35 Burst results for "Henry Kissinger"

"henry kissinger" Discussed on The Doug Collins Podcast

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:49 min | Last month

"henry kissinger" Discussed on The Doug Collins Podcast

"Minute, for someone that young, you're growing and you're learning at the same time, I have that disease too that I can top rather fast too, but I didn't get to go to work for Kissinger. Talk. I mean, because that was Kissinger's prime time. I mean, that late 60s, early 70s, mid 70s. I mean, how did you, what did you think at that point and now looking back on it, what would you wish you would have asked or what you wish you would have learned? Well, I learned a lot. I don't think there was any. I don't have any regrets, and I remain in touch with Henry Kissinger. And he's been a mentor to me. I did his oral history about ten years ago. He had never done an oral history. So sat with him for dozens of hours going over his career and his negotiating strategies and what he had done and the sort of lessons learned. So I don't have any regrets at this point. So the difference is that for a lot of women, you say, well, people don't have any experience. Yeah, they don't have any experience. But for me, the exciting part was as a woman, you know, in the late 60s, early 70s, women had no rights. Internet right to equal pay, equal opportunity. A woman could go to college and get a degree and she was the secretary to a guy that she had been sitting next to for four years in the classroom. So it was an opportunity for me to be that really the first generation of women, especially women who were going into a field that had been dominated by men and my face national security. And I have real opportunities. And so I watched my daughters, I 5 kids, so two daughters. And I watched them really being able to take advantage of a lot of the things women my generation were kind of struggling with. How do we do this? How do you balance a family? How do you balance a career? And so we kicked open a lot of doors and I'm thrilled to see that my daughters have walked through all of

China Henry Kissinger Taiwan national university Taiwan Shanghai Beijing Singapore Kissinger United States Nixon
KT McFarland on Breaking Barriers and Working for Henry Kissinger

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:49 min | Last month

KT McFarland on Breaking Barriers and Working for Henry Kissinger

"Minute, for someone that young, you're growing and you're learning at the same time, I have that disease too that I can top rather fast too, but I didn't get to go to work for Kissinger. Talk. I mean, because that was Kissinger's prime time. I mean, that late 60s, early 70s, mid 70s. I mean, how did you, what did you think at that point and now looking back on it, what would you wish you would have asked or what you wish you would have learned? Well, I learned a lot. I don't think there was any. I don't have any regrets, and I remain in touch with Henry Kissinger. And he's been a mentor to me. I did his oral history about ten years ago. He had never done an oral history. So sat with him for dozens of hours going over his career and his negotiating strategies and what he had done and the sort of lessons learned. So I don't have any regrets at this point. So the difference is that for a lot of women, you say, well, people don't have any experience. Yeah, they don't have any experience. But for me, the exciting part was as a woman, you know, in the late 60s, early 70s, women had no rights. Internet right to equal pay, equal opportunity. A woman could go to college and get a degree and she was the secretary to a guy that she had been sitting next to for four years in the classroom. So it was an opportunity for me to be that really the first generation of women, especially women who were going into a field that had been dominated by men and my face national security. And I have real opportunities. And so I watched my daughters, I 5 kids, so two daughters. And I watched them really being able to take advantage of a lot of the things women my generation were kind of struggling with. How do we do this? How do you balance a family? How do you balance a career? And so we kicked open a lot of doors and I'm thrilled to see that my daughters have walked through all of

