger so they start buying conceptual ships eventually exist when this is released they get Tesla right. This is actually a real. There are some similarities. Does la a cheaper price point but they get this this and eventually they raised seventy five million dollars. They hire Luke Skywalker Mark Hamill and Jillian. None of the voice over the characters they create new symphonies. They create new languages. And that's almost the million dollars now raised for this game and the game still doesn't exist. This is now is now three or four years later and this community of people out there who have have have seen huge value and obviously people this Ponzi scheme but actually when you talk some of the people inside this world. They're seeing huge value create already because they have this real. Oh sense of purpose. They're part of something that are building this amazing 'cause there's amazing 'cause around video game and they feel genuine can shape the product. They feel that they're part of this world being uncreative and so if you're struggling more business you look at a story like that and you can either think while this crazy video game stories or you can think there are some lessons in this which which can help me. which which is whatever your product is can you connected to a higher pair community and purpose and whatever your product is how you create people how you giving people real ways? They can get their hands hands on it and really shape it themselves and and that is about giving also control the decision to transform neck and nominate from drinking game to a multi-million dollar other fundraising tool wasn't made in a boardroom. The Games originators didn't know it at the time but their idea had all the elements that needed to become something bigger and more meaningful and its evolution may have something to teach us about our public life. The next big idea is supported by wicks. Do you have a great idea of your own. Of course you do put it online with wicks dot com wicks gives you the freedom to create a unique website your way take full control of your design without a developer using the intuitive editor or go deep with advanced code capabilities either way. Your designs will look amazing on any screen ideas evolve and your website can to bring your site to life with animation para lack scrolling and hd hd videos. When you choose wicks you also get one million royalty free photos unlimited funds special effects multimedia galleries and so much more and with twenty four seven support? Wicks is here to help you along the way so design your dream website today with wicks and for listeners of the next big idea if if you go to wicks dot com and use the coupon code big idea you'll get ten percent off when you're ready to go premium that's wicks dot com code big idea idea for ten percent off any premium plan in the spirit of Henry Timms Book. We'd like to invite you to join the new power community that we're building around life changing ideas. It's called the next big idea club. And if you join now we'll send you a free copy of new power. Just go to next big idea club dot com slash podcast Promo Code Power. That's next big idea. Club dot com slash podcast. Promo Code Power..

Wicks Powell Africa Rebecca Walker Greg Kelly Chris Kennedy facebook Ginette Center Association Raises One University of Michigan Homina Jessica Henry Timms John Henry Timms Book Ponzi scheme Matt Dodson Marisol
"henry timms" Discussed on The Wellness Mama Podcast

The Wellness Mama Podcast

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"henry timms" Discussed on The Wellness Mama Podcast

