5 Episode results for "Henry Reese Sheridan Henry"

Edition 2394

Monocle 24: Midori House

26:42 min | 6 months ago

Edition 2394

"Us president joe biden unveils ambitious plans to overhaul american infrastructure. As a central plank of economic recovery plan would assess why there appears to be such a variation in vaccination rates in cities as new york speeds ahead and places like toronto like behind and as germany prepares to return the benin bronzes nigeria when assess the complicated process of returning works of art to the places they were taken from. Monaco's editors and correspondence are here to discuss those stories today on the late edition here on monocle twenty four. Hello that very warm. Continue to the late edition here on monocle twenty four. It is thursday the first of april. And i'm thomas here in toronto and to discuss some of the day's big news stories with us on monocle. Twenty kaleta rabelo. Who's at midori. House in london and in new york city is monaco's henry reese sheridan henry and a great to have you both with us on the program today henry to start with you is the first of april says april fools day. Have you spent the day trying to find the strategic placed rupee cushions and banana skins around the henry sheridan residents the herenew york city. I've got to be completely honest with you. I have just realized that. Now you said it the april. It's april fools day today. I'm not sure if it's is closely observed in north america. I'm not sure how you found in candidate tomas but In in in in britain it's quite a kind of like it is almost a national event. isn't it. I feel the people kind of invest quite of energy in it. But i don't know. I haven't i haven't really noticed it since i've moved here to be still be sure to keep your wits about you henry just in case this listening to this whole slip up talking. Mousa something into your pillow a little later today. And how is the week treating you in london. It's been a big week for london. A tentative opening up of the lockdown has coincided with these incredibly warm temperatures. It looks like watching from afar. How's the how's this first week of relaxation treated you. Well you know. What hamas if this week is an indication of to come this summer. I think it was going to be a really happy one We as you mentioned. We have We've been having heatwave for all of this week. Registering even twenty four degrees last tuesday twenty four degrees celsius which of course for london in march. I don't remember that ever happening before and on monday. We saw the first kind of step and relaxing. Some of the lockdown measures with now we are allowed to meet people out of our households in public spaces so up to six people. What is calling the rule of six or two households together so it just meant that you know that paired up with good weather just meant really busy parks and canals would people just really happy to see some of the friends for the first time this year for many of them. And it's just really lovely to see a bit of city life back in london while toronto's a band to go back into lockdown rethinks. I'm feeling rather envious event in london. Rabelo and henry sheridan is great to have you both with us on the program. Today will in pittsburgh yesterday. Us president joe biden unveiled a sweeping sets of proposals. The would haul infrastructure in the united states at a cost of some two trillion. Us dollars he. Some of what president biden said yesterday about the role. Corporate taxation will play in the plans the raising of which looks like it will pay for the bulk of his proposals or establishing a global minimum tax for us corporations at twenty one percent. We're gonna level the international plainfield. That alone will raise one. Trillion dollars over fifteen years also eliminate deductions by corporations for offshoring jobs shifting assets overseas. You do that. you pay a penalty. You don't get a reward at my plant and use the savings from that to give. Companies tax credits to locate manufacturing here in manufacturing production here in the united states will significantly ramp up the irs enforcement against corporations. We either failed to report. Their incomes are under report estimated that can raise hundreds of billions of dollars. All this adds up to more than what i proposed to spend in just fifteen years. It's honest it's fiscally responsible. And by the way is experts will tell reduces the debt federal debt over the long haul. Let me be clear. These remind is how to pay for this plan. Others have additional ideas. Let them come forward. I'm open to other ideas. So long as they do not impose any tax increase on people making less than four hundred thousand dollars. Us president joe biden fast. Speaking jury the unveiling of his so-called american jobs planet carpentry training facility in pennsylvania. Yes today well. On today's edition the breaching monaco's news adds to chris. Chairman gave his reaction to the proposals. So really you know on the one hand this is being sold as an infrastructure bill but again when you also look at the challenge that i was mentioning earlier if if you talk about the infrastructure bit itself. It's actually not that large when you think about six hundred billion over eight years and as i said five hundred billion over five years just to keep things running so in that sense really. The numbers are not as big as you seem. And that's part of where also maybe the disagreement is going to start to come on this especially you know the the bipartisan site or republicans because at the end of the day this isn't just about infrastructure anymore. It is also an effort to get other important progressive projects. Through at a time where joe biden feels. He has that political momentum to spend money christian. Mac speaking to us in today's edition of the briefing at the american jobs plan is being called by. President biden is being described by some as an equivalent to the new deal in the us in terms of the size of the spending involved here. walk us through if you could of the the key elements of the plan. That was unveiled yesterday. Absolutely in a lot of aspects this has been you know is going to be the biggest investment since world war two and certain areas one of the things of course as expected in an infrastructure plan is investments proposed for the transportation sector and in here the biden administration is trying to address several aspects. Not only modernisation and Creating new lines or better Transit lines in certain areas but also of course with a climate Centric approach as well being conscious of the clock of climate change as well and it really depend really prioritize is addressing some of these long standing and Persistent inequalities. That have been over the years. I've fallen through the cracks and are present in the us One of the things of course That immediately jumps Whenever you read the planners decided to fix highways proposal of modernizing over two and two thousand miles of highways and main roads and streets also repairing a lot of bridges in the country up to ten thousand of the smaller and worst bridges in the nation. pre preserving A lot of the existing infrastructure as well with the mindset of creating jobs etc but one of the things. I noticed as well which is quite interesting is the investment for the aviation industry as well off this you know two trillion dollar package Twenty five billion dollars Will go to upgrade aviation As a whole that includes anything from updates to air traffic control renovations of terminals investments. In what they describe as affordable convenient and car free access to travel. We need to remember that. In the united states you know not only our airports not particularly an enjoyable experience as i think. The three of us can attest to Particularly when you compare it to travelling around europe or asia but it is quite difficult in certain places to arrive to the airport without a car You know either Infrequent or nonexistent public I transit facilities to get us there so This aviation ambition. You know wants to make the us global leader when it comes to that And see it rise to durang kings even quote the fact that not. There's not one single united states airports on the top twenty five airports around the world Which is quite a significant thing to notice. Well one of the things that. I also think it's quite interesting in its plan is when we're reading a bit further into it and go beyond the headlines when to talk about you know redressing historic inequities and build the future of transportation infrastructure They talk here about of course how. The car has dominated so much of american cities narrative. And we all know that the not the car does tend to be predominant in in terms of thinking when it comes to city building and arben planning rather than pedestrian or even psychic bicycles or public transit but found it really interesting that they decided to in this specific plan to quotes And to call out to highway projects by name that have been quite destructive to the urban environment they mention here the clairborne expressway in new orleans. Or the it one in syracuse That have you know. Those mega highway starts destroyed neighborhoods. Made people move out into have to be re homed at the communities and of course they have not solved any of the issues. We all know by now that adding an extra lane does not fix fix. Traffic just increases it But it's quite an interesting to see that they actually naming a these particular projects that kind of in a way recognizing that This was not a good decision back then and it hasn't worked out The way they wanted There's just finally just want to mention how throughout the plan. The twenty six page plan that he announced yesterday one of the other things that is really nice. To see is often words resilient. See all resilient shows up and actually you know addressing the importance of building. Not only to last to tackle a lot of the inequity and inequalities That people experience due to bad infrastructure and henry joe biden pitched this plan in a bipartisan way. Want do know so far about the reaction by some republicans because it is infrastructure that anchors. This plan isn't it. But it. Is chris us editor alluded to about much more as well. Isn't it yeah. it is I mean i think as as a lotta touched upon somewhat Inherent is being cast as not only a kind of economic boost but also explicitly as a mechanism for realizing social justice. One of the measures. I'm really struck by is is is the Provision made within the legislation to close was become referred to the digital. Divide a pretty astonishing. -ly thirty five percent of rule. Americans lack access to the internet. Minimally acceptable speeds which even at the best of times is going to community at social and economic advantage over the course of the last year where work but most importantly school has become remote students which who don't have access to to high speed internet have really suffered in terms of not having access to two lessons and learning resources of moved online and so simply by increasing or improving rather the provision of high-speed high-quality internet around the country particularly these areas that are currently lacking it. The thinking is that this is going to This is going to have a really significant impact on on social equity while next year on the late edition how of vaccination programs in cities bearing in new york earlier this week. All adults were given access to sign up for a corona virus vaccine while in other cities. Like here in toronto. Vaccination appointments have in some cases going unused due to complications