Kissinger Henry Kissinger
How KT McFarland Became the Person She Is Today

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:38 min | Last month

How KT McFarland Became the Person She Is Today

"KT McFarland's with me today. I can't been waiting for this one for a while. Got to run into her cpac with the crazy part about it is through all of our travels. We have been on TV together multiple times on interviews, but never in the same place. It seems like at the same time, especially with the last few years going. And so it was so good to be in the same room, not on the same convention center, but there with you in Orlando. It is great to have you on the podcast today. Well, I agree. I mean, I feel like I really know you well because I've been on television with you. We've talked to each other, but we've never actually met in person. And so here we are yet again, not in person, but it's good to be with you. It is. But it works out, great. Well, you know, one of the things is and especially the way life goes these days is we all have our backgrounds and where we come from. And people see us and make judgments, basically, you know, we're on TV or we're on the interviews, one podcast that was kind of like, one of the things I love to do with this podcast has been great to be able to do is sort of people see how we became, you know, you or how you became me and it gives people that background so that when they see you, they say, hey, I know where she came from. I know what was going on. So tell us a little bit about how you became you in a lot of sense. Gosh, that's so nice. Well, I started out as a freshman in college in 1969. I was from Madison, Wisconsin from a working class family, but I got a scholarship to go to George Washington University. But I needed a job. So I was a really fast typist. And through a series of accidents, got a job as the nighttime secretary in The White House situation, freshman in college. And I was working for Henry Kissinger in the Nixon administration. So I went to college during the day, majored in Chinese Chinese studies, wrote my bicycle, went to The White House situation room every afternoon, and then typed the first draft from what was then called the president's daily brief and is still called the president's daily brief. And that was the classified items briefing items that would be on the president of the United States is desk in the Oval Office every morning at 7 a.m.. So I typed the rough draft at night, somebody finished it off in the morning. And I did that all through college, through part of graduate school. And all of a sudden I got promoted after chain. And I was Henry Kissinger's research assistant. At a very young age, and so saw firsthand to some of the most extraordinary periods of American foreign policy. It was the opening to China, the end of the Vietnam War, the Paris peace accords. The detente with the Soviet Union, Middle East peace negotiations. So as a very young person in my late teens, early 20s, was exposed to people and events.

Kt Mcfarland Nixon Administration Orlando Henry Kissinger White House George Washington University Madison Wisconsin Oval Office United States Vietnam China Paris Soviet Union Middle East
How the Chinese Communist Party Works

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:41 min | 5 months ago

How the Chinese Communist Party Works

"Most of the west learn how Moscow work, not from going to college and taking Stanley Hoffman or Henry Kissinger or anyone else who is talking about how the Soviets worked. And most of what they thought was wrong or they read the long telegram by mister actually turned out to be George cannon early on in the Cold War. No, they weren't Nixon. They weren't studying the briefing papers. They weren't Jimmy Carter who had an inordinate fear of communism. None of that, all those years of the Cold War, that's not how people learn in America. They read time, newsweek, and U.S. news and World Report, and they would routinely report on what was going on or so they thought or some correspondence in Moscow thought. And now people have watched the Americans and they get a view of how sleepers work, which isn't right. That's not how sleepers worked in the United States. They had lots of spies in the 1980s. That was one of my earliest jobs. If you're looking to hear it for the first time, I'm going to give you the quick bio in a second. But after the wall came down in the Soviet Union crumbled, people sort of put their communism studies away, thinking, oh, well, the Chinese are simply evolving to a market capitalism society and we will help them get there and everything will be comfy, hunky Dory in the world. Bill Clinton let them into the world of free trade, we accepted them into the world's institutions. And in fact, they're still letting us. And the country's difficult to understand. It's so big. It's so numerous in the billion people. And so opaque, that very few novelists have dared to try and describe how the country works.

Stanley Hoffman George Cannon Moscow Soviet Union Henry Kissinger United States Mister Jimmy Carter Nixon Newsweek Bill Clinton
"henry kissinger" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:56 min | 6 months ago