"For optimal sleep. And I think that's one of the easiest things we can do for our health. I know that you've done so many hours of research in this league arena. Are there any other factors that you would encourage people obviously, temperature being a drastic one, but encourage people to make sure that they're taking into consideration in their own sleep environment? He has, so I think it goes back to this idea of tiny changes. And, you know, when we look at those changes we can make every day. The blue light, the electron IX, those EM. To me that to really low hanging fruit a lot of people will watch TV to fall asleep, and so their TV's running in their bedroom. They've got that blue light hitting their brain right before they're trying to go to sleep. I think that, you know, temperature in light kind of have dueling match to see which one has more impact on that sleep in your sleep latency. And so anything you can do to sort of limit that electron IX before bed create a habit of not using the tail television to fall asleep with, even if he is a sound machine, or something, that's a mellow contribution in order to still have some noise. Some people like the TV on. They have noise to fall asleep with, but find find other solutions or tiny habits to sort of back that up a little bit take that out of that space, keep the light keet the EM, Fs as minimized as you can based on, you know, where you are today and set a plan set. Goals to, to reduce that. So, you know, maybe you at least eliminate it most nights. You know, health is definitely measured in those tiny contributions to what you can do to improve sleep along the way. Yeah. Completely agree with that. I think it's great advice. Another question. I love to ask for the end of interviews largely selfishly because I'm an avid reader is just if there are any book, a book or books that have really changed your life and if so what they are. Yes, I am a crazy reader. I have I when I thought about that question. I you know, one is sort of work related, and I think, honestly, I think you'd really like it, it's called new power by Jeremy hymens and Henry Timms and it speaks to the power of the people that the, the age we live in today is all about the rise of the power being in the person. Someone can start a podcast in a blog, and like you do reach millions of people and change their lie. Lives, the old power way would have been a hospital or doctor saying, this is the way to live your life. And we just had a live with in a sumo that they were right. And they were giving us the right information. And so that's a, that's a book that really looks at the power of of where that power lies in the future. And how we can hotter sit how we can be a part of that revolution. So I really liked that one. The one that I've shared with my book club, that is still one of my favorites, I think, because of all the philosophy in it is Shanta ram it's by Gregory David Roberts. It's a fictionalized account of this guy that has lots of problems and ends up living in, in India, but the quotes on how to basically had to get past fear and all these limitations and put them back in their place. So the book opens with him describing how he described learned everything he ever needed to know on. Fate, and love when he was chained in this Indian prison. And he realized he still despite the fact that he had no food. No water was chained up. He still had the power to forgive. He still had the power to, to see life. He he had all the power. He needed to, to still be an couldn't take that away from him. So those be still probably my two favorite books. I love that. Those are both new for me. And especially that second one such a great reminder that like, so often, we try to change our environment and our circumstances. When really if we shift our perception of those, we can achieve the same result much more quickly, and we always have the power to do that as love. I love that message any parting advice you wanna leave with listeners today? Yeah. So I've been doing talks and workshops recently on sleep is the future of health, and I feel fundamentally that we have as you mentioned with all these interventions. They're great and health and diet, an ex. Cise. Don't diminish in their importance in our lives. But sleep is designed as part of this human experience to be where we heal where we can file our members in clear clear, the banks out every day. It is this magical space that we've in the last fifty years, decided wasn't magical anymore, and all of the words of dream and imagine are all sort of centered around this, you know, nighttime space. And so I really feel that.

Gregory David Roberts Jeremy hymens India Henry Timms fifty years
"henry timms" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"henry timms" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Software made smart by the artificial intelligence technique called machine learning. And here's the ironic twist the machine is designing parts that appear to come from nature's playbook. Check out these two parts on the left a sleek human design on the right? The route like handiwork of a smart, computer. Andy Roberts is a software engineer you've tested this. And what happened what we find is that the parts have been self organized. So that they distribute the strain evenly across the part. So there are no sort of hot spots where you get a crack forming, for example. So this is better than a human can do. Oh, yes. It is better than a human. Could do it may take some time before organic looking parts take root. But in the short term some big players like BMW and Caterpillar are anxious to try new ways of manufacturing their current designs. A lot of customers for industrial printing. Do get it. They've been working with the technologies for many years studying them prototyping with them and there's this urge and thirst for mass production. I wouldn't have said this three to five years ago. But but I'm convinced of it now because you see more demonstrated applications at relativity, they're still developing designs and printing processes, but. They have reason to believe they have launched a good idea they printed. This giant fourteen foot tall fuel tank in a matter of days, a traditional manufacturer would have taken a year. Relativity, the real proof is in the testing, and they have successfully fired their printed rocket engine eighty five times. At NASA, fabled rocket testing center in Mississippi. So that's like a fully printed design would normally almost three thousand parts vote. We've gotten it down to three and really son that that's robust and not it works by the end of two thousand twenty the team hopes to be delivering satellites and other payloads to lower orbit with fully three d printed rockets they predict they can cut the cost of even the cheapest flights today by more than eighty percent. A game changing number like that would destined manufacturing for a tectonic. Retooling layer by layer for the PBS news hour, I'm miles Brian. Finally tonight this week's that moment when does our series on Facebook watch features Henry Timms their creator of giving Tuesday, which is today. Tim's is the co author of the bestselling book new power that explains. How interconnected groups often organize through? Social media are changing the world. Henry can you? Tell me the moment when you decided to apply new power tactics to an old challenge fundraising. We have this idea about black Friday and cyber Monday. And so we were thinking, okay. What about adding giving shoes? Could you out today that reverse the train after all this consumerism that people would give back? So the idea began of the ninety second street wine. It was really simple idea. And we designed that from the store nobody we hoped. Other people will grab this idea. And and take it somewhere new, and what was so interesting about giving as we watched it grow was from the very first days. It was a story of other people stepping up and saying I'd like to make this idea what really supercharge giving Tuesday was small communities families people around the country. You just said, you know, what I'm gonna stop making this Paul of my annual tradition. So given Tuesday in the first year we were lucky 'cause like people like Bill Gates with tweeting about but underneath that was what was really changing was people were saying down with their kids around the table. And they were saying. What are the charities? We care about the causes off family stands for wise, philanthropy important to us, and that's been Joyce watch. And what are the dangers and challenges of the people who treat the internet like it's a cash register the danger with with the incident causes we have the scale of engagement now. And so people who are entering that space and just trying to get people's money and do nothing else with them on on getting far as they should because the big shift in fundraising in particular is we need to stop seeing people whose donors and start seeing them as onus. What I mean by that is we need to stop seeing people in the very old power job is simply to give us money. So we can solve problems, and when he'd stage well selves, how do we mobilize these people who want to help to do more than simply give them money, but to give that time to give their voice to give their ideas. And I think that's the big shift. We're seeing with giving Tuesday and across the sector..

