17 Burst results for "Henry Purcell"

"henry purcell" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

02:02 min | 5 months ago

"henry purcell" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Xylophones are made of tuned pieces of wood. You play melodies on them by hitting them with a mallet. Britain also demonstrates a few other percussion instruments along the way, and then has them play together. After that, Britain brings back all the instruments one by one very fast and then he brings back the original tune that he borrowed from Henry Purcell. Can you hear which instrument family gets the tune? The brass instruments play the main melody this time around, and everyone gets into the act at the very end. Benjamin Britten's young person's guide to the orchestra based on a tune by Henry Purcell. I'm Naomi ruin. I write classics for kids and produce it with Tim lanter at WGU Cincinnati. Please join me again for more classics for kids..

"henry purcell" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

03:54 min | 5 months ago

"henry purcell" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Welcome to classics for kids. I'm Naomi Lewin. Last week we started working our way through Benjamin Britten's young person's guide to the orchestra, for which Britain borrowed a tune by Henry Purcell, and wrote variations on it to introduce all the different instruments. There are four instrumental families in the orchestra. Last week you heard about the woodwinds and strings this week, it's percussion and brass. First up are the French horns. Brass instruments are made of metal tubes, but with brasses what you see is not what you get. The instruments are all a lot longer than they look. Most of their tubing is wound around and around, which makes the instruments much easier to carry and to play. The highest member of the brass family is the trumpet. Valves are another thing that makes brass instruments easier to play. Valves open and close off different parts of the metal tubing. The same bigger is lower rule that applies to all instruments applies to the brasses, so the longer the tube, the lower the sound. Instead of valves, the trombone has another trick up its sleeve. On the trombone, there's a piece of metal tube that slides in and out, as the tube gets shorter and longer, the pitch goes up and down. That sliding piece of tube is cleverly called a slide. Here are the trombones playing along with the lowest brass instrument of all. The tuba. It's huge. Then, Britain moves on to the percussion section. Woodwind string and brass instruments are all named for what they're made of, but percussion instruments are named for how you make the sound. Percussion means striking or hitting, and all percussion instruments involve something hitting something else. For instance, drums use sticks to hit a piece of plastic or animal skin stretched across a hollow piece of wood or metal. Woodwind string and bran's instruments can all play a melody, but most percussion instruments can't. Here's one that can. Tympani, also known as kettledrums because they look like giant copper kettles. Symbols are two pieces of metal that are played by striking each other. Listen closely, between the symbol crashes, you can hear the largest drum in the orchestra, the bass drum. A tambourine is a small handheld drum with jangly metal discs attached to it. That was a triangle, a piece of metal that's shaped like a triangle and struck with a small metal stick. Wires called snares just under the drum head make that rattly sound and give snare drums their name. I think you'll recognize the xylophone..

Naomi Lewin Henry Purcell Benjamin Britten Britain
"henry purcell" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

05:19 min | 5 months ago

"henry purcell" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"To create the young person's guide, Britain borrowed a tune by one of his favorite composers, Henry Purcell, who lived several centuries earlier. Then Britain wrote a set of variations on that tune. Each variation changes the melody slightly and focuses on a different instrument or group of instruments in the symphony orchestra. The orchestra has four families of instruments, woodwinds. Brasses. Strings. And percussion. Britain starts out with the woodwind family. As you might guess, most of the woodwind instruments are made of wood, and you play them by blowing into them. That's the wind part. The two highest pitched members of the family flutes and their smaller cousins piccolos can be made of wood, but these days they usually made of a metal like silver. The sound on a flute is made just like the sound on a whistle. You blow air past a hole. Unlike a whistle or any other woodwind, flutes and piccolos stick out sideways to the right of the person playing them. Next up is the oboe. The oboe sounds a little like you're singing through your nose. You play it by blowing through a double Reed that sticks out of the top of the oboe. Reeds are made of two tiny pieces of cane, a kind of very thin wood. Clarinets only use a single read. The clarinet can play a little higher than the oboe and a little lower. The woodwind instrument that plays lowest of all is the bassoon. The bassoon has a double read, too. It fits onto a curved piece of metal called a crook that sticks out of the top of the bassoon. What looks like the top of the bassoon is really the bottom because the instrument is so long that it's folded over. Next, Benjamin britton moves on to the top of the string family. The violins. String instruments all consist of hollow wooden boxes with strings, usually metal strings, stretched across them. Most strings are played with a bow, a wooden stick that has hair from a horse's tail stretched along it. Drawing the bow across the strings makes the sound. All instruments have at least one thing in common, the larger the instrument, the lower the sound. Violas are one notch lower than violins. I don't know why, but violas and violists have always been the subject of orchestra jokes. Here's an example. What's the difference between a viola and a trampoline? You take your shoes off to jump on the trampoline. The next string instrument down is the cello. People like to rhyme cello with mellow and it fits. The lowest string instrument is the double bass. There's one member of the string family that doesn't look like the others, and you don't use a bow to play it. The harp. Strings and woodwinds are the first two families in the orchestra. Next week, I'll show you how Benjamin Britain demonstrates the brass and percussion sections. I'm Naomi Lewin, I write classics for kids and produce it with Tim lanter at WGU C Cincinnati. Please join me next week to continue exploring the instruments of the orchestra on classics for.

Britain Henry Purcell Benjamin britton Reed Benjamin Britain Naomi Lewin Tim lanter WGU Cincinnati
"henry purcell" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