with the sign up process and delays in the supply of vaccine doses. I'm henry. I was speaking to someone in new york yesterday for an interview for the next edition of monocle magazine. Who described the mood to new york as being pretty buoyant terms of of the vaccinations in the state of the rollout at the moment is not how. You're seeing it from from your corner of new york. City is certainly true that the rollout of vaccinations is progressing quite fast here in new york so this week in new york residence aged thirteen over and also incarcerated people became eligible to be vaccinated and as of april the six a state will have referred to was universal eligibility so all new york residents over the age of sixteen will have access to a vaccine which is significantly faster than the vast majority of places in america ibook my vaccination this week and it definitely instills a sense of optimism when you can when able to do that but i think it's worth noting that there is still a high level of corona virus in new york there's a steady stream of covid cases. It is actually at an extremely high risk level. And i think that there's a pronounced sense of coq ntative dissidents on the one hand people feel optimistic and perhaps justifiably so given the role of the vaccine. If you go into manhattan which have several times in the last few weeks there is not. I wouldn't say that it's back to normal. People socially distance wearing masks but certainly very busy restaurants are open at fifty percent capacity which feels very weird. Actually when you when you walk into. And i haven't myself dined in one yet but i've walked through one of them and i think there is this kind of. There's there's a little bit of kind of mental division between on the one hand health experts. Who are still extremely cautious about reopening at such clip and point to the fact that covert cases of quite high on the one hand and the other hand. I think a sizeable portion of the public who want to believe that that to return to normalities will the threshold of it and culture is interesting. Isn't it that's idea that in places where vaccination rollouts are going fairly speedily That is this idea of well. Times can be eased a little. Because there's something in the flu. Vaccinations to counter it here in toronto. Vaccinations being very slow. And we are now. Seeing the restrictions are coming back again but henry point to that. Maybe that correlation isn't maybe quite as easy to make. Is it when you actually look. At the numbers of how viruses progressing even in places where vaccination processes have been happy particularly efficient absolutely and it has of course a lot to do now with you. Know didn't new issue is the variance and of course they are new ads the vaccines and needs to be further testing to find out whether the old vaccines are effective against all variants. or not. and we're finding out that that might be not necessarily the case so the spite fish vaccine rollouts That doesn't necessarily mean that we're out of the woods yet. It's interesting you know. Do w h o this. Just this morning was saying how you know. Europe in particular the european union's Vaccine rollout has been and i quote unacceptably slow. And that's why. We're seeing a resurgence of cases particularly in france. Where just yesterday. The president emmanuel macron announced that the country was going to go back into a third lockdown. All schools would be closed from next week You know students will return to remote learning You know. Some lockdown measures are being extended to other parts rather than just paris All non-essential shop going to be closed You cannot leave Your local area. So there's a ban on travelling further away than ten kilometers or six miles for further away from your home without good reason or a valid legal Reason this is you know does now over five thousand people in intensive care and that is the main reason as we've hard in most countries lockdowns on not only to avoid the spread of the virus but also to avoid Pushing the health services and hospitals to breaking point so it has to do a lot with that. And i in belgium for example so here in europe we have a four weeks of easter lockdown. Coming into place That you know. Primary secondary schools are closed until the nineteenth of april. If i'm not mistaken you know the prime minister talking a lot about the high infection rates are at a younger age and so the dynamic here in this on this side of the world is slightly changing. And you look at the uk where you know vaccination roll has been a quite a efficient over. Fifty percent of all adults in the country have received at least their first those of vaccine And this slow. Easing of restrictions A lot of people have hoped that we do not need to go back into lockdown. But i'm not so sure hearing henry there Talk about passing in front of restaurants that even though there are fifty percent capacity. I don't remember what that's like. I'm quite missing it and counting down the days when that's possible if it is in the summer that's fine I just really wish start this. We can say that. This is our last lockdown. That's what i'm hoping for will finally here on the latest. Jimmy's prussian cultural heritage foundation as being tasked with overseeing the return of the so-called benin bronzes sculptures looted from what is now nigeria by colonial forces in the nineteenth century. When it's been luke reviews editor of the art newspaper in london told us today's edition of the globalist. The process of returning the artifacts has been long and complicated dan hits. He's written a lot about this in. this book. called. The british museum's which i really recommend people read has said that it's really notable that germany is actually leading the colonial repatriation of british colonial loot. So this is a really notable distinction between what's going on in britain which is the moment pretty much silence so the british museum has a great number of these bronzes and there was a lot of pressure in the has been growing pressure on the british museum to return them. But of course it would require a change of law in the uk. But that's been done before with nazi salutes. So i think there's growing pressure we wait to see any really consistent argument from the british museum as to why they can keep them on a moral code moral grounds. The newspapers benedict. They're speaking to us on today's edition of the globalist henry as ben outlined their the argument. That's an artwork that was procured by what would easily conscious theft. Today should be returned to eric. Came from his is a clear one. But there's also an argument as has been made in the case of the benin brahms in germany previously that their preservation or the curation of the main factory more secure in some of the institutions some of the museums that are now considering how to send it back to where they were made. That's correct. I mean before i am before i go on to outline some some of the arguments for Not returning a things like the benin bronzes another other cultural artifacts it will eat. it is important state. I i personally don't actually endorse any of the arguments either side. I think it's an extremely complicated question as you hinted that there's a kind of pre straightforward argument for for keeping them in these museums that the museums are institutions which well-equipped to to care for them a complicated. There are more complicated arguments for not repatriating these artifacts as well one of them is. It's sometimes difficult to draw a direct line. The inhabitants of the places these artifacts were made in the current day inhabitants rather and the people who who made them in the instance of the benin bronzes first wave of them were created in the thirteenth century. Now this is long before the modern state of nigeria existed They were made by benin craftsman for the king at the time. Who was the king of an empire a and the royal court fashioned. Some of these plants out of out of a brass bought by portuguese. Traders had been exchanged for among other goods slaves. The point being that sir. The circumstances under which they were produced not exactly morally ideal. So so if you're going to. I suppose the argument for keeping them diving outlining in the countries of the currently in would be that. If you're going to criticize the circumstances under which britain for example procured them as not merely than you have to be consistent in applying those standards to the circumstances in which they were created. But i'm playing devil's advocate as i say i don't personally have a consistent position on this on this matter and carlotta we heard ben described this move in germany as being close to a landmark. Move in this area. Do you think it's likely that other institutions we heard that the british museum for example stayed relatively silent on many of these conversations. Do you think the other institutions might be tempted to to look again at this issue and to maybe follow on from from. Jimmy's lead here. I think it's likely and i also think that germany is following a other leads Previously a story makes me think back to the beginning of the sierra. I believe it was either at the end of january beginning of february when the netherlands actually The government issued a new guideline to basically help return stolen loot to their countries of origin and they issued all these guidelines you know the the colonial collections recognition of injustice. That's the name of the the report that was prepared by a dutch government. And you know they talk about the need to rectify historic justice and they collect and this it outlines guidelines to collaborate with the countries of origin and their requests to get a artifacts. Return to to them. And you know The idea to help them tell their own stories. And the fact that this guideline is says that is an unconditional return and this is of course applies to objects are in the custody of state museums or state galleries and when the return is formally requested by another country and the thought it was really interesting back. Then i remember reading. How a lot of experts thought that this move could make the netherlands and leader and you know repatriating artifacts that were taken during The colonial era. And perhaps having you know. A more structured approach like that can help guide Be it the governments or private institutions to act in similar ways because it is a complicated argument in complicated discussion as henry was just mentioning The the idea that of course you know. Being a museum that we can be While captained is viewed by more people so therefore informs larger parts of the world population about The particular story In history of that object and everything that's associated with it There's an argument for that. And of course argument to it was stolen. It shouldn't belong there. And of course it should go back to country of origin so i think having a structured guideline can really really help Making this you know something that is it stops. Being revolutionary and starts being the norm while kaleta rabelo and henry re sheridan. Thank you both very much indeed for being with us on the program today. That is all we have time for for. Today's edition of the late edition. Tedium manage date was louis allen. A big thanks to him as always to the late edition returns opposite tomorrow. But in the meantime we'll have more news discussion for you on tomorrow. Morning edition of the globalist which begins live from midori. Heist at seven. Am london time. But for now for me. Thomas lewis here toronto. Thank you very much for listening and goodbye tonight.