software engineer Henry Timms Bill Gates Andy Roberts NASA Facebook BMW Mississippi Brian Tim Paul Caterpillar eighty percent fourteen foot ninety second five years
"henry timms" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"henry timms" Discussed on KOMO

"Social media component. Chad Royal Pasco at boys and girls clubs of America said attracts givers that otherwise would not be reached whether it's a donation of money. Whether it's an offer. That is a challenge out by a company, whether it's you know, coming on this day and GIO by these things. And then for each one of the things donate a percentage of proteins, two, boys and girls. It's just a great way. And there are very focused way. I'm giving up for giving Tuesday founder, Henry Timms. That's exactly the point giving choosy has proven in the most local and every day kind of way that there are people everywhere. Just doing good things. Like, you know, whatever the headlines might be whatever happens to be trending. This is capacity of people to connect with each other to recharge their communities to come together that's alive and people choose the if if it makes a contribution. I hope it's a celebration of spirit because volunteering or otherwise participating in giving Tuesday isn't just good for the recipient. Tim said it's good for you specific muscle that we wanna flex more often. And it's also where people could make a real difference right in a world where a lot of people in the data backs this up a lot of people feel very powerless, right? One way of feeling more powerful, it's recognized that you can in the next ten minutes. Make a meaningful contribution to masters in the next three hours. You could be out doing something useful in your community. And they never seem like the biggest acts in themselves. But if you get to put my millions of people are doing that, you can really starts galvanizing some change. And I think most importantly doing that together we human beings, we can be. That's what we do. We always going to do it. And so creating new opportunities to convene which I think giving Tuesdays one of those. That's that's something which is is substantial. Distinctly different way than the shop. Right. There is something about you can look.