07:41 min | 5 months ago

"henry purcell" Discussed on Fresh Air

"That was Jeremy dank playing the Bach chromatic fantasia and fugue in D minor. So Jeremy, that's why you have to learn to play scale. That's where all the work learning scales, learning scales, playing them over, over, and over again really pays off because you can just get such a complicated piece. But it's built on, it's built on scales. It's built on scales, and then there's all these kind of whorls and curls and curlicues. And devilish turns within the scales. But yes, there was a reason why you had to suffer all those years of piano lessons. Your book is so much about piano lessons. Did you hate it when you had to spend hours and hours earlier in your life? Playing scales, and when some of your teachers didn't even want to play music with you, you know, have you play music for them until you mastered the basics, the scale. Yeah, my teacher, when I was in my early teens, we spent summers basically only on technique with very little music, right? And those were his moments to sort of have me under his control and build a foundation. And I admit I didn't love those summers, though I would probably not be a pianist without them. I think one of the real problems when you're practicing at least for me when I was a kid is you just don't know what the point of all that time is. So you repeat something over and over. Hundreds of times. And at a certain point there's a futility and you're not sure what you're doing, what you're changing, what the job is you're really engaged in. And that's one of the hardest tasks for a teacher, I think, is to make it clear to the student what practicing is about. Well, how do they make a clear to you in a meaningful way? Well, a lot of it, of course, is like you would do with a tennis coach or whatever. You have to pay attention to physical changes that you have to make, and you have to kind of try to build certain physical habits and get rid of others. And lately I've come up with a little bit of a formula that I use, which is every time you try to play something again, you explain to yourself what the physical changes you're going to make to make it better the next time. And that slows you down. Physical in your hands? Yeah, are you going to raise your thumb more? Are you going to bring your second finger down more slowly? Are you going to use your wrist more? Are you going to engage the arm? You know, it could be a lot of different things. But for me, anyway, it often you really have to remember the role of the body in making the music thing. In the piece that we heard, the Bach piece, it's a very complicated piece. You're playing lots of notes in each hand at a rapid speed. And you also have to breathe. Speaking from myself when I'm doing something really complicated, I don't think I actually breathe. Or if I do breathe, it's really shallow breathing. Did you have to learn how to breathe? While playing. Yeah, most definitely I did. And I still do. And one of the beautiful things that Sherlock explained that I maybe didn't put in the book, my teacher, George Sebastian Bloomington, was that there is a beautiful parallel between breathing with your lungs as we all do. And must do. And the kind of breathing of the muscles in the active piano playing, you know, releasing your wrist or elbow or whatever it is. And he would often show his arms like a bellows kind of allowing the sound to blossom because you let the muscles release the energy that you put into the piano. And that is a lesson that I keep having to teach myself, especially in nervous situations, because your body begins to breathe less, right? By the nature of adrenaline or breathe differently. And that's a whole other study to figure out how to cope with that in front of a public. So you mentioned your book who was your teacher when you were at oberlin in your final year there. And he was a pianist from Hungary who performed with the top musicians and conductors and would tell you stories about them. What did he teach you about breathing? Because he talked to you about different composers breaths. I'm not really sure what that means. What did that mean to you? Well, each for him, it was very important. That each composer kind of spoke his or her own language. And those languages relied on different kinds of breaths. For example, Bach, you know, loves to elide. He loves to create these kind of endless rivers of notes, you know? And there are very few rests in Bach. But by the time you get to Mozart, you know, 70 years later or whatever. Almost everything is about little clipped phrases with tiny commas and punctuation between them, right? And the way that you hear those little silences and the way that you think about them, often changing character from one thing to another, from the imperious count or whatever to the pleading Susanna or whatever. The way that you thought about the punctuation changed everything. And so you had to think about the breaths between the phrases as much as anything else. Because they indicated when you changed from one person to another in a way. And schumann breeds quite differently. You know, he's full of this art and romantic. Often palpitating incredibly intense music and you have to figure out how to find repose within his romantic frenzy. So I want to play another piece in this piece as earlier than the Bach piece that we heard. And this is by Henry Purcell. It's called ground in C minor. It's very beautiful, and it's much more spare. Than the box that we heard. Can you talk about this piece and what it represents in music history and why you love it? Well, I think, first of all, it's beautiful on its own account, right? And I was creating a program sort of chaining musical style from the earliest medieval times classical western classical musical style that is. And I was interested in this sort of Proto baroque time, you know, sort of what we consider to be tonality and harmony, beginning to evolve out of a totally different language. And this piece seemed to me a kind of wonderful plaintive representation of that. And also the sort of joy of the ground base. I was interested in this sort of walking bass in relation to some earlier madrigal that I had played on the album. So I don't know if that explains I think partly I chose it just because I love it. Also. Yeah, it's beautiful. So this is Henry Purcell's ground and.

Jeremy dank George Sebastian Jeremy tennis Sherlock Bloomington oberlin Hungary Bach Mozart Susanna schumann Henry Purcell
"henry purcell" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

07:57 min | 6 months ago

"henry purcell" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Have to say about your music when you were young? Well, my father, both of them loved music, you know? He always wanted me to play this one Bach chorale, one very sad Bach chorale. He was called come sweet death. I think he kept begging me. You know, every time he came home from work, Jeremy play come sweet death. And then I would often want to play it a little bit. I was often impatient and just wanted to play it and get it over with. And he's like, no, no, with feeling. But he didn't want to impose so much in the details of my practicing. He just wanted me to practice more all the time. And he wanted to be sure that I was being responsible to my talent. That was the most important thing in how I spent my time and how I if I had a gift I had to devote work. And so I always had he was a very both of them were very work ethic parents. So I want to play another piece and this piece is earlier than the Bach piece that we heard. And this is by Henry Purcell. It's called ground in C minor. It's very beautiful, and it's much more spare. Than the Bach that we heard. Can you talk about this piece and what it represents in music history and why you love it? Well, I think, first of all, it's beautiful on its own account, right? And I was creating a program sort of chaining musical style from the earliest medieval times classical western classical musical style that is. And I was interested in this sort of Proto baroque time, you know, sort of what we consider to be tonality and harmony beginning to evolve out of a totally different language. And this piece seemed to me a kind of wonderful plaintive representation of that. And also the sort of joy of the ground base. I was interested in this sort of walking bass in relation to some earlier madrigal that I had played on the album. So I don't know if that explains, I think partly I chose it just because I love it. Also. Yeah, it's beautiful. So this is Henry Purcell's ground and C minor performed by my guest Jeremy denk. This Jeremy dank at the piano from his album of music from 1300 to 2000. Let's take a sharp break here and then we'll talk some more. If you're just joining me, my guest is the great pianist Jeremy dank, his new memoir is called every good boy does fine. A love story in music lessons. We'll be right back. This is fresh air. What does it mean for an album to change your life? And whose music gets to be called life-changing? NPR music asked writers to answer those questions by telling us about one album by a woman artist that changed their lives. Your conversations about those records every Wednesday in March on the all songs considered podcast from NPR. Let's get back to my interview with Jeremy dank, the great pianist who has written a new memoir called every good boy does fine, a love story in music lessons. The first piano you had was from a burlesque house in Atlantic City. Can you describe the piano and how your family ended up owning it? Of course, actually my first piano was my mom's heirloom. It was like a little brown spinet. You know, that just sat in the corner of our den for many years. And that's what I started on for the first year, but then you're right. My teacher, my new teacher, Lilly and Livingston. It was an amazing and serious teacher in New Jersey with lots of kids. She said to my parents that I had to have a better instrument. And my dad had been had been a monk, a Catholic monk until quite recently. And my mom had had three kids and her husband had left her. So their finances were very tight, still. They were very much rebuilding their lives. And there wasn't money to buy a fancy piano. So Lillian put my parents in touch with some piano technician, and he had been rebuilding his piano that he found that he got, you know, basically for free from a burlesque house. In Atlantic City, and it was covered with graffiti, filthy, graffiti, honestly. It had been carved and various letters, RF loves TK or whatever, and then ladies like it. And some other things that I probably shouldn't say on the air. And also it didn't have wheels. It just was on these little blocks that were built to sort of keep the piano in place. So once you got the piano in a place in the house, there was no moving it, you know? So it came into the middle of the den, more or less disrupting the entire TV watching area. And that was how I practiced, you know, from age from age 6 or 7 on as in the middle of everyone's lives. On this hideous instrument. There's a story you tell in your book that I think is so telling about what your childhood must have been like as somebody who loved and was studying classical music. And who had no interest in the pop music of your time. And so let's start with when you were in school. And I should mention here that you spent part of your childhood in New Jersey, which your parents hated, then your father got a job in New Mexico, so you moved there. So your schooling wasn't both places, New Jersey, and New Mexico. And it sounds like you were a kind of kid who didn't socialize a lot. Yes, I think that's fair to say. And probably part of that was because you were practicing all the time and part of it is probably because that's how you were. But so I want you to tell the story, you're on the school bus, and you're determined to show other people in the school how great classical music is. Yes. Well, you know, I had to listen to all this music on the bus that other kids brought. And so I thought that wasn't fair. So I have this backpack that was already kind of strained and overstuffed. With books and I pulled out some of them and I had gotten a new tape like a boombox from my parents after a lot of pouting. So I got new batteries in there and I stuffed in a cassette, I think of Strauss's.