henry sheridan us joe biden london new york toronto henry kaleta rabelo henry reese sheridan henry herenew york city Mousa Rabelo president biden President biden biden administration
Thursday 6 May

Monocle 24: Midori House

24:53 min | 4 months ago

Thursday 6 May

"Us president joe biden says he'll support moves to waive the patients of corona virus. Vaccines will assess. The implications elections are taking place in the uk. Today i'm demong them for may in several english cities with nook attack. The road of the mayor has changed in the uk over the past few years and pacu backs. We're off to switzerland. Well that's roger. Federer and robert deniro the stars of the niece swiss tourism campaign. Have anything to do this. We'll look at some of the more creative ways. Tourism bodies around the world are pitching themselves to travel this post. Pandemic monaco's and correspondence are here to discuss those stories today. You're on the late edition on monocle. Twenty four hello that very warm. Welcome continue the late edition here on monocle twenty four. It is thursday the sixth of may. I'm thomas lewis here in toronto and with us. Today are regular thursday gio monocle. Twenty four wisconsin commentary bella. He's in london. And monaco's new york correspondent henry reese sheridan henry carlotta great. Have you both with us on the program. Today henry quite a big week in new york this week argument that we now have a date for when the theaters on broadway will reopen if he snapped up tickets yet. I haven't thomas yet. Have you know. I have not given. I'm in toronto. Is a bit more for me than you. On the other hand you do have a far higher level of commitment to attending broadway shows. Historically so i wonder if that might have tipped in there typically other direction. No i have not argue. I haven't snapped up. And i've never actually been to a to a broadway show so i might actually go mainly for kind of anthropological research reasons when they when they reopen. And if so i will be reporting back to you. Please do and call letter. You've also while you have in fact snapped up some tickets for the reopening. The west end in london little bit tells me he s. I'm very happy to be ticket holder for Somewhere in june and beginning of july To go and see under milk wood at the national theatre some very much looking forward to dot. I've missed it here. Ns was such a weird experience. Salvi booking tickets online once decide like. I haven't done that in a while and second. You know. I got an hour used to go to the national theatre quite often and almost no more or less would then my a budget Where to pick a seat but then you go to book it and most of them are gone like not as in gone like being sold they physically have been removed because of course social distancing and not being able to be at full capacity but nonetheless. I'm very excited to Just watch some look great theater and actors doing what did you best. Do you excited about these pilots that have been taking place in the uk this week after the return of clipping. You think of your dancing shoes already. The pilots happened in liverpool. And i do not know why. There's not protests on the streets demanding the pilots here in london or at least in my own neighborhood avenue here in the uk this past weekend which was a bank holiday. We can so longer one Did a big live events slash club night while about five thousand. People in total attended all required to test beforehand But during the actual events there was no social distancing no masks it was back to business dancing closer people jumping singing sharing drinks. Everything that you want slash regret the next day when you go out and it was just marvelous to see the footage coming out of it and And just hearing people that attended. Just you know that's part of life and of living in cities and It's the pilot is see not only about obviously clubs which even last year there was. A relaxation of the rules. Never open but more importantly live events concerts a dj spying all of dots. It was a great trial out so far from what the data suggests so far has gone. Pretty well Of course he's gonna take at least. I think it's fourteen days to get the full results back. Have to know if people tested positive afterwards etcetera but it it was great to see the reports rolling all over the weekend and it wasn't just from you know the youth going to these events but you'd have you know virologists and health professionals journalists. They're having fun and attending the event so in the name of journalism. I'm putting my hand up to go to the next one. Please welcome up through ballots. Be seen on a dance floor near year very soon to henry. Great avi both with us on the program today. Us president joe biden yesterday gave his support to growing international calls to waive the patients of corona virus vaccines developed in the us in order to boost production process off vaccines and their availability to those parts of the world hardest hit by covid. Nineteen monaco's health and science correspondent. Dr chris smith had more for us on the story on today's edition of the briefing. What a lot of countries india south africa arguing is that expensive patents owned by the owners of the intellectual property behind these vaccines prevent on the ground local manufacturer vaccines and that could impede vaccine. Supply the flip side of this on the other hand of from the fomc sector but also independent impartial. Commentators is that really. The bottleneck isn't payton's it's just vaccine supply it's the ability to make vaccines because it's just a recipe book. It is the know how and the magic hands approach. That goes with making these things. That's really important too. So it's not everything. It's a step in the right direction in terms of mass production vaccines. But it's not the whole story. Dr chris smith speaking to us on the briefing a little earlier today Henry how significant would you say. Is the statement by president biden yesterday. And how is it. Being received in the united states. The potential impact of the policy he proposed is enormously significant and with open up production of toronto virus vaccines beyond the really handful of companies that have developed them and currently manufacture them and opened up to any other any number of other companies around the world to doing so in the us received differently. Depending on who you ask. Democrats who have been advocating for this and health public health advocates who've been advocating for this move for a long time bernie sanders and elizabeth warren or among them. They obviously welcomed the decision. They think that it's important. For the united states to projector projected moral leadership on the global stage by by not withholding the ability to to produce these vaccines which is now how how advocates of the of the policy view the us sanctions so far on the other hand is christmas mentioned. There are strong voices of opposition from within the. Us pharmaceutical industry now obvious motivation for them to oppose measure is that these companies don't want what they consider to be their intellectual property to be taken from them essentially or or at least not defended quite straightforwardly that would make them less profitable shares of biotech madonna and novak three of the big pharmaceutical companies responsibility for manufacturing. The vaccine dropped on wednesday afternoon after this announcement but as christmas also mentioned there are substantive considerations from both within and without the pharmaceutical industry that simply handing over the recipe book. Essentially and i've. I've read several opponents of this policy who've us culinary metaphors handing over merely the recipe but without any of the kitchen staff or the or the or. The kitchens need to prepare the recipes. That is vaccine. Safely is is is not only counterproductive but actually could be directly. Harmful basically these these blogs us pharmaceutical companies have developed extraordinarily complex procedures for manufacturing these vaccines safely and responsibly. They will not have oversight over the way their vaccine recipes are produced in other countries in countries outside of the united states and europe and britain of course are also have their vaccines they want to protect and there is a legitimate concern that the this could lead to serious public health drawbacks. So with that in mind karnal if patients are ultimately waived on some of the coronavirus vaccines currently in use in many parts of the world. What would that mean in reality. And how quickly vaccine production can in fact be scaled up well I think it can help. But we need to remember that the patents are just one of the many steps. Getting access to components of making a vaccine is another entire conversation that not a lot of countries might be able to You know this temporary relief from patents doesn't necessarily equate you know an immediate speeding up of manufacturing or of the supply. We need to think about securing components. setting up the factories in countries. Where that doesn't exist to training people and even going forward in and dot passing relevant laws that apply to that and all of these things are essential to vaccine delivery. But you know what's in question here is allowing nations to develop a generic version of the vaccine their own version in their own country. So that we can stop referring to the moderna the pfizer the astrazeneca a job and just call it a coronavirus vaccine and it's a generic From each country in each of these nations. i think it's an important first step But that it will ultimately help some of these bumps that we've seen along the vaccination drive that's happening worldwide and it will definitely have help with some of the world's poorest nations To be able to at least start a conversation and start considering how they could manufacture these rather than rely on imports from other countries But re realistically. I think we're still a few months. If not more of a wet for further away from from you know getting these vaccines fully developed in these nations one. Next year on the late edition. A slate of elections is taking place across the united kingdom today among them. Elections city says new england. And for this week's edition of the urban est. We spoke to akash porn. Senior fellow at the institute for government think tank in london on the role. Many mas- play in english cities. Today these mayors here have responsibility for some important public services typically that they have responsibility for public transport for investments in infrastructure and so on responsibility for planning and deciding when you houses in other things should be built save a role of a in further education and skills for vision and so on on in some cases. This applies to the london mayor and the mayor of manchester as well. They will serve responsible for police on fire services so awesome quite important issues not do full within the control or responsibility of the mayor and they will say do just have a big public profile they gotta personal mandates and a night gives them quite a lot of authority to speak on behalf of their ciccio or region to negotiate with central government for more funds or other supports unto coordinates as well to bring local stakeholders other local leaders and business and so on together to for example achieve sets and infrastructure plans. And so on. Akash porn senior fellow at the institute for government think tank in the uk. Speak to us for this. Week's edition of the urban est at coletta. The road of the man in several english cities has changed quite significant ways over the past. Few years. hasn't says yes particularly in the past decade Here in the uk this idea of creating metro mayors was first introduced and basically best way to describe a metro mayor. You know it's the combined authority of mayor. These are directly elected leaders of city regions that span a number of local council areas and each of them each of these metro mayors chairs mayoral combined authority. Which is then formed by all the leaders of the councils in the region. If i'm making sense and it goes to the point that we are hearing there from our guest That having a metro mayor speaking for a wider region representing more people than we'll have he will they will be able to have more leverage when trying to negotiate with central government. Or when trying to you know ask for different things for his city slash region and it's a different power behind you then just city so we've seen that introduced across a couple of cities here in the uk. But you know today. Today selections really have highlighted the importance of having a good leader And i think that's a consequence of the past eighteen months Of a pandemic and where more often than not mayors and the local leaders and metro mayors came across obviously understanding their region their city their constituents much better than central government which in a way it's granted government it. That's why it's called. Central government has a more national Wider looking approach to issues. But this this these past eighteen months really have highlighted. How having a good mayor dots on your side really can make a difference and more often than not the decisions taken on a local. Now let are the ones that have a more immediate impact In citizens lives and More palpable in that sense and that people more easily recognized so these elections i mean. It's quite astonishing. A lot of demerol elections were meant to happen last year. But then you know. The pandemic prompted a year. Long delay in the casting of many of the ballots So it has meant that today. The super thursday here in the uk is the biggest set of local elections in this country since nineteen seventy-three which is quite astonishing. And we're talking about one hundred and forty three english councils. Having seats up for grabs Even police and crime commissioners commissioners thirty nine of them up for grabs and then yes. Thirteen directly elected city and metro mayors from london to liverpool greater manchester. And other places i. It's it's a lot of people today knowing about their what's going to happen in the next couple of years of their lives and henry to shift the focus to your city as discussed on the program several times before new york is electing. Its own you mad this year and merrill races in new york city on known i suppose historically for for throwing up surprises or will bucking. The patents of that campaigns was the state of the race in new york city. Far this time around so i. It's a bit weird. It the way that the racist shaped up so far the incumbent bill de blasio has exhausted his term limits. So he he will not be running this year. He's not in contention so there is going to be a new face as of january first one thousand twenty two leading city still on its pandemic recovery and and the top of the field. Front runners are shaped up in a way that you might expect so number one consistently in the polls although he's wavering a bit slightly now is andrew young who is conjured a political career. Have nothing when he when he ran for the for the two thousand and twenty democratic presidential primary really made a name for myself advocating national policy of universal basic income. And he's parlayed that now into a extremely successful so far bid to become the mayor of new york which is perhaps slightly not what you would have predicted. He's not from the city. He doesn't have any political experience at all. He used to be an entrepreneur. And he's ready to be centrist at this moment when new york is really undergoing a perceived leftist awakening but he seems to be appealing to to new york. Because i think you're in the mood for a fresh face. The new approach trailing behind him pretty consistently in the polls number two guy called eric atoms. He's the borough president currently for brooklyn. He was born and raised in queens in queens. Brooklyn used to be wiped. Police officer fault. Racism from within the force was eventually elected to the new york senate and rose to becoming brooklyn borough president. He's putting a very strong showing but has been has been trailing behind yang so far and then the third position pretty consistently has been at the city comptroller which is a role that basically amounts to being the city's accountant guy. Called scott stringer has by far the most conventional political experience. Anyone running he's he's. He's really a water for democratic politics in the city he he's been consistently underperforming in the race and then last week on top of the fact that he was underperforming. Anyway a former campaign campaign volunteer. Who work within twenty years ago accused him of sexual misconduct which led him to lose a bunch of endorsements he'd managed to rack up from various politicians and political groups. But it's still very much ought to play for the primaries or on june twenty second in the sense that the the races only just heating up. I think it's going to be. I mean whoever wins those three is going to be interesting. Either for the sheer fact of renting or the fact that they've managed to come from behind win in the case of scott stringer's the managed to put it off and you know the morality in a new york is a little bit kind of bitter kind of sexy office than i think the morality in in in in english cities historically is a bit more attention paid to a bit more pomp and ceremony around it so should be should be fun to watch. Hopefully you can hear more about some of the marrow races that are taking place in cities around the world this year on this week's edition of the urban est which premiered here on monocle twenty four and a little while ago. Well finally here on the late edition how to lure travelers back. Once travel restrictions are relaxed is a question. Many national torres more therapies that kind of pondering while for switzerland. It's a slight the unlikely double act that its tourism body hopes would bring visitors back in this new. Tv switzerland's most famous sportsmen roger. Federer tries to convince the legendary. Hollywood hardman robert deniro to pay switzerland visit doing. Hey roger. how are you just relaxing into swiss alps. They a look. Yeah good good good for you. Listen about to switzerland film you want me to. Do you see the film. I sent you. I'm watching it as we speak. I don't like what just look at where you are roger. I mean you've got your mountains. Just king resort your charming little tiles. Green valleys no drama. No drama dolls button sunset. Roger from certain type of actor. I need an edge conflict. Jeopardy switzerland is just too perfect new. Television adalat switzerland's tourism aurthority featuring roger federer and a apparently heartache of robert deniro colada. You've seen this odds. Have this double act. Convinced you to pack your bags and venture off to switzerland since you can. Oh tom i was already fully convinced with ninety different. Strata monaco's hq in zurich of But this double act has made me One to visit as soon as possible. I mean hearing that something is just too perfect. That is quite a cell. If i must be honest even though i did like watching the ad seen you know they try to portray the chaos of new york city which i'm sure Henry can attest do but seeing that. ju- just opposed to all these beautiful Scenes of the mountains and the lake and these scenic scenic views. The ideal holiday would be to combine both base. I loved this advertisers just at clash of two worlds That i found quite endearing and henry. How did that clash of two worlds. Play out for you. And how much in your mind on national tourism authorities getting. Do you think anticipation of the return of travel at scale once again. Yeah i think there's going to be an enormous birsh. Isn't there to kind of open up new destinations in the minds of people who i think pretty desperate to travel and travel hard so this obviously switzerland obviously as roping in two major players major celebrity's to assist with their tours and drive. It wouldn't surprise me to see To see to see other other countries making a big push. As i say. I think that people are really open now to visiting new places places. They might not have considered before. There are people who save money over the course of the pandemic that they haven't been spending holidays that maybe you know they're winning to spend flying to a lesser known island somewhere in the middle of the ocean or or some kind of maybe like a balkan country that they wouldn't have previously considered. I think the countries need to kind of have an eye on availing themselves of this opportunity and of course all of their partners in terms of airlines travel agencies municipal authorities a city based tourism agencies working conjunction with national ones. That'll be board as well and to put you both on the spot. Just finally here on the program today if there's one part of the world parents that you haven't visited before that you'd be open to a pitch from after post pandemic trip where without be kalitan as with you. Oh god there's so many places to thank called like you saying where i haven't been in the world you know what i'm open to anywhere in asia. Pitch me i'll be there. I don't even need to hear the pet. Just tell me one. And i'll go there a too boring ones. I'm afraid i'd like to go to hawaii for some for some reason. It's been It's been presenting yourself to me recently of doing that. I was like the japan. My sister should be moving there soon. i think so. I'm looking forward to visiting there. Which i never have before. That's the solution then. Henry pitchers asia. We both go to japan. Yeah we could do it. You could have multiple to occupy very. That's being done not by us. The first day late edition crew spin on it. Well if you do both end up going on travel. But he's d be sure to send me a postcard. Please collateral and henry sheridan. Thank you very much the tv for being with us today. That's all i'm afraid to say. We have time for for the program today. Today's studio manager in london was louis allen. Big thanks to him as always to the late edition returns for the final time at the same time tomorrow night for me. Thomas lewis here in toronto. Thank you very much finishing and joining us during this past year. Here malate addition. He's been great to have your company we'll see.