Chad Royal Pasco Henry Timms GIO Tim America founder ten minutes three hours
"henry timms" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"henry timms" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I mean, there's only so much work. You can do in terms of promotion, but we've been able to partner with a number of media houses, especially newspapers who've been able to he published this sort of work that we're doing we tend to reach between. Let's say thirty to fifty thousand people a month with the content that we put out to sort of make factor checking more mainstream in terms of the work that they're doing. So you're sort of publishing a brand on any piece of information just to show. It had been verified. Yes. Yes. Exactly. Eric MaGee fight facts checking to fight fake news in Kenya. But by his own admission with limited affect so far, the problem here is really that. One person's fake news story can be another's opinion. The free expression so to to curb inflammatory claims or ideas, it's going to require a level of careful oversight. And it's bound to be controversial where do the conventional news outlets fit into all of? This. Henry Timms has just co authored a wide ranging and thoughtful book on this Subject New power. It looks at how old high Rockall meteorology like ours here at the BBC have struggled to compete with the decentralizing impact of the internet. We now see ideas spreading sideways, we used to think about powder, and I mix is top down and bottom up. That was the way we feel about power ideas, not spread sideways that the most influential people in most people's lives are actually the groups of friends that they have on their social networks. They're the people that trust him more than established institutions. So the question with fake news, isn't I don't think how do we get everyone to pay attention to the BBC like they used to that property isn't the answer. The answer is how do we get spreading sideways? How do we empower more messages to tell the stories? The our representatives truths. And and I think that's a very very big projects. But it seems to me actually is precisely the kind of big project the institution like the BBC will take home, which is to say, look, we came to prominence and power throughout capacity to broadcast. Our job now is also to mobilize. So the centralized organizations need to decentralize in Choon with this decentralization of truth. And I think one of the great critiques of our age is that people don't trust institutions and one of the main reasons for that is institutions trust people. They actually the institutions we care about don't give people very meaningful experiences. We look democracy in in general or government. If you look at working with your local council or attending a local meeting all going to vote or any of the kind of apparatus of government democracy. The feedback loops around that pretty terrible compared to the amazing feedback. Loops we now have around social media if I took a picture of us now, I'm put on Instagram within seconds. Fifty people would tell me how terrific it is. I will get this immediate and positive and Pia validated. Re. Action compare that with our experiences of our health compare that with a trip to the daughter of the NHS confused, and there's long lists bureaucrats, and you don't know what's going to happen. So one of the great disconnects right now is the the feedback. Loops the are most seducing us, which especially come from Silicon Valley are so much better than the one surrounding our most important institutions so old organizations power structures need to update themselves tomato them selves, more user-friendly untrustworthy. But Henry Timms acknowledges that the answer to combating fake news will necessarily come from a range of different sources and solutions. What no one can do. Now, he reckons is hope to turn back the clock on the distributed networks that define our lives. Online decision to fake news isn't gonna be one single thing is going to be an ecosystem of interventions. I certainly think one of them is going to be those quote, trusted institutions finding ways of building genuine mobilized constituencies. Around their missions. And then a second you think there's going to be a more sobering public debate around. How we think about what we share in? How we share it? I think sharing is going to become a public health concern, people realize the mental health dangers of some of these networks and how we entertained with them. I think we'll see next is actually we talked about this all the time of how do we get more people engaged in our mission on their terms and providing people with kind of the overarching mission, but giving people are very meaningful role to play that's the mechanics. I think of how you start to push back again something like fake news. Henry Timms co author of the book new power do check out all the BBC content on the subject of fake news across the BBC website. Some amazing stuff. They're a great one about face recognition technology coming out right now. That's it for today's daily..

BBC Henry Timms partner Eric MaGee Kenya NHS Choon Silicon Valley Instagram Pia
"henry timms" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"henry timms" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Look at all sorts you look at these articles. And sometimes we also look at claims published by these figures on social media as well. How do people source this information? I mean, how many people are following? You know, we do have quite a small reach. I mean, there's only so much work. You can do in terms of promotion, but we've been able to partner with a number of media houses, especially newspapers who've been able to publish this sort of work that we are doing we tend to each between say thirty to fifty thousand people a month with the content that we put out to sort of make factor chemo mainstream in terms of the work that they're doing. So you're sort of publishing a brand on any piece of information just to show it to bidden verified. Yes. Yes. Exactly. Eric Gandhi fight facts checking to fight fake news in Kenya. But by his own admission with limited affect so far, the problem here is really that. One person's fake news story can be another opinionated, free expression. So to to curb inflammatory claims or ideas, it's going to require a level of careful oversight. And it's bound to be controversial where? Do the conventional news outlets fit into all of? This. Henry Timms has just co authored a wide ranging and thoughtful book on this subject. New power looks at how old hierarchical meteorologist nations like ours here the BBC have struggled to compete with the decentralizing impact of the internet. We now see ideas spreading sideways, we used to think about powder, and I mix as top down and bottom up that was the way before about power. I did not spread sideways that the most influential people in most people's lives are actually the groups of friends that they have on this social networks. They're the people that trust him more than established institutions. So the question with fake news, isn't I didn't think how do we get everyone to pay attention to the BBC? They used to that property isn't the answer. The answer is how do we get ideas spreading sideways? How do we empower more messengers to tell the stories that are represented the truths? And and I think that's a very very big projects. But it seems to me actually is precisely the kind of big project the an institution like the BBC will take home, which is to say, look, we came to prominence. Power through our capacity to broadcast. Our job now is also to mobilize. So the centralized organizations need to decentralize in Choon with this decentralization of truth. And I think one of the great critiques of our age is that people don't trust institutions and one of the main reasons for that is institutions don't trust people. They actually the institutions we care about don't give people very meaningful experiences. We look democracy in in general government. If you look at working with your local council or attending a local meeting or going to vote or any of the kind of apparatus of governmental democracy. The feedback loops around that pretty terrible compared to the amazing feedback. Loops we now have around social media if I took a picture of us now, I'm put on Instagram within seconds. Fifty people would tell me how terrific it is. I will get his immediate and positive and Pia validated reaction compare that with our experiences of our health compare that with a trip to the daughter of the NHL, and you're confused and there's long lists crossing. You don't know what's going to happen. So one of the great. Disconnects right now is the feedback. Loops the are most seducing us, which especially come from Silicon Valley are so.