Bach chorale Jeremy dank Henry Purcell Jeremy denk NPR Atlantic City Jeremy New Jersey Livingston Lilly Lillian New Mexico Strauss
"henry purcell" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

05:53 min | 7 months ago

"henry purcell" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Welcome to classics for kids. I'm Naomi Lewin. March is women's history month. Today, some women from history who inspired classical music. Cleopatra was queen of ancient Egypt just as it was being taken over by the Roman Empire, where Julius Caesar was the ruler. Cleopatra is a character in lots of operas, including giulio cesare, Italian for Julius Caesar by George Friedrich handel. Another queen, Elizabeth I of England, stayed on the throne for 44 years, a lot of great music and writing, including Shakespeare's plays, came out of that time in the 16th century, the elizabethan era. Queen Elizabeth I was also a musician. In 1953, when Elizabeth II was crowned queen of England, Benjamin Britain composed an opera about Elizabeth I. The title is gloriana, which was one of her nicknames. Aphra Behn, who lived about a hundred years after Elizabeth I, was the first English woman to earn a living as a writer. Henry Purcell composed music for one of her plays. And Benjamin britton used that as the theme for his young person's guide to the orchestra. Joan of Arc was the daughter of a farmer in 15th century France, when she was 13, she saw visions of saints telling her to help the teenage dauphin, the prince who was next in line to the French throne, fight the English to get back control of his country so that he could be crowned king. A lot of composers wrote operas about Joan of Arc, including rossini, verdi and tchaikovsky. Around the turn of the 20th century, English woman emmeline pankhurst fought hard for women's rights, especially suffrage, the right to vote. Composer Ethel smythe was also part of the women's suffrage movement and wrote the march of the women for it. In America, Susan B. Anthony fought for women's rights and against slavery. She's the main character in the opera, the mother of us all, with music by Virgil Thompson and words by Gertrude Stein. The most powerful antislavery book in 19th century America was Uncle Tom's cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe. Rogers and Hammerstein included the story of that book in their musical, the king and I. Small House of uncle Thomas. After sojourner truth escaped from slavery, she became a powerful speaker for the rights of enslaved people and for women. Paula Kemper composed an opera about her called truth. Now you talk to me speak of God what you're waiting for. I don't agree. In the mid 20th century, Rosa Parks fought for civil rights. When she refused to give up her bus seat to a white person, she helped end laws that made black people sit in separate places, drink from separate water fountains and use separate building entrances. In Detroit, Michigan, there's a street named for Rosa Parks. Michael Doherty celebrated it in music. During World War II, grace hopper used her math skills to help America win the war. Then in the early days of computers, she was one of the first experts in computer languages and programming. Wendy Carlos playing Bach's music on the computer. Next week on classics for kids, famous women composers from history. I'm Naomi Lewin, I write classics for kids and produce it for WGU Cincinnati. Please.

Naomi Lewin Julius Caesar Cleopatra giulio cesare George Friedrich handel Benjamin Britain Elizabeth I. Aphra Behn Benjamin britton Elizabeth emmeline pankhurst England Joan Ethel smythe Henry Purcell Elizabeth II Virgil Thompson Queen Elizabeth Egypt Shakespeare
"henry purcell" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"henry purcell" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Right? Incidental music illustrates the action or creates a mood for what's going on in a movie or play. For thousands of years all the way back to the earliest theater in ancient Greece, people have been using music to spice up what's happening on stage. The first time someone composed incidental music for a particular play may have been in 1664 for the first performance of John dryden's play the Indian Queen. But that music is lost now. A bit later, Henry Purcell wrote that music for another production of the Indian Queen. I have a composer friend who writes incidental music for plays and jokingly refers to it as accidental music, but since he and other composers spend hours getting the music just right, it's anything but an accident how music is used in the theater. That's some of the incidental music Felix mendelssohn wrote to set the mood for the fairies and magic in William Shakespeare's comedy amid summer night's dream. One of the human characters in a midsummer night's dream, bottom the weaver spends a good part of the play wearing a donkey's head instead of his own. In another piece of mendelssohn's incidental music for the play, you can hear the donkey going, he ha. He ha. The braying donkey is just one way that mendelssohn lets you know that amid summer night's dream is funny. Good composers use their music to show whether a play is a comedy or a tragedy. Definitely not funny, right? Ludwig van Beethoven wrote very noble music for the play egmont about a noble man who stands up to the Spanish inquisition. It's hard to stand up to the Spanish inquisition without losing your head, or getting hanged, which is what happens to egmont. The tragedy egmont is by the German poet Goethe, who really knew how to put words together. Unfortunately, Goethe had nothing to do with the German play rosamunde, which was so terrible that both the author and the play have pretty much been forgotten, but not the wonderful incidental music that Franz schubert wrote for rosamunde. If people like Beethoven and mendelssohn were composing today, they'd probably be writing music for the movies. Lots of classical composers have written film music like Erin Copeland, who sets just the right tone for the movie version of Thornton wilder's play our town. Of course, movie music has only been around since the mid 20th century, so all the composers who lived before then, like edvard grieg wrote their incidental music for plays. You can tell just by the sound of it that something very creepy is going on in the hall of the mountain king. In the hall of the mountain king is just one part of the incidental music that edvard grieg composed for the play peer gynt. Next week I'll let grieg's incidental music tell you the story of the play. I'm Naomi Lewin. I write classics for kids and produce it with Tim lantern at wgc, Cincinnati. I hope you can join me again for more classics for kids..