"henry kissinger" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Caroline has been a busy day on the data front when it comes to the UK inflation picture of course We see markets reacting there also plenty of corporate news flow to keep us there as it busy and the new economy forum taking place over in Singapore Yeah absolutely It's much later in the day of course in Singapore Chinese vice president Wang ki Shan has been speaking about China continuing to open up to foreign investment that's been the message how much of it is rhetoric versus reality Also the U.S. commerce actually Gina raymondo speaking to Bloomberg along with Henry Kissinger addressing that forum of course he was the Secretary of State who helped to well reopen the ties between the U.S. and China in the 1970s so he gave us his view on the she Biden former and the she Biden summit that happened virtually a couple of days ago Right In terms of what's coming next then more from that forum because the Goldman Sachs head will be with us The CEO David Solomon speaking to frosty lacquer in just a few minutes time So do stay tuned for that We're going to bring it to you live Let's also bring you up to speed with the markets this hour European stocks close to record highs but up another tenth of 1% this morning Just breaking on the Bloomberg terminal Baidu third quarter revenue coming in at ¥31.92 billion That's above the estimated 31.81 billion So still some earnings coming through Also for the rest of the markets Asian stocks actually were largely lower this morning MCI Asia Pacific index off by four tenths of 1% This after a very strong U.S. retail sales print and more speculation around and calls for tighter monetary policy in the U.S. As for U.S. stock features there up this morning the dollar holding well she's seeing some retreat now actually on the biblical spot index down by a tenth of 1% Crude oil also down Bitcoin dropping 1.3% below that $60,000 handle So that's a brief look at the markets Let's get to some of our top stories and we've mentioned in passing the UK inflation story So let's get some details inflation in the UK accelerated faster than expected in the month of October Piling the pressure on the Bank of England to raise interest rates consumer prices rose 4.2% from a year ago the fastest pace in almost a decade and more than double the target rate the pickup was largely driven by temporary factors including natural gas and electricity prices but the Bank of England is concerned inflation could take roots and further squeeze living standards Well we've had more reaction to searching inflation in the U.S. the St. Louis fed president James bullet says that the Central Bank should speed up its reduction of monetary stimulus He told Bloomberg the committee would also have the option to raise rates while the taper is ongoing if it wants to move faster In top corporate news Elon Musk sold their Tesla shares for a 7th consecutive trading day more from Bloomberg's Doug Krishna The latest sale brings mosque roughly halfway to his promise to unload 10% of his stake in the company on Tuesday alone he sold shares worth about $973 million Now to reach the 10% threshold he would need to sell some 17 million Tesla shares So far as liquidated about 8.2 million and if his exercise options are included Musk would need to sell even more On Tuesday Tesla shares rebounded by 4% after nearing a bear market The stock is down 14% since a peak on November 4th in New York on Doug prisoner Bloomberg daybreak Europe And finally China is speeding up plans to replace American and foreign technology Bloomberg has learned that secretive government backed organization is certifying local suppliers in sensitive areas from cloud computing to semiconductors roughly 1800 Chinese makers of chips and PCs networking equipment and software have all been approved by this organization Now with Bloomberg's new economy for him underway in Singapore one of the big questions is how U.S. engagement with Asia will progress under the Biden administration the U.S. plans to launch a new economic framework for the indo Pacific next year Commerce secretary Gina raimundo told the forum and in an earlier interview with Bloomberg TV she described how she's in Singapore to build a stronger supply chain with partners in Asia Here she is speaking with Bloomberg's husband amen You know for so long in our supply chain the mantra has been just in time And now we realize the vulnerabilities of just in time We need to move to just in case We need to have redundancy We need to have diversity And so we are here I am here in the region talking to companies that are in our supply chain and ministers here to say let's collaborate with our partners Tomorrow I'll be in Malaysia A good part of America's supply chain is in Malaysia Some of the factories went down due to COVID outbreaks which had disruptions obviously in America Some of the factories went down due to natural disasters So we're saying okay how do we work better together How do we improve resiliency and transparency So we get rid of these choke points and bottlenecks We have to talk about trades We had from U.S. trade representative Katherine Tai talking about a possible recoupling with China In a new normal in the area of trade but in the U.S. and China what is that exactly How do you define it Yeah Well we want trade obviously We want trade as good for U.S. business exports are good for U.S. business but it needs to be China needs to play by the rules They need to respect our IP They need to live up to their commitments You know right now for example in the so called phase one deal where the Chinese committed to purchase a certain amount of aircraft and agricultural products they're not doing that They're not living up to their commitments So you know we want a level playing field We want everyone to play by the rules and then of course we do want trade and exports Good for American business The U.S. is also talked about using new tools to address Chinese practices What are these new.