BBC Choon Henry Timms Kenya partner Eric Gandhi Silicon Valley NHL Pia Instagram
"henry timms" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

08:11 min | 2 years ago

"henry timms" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"On exercise TRITON, juncture in Norway, later on this year Being ready is only one thing but the United Kingdom has that essential willingness a willingness to act But willingness to use military force when over measures, fail but willingness to operate where others cannot, or will not go Look at the way you UK pilots joined the US counterparts to strike Assad's chemical facilities after the polling chemical attacks in Duma. Or look, at our operations targeting is so in Iraq and Syria conducting more than seventeen hundred strikes. Against terrorist targets British Defense Secretary Kevin Williamson training more than seventy seven thousand directly security forces and infantry skills, counter I d engineering medical expertise and providing the second, most significant contribution to the military campaign after the United States The UK is not. Just in, the Middle East region Afghantistan training new generation of officers to secure that fledgling democracy and. By committing a second battalion to go to Kabul where demonstrating a continued commitment to Afghanistan and the Afghan people We're also in Vienne dough Pacific where we led the way by deploying role naval ships to beaver first nation to enforce United Nations sanctions against North Korea And where, we're maintaining an Umbro presence of role navy, service surface competence throughout this year and next increasing our, presence around the globe And when it comes to China We have our eyes wide open We have a positive relationship with Beijing, and wished to build on that but we will not Trink from telling them when we feel that they do not respect the commonly. Accepted rules norms of international behavior The laws and systems by which we all China included benefit and have a duty to protect In this respect they're militarization if artificial features in the South China Sea is a backward step and. Puts them on the wrong side of the line, of what people expect from great international nations if you wish to be respected as, global power you have to respect the international norms and behaviors that bind the international community together And from the continent today Asia to Africa I just returned from Mogadishu in Somalia and also having had the opportunity to visit THEO PR in Kenya where I've seen, firsthand the excellent work of UK forces training stopping terrorists and, helping bring stability In Mali we providing our French allies with strategic lift and Chinooks and let's be clear we. Are the only power in Europe with a capacity and the capability to do that and in south Sudan people have built a United Nations hospital bringing laid in the, midst of an awful humanitarian crisis Whether, the danger is narrow far whether we're acting unilaterally bilaterally or multilaterally the UK continue stepping up I've already touched on NATO efforts but since I'm at the Atlantic Council I hope you'll pin it permits me to say. A few more. Words in support of the alliance, for it's worth remembering that European nations a not it's so beneficiary The only time this article five has ever been invoked was. After nine eleven When Great Britain and other NATO nations stood side by side with you after be Trojan atrocities that we saw Just as the United Kingdom helps United States shoulder the burden of international security so does NATO It is providing a. Majority of forces for this new Iraq mission European allies lead NATO's forty thousand strong response falls there's sponsor for eighty five percent of the Kosovo mission in the Balkans and the most recent summit allies agreed readiness initiative within the next eighteen months to have thirty mechanized batallions thirty combat vessels and thirty squadrons ready to use. In thirty days Alongside the US UK has been. Pressing for the alliance to do more to pay its way, we, now seeing, resorts last year saw NATO's biggest spending. Increase in twenty five years since making the defense investment pledge of between fourteen Wales summit spend eighty seven billion dollars more on defense in just two years time that number will increase to at least one hundred fifty billion dollars four years ago Only three. Allies spent two percent of their GDP on defense by the end of this year Eight will meet that target And increasingly we're seeing, more partners pulled their weight realizing that they got to spend more because of increasing threats that the world faces They're, investing in capabilities essential and relevant tomato, modern warfare making sure that they have the best equipment and the very best technology So the UK is ready we're willing but what. Makes us reliable partners for long long-term is, with fact, that we are able able to act now and far in the future Thanks to our world class defense technology and industrial base Some mistakenly believe. There's only America can develop cutting edge technologies or capabilities That has never been and never will be the case The UK has always brought something special to the. Table from the perilous days of the second World War when an unassuming British scientists named Henry Timms aren't flew to the United States taking with him a black box containing the secrets of airborne radar, and the turbojet and from then right up until today the UK is with biggest offshore supplier to the US military with the skills to meet a host of your requirements from avionics and vehicle communications to military bridging and c. b. r. n. That's why sixty years on from the signing of the mutual defense agreement We continue to cooperate on nuclear technology they can surely be no greater sign of trust and our willingness to work together on. A, common missile, compartment, for, our, dreadnought submerged and your US Columbia, class submarines. Finish Defense Secretary Gavin Williamson live on c..