mendelssohn John dryden Henry Purcell Felix mendelssohn Goethe William Shakespeare Greece Ludwig van Beethoven Erin Copeland Franz schubert edvard grieg Thornton wilder Beethoven Naomi Lewin grieg Tim lantern Cincinnati
"henry purcell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:41 min | 1 year ago

"henry purcell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Music made in response to another man made tragedy. We'll hear pieces written in the aftermath of 9 11, including an excerpt from this astonishing Pulitzer Prize winning score by John Adams called on the transmigration of Souls. Also works by Steve Reich, Robert Moran, Julia Wolf and the late led Loughton. Each of those composers took a different approach to writing about that event, and we'll get a chance to hear some of them tomorrow night at 11. All these new sounds, programs are available for on demand listening anytime you want. Just go to new sounds dot org To find a specific show. You can use the Search function just put in the program number. This is new Sounds number 45 34. And my guest on new sounds This time around, is the the English violinist and composer Jocelyn Pugach. We're listening to drawing life Remembering terror scene. You referred to it before the last pair of songs, Jocelyn, You refer to it as a transit camp, which obviously was because you know, these people came in, and then they were moved out. Often to the death camps from from which most of them did not return. But it was it was something other than that as well. It was kind of like a A PR ploy by the Nazis. So they presented kerosene or to raise and shot as this model art camp, and there were, in fact arts flourishing, you know, in the camp, all these composers and musicians and poets and An art visual artists. Um You know, the reality was far grimmer than what they lead on. But you know this. This book that you're drawing from is kind of A remarkable document of the will to create, even in the darkest circumstances. That must have been a really inspiring thing. Absolutely Yeah. And made it kind of possible to work on. Really, because I could If I've been approached to Um, work on a project about I think about one of the death camps. I don't think I would have taken it out could have taken it on because it This. You know has these, um Yeah, There's this sort of how our The human spirits coming through and hope the summer you know that was with these educators that managed to Um Create kind of Exactly a syllabus. But you know, for the for the Children. Well, a lot of that was kind of a therapeutic kind of education as well. And, um, it was kind of artist therapy. But it was very It's very powerful as well. What what came out of them? That, uh, you know, to work that the Children did the poems so I mean, of course, they're reflecting as well the darker aspects of their situation. But, um Boys. It's as if the Experiences also Given a kind of sense of Uh, lucidity of of living and life and And don't Extraordinary nous of life and the wonder of life which comes through in these poems, particularly, I think in some of the Yeah, and the fact that the in the in the camp There was so much creativity as you mentioned going on, and terms of opera isn't actually written and created their you know, as well as staged. But and I also the other thing that comes through. Particularly the testimonies was the fact that it was people bought in Two brought into go into their they were told. People from Germany and all over the Europe. We're told that that would be a safe place to live out your days in the war. Well, that you know the next two pieces that I want to play from from your album. Are about that experience of life in the camp. The second of the two is draw. What you see which goes to what you were just talking about, you know? Literally. This was the instruction to the Children draw what you see, And it was both a way of kind of art therapy but also a way of documenting what was going on. But the first piece is called packing. And this goes to what? You were just saying that you know, people were told. Hey, You're allowed 50 kg. You know that's over £100 of stuff. It's like Bring food drink. There's something dark. Maybe not funny, but kind of farcical about You know this This idea of these people packing up sausages and sardines and stuff and thinking, almost like they're going on holiday? I mean, it's Yeah, I think that that also in these voices, which I I the voices that people That's kind of littered throughout the album. I really precious materials to me because I held in these voices are is such an emotion and and in some, such that it was one particular lady that there's a lot of humor and remembering these kind of moments, you know, and the ridiculousness of packing jumpsuits and You know, like their best clothes and stuff, you know? Yeah. Only to have it taken away from them when they arrived, you know, but, um, it's remarkable really that you know, some of them have to still see the funny side. Well, And this this song packing essentially turns into, uh, a list song. You know, there have been list songs going back to the The time of Henry Purcell in the 17th century, And this is another one. With Melanie popping Hyman Lawrence Blumberg, joining in with the archived voices on tape. Here are two more excerpts from Jocelyn Pucks record drawing life Remembering kerosene on new sounds. I didn't know anything except that it was a place where they're only Jews and where we are all deported to and there isn't much food to eat. So everybody who went Had one suitcase.

Steve Reich Robert Moran John Adams Jocelyn Pucks Jocelyn Pugach Julia Wolf Melanie Germany 50 kg Hyman Lawrence Blumberg Europe Jocelyn 17th century Henry Purcell Pulitzer Prize English first piece Each over £100 tomorrow night at
"henry purcell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"henry purcell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Now, let's hear it in a couple of very different contexts. Up in Canada. There's an ensemble called Constantinople, which includes singers and musicians from Senegal and Iran, among other places. And one of the instruments that they use Pretty regularly is the viola da gamba from Constantinople is 2019 record called Traverse a. We'll hear the retro Kata Quinta Is a very kind of Renaissance sounding title. I wonder if it is, in fact, an old piece of music. It certainly sounds it. And then we'll hear from Gerald tremble from his record called uncharted and a piece that he calls the Moors revenge. Now there was A play in the 17th century with that title that the English composer Henry Purcell did music for and part of Gerald Trembles piece is an arrangement of some of that music and the other part Is a Morrish tune from from Spain medieval times, and this is music for two violas, da Gamba, as well as a regular double bass and percussion and a little bit of flamenco style handclaps. And then we'll wrap up with that ensemble Constantinople again, this time going back to their 2015 record called Giada Mega Tour Itinerant Gardens. Featuring the Senegalese singer and kora player ablaze Sissoko the song will here is called Lung Tang and the viola da Gamba features prominently in the early part of the peace, the instrumental prelude of sorts. Once the song actually gets going, it's all about the singers and their respective lutes again from Senegal and Iran, so that at the end of the set will begin with ensemble Constantinople. In the more recent record, this.