U.S. Bloomberg Wang ki Shan Singapore Gina raymondo David Solomon Biden China UK Bank of England St. Louis fed James bullet Henry Kissinger Doug Krishna
"henry kissinger" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

05:36 min | 6 months ago

"henry kissinger" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"You know, for example, deep learning, machine learning is really popular in the computer science now as an approach for creating artificial intelligence systems. It is controversial in that space to say that anything against machine learning, saying, sort of exploring ideas that saying, this is going to lead to a dead end. Now that takes some guts to do as a young 20 year old within within a classroom to think like that to raise that question in a machine learning course. It sounds ridiculous because it's like who's going to complain about this. But the fear that starts in a course on history or some course that covers society, the fear ripples and affects those students they're asking big out of the box questions about engineering about computer science. And there's a lot there's like linear algebra that's not going to change. But then there's like applied linear algebra, which is machine learning. And that's when robots and real system touch human beings. And that's when you have to ask yourself these difficult questions about humanity even in the engineering and science and technology courses. And these are not separate worlds in two senses. I've just taken delivery of my copy of the book that Eric Schmidt and Henry Kissinger have co authored on artificial intelligence, the central question of which is what does this mean for us broadly?.

Eric Schmidt Henry Kissinger
"henry kissinger" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

05:04 min | 7 months ago

"henry kissinger" Discussed on People of the Pod

"Even Jared Kushner Jason grant. I think had the same view, even though I don't agree with the way that they went about trying to make peace. I still think there was a consistency there. And kissing, I think, often gets a bad rep, both in Israel and in the American church community. And they're raised for that related to the way, in particular, that he pressured Israel in 1975 and pressured Israel at the end of the Yom Kippur War. But in retrospect, we say two things about that. First of all, that it produced the Israeli peace treaty. I played the foundation for that, which is redundant to the immense benefit of Israel. Took Egypt out of the conflict in for all intents and purposes. The state to state conflict between Israel and the Arab states. That eventually to this normalization of the other Arabs. All of that starts with kissing. But it starts with him, having to have knocked down drag out fights, which are detailed in the book. First between prime minister of the mayor, then between prime minister he hit sacrament in his first time as prime minister and Shimon Peres who was defense minister trying to make them understand. Wyatt was in Israel's interest to give up territory in a calculated way. In order to justify the peace process, strengthen America's credibility in the region and by time. And this is the thing that I think is the art in kissing just to plan the city. He strongly believed that Israel needed time. And that giving up pieces of territory to buy time was the best strategy for Israel's survival. And when we look back now, we see how right he wants that time that Israel giving up territory. He brought time to strengthen itself to end its isolation to build its relationships across the world and to give Jewish genius and ability to grow, burden into the high-tech industries and so on that we say today in Israel..

Israel Jared Kushner Jason grant American church Shimon Peres Egypt Wyatt America
"henry kissinger" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