Dr chris smith uk robert deniro us monaco london institute for government new york Thomas lewis national theatre henry reese sheridan henry car switzerland joe biden toronto henry president biden roger Federer Salvi akash porn
Edition 2389

Monocle 24: Midori House

25:14 min | 6 months ago

Edition 2389

"Us president joe biden gives his first press conference at the white house since taking office and many of us what took him so long. The owner of the huge vessel that has blocked section of the suez canal has apologized for the backing up of ships. Within one of the world's most important trading routes and candidates in the meryl races currently underway in. London and new york city continued to set out their stalls will have the latest on each race for you before the end of the program. Monaco editors and correspondents are here to discuss those stories today. On the late edition here on monocle. Twenty four hallo. They're very warm. Welcome to you to the late edition here on monocle twenty four. It is thursday the twenty fifth of march and. I'm thomas here in toronto and joining us. Today from london is monocle twenty four qatar rabelo and from new york city. Monaco's henry reese sheridan henry great to have you both with us on the program. Today at kolata is thursday. Almost the end of another week but a brand new episode the herbalist has just been brooke us your monocle. Twenty four and he gives a sneak peek of. What's in store for us this week for those. Have another chance to hear it yet. hi tom. Es this week. While we're we're going to speak about mr biden in a few minutes from now but actually this week. We're looking at the new dawn for transportation in the united states. People will know that. Joe biden is nicknamed amtrak joe and now having pete buttigieg mayor pete at the helm of the transport as transport secretary has opened up all these questions about the future of transit in the united states. And so we profile beds The state of the rail infrastructure in the country have few of damore Groundbreaking initiatives to try to shift the conversation away from automobiles particularly on the west coast as we know very car. Centric part of the us And yes a little wondering and musing on what This pairing of amtrak ago and mayor. Pete can bring to the country and henry imagining that you're fond of her the trainer new or to you dreaming of the day you can hop back onto an amtrak train sometime in the afc jet. I'm fantasizing ninety about getting back in the in the bank seats of the long island. Railroad look keeping us guessing on what adventure will look like. Sheridan aunt called rabelo. Great to have you both with us on the program tonight where we begin. Today's show in the united states. Where president joe biden has given his first press conference since taking the oath of office in late january. Some had asked why it's taken president biden so long to hold a former press conference. It's been sixty five days. Since he assumed the presidency and every one of his predecessors since calvin coolidge who was president of the nineteen twenties at all held a former encounter with the press by a comparible point in their presidencies collado before we get into the importance of the presidential press conference at today's encounter with the press for joe biden comes at a particular time of pressure for him early on in his presidency. Doesn't it oh absolutely We're likely to see. Joe biden being pressed particularly on the issue of gun control in the us. Anita remember that to Mass shootings happened within a week. Very recently a also the figures for an employment have been released so that's likely to be another a focus of the press conference at least when it comes to the questions being directed at him as mentioned is sixty five days since Well sixty five days. A no formal press conference has been held a lot of speculation on why that might be the case You know the idea that we were so overwhelmed during the trump years That perhaps is on a bad thing now not to be around the clock looking at what the next press conference might be saying now. biden's white house is of course a under a lot of pressure because of all of these issues. Immigration is another one as well. But also i think The you know this is the first time that he will be addressing. The nation since The cove nineteen relief. Bill has been passed. And there's a lot of questions There as well On what that means in reality for citizens so these are all a lot of really serious consequential issues Almost a perfect storm in a weird way. I don't think this press conference could have come at a better time in terms of people needing answers and in terms of helping biden using use this platform to Pro pro to properly spread the message that he's trying to say from his white house and from his administration and henry there had been a growing chorus of and questions asking why biden hasn't held a press conference before now in your opinion. Do you think those questions have sort of. Put a bit of a focus on the value of the president. Taking questions directly from the prestige questions were not fair. I do think that they were fair to an extent. And i do also think that they shine a light on or thrown into relief. Exactly the point of official white house press briefings. Are there a somewhat unusual type of interaction between the highest elected official in america and the press the somewhat theatrical everyone i'm sure listening is familiar with format. The the president standing at the front of the white house briefing room behind the lectern picking reporters who form the right of the white house press corps which is a kind of prestigious group of journalists that have their own culture faced criticism in the past for being a forum for grandstanding. On both sides of the lectern both the president a well presidents in the past and the journalists are called upon sometimes can use can use is an opportunity to kind of Flexor theatrical but. I think that it's a legitimate mechanism. For holding the president to account and i also think that it does provide a degree of visibility for people to be able to see the president reaches a broader audience than interviews with for example specific press outlets which is what biden has restricted himself to so far in his presidency. So i think that although they can be made fun of of the utility can be questioned somewhat. I do think it's important for presidents to engage with them particularly president like biden. Who is looking to reestablish what is considered a normal relationship with the press after donald trump's presidency while we will have further analysis for you from today's press conference at the white house on tomorrow morning's edition of the globalist hero monocle twenty four that begins live from london at seven. Am london time well next here. On the late edition the effort to unblock. The suez canal has entered a new phase as dutch and japanese. Salvage teams have been brought in to try to free the two hundred twenty thousand ton ever given from the bank of one of the world's most important shipping routes. The vessel ran aground after reportedly being blown off by strong winds. On tuesday henry. The owner of the ever given has apologized for the delays. This instant is now causing but there are several reports circulating today about what might have to happen too to free up through. We've heard from one salvage company at the moment that it like. He isn't going to impossible to free it while the cocker is on board Unloading kaga is likely take several days. It's quite an unpredictable picture. Still isn't it. Yes so. I think the last time that a vessel stuck in the suez canal was also a japanese vessel. I think back in twenty seventeen in that instance tug boats were able to refloat it within a few hours. This is a completely different situation. The ceo of one of the salvage companies parent company has compared the ship to an enormous beached whale and has set the as you mentioned could take weeks to refloat and that could involve a complex process of systematically removing the cargo from the ship to make it light enough to reef refloat difficult to emphasize the extent of the disruption that causes to global trade a massive proportion of the world's trade with the cargo cargo anyway shipborne cargo canal and i think aside from the aside from the potential disruption to global trades. This could also say A kind of wild crisis within the shopping insurance industry all of the companies that have lost time and money because their ships have been delayed by this stuck ship are going to be filing their own insurance claims for damages. An well you can only imagine how messy that might get and carlotta th the time we're going to wear the reports are that there are some one hundred. Fifty ships backed up at the suez canal. This is only the third time. I believe that the as canal has effectively been closed in this way since it opened all the way back in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine so it is an extremely reliable thoroughfare historically even so do you think that the the grounding of the ever given has shown that there is still a precariousness to global trade given just how vast the volume of goods that passed through the suez canal. Every day is now that much traffic is ground to a halt. It does make you pause when you think of because of this incident at ten percents Over the world trade is currently Halted waiting for this For it to be for the ship to be removed By one of the salvator by all of the salvage companies is unbelievable to think the damage. You know a situation like this can do what it out of solution. I have no answer for that as you said it has happened in such rare occasions that perhaps it doesn't make sense financially you know to Look at another alternative The problem now is also another. Henry was mentioning just there. You know the crisis it might cost 'cause a insurers but also for egypt who relies a lot on the trade that goes to as canal as part of a lot of the money that comes into its own economy. And i'm not sure how if you know if boats are just there waiting if any money is actually coming in and how much of an impact this is actually a going to have I'm not as reports emerging right now about How the possibility of even removing the container ships which are on board of dispersal. Which could help you know. Bring it back afloat Just thought process will take weeks and there are questions about insurance of the contents there because obviously the people who put their goods into those containers. are perhaps not insured for them to you know be taken off the boat into a different country as the so many questions here every time someone seems to have the solution is a gift that keeps on giving this story But unbelievable when you think the amount of trade that it's currently halted because of deaths while we will be monitoring events on the canal in the coming days on monocle twenty four but finally here on the late edition there are meryl races underway in both london and in new york city. We can check in with a state of both sides of campaigns now color to begin with you in london last night. The the two leading candidates for the morality in britain's capital city at the incumbent massively khan and his leading challenger shawn bayley they met each of the virtually for the first debates of the campaign. I'm give us a roundup if you could of of what was discussed and whether now the the lines if you like a clear about what the central shoes all going to be now in london's merrill racer had day in may so currently. We are in a at an interesting point with the mayoral race. Right before this debate between silicon and sean bailey Most of the headlines ahead of the debate were basically something along. The lines of Is city cons reelection inevitable. He has you know. Been quite Firm when it comes to values that londoners Really hold dearly on the issue of brexit and obviously london being a really diverse city with a lot of european union citizens being londoners to He throughout his mayorship has been a staunch defender of preserving the rights for european citizens throughout the pandemic as well We need to remember that it was also during his mayorship. That's london had the most recent terrorist attacks in his reaction to that has also been praised. So cdc on overall has been a really good mayor faced with Quite incredible and unprecedented challenges. Now the debate that we had between the two of them basically started With a about crime and in education and essentially Each other blaming one and the other being obviously said he can versus the conservatives And making the streets safe There's also conversation a bit of the debate about the pandemic and how To safely reopen the city and To balance the needs of individuals individuals versus the economy has been Over the past couple of months criticized by the way that transport for london is doing at the moment which of course fair revenues have fallen by nearly ninety percent which is no surprise to anyone since the uk has been mostly in a lockdown over the past twelve months with people basically being not allowed to be on public transit unless they have a medical exception or an exemption a because they are essential workers or key workers so it's not surprising to see that number. But you can understand as well. How in the lead up for an election. That number becomes contentious The there was a ski quite an interesting moment where they were talking. They were asked What he thought of each other and Shawn bailey was the first one to answer any set. Something along the lines of oh one of the great things about working In london's assembly is that we work well in across the aisle and we are very cordial to each other Basically saying he has nothing to say He doesn't think anything badly about you. Know city-khan as a person and city-khan basically reply to that in the lines of I'm sorry but i disagree because i cannot support someone who has made really controversial comments particularly against minorities in the city. And how can this be a person running for mayor so that was quite an interesting moment that no one was expecting especially after you know such a cordial message from the opposing candidate There's still a lot Happening until of course the election day in may but this afar has been you know a hint of The key issues that this city is facing at the moment and as thinks slowly start to reopen Perhaps more answers and questions will emerge in On when it comes to. Who will london after this and culture. I think we can hear a portion of that interaction that you're just describing for a snack. Let's just get a a final thought. You can always. I mean getting on famously of course but do you. Do you like each other. I mean do you have respect for each other. You know each other london assembly the mayor. Also that worth for me. Of course. I respect steve. He's got a big job as a mayor of london has things to do. Our spent all of my colleagues one of the great things about london. Semblance is how collegiate we work. Sourcing shoulder said about About each about diwali about women about girl's culturism about those who receive benefits. It upset by philip. My values catholic bodies on a hobart london's those values and made a six and interaction there between the main contenders in london's merrill race sadique khan and shawn bailey. There and it's interesting. Carlotta isn't it that the simple fact of being cordial to your opponents seems like such a novelty here. Do you think in terms of the mood. So far mung the electorate in london. Is there an engagement with the process. So far would you say yours is still fairly up for grabs with these final weeks to go before before election day i would be extremely surprised if city can is not reelected. I think that's the best way of phrasing it. We need to remember so he has a great story you know. He's the the first Muslim mayor in over city hall in london. He's a son of a bus driver is a great personal story as well. The really represents the city more than anything else. So that is very important to There's been a quite a drive over the past few weeks to get people to register to vote for postal ballot here in the uk you're mostly always automatically registered about because of the pandemic and so many people shielding or not being comfortable going to polling stations. I don't recall in The nearly decade that. I've lived in the city ever seen such a push for the postal ballots adopt might change Numbers in certain areas will be interesting to see if that actually has any impact and henry to switch. Focus to the city that you live in. We have discussed these early stages of the mayoral campaign new york with you previously on the show but a new poll. I suggest that in the race for the democratic nomination for the merite That is still wide. Open the race there. Yes oh new. Poll came out this week. Which puts Thirty fifty percent of democratic voters as undecided on who. They're going to support now. Democratic voters are basically the only voters who count in new york because whoever wins the democratic nomination is almost guaranteed to go on to win the morality so that really is a very high number of people who haven't decided yet among those who have decided andrew young is. The front runner normally followed in most polls by eric atoms. And they're engaged in an ongoing war of words which is owned the poised to to heat up so slightly under three months until the election. Apparently it's quite normal for the kind of attack cads and really aggressive campaigning. To not be in full gear yet that comes in may But but timing aside or that normal kind of campaign cycle aside You know obviously the one thing that might explain why the such a high proportion of undecided democratic voters is that under the pandemic Candidates haven't had the opportunity to campaign giving speeches in front of big crowds getting down in the subways and kind of greeting commuters. Just getting among it. They haven't had that those opportunities and so for this spate of candidates. Many of whom are relative newcomers to politics or don't have huge amounts of name recognition. It is a challenging environment in which to get their names out there and so it wouldn't surprise me. If if the proportion of undecided voters remained relatively high all the way up until until voting day. i'm not challenging environment side henry. Just finally i was speaking to a friend. He's a journalist in new york yesterday. Who said that you know he was looking back at. You know the twenty fourteen race for the marathi in new york and the mad bill de blasio who obviously went onto win sort of came from nowhere. I thought time in that campaign And surprised many by by eventually winning. Have you got your eyes on any candidates who might be realistically likely of a similar kind of surprise or upset as these months of campaigning narrow rumble only new york. Well i think that the big question mark hovering over over the race is whether andrew yang's support is going to translate into a strong election day performance or if it's merely a reflection of the fact that he's entering the race with by far the most amount of name recognition ju to his participation in the democratic presidential primaries last year he is being attacked pretty relentlessly by his competitors for just basically not being new york enough. He was raised north of the city away. North of the city upstate in westchester county He's been criticized for spending a lot of the pandemic outside of the city again in a house. upstate now. Andrew young has explained the one of the reasons that he he chose to spend so much time upstate was to make life easier for his son who has autism. It's there are commentators who are saying that the relatively high level of support for him is going to disappear when it really comes down to the crunch and voters become more engaged because he doesn't have fantastic connections frankly within the traditional a community of political kingmakers in new york city which are kind of lobbying power brokers and also unions one of the biggest unions in new york recently endorsed. Eric adams his main competitor. So i think the kind of mikhael nature of the support for yang is is is the most elusive factor at the moment in the race while both races in new york city and in london are ones we will be following closely here in the coming weeks up until election day in both places here on monocle twenty four but for now henry. Sheridan and carl lauter rebelo. Thank you both very much. Indeed for being with us on the program today is all. We have time for today's edition of the late edition. Today's program was edited in london by louis allen. A big thanks to him as always to the late edition returns at the same time tomorrow. But in the meantime be sure to listen to the brand new episode of the urban est which we had collado took him out a little earlier in the show which premiered a short while ago here on monocle twenty four. I'm thomas lewis here in toronto. Thank you very much for listening. And we'll see you tomorrow.