Henry Purcell 2019 2015 Senegal Gerald tremble Gerald Trembles Iran Canada Sissoko 17th century English Constantinople Senegalese two violas Spain uncharted one of Giada Mega instruments Morrish
"henry purcell" Discussed on Premium Hoops

Premium Hoops

04:56 min | 1 year ago

"henry purcell" Discussed on Premium Hoops

"We have not all been out at the same time together before I'm doing by scott levine. Evans ouch and our guy. Henry ward from over pro insight. Guess what my one. Henry purcell how you doing today man. Good mark thank you. I'm pumped for the ph hybrid episode. We have here yes. I'm very much looking forward to this evan. How how're you doing man. Roko precaution withdrew from the draft today. So i'm devastated. And after i i am heartbroken. Law life is pain mark. Yeah well hey at least you didn't have a faceless avatar break the news to you four hours before it happened and then claims fall that you know you know worse. Things have happened. Scott how are you.

scott levine Henry ward Henry purcell Roko Evans evan Scott
"henry purcell" Discussed on Premium Hoops

Premium Hoops

04:56 min | 1 year ago

"henry purcell" Discussed on Premium Hoops

"We have not all been out at the same time together before I'm doing by scott levine. Evans ouch and our guy. Henry ward from over pro insight. Guess what my one. Henry purcell how you doing today man. Good mark thank you. I'm pumped for the ph hybrid episode. We have here yes. I'm very much looking forward to this evan. How how're you doing man. Roko precaution withdrew from the draft today. So i'm devastated. And after i i am heartbroken. Law life is pain mark. Yeah well hey at least you didn't have a faceless avatar break the news to you four hours before it happened and then claims fall that you know you know worse. Things have happened. Scott how are you.

scott levine Henry ward Henry purcell Roko Evans evan Scott
"henry purcell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:54 min | 2 years ago

"henry purcell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of Steve Righteous piece called Music for Ensemble and Orchestra. This recording David Robertson in the Sydney Symphony Orchestra that you haven't Written a whole lot for trumpet. But in this piece, there are some pretty prominent trumpet lines. Well, I don't generally right brass is that one group of instruments that I write the least for And when I do most attracted to trump it's because you don't trumpets are great melodic instruments and, ah They travel very often in force, so so it's not hard to accident and get it. My model for trumpet was undoubtedly Miles Davis, who I was a trick question I sometimes do when a school's say What instrument did miles Davis play and everybody's troubles? You know it was a flugelhorn. Muted with a microphone because you had to get his sound. You need all three of those things. And that's that is the re infact. That's the kind of invention of musical invention of instrumentation. Which is I think it's a he wanted to get something that he was working towards. He wasn't he wasn't a trumpet player. Amy certainly was. But as he finally created his very own sound, using traditional means any completely unique way and using the microphone because that's part of the 20th century music. Well, it's kind of like saying, well, what was being Crosby's instrument? It wasn't just his voice. It was his voice and the microphone right because that's what allowed him to croon so softly And for Ella Fitzgerald, How could you play with Chick Webb's family? They've got saxophones and trumpets and he heard And she's saying ideas. Good. She's not forcing it all well. And for you as a composer, my amplification has always been right. Not in this piece about in this peace, but it's been one of one of the tools in your arsenal. Absolutely particularly voices that Aaron Drumming voices that Aaron Music for 80. Musicians cannot really be heard. Unless they're amplified just a bit. And so, my use of microphones, which was crucial, as you say, was for balance, not for volume, right? Right, so let's let's go back to this recording of music for ensemble and orchestra. My guest is Steve Rice on and the fourth were into the fourth movement here. What's What's the salient thing to listen? Well, I think I think the lesson here is something you find Henry Purcell to which is a fixed base line of this repeats itself over and over again. That's that's been a staple off the music and all sorts for hundreds of years on and I think it's very successful at the end of the fourth movement, all right, this is music from Steve Rice. My guest on this edition of new Sounds. Some of the fourth movement of the five.

Aaron Music Ella Fitzgerald Miles Davis Sydney Symphony Orchestra Steve Rice Steve Righteous Crosby David Robertson Chick Webb Henry Purcell Aaron Drumming Amy
"henry purcell" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

04:26 min | 2 years ago

"henry purcell" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Comedy Lucille Ball and Richard Denning starring in my favorite husband. One of the earliest episodes we actually have a usable copy of this was originally broadcast seventy two years ago today September, Tenth Nineteen Forty Eight, and we thank you for tuning in on this you're happy. It's Thursday the tenth day of September two Hundred Fifty Four Day of twenty. Twenty one hundred twelve days remaining in the year in the American Revolutionary War Nathan Hale volunteered. To spy on this date in seventeen, seventy six, the US defeated the British fleet on this date in eighteen thirteen at the battle Blake Erie during the war of eighteen twelve Elias. How got a patent for the sewing machine on this date in eighteen, forty six and in nineteen thirty nine candidate declared war on Nazi Germany joining France UK New Zealand and Australia and the allies. It'd be another two years for America officially entered the war. Twenty black students entered public schools in Birmingham Mobile and Tuskegee Alabama on this date in one thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, three after President John F Kennedy sent National Guardsmen to end the standoff with Alabama Governor George Wallace I would think you'd be concerned that. Football team at Tuskegee, opt to the activities of the governor over the period of the last ten date football team. I voted discontinue football because I haven't be some negroes going to the high school. How are we bringing up our children? Senator is not going to be leadership and help and assistance from somebody such as yourself. I think you have a responsibility and while many people believed in the forward looking integration plan. Some folks including politicians steadfastly refused to integrate the. Role among the people. The masses of people men good. Of course. Preachers newspaper. Ocean, ivory towers and some. People who frustrated. Ready to give up of course, they just said well. What can you do? People stay do not like. gration racist school system. It'll probably take another generation or two to further obliterate racism in America. But look back at nine, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, three. And Look at how far we've come since then. At his residence in Afghanistan some bin Laden launched al Qaeda on this date in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, seven. Premiering on this date in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, three, the X. Files the series ran until two, thousand two but came back for a short run in January and February of Twenty sixteen. Switzerland known for its neutrality joined. The United. Nations in two thousand and two Anna Lindh. The Foreign Minister of Sweden stabbed fatally while shopping in two thousand and three died of your wounds on September Eleventh Hurricane. Irma, made landfall on Cujo key Florida as a category four hurricane three years ago after causing catastrophic damage throughout the Caribbean Irma resulted in one hundred and thirty four debts and sixty four point seven, six, billion dollars in damages. Passing away on this date in history. But King Fish Huey long a politician from. The state of Louisiana he was assassinated the Cisco Kid. Leo. CORREAL. Passing away on this date. Jack Adkison that name may not mean much to you. But for generations of wrestling fans, he was the patriarch park of the von Erich Family Fritz von Erich also clarence gatemouth Brown actress Jane Wyman the first wife of President Ronald Reagan and actor Cliff Robertson. This is the birth data composer Henry Purcell actor Edmond O'Brien the Peruvian Song. Bird Ema Su Mac. Golfer Arnold Palmer, and journalists. corralled. As always now on the road. Eldridge Coleman better known as superstar billy. Graham the pro wrestler he is seventy eight years old today the Puerto Rican singer Jose Feliciano who.