04:30 min | 7 months ago

"henry kissinger" Discussed on People of the Pod

"Solve the French in the way that we did. And so I think a question marked about that. It's not a, I think the guy in the Kissinger would have played, although he didn't have much time for the French. But I think the great lesson of what Kissinger was able to do was that he understood that first there has to be an equilibrium in the balance of power. And then there has to be a mechanism for advancing America's interest. Now, his mechanism was getting Israel to agree to limit it withdrawals in exchange for commitments not to go back to war on the part of the Egyptians in the Syrians. And that was short of peace, but it was a process that he managed very effectively in the analog to that is, but Biden did have handedly with the UK USA Australia agreement. What's really trying to establish an equilibrium in the balance of power with the Chinese. So I give him how much for the concept. It's quite Jerry. But the implementation was problematic. Let me talk to another issue in your book that was quite fascinating to see you write about Kissinger's jewishness. Whatever his level of observance during the years where you're writing. That as a factor in his Middle East peacemaking success. That when negotiating with Israelis and Arabs, his Israeli interlocutors as you describe it, received him as being a member of the family in some sense. And has ever been to marketers saw that perhaps he would have more influence in delivering Israeli concessions were those perceptions and assumptions accurate and from your own experience have the Jewish U.S. Middle East and negotiators who followed Henry Kissinger found this to be the case as well. Yes. I think the Kissinger was very unsure of himself when he started was very defensive and he never visited the Arab world before he went into government, or in his first 5 years in government. When he was national security adviser, it never visited the Arab world his first visit came after the 1973 young people war. He had never written about the Middle East. For all of his brilliant studies of European 19th century order he wrote this brilliant book called the world restored, which was based on a study of castlereagh and met Nick, establishing the post Napoleonic order in Europe. But he'd never written about the Ottoman Empire..

Kissinger USA Middle East Biden Israel Jerry Australia UK Henry Kissinger Nick Europe
"henry kissinger" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

05:14 min | 7 months ago

"henry kissinger" Discussed on People of the Pod

"Without and therefore, if you follow Kissinger's principles, they're made to be a workable piece process between the Israelis and the Palestinians. Which is missing at the moment. And his view of how to do it is worth pondering now because his whole approach was gradual, incremental, step by step diplomacy was his formulation. His concept. And had we stuck to that back in the days of Oslo, everybody kind of trash results like these days. But we forget that Oslo is a gradual incremental process. It had no defined endgame. It was designed to have Israel withdrawing stages. That's exactly what Kissinger did. With Egypt and took Egypt out of the conflict with Israel. But that was abandoned by Al Barack and Bill Clinton. At the end of May I was part of that process. Exactly. I'm so glad you brought yourself into this because I really wanted to ask your own experience, whether you followed that kissing Gerry and gradualism that you describe in your book in your own role in special envoy. Well, let's back up to the time with Clinton when I was part of his place team and I was the time of Camp David, where we went to Camp David to try to resolve the conflict, something Kissinger would never have done because he didn't believe it could be done. He believed in a gradual long game. But we were under the influence of Eric Barack, who had his own calculations politically because he no longer had a majority in the class. And he pressed Clinton to go for it. Clinton was in his last year in office and he decided that he too would go for it, which was an example of what Kissinger warned about. Particularly for American statesman leaders that they are drawn to this idea of immortality and universality. And it's much more attractive than his gradualism and maintenance of the balance of power. And so, you know, Clinton succumbed to the siren song of comprehensive deal, which Aaron Barack was insisting on..

Kissinger Oslo Al Barack Egypt Camp David Israel Clinton Eric Barack Bill Clinton Gerry Aaron Barack
Who is K.T. McFarland, Trump's Former Deputy National Security Advisor?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:17 min | 9 months ago

Who is K.T. McFarland, Trump's Former Deputy National Security Advisor?

"We have so much to discuss with regards to the disasters occurring in central asia in the last two weeks. But let's start by those who may have just accidentally happened on this channel. Found us on rumble. Downloaded this podcast. Tell them a little bit about who. Kt mcfarland is when she started to get involved in national security issues. And then you'll climb to the heights of power in the white house under the trump administration starting in nineteen seventy. I was a freshman in college at george washington university and got partial scholarship and had to pay the rest of my way through school. So i got a part time typing job in the west wing of the white house and the white house situation room. Working for guy wasn't very well known at the time by the name of henry kissinger and he was richard nixon's national security advisor. So i started working part time in the nighttime typing pool for henry kissinger In the west wing and then worked in the nixon administration. The ford administration went to graduate school during the carter administration went to oxford university and then. Mit where i studied and taught nuclear weapons Then joined the reagan administration when we won the cold war Was part of the pentagon team Did one help win. The cold war got the pentagon's highest civilian award for that service. And then i retired. We'd want our cold war. My war was one done. And so i married. Had five. kids was living the good life in new york and long island and then september eleventh happened and it convinced me to get back into government because i had such a pretty extensive experience. I point so. I did And i ran for the. Us senate against hillary clinton the organ lost. Predictably but i did Get back involved in a lot of issues. And then he came. The fox news national security analysts for over a decade until i joined the trump administration Which i did at the beginning and so here. I am out of the trump administration of back on talking to import. People like you about issues. I care deeply about what your national security