joe biden london suez canal biden white house united states henry henry reese sheridan henry kolata mr biden amtrak joe pete buttigieg mayor pete new york city rabelo collado president biden white house calvin coolidge
Tuesday 4 May

Monocle 24: Midori House

28:34 min | 5 months ago

Tuesday 4 May

"India's opposition leader who gandhi calls for a national lockdown as the official number of new daily corona virus infections in india continues to break records the feature of gun ownership. The united states is under review at the us supreme court in a case that could have significant implications for the second amendment right to bear arms and the coliseum in rome is set to get a new floor will bring you. The gladiators view of the world's most story landmarks before the end of the program monaco's editors and correspondents are here to discuss those stories today. Here on the late edition on monocle. Twenty four hallo that a very warm welcome. Teach the late edition here on monocle. Twenty four it is tuesday. The fourth of may and i'm thomas lewis here in toronto and with us today to cast. Their expert is across some of the day's news articles europe editor at large at stocker. He's in milan forest and from new york. City monica's correspondent henry reese sheridan henry. Add great to have you both with us on the program today. We are the start of another week just about. So how things shaping there in milan. So far it Very good thank you. I've just have a quick gulp The of this week over two too late coma for a pace for our sister publication which is of course comfort magazine. So i wasn't hanging out with george clooney But i i wasn't listing a very lovely coma hotel For the next issue off dot com fact magazine and so of enjoying some wondering around the lake So very nice to be there and get out of the big smoke for day on now you back in a milan but it was nice to get a bit of a lake. Air for a day certainly sounds delicate postcards. And how things are shaping. A few there in new york couldn't be better to be on the thomas. I am gonna second jab last night. Congratulations henry thank you very much So i'm feeling in a word. Immune city field to the home of the mets baseball baseball team and received a baseball themed sticker saying that i've been immunized so that was a bonus to be not the main point of going there but certainly welcome bonus they love a stick here in the states. Then they just love a job. You voted yet sticker everything and to be on his dad's what's not to love indeed two hundred and one of the biggest vaccination centres. Here is the biggest theme park in canada. Which is about an hour away from toronto. So i'm hoping when my time comes. I get to show up. Then they'll be fun theme park themed stickers but i shall keep you posted on that. I knew sheridan in new york. And that stuck in malahide greater. Have you both with us on the program today. India's leading opposition leader rahul. Gandhi has called for an immediate national lockdown as the crisis brought about by second wave of corona virus infections continues to deepen official figures from india claim that more than two hundred and twenty thousand people have now died and twenty million infections have been recorded but there is a widely held belief that both of those figures are significantly lower than the actual toll covid nineteen has taken in india. So far monaco's health and science correspondent. Chris smith explained some of the reasons the current situation in india for us on the briefing. Today it's made difficult in india for a of different reasons. Not just numerical ones. Population is the big problem. One point three plus billion people in the country but fifty percent of them have no toilet and if you use access to a toilet as a proxy for living standards. This is very much a work to live. Society of very divided society of very impoverished society for many of those one point three billion people. So when you have public health maneuvers like being used in britain to control the problem. Stay at home. Quarantine yourself you can't do that in places like this and when you've got people living in the sorts of population densities the some people being forced to live in then as soon as you get one case we know the vast majority of cases of crony of ours transmission occur in the domestic setting. Because where you spend most of your time where do you spend your closest personal contact time with others where you spend time eating sleeping and so on. It's in the high so unsurprising if you've got lots of people and very high density in relatively poor living conditions you can get lots of cases and people can't afford to then is late themselves to stop themselves giving it to other people because then another problem kicks in. They go bankrupt. They can't afford to eat. And then of course their children suffer. No one's gonna let that happen. So as a result it becomes a self fulfilling prophecy dr chris. smith monaco's health and science correspondent speaking to us on today's edition off the briefing. A henry spoken several times in the program about the international aid. This being pledged to india. Do we have a sense at this stage of active international aid. That has been arriving so far has been in the current situation in india. The international aid has helped significantly but there there have been impediments to its effectiveness. The biggest impediment isn't actually the necessarily a shortage of any given resource but the infrastructural resources as are required to disperse them. Distribute them over the country. Indie obviously is a vast vast country with an enormous population most of its oxygen manufacturing facilities. Were in the south of the country and that creates a shortage or has led to a shortage in the north of of the country and it is very difficult to get the oxygen there quickly enough. The air force has been enlisted to carry cannisters up to the north but there are vast swathes of the country which which are not served particularly well by road networks for example and this is a major impediment to getting the aid which is coming into the country to to where it's needed. Interestingly to fill some of these gaps in terms of coordination of the distribution of aid organic networks of a have have have popped up on social media both among indians with india but also Transcending the boundaries of the country and enlisting indians living in the global diasporas well and there's been an enormous effort on the part of ordinary people who are not in official positions to alert aid agencies in some cases even government officials in some cases even opposition politicians to where the resources needed to get the resources to where they're needed so there's an enormous effort on the part of obviously the government on the part of foreign governments but also on the part of unofficial organizations unofficial networks of people who are all contributing to the information distribution effort to make sure the resources are being distributed more effectively than they are currently being well in a story. That's running parallel to that situation in india little earlier today. India's prime minister narendra modi met virtually with the uk's prime minister. Boris johnson to announce a new trade partnership between the two countries. The historian schutte kapila at the university of cambridge in the uk explained the significance of today's agreement for us on the globalist day interesting because of causing relations between and are deep. But they've not always been even on a ticket warmer clothes as unlike the us relationship which has been an upward. Turn the indian. You came on you know for whatever many reasons including imperial legacy lack of understanding prejudice. It hasn't really taken off and the way you could have imagined it might have given the historic ties. But i think this is the turning point because the kind of political will on the side of johnston and moody to make it work and announcement portrayed. Bill is significant. Took shruti kapila. They're speaking on today's edition of the globalist and at both Narendra modi and boris johnson. Have in their respective parts of the world made chrysler a big statement about Disagreement that was agreed to today. Virtually between the two of them but how noteworthy in your mind is the deal. That's been announced today. I'm i suppose you think that the domestic political pressures the both modi and johnson are experiencing in their respective parts of the world at the moment as any of that played into. Do you think at least the of what was unveiled a little earlier today. I mean obviously. This was a while in the pipeline. But i think what you can definitely say is that you know. Both these leaders needed a win Know johnson facing this was renamed. Sister sleaze issue by the uk press in his In the uk. And then you have oversea mody. Who's battling the fact that coronavirus numbers Uh spiking out of control and who has recently lost a sort of battleground. In a recent election he lost west bengal party lost. They even are actually historically. It's never won the having said that this is being yeah projected as a sort of win for both saw that two hundred and forty million pounds is being invested. This is sort of what i wanted to put out something interesting by india's serum institute and basically they wanna set up trials and possibly even production four vaccines and like in the uk. The uk is sort of touting the fact that some six thousand five hundred jobs could be created by this deal having said that it is worth noting few things first of all. This is not a free trade deal. This is an enhanced trade partnership which is basically agreeing to lower than usual tariffs at the same time. India is in discussions with the eu about a free trade agreement. They've actually been having discussed discussions for longtime they clapsed A few years back but they've been reopened and oversee if the e gets a free trade deal that would be one up if you like on the uk also sort of looking at the nitty gritty looking at the details of some of these things oversee that job creation. is great but also some of the things you think Well less important. For example british fruit can now be exported to india for the first time. And you know things like apples and pears excetera but if you look at like what that's worth. The free vegetable industry is worth about one point. Three billion pounds of the economy and the total value of that. 