football Jose Feliciano America patriarch park Nathan Hale Senator Lucille Ball Alabama Governor George Wallace US Richard Denning Anna Lindh Eldridge Coleman Arnold Palmer President John F Kennedy Blake Erie Henry Purcell Elias Hurricane Tuskegee
"henry purcell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

30:42 min | 2 years ago

"henry purcell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Be shown to monks is a certain temple and original song by Theo Blackmun CO full will naturally assume that the voice is your instrument yes the electronics and the microphones are also your instruments I mean you've you've found numerous ways to extend the voice during the course of yes career difference a difference in the microphone makes you know makes it makes for something right it's an instrument yeah so when people talk about extending the voice I mean you've done that with Meredith monk and Kirk new rock and another people yeah usually that means extended vocal techniques overtone singing you know vocal fry things like yeah and you do all of that yeah well yeah but this is another way of extending the voice isn't it yeah so if you have extended techniques in your voice then you can also use them to to layer and create sound textures whether it's you know with her without pitch so that's an interesting thing and so what is it that you're going for in in your own music and in some of these inventive arrangements that you do of earlier music what it what is that sound field that you're looking for I'm looking for something that's really weird but really seductive and enticing like you would go to a peanut bash concert and you go what is that but I love it so you don't need to know what it is but I wanted to be there's a certain sense of beauty that I'm looking for but also a certain sense of in strange mentor just oddness they always put in there this there is a sense of mystery to it I mean at its best that's what art is about yes you know you inserting measure that is more than just like name it and that's all it is no link to backing up a bit I mean I mentioned in introducing you you've been here in New York now for over thirty years yeah what brought you here first I wanted to get away from Germany at the time it was still east and west and it was quite small I wanted to be in a place where everything was happening at once a city that has brought you know that has jazz that has contemporaneously has in profiteering music this is weird improvisers and dancers and that I could only find in New York at the time how much of what we just heard was improvised how much of of this set is in the moment and how much of it is pretty well thought out and arranged the way I write is that right almost like a classical composer write everything out in notes usually not with quartz symbols and then I hire really really great people to not play that music because it sounds much better when they play it so it's usually sort of a weird process of reverse process actually I don't write like a jazz composer with with chord symbols normally broadcast part sometimes it's unplayable and sometimes it is playable like the the voicings that we just heard on the first piece for exactly the same as I wrote it okay an assist on that some well now one of the things you've become known for over the years is taking other people's music and really making it your own your album of of arrangements of Kate bush are a kind of fractured prismatic view of songs that Kate bush fans would sometimes have to here twice before they could figure out what it was you were doing this next performance is a mash up of two songs that are separated by about three hundred years tell us how this came about so the the first song is Henry Purcell's Dido's lament from died on an A. S. beautiful opera the aria when I am laid in earth and it's you know it's a song about death and so is the next song tear drop which is a massive attack piece which was written for Jeff Buckley's death so they they kind of fit together did you know that I did not know that I mean yeah one of my all time favorite songs of the nineties yeah this trip hop class I had no idea yeah so I felt that they sort of lamenting the loss of a person and they they go together in key relationship ended in in words as well okay well I wouldn't have thought so but they do now at least in my world that show we us yes this is Dido's lament from Henry Purcell and massive attack's teardrop mashed up by Theo Blackman with Ben Maunder and Dan tap for Noel moved no we all and we all I the and then she drops on the those most famous for T. my most of the full did you drop the bomb the bomb we thank you thank you so much Dale black with Dido's lament and massive attack's teardrop I have a handful of Ben Maunder on guitar dance for for I suppose the there there are many interesting things about that arrangement but the one that strikes me is that the original versions of both Henry Purcell's piece from Dido and the S. and massive attack's teardrop they both share the harpsichord yeah and yes your arrangements has nothing to do with the harsh or was it just too obvious to to start to define that I know I've always had a heart attack harpsichord is a pain in the **** it's so much work it's it's needs constant attention and tuning and the right room temperature it's impossible to work with the harpsichord I know but I mean these electronic yeah if you're in kind of a hard and I don't know I'd rather have a set of it a cheesy piano sound than a harpsichord sound so if people will you know if you're traveling you know across the border and you're stopped by customs and they save what do you do when you say I'm a musician and then if they yeah the next question is what what kind of music do you play yeah here's my here's my new answer many winters I'm playing music that most like you most likely you will not like it is true because you tell people I do this and then they look you up maybe even while you're there and then like I my son might like this so I just tell me it's music you probably won't listen to and it's okay well among the many things that I've seen you do over the years the one that inspired me to ask you here today is your arrangement of a song called Lili Marlene I don't know how many people here know this song anybody over sixty here you would know if he will know it it's it's an extraordinary story first of all do you want did you know so so Lili Marlene is a song that was hugely popular with German soldiers during World War two and with American and British soldiers during World War two so it was that rarest of pieces of music that you know both sides of of a terrible conflict what at least had that one thing that United was they all loved this song with Marlena Dietrich who did the English language it was yes my lady who made it a popular you will appreciate this the way this song became popular was a Moroccan radio station was out of records and they only had this a recording and they played it and boom it was a hit so thanks to the radio this song has lived on and on and on right now it's it's kind of a jaunty number I mean you know I I can remember I grew up here in New York in queens in a neighborhood that had a large German population every fall we would have Oktoberfest and Lili Marlene it was all of a yes perfect for hoisting a Stein of of beer yeah and show current which is you sit and you're too drunk to dance so you just sway back and forth or sideways yes so and yet this is the song is about longing in memory and and you really have tapped into something kind of haunted and and spectral in in your arrangement of the song how did you get to that I I wanted to do this song as sort of a memory of a sort of a in the clouds out there that we all share there's a common memory that we all share the song it's not the actual song the lyrics are the same the melody for the most part is the same but sort of this this memory of this come this embracing kind of how did you can you can rest your head on for a moment so is this a song that you grew up with yes very much it's every German knows that song yeah whether you are aware of it or not it's somehow it gets into you there is a fine of an if I spend a movie called into my lane as well which is very good so here's something that's kind of thrice familiar and to hear it as if for the first hear something new in it did you have to go looking for that was that like a challenge you said to yourself or did it just like you had a light bulb moment I thought oh my god there's something in there that people are not funny aren't as one of those rare light bulb moments which I don't have very often so we don't need better down for this one just you and me and my toys all right it it's an extraordinary performance and I hope you enjoy it once again feel black men with Lili Marlene none of the uhhuh she that's cool the by the he's the and the the mobile the that is the Blackman live solo we heard most of this said playing with the trio that included than margarine Dan tougher but that was the Blackman just his voice his high tech electronics and use low tech stuff a plastic cone that said megaphone on it but which literally was nothing more than a plastic column we have actually heard the saying into a genuine megaphone before in the the Zippo songs written for him by Phil Klein but they're on stage with the high tech and low tech gear the Blackman doing an extraordinary reinvention of this Old World War two song called Lili Marlene hugely popular on both sides of the European conflict in those days and if you're not familiar with the song should check it out on YouTube or somewhere Spotify wherever you check out old songs like that and you'll get a sense of just how remarkable arrangement this is by Theo Blackman my thanks to Sam bear he was the engineer for the on air fast which is where this set took place in the wife hotel in Brooklyn site of this annual celebration of audio art in its various forms lots of podcasting but in our case broadcasting as well and in a moment we will broadcast some music from Theo Blackman and Joseph brand support from there improvised album called simply L. P. number one but when it came to actually making the record nothing simple about it at all as you'll hear stay with us as we continue with new sounds on the plane there show talk doesn't just mean talking it also means listening it's a challenge to allow different points of view to be heard and still keep a strong grip on the truth we do our research if we hear lies masquerading as opinion we have to.