United Kingdom United States NATO UK Iraq United Nations Middle East China South China Sea Kevin Williamson United Nations hospital Gavin Williamson Norway Syria Kabul Assad Mogadishu Afghanistan Wales
"henry timms" Discussed on Something You Should Know

Something You Should Know

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"henry timms" Discussed on Something You Should Know

"Today on something you should know it's coffee good for you or bad for you or what the look at what the science has to say then we're learning more and more about heredity what your parents do and don't pass down writing means a lot to us and it's really interesting especially because now we can look at individual gene so for height i can give you listed jeans and say i know that each of these genes plays a role in how tall you are plus i'll explain how couples can stop fighting about money which is one of the biggest reasons they fight in the first place and a fascinating look at how apologies and forgiveness really work by the way you know you can continue relationship without forgiving the other person and one of the myths about forgiveness is that you forgive or you don't forgive a hundred percent and that's not true all this today on something you should know somethingyoushouldknow fascinating intel the world's top experts and practical advice you can use in your life today something you should know mike carruthers one of the things i've learned doing this podcast is that the titles of each episode really matter and the more clever and witty and suck you in kind of titles i can come up with the more people listen in the first few days of the episode being published so i spent a lot of time trying to come up with clever witty suck you in kind of titles but in the last in the last episode episode one seventy five i really struggled with coming up with a clever title for the interview i did with henry timms author of new power and the best i could come up with was how to harness the power of online communities which i thought was really terrible but i couldn't come up with a clever witty way and did pay the price.

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"henry timms" Discussed on Something You Should Know

Something You Should Know

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"henry timms" Discussed on Something You Should Know

"Optimal distinctiveness and that's the idea of how how do people function best she thinks people functioned best if they feel just the right amount of the same and just the right amount of different and so both these youtube saw will often do though always is they'll build a very strong kind of community around that brand which is about cutting engaging with that community making them feel connected but they'll also make sure that there are lots of roots for people to participate in at the viewing engage so the fan forums the comment woes all of these routes participation of very much paw the content itself it's less like the download tv mogul where we would sit there and ingests the content and it's more like a will whether trying to create a will the participation around that brand and if you wanna really good example of that look at someone like lady gaga so lady gaga up as has always been hugely successful thing about how catholic she is not about making sure she's the superstar but making sure how community is superstars and everything from the the social network she created from her fans to the iconography of her work to hassan's themselves are about reversing the pounds on epic making about making fans feel more agency in belonging and that's very different than than how people would react with that fans back in the day what's a very different way of looking at power in creating community and clearly has the potential if you do it right to make money and end to make someone very very powerful henry timms has been my guest his book is new power how power works in our hyper connected world and how to make it work for you there's a link to his book in the show notes thanks henry thanks mike iranian joined it and take him.

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"henry timms" Discussed on Something You Should Know

Something You Should Know

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"henry timms" Discussed on Something You Should Know

"Watch or whatever and if you're looking for even more of an adventure into nature mt hood the columbia river gorge and the pacific ocean are all reachable within a couple of hours portland has more breweries and beer pubs than any other city on the planet seventy six in the portland metro area and of course there's the food in portland some of the best most delicious food you'll ever taste is available in portland's acclaimed restaurants and legendary food carts around the city portland is also a hub for artists and creators alike they've got community studios and warehouses and maker spaces that let you diy your way all around town and portland saturday market open every saturday and sunday until december twenty fourth portland saturday market is the largest arts and crafts fair in the united states there's just so much to do and so much fun to be had in portland this summer here's a simple way to get started visit travel portland dot com to start planning your trip that's travel portland dot com you can in portland we're all very connected today through the internet we're all part of this huge community and this connectivity has allowed the creation of smaller communities and businesses for example airbnb and uber airbnb is a business that allows you to book a place to stay but airbnb doesn't own those places they've just connected the community that allows people to rent places from each other uber doesn't own a fleet of cars instead they've connected people who do have cars with people who need a ride this ability to connect people creates power for those who do it well it has been called new power and it's something we can all understand and benefit from henry timms has studied this carefully and he's the author of a new book called new power how power works in our hyper connected.