'cause three hundred billion so it's a very small A fragment we know that. Boris johnson and his conservative government since brexit since even the e you have been extremely keen for trade deals and obviously it's You know why that would be the case. They need those new alliances and agreements with countries after leaving such a huge trading partner like the european union. We know that you know. India is of course important. But it's not you know the big one Really will johnson but like if he was ready to sort of claim a huge victory would perhaps be to cement this us trade to and you may remember. This was on the table and being discussed when donald trump was president was sort of shock and horror about some of the concessions that the uk may have been willing to make in order for that to happen like the introduction of of chlorine treated chicken to the uk. Which of course made lots of Scam mongering headlines. The time but since joe biden's come into the presidency he hasn't really committed to that He's been sort of dodging that one. So i guess johnson will be hoping that although india's step in the right direction he can get something like a big win like the us under his belt rather than further way destinations india australia new zealand. The us is still the big ticket. I think well next here on the late edition the. Us supreme court last week agreed to hear a case that could have deep and lasting implications for gun ownership in the united states and on today's edition of the briefing. The political scientist and commentator robert spitzer explained the potential significance of the case for us. I do believe that the supreme court would not have taken this appeal in the first place. If it were not for the fact that at least five of the nine justices want to begin an effort to rollback some gun laws and want to expand gun rights into the public. They could rule narrowly. There would only affect the new york law but that to me is a less likely outcome than a broader ruling. That would seek to do something that has not existed before that is to say to extend second amendment rights in some manner to the public sphere. And i would add that ironically. America's gun law history really is the reverse even though people think of america in the nineteenth century in the eighteenth century is kind of the wild west. The fact is that by the end of the eighteen. Hundreds virtually every state had strict laws against carrying concealed weapons. He at this supreme court seems to be poised to want to try and carve out a second amendment right for americans to carry guns in some respect in public robert spitzer. They're speaking to us on the briefing a little earlier today. Ed do you have a sense of why the. Us supreme court agreed to take this case. Which is robert spit. Side like this centers on a specific Gun laws an appeal to a gun battle in the state of new york. I mean oversee. The i mean bisque specifically it was a couple of individuals who are basically suing for the fact that they weren't able to get at these permits to carry guns outside the homes. New york currently need you to show proper cools In order to be able to do that making it virtually impossible to do so as you know Having spent time in the us. And of course henry spice in new york new york has very strict gun control laws at the moment but broadly speaking we can say that this is in part to do with the previous administration the fact that donald trump was impossible for a and the supreme court has has definitely shifted to the right is become more conservative. Don't forget that donald trump was able to to have three nominations to the same. Neil goal such Brett kevin now and the most recent of course with the parsing. I've ruth ginsburg was. Of course amy coney barrett and all three of those are defenders of gun rights and so with the supreme cool being essentially highly politicized. And you know we've seen over the years how it's full time between republicans and democrats that it is at. Its most conservative for many years. Means that of course is more likely that conservative rulings would go in its favor and the fact that it's agreed to take this up is you know is is a big step because it's been over decade. I believe since the supreme court was prepared to take up anything relating to the second amendment and so this is a big moment In the us history and and sort of really runs counter to to what's happening in the us. Not just the odyssey stream of of mass killings seem recently but also that pentti oppose that. Say that the majority of americans would welcome more gun control. That's the thing. It's not really keeping in step possibly with the american public and we also know that unlike his predecessor joe biden was really elected on a ticket of of of of trying to increase gun control laws. And he's been trying to do that. I including executive action on these so-called ghost guns which basically untraceable weapons are often made from kit this executive action trying to introduce zero numbers to all those different parts of that kit to make sure that any weapon is therefore traceable but of course. It's been hard. Historically in the past and barrack obama had this problem is well. it's tough to get legislation through even the fact that You know the democrats have a majority in senate. It is razor thin so that while they may pass legislation in the lower house house of representatives. It will always be much harder task in the senate so yeah key a key moment coming up in the us history and one that seems to be while the different to the direction in which joe biden is trying to push them and henry touched on the idea idea of what public opinion in the us seems to be saying that the moment towards increased gun control. How is the supreme court's decision to take this case playing out in a place that new york which is what this case centers on where. You are a gruesome abroad. Would you say in the press on either side of the spectrum. I think the responses fallen along. Broadly predictable partisan lines. Democrats are pretty universally horrified. That the idea. I think of gun laws being loosened particularly in new york. I think there's a real sense here that you know in in the prospect of a of a conservative majority supreme court ruling on a new york. New york gun carry laws He's really kind of like conservative. Pro gun advocates. Taking the fight to the kind of liberal heartland. I think that's causing a large amount of anxiety governor. Andrew cuomo has come out and said that the streets of new york and not the ok corral caradon saying the the national rifle association's dream of society where everyone is terrified of each other and onto. The teeth is a borough into our values which is a pretty unmitigated condemnation of of of the program agenda in the states. I think it's also worth pointing out that. This is coming in a kind of weird moment in the history of the national rifle association which is of course the largest gun advocacy organization in the In the us the organization is currently a facing a legal challenge in new york. The attorney general. The tissue james is trying to shut down the organization and get back millions of dollars that that she alleges was misspent and by the organization and it doesn't seem that the the the wayne lapierre who was the longtime nra chief executive really badly mismanaged the organizations funds over the course of years concealing personal expenses business expenses and actually the nra and now filing for bankruptcy in new york in a desire to avoid essentially these legal challenges. So this despite it's kind of this like it's kind of weird mixed mixed moment of mixed fortunes. Four gun rights advocate in the us in general in the new york in particular at the moment where on one on one side they have this potentially in there is empowering supreme court case coming up but on the other hand they are facing significant trouble completely caused by their own by their own mismanagement and therein misbehavior essentially. So i think it's it's a confusing and slightly fraught time for both sides of the of the gun. Rights debate in. America will finally here on the late edition today. A winning design has been unveiled to build a new floor in the center of the coliseum. In rome it's goal so italy's culture ministry has said is to give visitors. The same view as gladiators would have had as they entered the coliseum for battle. Well before we get your responses to the winning design at henry. Let's hear from the journalist. Megan williams who spoke to us on the line from rome on the globalist today and she explained where the coliseums original flooring had gone. During the renaissance ancient roman roads were all throughout the city of rome and including the coliseum were essentially turned into quarries and stripped of pillars marble facade. Anything that could be re used to build renaissance churches so it was both natural causes and human beings coming in and stripping. It did away eventually with the whole floor covering of the coliseum and exposing all of these Tunnels underneath the journalist megan williams. They're speaking to us on the line from rome little earlier today at this. This new flooring is expected to be complete by twenty twenty. Three i believe and i did before we spoke to each other. Stay watch the the simulation video of how this new floor. The new design for the floor will function and it felt to me watching the simulation that there was a real magic to what has been designed here. Maybe you can outline what this new floor will ultimately look like. You just got moved by the promotional music that went with it. I know you are the pump happened. I'm the second online. No it is. It is an amazing project. I have to say it is really beautiful and milan-based firm where i am i is doing this project and like you said it will be completed in twenty twenty three costing eighteen and a half million euros the coachman is is kind of quoted they intelligent conservation basically what it is that round Floor area in the middle of the coliseum as clip alluded to is currently will expose you can seal the sort of passageways underneath and the plan is to basically cover that with the flooring but it will be made from this koya would and it will be made of slats and because it's made of slats. It will basically allow you to do with as you wish you could have it completely flat looking like a conventional floor. But then of course you can open these wooden slats to two then allow light Into those patches way areas below and of course allow people to see down below and see the sort of workings of the coliseum. So you could be in a situation where you have part of the flu closed and part of it open. There's also going to be this sort of new ventilation system to control the atmosphere underneath. And and i guess to better preserve Those those areas underneath this new floor and also Water will be collected as as part of this new system. Rainwater will be collected and will be sort of used throughout the site including in the From so i sort of intelligent solution in more ways than one sort of eco friendly as well and really. I think you know assist light. Beautiful would that. I think would pass an aesthetic test monaco. So an exciting project and henry the precariousness of adding something back or even adding something new to a landmark as what his old but as recognizable as the coliseum is without stating the obvious. Yeah this is. This is quite an interesting mix of ideas of preservation but also of design as it is now is it. What did you make of the plans. For the colossians new flow. I really like is really tasteful from a design perspective and it seems to be relatively low impact. In terms of they said he's going to be fully reversible. So they wanna return they wanna take it away. that's possible. I really interested in different approaches philosophies of preservation around the world i thinking europe. There's this very deep. Seated idea the preservation es about conserving the original structure the original materials of a given artifact or building so that it is as close to the only as close to the original as possible but actually the thing the thing that was installed itself to to the greatest extent possible. And we'd rather have a set of authentic ruins right then. Mike reconstructed like like a structure that that looks like the thing when it was first built. This isn't the case all over the world. In japan they're a shinto shrines which have been around for. but i'm not a historian but like a very very long time hundreds and hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of years. I'm not very good with dates. The gives specific one but they and they get rebuilt cynical basis so every twenty years for example. Okay they're they're systematically deconstructed and then rebuilt in a in a very similar spot in ceremonial fashion and these shrines are considered to be the same shrine. If you get what. I'm saying when you go there you are. You are considered to be visiting the same shrine that existed there hundreds and hundreds of years ago but none of the materials of the same and that represents a completely different idea of preservation. Which is is fascinating. I think the fact that humans we can have such a wide variety of approaches to conserving a physical infrastructure. From the past while henry reese sheridan and ed stock of us is all. I'm afraid to say we have time for for today's program a big. Thanks to the two of you for being with us on the late edition today. Today's program was edited in london. By some npr. Big thanks to her as always to the late edition returns after same time tomorrow. But in the meantime do be sure to listen to the brand new episode of monocle on design which premiered here monocle twenty four a little while ago. I'm thomas lewis here in toronto. Thank you very much finished ning and we'll see you tomorrow.