Theo Blackmun
"henry purcell" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

11:53 min | 2 years ago

"henry purcell" Discussed on The Frame

"Chuck Politics First. Novel was already a success when it was made into a nineteen ninety. Nine movie with Brad Pitt. The first rule of club is you do not talk about second rule of Fight Club is you do not talk folks about fight club and now politics. Latest book offers a new set of rules so to speak but for writing. It's called consider this moments in in my writing life after which everything was different but for writer whose work has often pushed the limits of what's acceptable especially when it comes to sex violence silence and graphic imagery. How does politic expect a person to write something new and original while following a set of rules? You know there's a difference is between writing which you're born to write and how you write what you were born. The right and the mistake that I see with so many beginning writers is it. They take a story that is so close to them. It is the story of their abuse. It it's the story of why they no longer fit in the world this enormous enormous source of personal pain. And they tell it using very conventional very mundane writing methods and they completely dishonored the story and they take a very powerful story and in effect reduce it to a kind of comedy they make it really the now and laughable which is their intention. I'm GonNa ask you to read a section from your book it starts at as Highlight and goes on to the next page. My guess this is that people haven't a clue how to get along. They need a structure rules and roles to play once. Those were established people can gather author and compare their lives they can learn from each other. Tom Span Bauer always said writers right because they weren't invited into a party unquote so bear in mind that the reader is also alone. The reader is more likely to feel socially awkward and crave a story that offers a way to be in the company of others. That is so much about how the audience receives a story and how the rider rider has to in some ways. Kind of figure out what they are going to be receptive to and it feels like that is alchemy that. There's no way to really teach that that you have to understand it as trying to write about how to write. Is it hard to put in words that special relationship between author and receiver. I don't even ever consider that relationship. You know the only time I consider. It is isn't workshop when I am testing the premise for An odd way an odd form of voice in a story and I'll bring a sample or I'll bring in a situation and I'll read it and workshop and really listen to People's People's visceral reaction with the day laugh or grown or whether there's a sharp intake of breath because that's the best feedback you can get and also you can listen for the kind kind of silence that shows. They're not paying attention anymore. Does it ever surprise you. The way that stories are received because there's so many different ways that people interpret fight club for example. Hey I always fall back on role in Barth the death of the author. It's not my job. I just make the Rohrschack thing. I don't tell you what it means means. We're talking with writer. Chuck politic several of your books and short stories have been adapted into film Notch Fight Club but choke the short film romance when you're working on an adaptation of a book or a story. What does that teach you about? Storytelling going forward or they totally separate Britt experiences that are thanks unto themselves. You know I have never written the adaptations. The only thing I've done is written the sequels to fight club in graphic graphic novel form and that was a fantastic learning process telling the stories and depicting motion in still in the sequence of still images was was great was a huge challenge. I want to tell the stories that at this point in history only books can tell you know. I want to tell the stories is that are too dangerous to be made literal enough that they can be filmed that that the stories that can't be shown on an airplane that that can't can't be shown on television even on any of the streaming services. Otherwise I should be screenwriting. What is it about that that you just don't I don't want to be homogenized? You think that those stories aren't the stories that you were born to tell my best teacher. Thomspon Bauer my first day in his class. I really Nice Story. I mean cheever would be really proud of this story. It was such a nice story and Tom said in the Taoist world of ten thousand things. What does this story has to offer? That is worth people's time and attention and will make it stand find out in this world that has already so crowded with things and I got it that I wanNA write things to stand out in the world of ten thousand things I want to ask you about some of the authors that you cite in your book because something occurred to me. I'll read the names and you might see it yourself. Bret the eastern Ellis F Scott Fitzgerald. John Steinbeck John Barren armistead Maupin. Amy Hempel Cormac McCarthy Tim. O'Brien Stephen King. A bunch. The white guys mostly twenty twenty first century authors. Is that your area. I also I. I never stop blowing blowing the trumpet for Naming Moon. Have you read naming moon miles from nowhere every time somebody comes up and says I'm a high school teacher. What should my kids read? I say they should be reading and Junot Diaz a naming moon and maybe Sherman Alexi. Okay Oh very good authors. Amy Moon is glorious as she is she is Asian American Dennis Johnson and so they should also be reading Dennis Johnson but You know white people have been in the pipeline longer are. So there's there's more to recommend but how do you change a model where it's not only different voices that are heard but different stories that are heard. How do you start getting the Conventions Publishing and book buying change that people are more receptive to hearing different voices? Will there was a fantastic book. A couple years ago called the program era by a man named Mark my girl and it was all about the history of the MFA writing programs in in the United States in the twentieth century and one of the ideas he supports throughout the book. Is that fiction. Had To be standardized Andrew dice in order to be graded With standard grades and so that all of American literary fiction eventually had to fit into One of three slots was a techno modernism. which would be like Gaddis or pension or David Foster Wallace Another one was cultural pluralism high cultural pluralism. which would be anything from I kind of outsider marginalized voice It would be naming moon. It would mean The House on Mango Street and then the third one was dirty realism which is sometimes called Kmart realism. which would be Raymond carver? Joyce Carol oates oats it's kind of really low gritty White People When definition was that they are poor people who aspire spire to whiteness? But I think that once we recognized three classifications. We can start to right outside of them and it won't matter matter who the voices because we'll be less important that it fit into one of those three very narrow categories you write in the book to about how many books and stories there are about communities of women and girls but not so many about men. Are you consciously asleep or even subconsciously. Try to fill the void in that regard. I think I'm just sort of playing the game. You know when we were little we would make up games at the drop of a hat we would throw planks out and say okay. This is lava and this is safe. And you have to go from here to here and you can't touch this and you can only be here here for three seconds we will just arbitrarily. You know create The condition of our lives and and I love that and the idea is always as you know citing sociologist. Victor Turner to create these little experiments limbaugh experiments that we hope are so entertaining and serve people so well the people will adopt them and make them institutions like burning man. What do you enjoy about writing? The greatest part is when I when I surprised myself and sometimes that's not until the book is out and then I'll be on the road and realized what I actually was writing writing about and I will be mortified that I made something so deeply personal known to to God knows how many people and the idea the Tom always taught again thomspon. Bauer my best teacher. His method of teaching was was called dangerous. Writing and the idea is right about some aspect of of your psyche that you cannot resolve and you cannot be with you have to find a way to so completely explore it and exaggerate it that you exhaust all of your emotional reaction to it and typically. By the time you've written the book that thing disappears entirely because you are no longer emotionally psychologically reactive to it when you are best known for a certain book for Fight Club. Is that a blessing or a curse his at hard to get people to think about you as an author of anything other than that. How many Shirley Jackson novels can you name? Probably not many. You can name to. Oh and you can name one short story and I tell my my students if you can have one novel people know and one short story that people know. Then you're in the Pantheon. Chuck pollinate is a writer of many books has latest one is considered this moments in my writing life after which everything was different. It's out now. Chuck thanks for coming in. Thank you so much yourself up next. On the frame. The comedy group culture clash has breaking down boundaries. Again this time with a classic opera. mm-hmm how is this for an artistic recipe. Several Marvel superheroes Live Baroque music and three Chicano Hano Comex yes. The experimental Long Beach Opera is added again. The company invited the satirical comedy group culture clash to create a non traditional take aac on an operatic classic. It's King Arthur by the British composer Henry Purcell and the hybrid production finds parallels in today's immigration realities on the border her. The frame contributor mark had up has this report about the company's latest world premiere more than three hundred years ago the Baroque British composer Henry purcell missile made a name for himself writing music for the church. The court and in a modest way even the theater and in sixteen eighty nine he premiered his first opera Daito. And Aeneas the love story between the Trojan Hero.