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"henry timms" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"henry timms" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Can learn from that as we continue our conversation with jeremy hammond's and henry timms the co authors of the book new power we'd love to hear your questions about how this new power works particularly if you feel like you're just trying to play catch up like if the world has changed around you and influences moving in ways that you don't quite understand you're not quite sure how to know who to trust who to follow or how any of this works we'd love your questions or if you are working in this space maybe if you have learned what does work or what doesn't work as you've tried to build a cause or vance a campaign or grow a business whether you're doing it through instagram or snapchat or twitter or kickstarter or patriotic or any number of platforms what has worked for you and what hasn't worked for you comment on our facebook page tweet us at one a or email one a at w a m u dot org henry before we have to take our first pause i wonder if any particular common bonds are starting to emerge in some of the social activism social justice campaigns like black lives matter me to the new movement that's coming out of the march for our lives to students at marjory stoneman douglas high school in south florida is there one common bond let's just say one in particular that all of these movements seem to have i think there's one common principle of them which is that they move sideways in these top down bottom up dynamic says you how we used to think about change but all of these campaigns pass sideways pay to pay to pair and they become stronger as they do so you look at the metoo movement and he's such a good example the everyone there every voice made.

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"henry timms" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"henry timms" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And the listeners of kqedorg weather forecast for the bay area overnight partial cloudiness with lows in the forties and then we expect sunny skies on tuesday with highs in the low to mid sixties tomorrow's predicted high and concord sixty four napa sixty two san jose sixty five and a predicted fifty nine degree high tomorrow in san francisco this is one a i'm joshua johnson in washington these days power just ain't what it used to be whether it's black lives matter me or the students from parkland florida those who are used to having power are being disrupted by folks who have long complained about having none this shift is at the heart of the work being done by jeremy hymens and henry timms too big thinkers on social change and philanthropy they argue that the forces behind this change tend to get romanticized or underestimated the old model of power is almost like a currency that only a few have jealously guarding it and shrewdly spending it but new power they say is less like a currency and more like a current open connective channeled and useless unless it moves jeremy and henry join us in studio to talk about their new book which expands on the this theory it is called new power how power works in our hyper connected world and how to make it work for you jeremy henry welcome to one a it's great to be here we also welcome your questions and thoughts about this new online power especially if you are learning how to use it for yourself email us one a at w a m u dot org comment on our facebook page or tweet us at one.

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"henry timms" Discussed on The Young Turks

The Young Turks

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"henry timms" Discussed on The Young Turks

"I wouldn't give it to the kids but i hear you oh okay and the members of the day or todd jagger and lawrence sills the jagger not also running for office in texas now was a huge part of wolf pack for a long time so thank you to all the members spend all the different ways for the members not only do we have to find a post game as we normally do but i'm also going to do something live after the show which we almost never do on fridays interview jeremy hymens and henry timms they wrote the book new power how power our hyper connected world and how to make it work for you but that's a super interesting book about the old world and how it's top down whereas now new power is bottom up and so it has a lot of interesting political implications too so if you're a member you could watch it live at eight fifteen eastern so to become a member ty t network dot com slash join or brett right we promise it we're delivering it it's diamond and filc who are diamond and silk while they are two women who here they are they have popular facebook page there trump supporters and they were actually on like the fcc declaration as being paid by the trump campaign in two thousand sixteen as for field consulting services a while back a little while ago they told people that they had been notified by facebook that they were posting content that was quote unsafe to the community facebook apologize to them and said it was an error that they delivered this message in the first place diamond and silk said that they have not communicated with facebook since then and they're very upset and they're doing all these interviews on fox shows saying about talking about how they've been censored by facebook facebook is like no no no we've reached out to you to prove that this is my favorite way they reach out and they found a laura ingram tweet even where she said joining us next diamond and silk to discuss mark zuckerberg's testimony before congress today facebook response to this tweet even saying like thank you for bringing this up on monday we emailed diamond and.

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