india Us supreme court new york uk us milan Boris johnson robert spitzer thomas lewis City monica henry reese sheridan henry baseball narendra modi Society of very divided societ johnson henry dr chris smith monaco donald trump schutte kapila
Friday 18 December

Monocle 24: Midori House

27:33 min | 9 months ago

Friday 18 December

"Today we'll be talking about press freedom as a recent report from the committee to protect journalists suggests that standards are beginning to slide. Top tops will also be needling new york correspondent on issues of transatlantic import. Plus where he gets his christmas trees last up things get steamy. Sort of we'll be discussing the plaudits and pitfalls of intangible cultural heritage status our esteemed editors and one oddball correspondent. Discuss these matters and more right here on the late edition. Hello and a very warm. Welcome to the late edition. I'm josh bennett. Joined today from new york city by our correspondent. There henry sheridan and here in studio by page reynolds. Welcome to the program Page i know you to be A woman very capable of driving a discussion about global affairs having a great sing song at a christmas party but you looked decidedly less comfortable behind the wheel when i saw you arriving at midori house earlier How do you have a driving licence. Exactly thank you very much. It was impeccable. Timing that you talk. Antonio's happened to be at the gate at the same time as i was reversing. My mint green metallic suzuki alto into the premises of midori house. I'm glad you got a bit of a show. You did it. You did a great job. And we'll debbie timeframe aguirre change this week and you're gonna be taking it taking it a little bit easier in the run up to christmas. Oh yeah i to say. I'll be driving once more back to the the parental home on the twenty third. But apart from that i'll be leaving the car in the garage and there is a bit of an end of term feeling and Who's that at. The school gates is former pupil. Henry reese sheridan. Henry is great pleasure to be speaking to you. It's been awhile since we shed a microphone. We're oversee speaking to you from new yorker. I wonder if you could paint us a little. Sonic portrait of where you're at and what you're up to absolutely to my rights. Look out my window. I can see ten to eleven inches of snowfall. So that's creating an extremely festive atmosphere. I turn back zone facing indoors. Look down on my feet. My japanese sox. I've not had to crack them out yet this year but the radiators broken in combination with the inclement weather i've had to. I've had to take them out of the draw other any more details that you'll know about. I just would say that any socks that need cracking a not socks i'd be wearing. There'll be plenty of time for these kinds of christmas. Japes first up. We're going to be talking about press freedom now. The twenty tens is operatives. Inelegantly called them in what he pulls a script was about decade for journalists and twenty twenty hasn't been much better a pair of reports published. This week highlighted the serious constraints journalists under around the world. Early up monaco's georgina. Godwin spoke to rebecca vincent the uk bureau director of reporters without borders who explained how free speech in print online and muttered into microphones. Who's western problem too. And it's not just trump but there's many other kind of figures that have possibly been emboldened by the leader of the country of the first amendment speaking and treating journalists way for sure that attitude has really grown over the past several years I think it does have some responsibility for the acceleration and press freedom violations including detentions and attacks on journalists around the world. I actually went to to mentioned another report. Which is the. Us press freedom tracker this is a collaborative project. Cuts are asaf is also part of in the united states now. These are not figures that we've included in our roundup but during this year the press freedom chalker detected an unprecedented one hundred seventeen arrests detainment of journalists in the us. So they're not in our report because they're not still imprisoned. These are often arrests or detentions but one hundred and seventeen journalists in the united states detained largely in connection with covering The black lives matter protests. That have taken place this year. Which is really alarming. Rebecca vincent bureau director of reporters without borders henry For all of your shortcomings you are in new york. And therefore capable of giving us a. Us perspective on things has the past four years of donald trump's anti-media moaning to change the way that people think about journalists or treat journalists in the us while covering politics. Do i think probably for most people in the united states it's actually enhanced the presses reputation and that's certainly true among people who are willing to pay for kind of premium media. I mean we've seen spikes in subscriptions to lexi titles like the new york times at the same time that outlets which perhaps not behind a paywall haven't marketed themselves. A savelly have had to rely more on kind of variety and online marketing techniques to to stay afloat a certainly the fact that the trump administration has been quite explicitly on the war footing with what they call the mainstream media since before trump took office has has fundamentally changed the dynamics between a particularly white house press correspondent and people covering the white house and and the trump administration and the administration itself of asli. We expect our media to Take a sceptical stance towards whoever's in the white house even the best of times. But from from sean spicer at kayleigh mcenany all of trump's communications leaders have kind of provoked the press of cast them as enemies of the people and it really got buy personal at times Just recently mcenany refuse to take a question from a cnn. Reporter extremely mainstream kind of representative of the press saying that she doesn't call activists deeply entrenched sense that most legacy media publications represent an anti trump view represents a set of values which cultivated among the coastal elites and not representative of the country at large. That's the narrative that trump is being at pains to spin. I think it should be said that. To an extent the press have played up to that characterization. There's been quite a pronounced shift within newsrooms over the course of the trump presidency where relatively younger journalists journalists who came up on social media where there is less of a firewall between activism and journalism have been advocating for a more combative stance from within these historically neutral newsrooms towards the administration. And it's uncertain as to whether or not that's going to go away just because joe biden's office and at the same time and i know this is a topic. Which is we've discussed often the monocle. Twenty four the. The journalism industry has undergone or rather has faced lots and lots of different challenges which has led to to restructuring across the industry lots of star journalists have turned to independent independent outlets publishing newsletters on substitute for example. Leaving like cpr. Two take that route so even if when biden comes into office he tries to reestablish what was considered to be normal relations with the press. I think that he will find the ground to shift pitch shifted. Excuse me beneath him. Over the course of the last four years the media isn't what it was for years ago and i would be loath to make any predictions about how that's going to affect a white house press relations for the next four years and page at the plight of journalists in egypt in russia or in other countries that are less willing to have their leaders. Questioned is one thing. But i'd kind of like to stay in the west and think about maybe you k. Us a little bit in an age of uncertainty where the pinions of ritually dubbed fake news. Is there an appetite or even imperative for journalists to do a little bit better. Or maybe i dunno being a bit of kind of decency back to debate. Bring a little. Bit of impartiality. Because as henry mentioned there has been a shift towards some people trying to sell papers with reactions against terrorism. Do you think could be to on just on nicest each other i. I wish we could josh. I mean i definitely take your point I think that you know it would be great if there was a more of a forum to have a more constructive dialogue in that sense but at the same time i think. Journalists are often just reflecting society at large and society at large is quite tribal at the moment. It is quite divisive. So it's it's. It's a bit difficult to say i think in terms of journalists are being asked to to do better in that sense. I think the onus is just as much on know the consumer and also on on those who are controlling the distribution of news in this sort of age of fake news. I think we as a consumer need to really apart digital literacy and you know we need to think about it before we empower those just with the loudest voices or the biggest followings mankind of take stock which i don't think we do particularly on social media channels twitter actually introduced a. I think it was sort of a function that before. You re post an article they said. Would you like to watch you this. read it. i you know that's crazy. You know that people are putting these things on public platforms potential that even reading anything further than the headline which i guess people all kind of into headline news. But that's that kind of takes it to to a bit of a new level. So i think kind of understanding how we engage with the news is is i think something that we all need to be doing a lot better. I could certainly save a lot of politicians skins who Find out about four paragraphs down that. There's something that they didn't actually mean to condone in an article that they re tweeted. Now we're gonna alter onto our next. Sonic treat each week which aimed alarmed often in grossly unequal measure for a man. In new york's rambling missives from the city this week. He's here to explain himself. But first let's listen to henry sheridan's latest dispatch. There's a christmas tree shortage in new york. Demand has spiked at the same time. The corona virus has complicated the logistics of conifer distribution. It's what economists. Call a double headed pincer attack. The same thing is happening in europe and canada. Why has there been an international surge in demand for christmas trees. Several articles from reputable and paywall news sources agree people feel rubbish after hard year and the trees make them feel better. But is that what's really going. On or is it merely the mainstream media rationalizing something altogether more sinister. I invite you to engage in the thought experiment. Imagine trying to explain the phenomenon of the christmas tree to intelligent and inquisitive alien. Who understands only the trees and humans are organisms. Who share the earth. I you would say. We cut to the trees from their roots. We wrap them in string or plastic netting and pile them onto transporters then we drive the transporters to our towns and cities in big cities like new york the defeated trees are dispersed among vendors and sold the street in more suburban and rural areas trees might be delivered to garden centers or farms and picked up by families in their cars. The abyan looks uneasy. What happens next they ask. Having acquired thereof boreal prize the humans given household. Drank the christmas tree into that dwelling where it's put on display as a trophy the more sinister and steadiest humans. Put the trees in buckets of water like giant cut flowers. This is essentially a form of life support for the dying tree and ultimately serves only to prolong its humiliation. That's not very nice. The alien which shorty interject. The torture has only just begun. You would have to retort from here. The humans proceed to decorate the trees with shiny baubles and other gordy decorations. Some of these are crudely fashioned by the inexperienced hands of children who are invited to participate in the decoration of the betty living conifer. Please say it stops. There says the avian horrified. Hardly you reply. The ornamented tree cadaver then forms the centerpiece of laborat- exchange of gifts between the humans they carefully place offerings to each other under the rotting tree. But they don't admit that they've done this instead. They pretend that a man has intruded into their dwelling in the dead of night and deposited the gifts of their. This is six as the comedy. Trees g do this to according to the national christmas tree association of america. You answer there. Are approximately twenty five to thirty