writer Fight Club Tom Span Bauer Brad Pitt Henry Purcell Notch Fight Club Dennis Johnson John Steinbeck John Barren arm Junot Diaz Scott Fitzgerald Joyce Carol oates Amy Hempel Cormac McCarthy Long Beach Opera Chuck Barth Amy Moon Britt Shirley Jackson United States cheever
"henry purcell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:20 min | 3 years ago

"henry purcell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"McMillan column joins us to discuss the latest collection of essays titled finally for the National Book Award then officer Junaid bridges shares what she learned about forgiveness and memory from Henry Purcell's heartbreaking dials lament on today and later New York times culture editor I used to her stop by for this week's reviews previews of movies addition will dig into bong joon ho with it Harris site among with ours painting glory and Scorsese's the Irishman and much more coming up next hour claim poet say Jones joins us to talk about his new memoir how we fight for our lives we'll get all of it I'm Alison Stewart and I'll meet you on the other side of the news live from NPR news in Washington I'm she's Stevens US defense secretary markets were says he'll meet with NATO allies next week to seek diplomatic and economic measures in response to Turkey's incursion into Syria the trump administration has announced new sanctions against Turkish leaders in response to the military action against Kurds in Syria meanwhile the European Union is responding to the situation by limiting arms sales to Turkey Mister Schultz reports from Brussels E. U. foreign ministers agree there should be no arms sales to Turkey nor financial assistance in areas where there are violations of the local populations rights France and Germany had already stopped weapons shipments to on correct in a unanimous statement the E. U. says well Turkey is a partner and a critically important actor in the Syrian crisis in the region its security concerns must be addressed politically and diplomatically with respect for international humanitarian law in a meeting attended by you and special envoy for Syria gear Peterson the twenty eight governments also reiterated their call for Turkey to stop what they call it's unilateral military action and withdraw from northern Syria news and Terry cells in Brussels in fort worth Texas a police officer is charged with murder with the weekend fatal shooting of all Tiana Jefferson at her home thirty four year old Erin dean was arrested and charged hours after he resigned from the force Monday city police sergeant Chris Daniel says he understands why their role feelings in the community to the citizens and residents of our city we feel and understand your anger and your disappointment name is accused of firing through the window of Jefferson home while answering a call to see if she was okay interim police chief it crawls told reporters there is no indication that any of the responding officers knocked on Jefferson store in Georgia white former police officer has been acquitted of murder charges in the shooting death of an unarmed black army veteran four years ago near Decatur Robert Olson was convicted on for lesser counts Monday details from a meal Moffett from member station W. A. B. E. twenty six year old Anthony hill was unarmed and naked when he was fatally shot by Olson four years ago at his apartment complex hill's family says the Air Force veteran was in the midst of a mental health crisis at the time after six days of deliberation the jury acquitted Olson of the most serious charges they did find a former officer guilty of aggravated assault violating his oath of office and making false statements the cab county district attorney Cheri Boston we are grateful that in.

"henry purcell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"henry purcell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Anti semitism throughout the world is on the rise a recent shooting at a synagogue in Germany left two dead nearly one year after eleven people were shot to death at the tree of life synagogue in Pittsburgh they'll talk about that with Sam with tens innovator on the take away this afternoon at three on ninety three point nine FM WNYC FM HD AM this is all of it W. NYC analysis to work on today show award winning sociology professor and author expressing McMillan column joins us to discuss the latest collection of essays titled finally for the National Book Award then officer Jim a bridges shares what she learned about forgiveness and memory from Henry Purcell's heartbreaking Dido's laments on today and later New York times culture editor I used to her stop by for this week's reviews previews and movies addition will dig into bong joon ho with it Harris site among with ours glory and Scorsese's the Irishman and much more coming up next hour claim poet say Jones joins us to talk about his new memoir how we fight for our lives we'll get all of it I'm Alison Stewart and I'll meet you on the other side of the news live from NPR news in Washington I'm Barbara Klein Syrian forces loyal to the regime of Bashar al Assad are deploying in northeastern Syria to help Kurdish militias fend off Turkey's offensive it's a major shift in alliances and adds a major player to the conflict is NPR's Daniel Estrin reports from the Syria Iraq border Syrian government forces are advancing to parts of northeast Syria and returning to the Syrian border with Turkey for the first time in years US forces used to protect the Kurds here but president trump decided to pull out troops and a U. S. official tells NPR all troops will be out within a week international journalists and aid organizations that entered Syria without regime permission are now rushing out of Syria before the regime or takes the area at the border crossing with Iraq there.