million. Rio christmas trees sold in the united states every year. The tiny kingdom of denmark alone grows twelve million trees a year ten million of which it exports there are millions more and almost every single tree suffers the same fate this point. The abyan is physically sick blowing space chunks. All over the floor are fit. Your glass of water you conclude off the back of this illuminating thought experiments. I would suggest reframing the spike in demand for christmas trees while we might tell ourselves. It's victimless bid for yuletide. Cheer in fact. It's a form of retribution. Which taking revenge against the earth to bios via the same biosphere that borders corona virus. Sometimes other species get caught in the crossfire of our war on conifers. The most famous christmas tree in new york is the one outside the rockefeller center. It's a massive specimen hand his girth and maximum christmas vibes this year. A small owl was found wrapped in the branches of the newly delivered tree while it was being erected she'd been trapped in the trees caucus for three days. Thankfully she was rehabilitated and released into the wild but we might bear her in mind and the less than happy ending. She could have met next time. Which using whether or not to participate in the annual yuletide are bora side and was man in new york henry sheridan who joins us on the line but first page bit of an abstract concept. But how would you go explaining what henry does each week in these strange little parcels for us If you're explaining it to an alien well that that's exactly what henry is. Just just done that with the the practice of christmas tree blind which did make me think a little bit about how it is. It is quite strange. I think he describes the christmas tree is a sort of large Cut flower that sort of just sits kind of slowly dying in one's living room which yes kind of is exactly what happens. Botanically not a flower one of the many mistakes in the piece going. Yes of course. And i really liked that loss line describing the christmas tree buying prices annual yuletide of bora side. Well as if this wasn't bleak enough. I've just felt a little bit bleaker. So thank you very much for that. Well i think Some of the best reporting and also henry happens to have done on the hit on mundane things are reach reach much deeper into our lives and show us the way that we live henry. Despite at my japes. I've really enjoyed your letters from the big apple over recent weeks and months I wanted to ask you a bit more of a personal question. Do you think having free rein to do these kind of Slightly whimsical slightly fund dispatches to almost a bit kind of anthropological in there guys have helped you. I dunno seth. Lynn understand the. Us little bit little bit better. Make friends influence. People must have been like to make them definitely not. I haven't made any. France arrived here and if anything i think. My alienated from the culture has only sharpened my kind of logical gaze upon it. I expect these letters to endear myself. Excuse me to endear me too. Many americans a tall. And i think at this stage my social life here is essentially a write-off. I'm going to try to continue to report from here to to the best of my ability but it will be like a dispatch from alien an alien planet. I think well. I've heard them favorably compared to alistair cooks famous letters from america and You know i don't get too much of a Too much pat on the back but certainly a welcome respite. Well researched interesting. And i guess you know you need to be a little bit detached to to to gaze into the beating heart of a country. Whether that's when you're buying a sofa or buying a christmas tree go on you can go a little bit further. You must've learned on the you must have met some people. You wouldn't be doing these things anyway. would you know. Obviously you know. I think actually started quite straightforward. He would be doing these things anyway. You know definitely writing about about place while you're there yet definitely makes you definitely makes you kind of train. Your is more keenly on the cultural quirks differences between between the place. You've come from the place that you are you know. America is obviously a country which you're exposed to the culture of so much. I think it's fair to say almost wherever you grew up in the world and when you're from a country like the uk which is very closely related to it which shares a language with it but which is along many dimensions. Really fundamentally different to it trying to tease out the those points of difference. Y they're there and and and what they might mean you know what culture is Is it makes task in my opinion. A all the more kind of satisfying to conduct and look into well at this point capable producer might have lined up and englishman in new york by sting. Obviously at that's not the case but Long way they continue handy. I've been enjoying them last up today in mainly at the whim of said producer who seems to find it interesting. We're talking about unesco's intangible cultural world heritage designation yes despite the frequent and sometimes in my opinion frivolous headlines about the promotion of bosh or camel racing in oman or turkish bird language to protected status. We're talking about it now. Earlier monaco's petrie solve explained what it means to the finns. Well you know s you know from maybe watching formula one and finished rally drivers. We don't celebrate. But i mean he paid has made the news. I saw it on on the news bulletin in the evening it was the main story in the newspaper. I read this morning so it is something that we are proud. proud of. Definitely add one important thing to Dimension actually In this regard is is that now that the finished on is on the unesco's intangible bitch list it means that we also have to kind of protect the sauna culture. We need to report in six years. Time how we protected the cultures. So you know we also have a responsibility now and that was petrie butts off speaking a little earlier about the designation. Intangible cultural heritage unesco designation of saunas as something to be lauded around the world page. I'm gonna come to you first. Intangible cultural heritage is something quite hard to get your head around so it can't be a physical thing. It can't be a rusty but it could be swiss pub culture for instance I'd like to open up the floor to even henry to i know designate some new intangible cultural heritage actions or things that you'd like to see so i've been thinking about this long and hard and you know what more than anything it's highly embarrassed to what made be revealed about who i really am as a person because quite truly the two things the first things that came to my the first one was purchase pop culture and maybe that's just because we have been denied it for so long this year and i'm definitely not one of those kind of let's make sure the pubs are from before anything else. Kind of people have missed a lot this year. Sort of what past my local feeling quite mournful the grieving and the only other one is. This is where we not per joni mitchell's big by taxi. I think we've every emotion and the other one. I i don't know if you ever went on a really trashy holiday when you maybe just finishing school. What do you know about six. So i i'm not gonna go into what those holidays kind of Are are just really. I think quintessentially british experiences of the narrow rolled out of very sort of pivotal moment of one's life and and i think they Every single person has a story to tell i think about a zante or or makalu or a napa and the those those would be mine. I didn't really have time to come up with a clever name for it. But i really think that british and it may be universal by series a very british thing that that sense of optimism before splitting fixture before a trade deal is signed in which british people hope against hope that something absolutely absurdly brilliant is going to happen that we're going to win the first world cup in football since nineteen sixty six successfully have a deal within the european union. That looks a lot like the one before we voted to leave and everyone's our friend. That sense of optimism. I think is Is something that will continue henry anything to add to unesco's list. I'll be posting it to them right after the show. I didn't have anything to add. But i did find it really interesting to look at the list and consider what's on there and the point of it is i mean for example. One of the items is craftsmanship of mechanical watchmaking and art mechanics. in switzerland. This is this is a kind of item which is alongside various the dances of the endangered dances of minority tribal groups and an endangered languages. I'm not convinced that the swiss watch industry needs the un's protection. I think they managed to maintain a healthy balance sheet on their own. And it just makes me think what the what the selection process. I think they call it. Inscription you have to have a given cultural phenomenon inscribed onto their onto their list in their Kind of jargon Either one of the most interesting people. I've met since since coming since coming to new york is a guy who works for an organization called the endangered language alliance which is based in new york lots of conversations with him about endangered languages. He's he he's basically told me that we're living through a we're living through a mass language extinction event at this point in history. The few languages spoken than any time before and what he calls big languages english chinese french spanish. Kind of gaining a monopoly. Along larger and larger tracts land and people. And i say this to the end of illustrating the fact that i do think that there are intangible cultural phenomena languages chief among them that do really need protection aren't being preserved by government bodies by private bodies. I'm not convinced that the list that the un has come up with is the best list that they could have come up with all the most endangered and valuable things and like so much to the un. Does i mean. Obviously it's it's it's kind of preservation by committee is the result of what is probably quite a kind of convoluted and procedural decision making process. And if bit bloodless to me. I'd like there to be a stronger justification for the items being included on there and and a kind of more robust selection process going forward if they're going to have this label at all. I must say. I agree henry and even more eloquently than i have expressed that It is an institution is very easily lampooned but page just very quickly As henry says there are some activities some languages some aspects of culture. The at being washed away in the sea of globalization. And surely there. We do need to take a little bit of time to maybe look past the cliches of finnish nece and britishness actually devote some proper resources to helping people minorities to to save aspects of their life. That are that are not obviously going to survive without that help. No one hundred percent and really interesting. What what henry says about language And i think it's so much well not more important but with a language a whole culture dies it's not just a specific cultural practice or or You know a song or an oral tradition. It's it's an entire culture entire group of people and their traditions over you know hundreds and hundreds of years that that might just disappear and i just i agree with him. I don't think it's really spoken about enough. I definitely don't hear enough about that. Specifically and to your point josh about about globalization and kind of this sort of cultural homogeneous sort of epoch that we're living through. I think that it's it's really is actually own a serious note really important that we have The correct preservation. and also. you know a lot. These safeguarding measures also about documentation and research and about promoting these practices as well so actually not just preserving the mass they are but actually making sure they happen you know more and more frequently or making sure they have the right amount of funding to to continue and long may they continue but sadly we won't be able to. That's all the time we have on today's late edition a big. Thank you to page reynolds here in london. And henry reese sheridan down the blower from new york. Our producer today was august. Him not laurie. Happy holidays my man. Great job today. And our sound engineer was louis allen until next time for me josh bennett. That's thank you very much for listening and goodbye.

henry sheridan us new york white house henry josh bennett page reynolds midori house Henry reese sheridan rebecca vincent chalker Rebecca vincent trump administration sean spicer kayleigh mcenany monaco asaf aguirre national christmas tree associ