Kt Mcfarland White House Henry Kissinger Richard Nixon George Washington University Ford Administration Pentagon Asia Carter Administration Reagan Administration Oxford University Long Island Hillary Clinton New York Senate United States
Sen. Cotton Responds to News of Saudi Arabia and Iran Military Coalition

Mark Levin

02:01 min | 9 months ago

Sen. Cotton Responds to News of Saudi Arabia and Iran Military Coalition

"The Jerusalem Post this is breaking Saudi Arabia has signed some kind of joint military cooperation agreement, which with Russia And Iran and Russia. Uh, are are going to be involved soon in a, uh Joint military exercises, and this is just the beginning. I think I even think in our own hemisphere south of the border of some of these Communist regime stick around when some of the others I think we're going to see this spread. So much of what we've done under both parties over more than half a century. Um, to establish our Our strength. Has just thought that it's so much of it is just melted away. I'd be curious of your of your opinion. I'm afraid you're right, Mark. You know what's happening now It's just a continuation of what happened in the Obama Biden there now that it's the Biden era, Russia had been a peripheral player in Middle East if a player at all since 1973 when Richard Nixon and Henry Kissinger help eject them from Middle East, and Obama basically invited invited him back in after the Syrian Red Line fiasco when he refused to enforce his own red line. And now you've got countries like Saudi Arabia, longstanding partner of the United States, who see what's happened with Joe Biden's bug out in Afghanistan were abandoning not just Afghans who helped us but even our own citizens, and they think they need to start cutting side deals to protect their own interests. You know, some people compared what's happened over the last week in Afghanistan. Having decided on in 1975. And remember what happened. Saigon in 1975 small foretaste of what Lay ahead, Laos and Cambodia fell almost immediately. You had the horrors of Paul Pot, then become a rouge. Cuba is sending shock troops all over the All over Latin America and Africa as well. Russia invaded Afghanistan. Um, so for years that reverberated. I'm afraid that Joe Biden's impotence and incompetence in Afghanistan will reverberate for years to come

Russia Obama Biden Saudi Arabia The Jerusalem Post Middle East Iran Henry Kissinger Richard Nixon Biden Afghanistan Joe Biden Mark Barack Obama Paul Pot United States Saigon Laos Cambodia Cuba Latin America
"henry kissinger" Discussed on Between The Lines

Between The Lines

05:03 min | 11 months ago

"henry kissinger" Discussed on Between The Lines

"They wanted to leverage and this brings us to the third goal is that nixon was trying to figure out how to resolve the vietnam war. Which was an incredible mess by ben for the united states Now according to winston lord what they wanted to do was ideally. I mean and they knew this wasn't going to happen. They ideally wanted to get beijing to agree to stop aiding hanoi or at least aiding hanoi as much as it was realistically what they wanted to do is say beijing could put a little pressure on hanoi to negotiate some kind of end to the war with the united states and this was at the same time something that they were planning to do in moscow because nixon visited moscow three months later with a similar mission and so part of this was about the vietnam war to try to figure out some kind of resolution so yes he was the cold warrior who went to china and shocked everyone but at the same time he had his reasons and they were different from what you might think. His thinking was just looking at the ideological ravings on iran. Between the lines with tom. Smith's up tiny walker is a former china correspondent on two occasions from nine hundred. Seventy nine right through to ninety ninety ross. Terrill accompanied golf with him on his trip to china. Fifty years ago and lyndon johnson is an associate of the australian cinta on china in the world at the australian national university. Okay so nixon arrived in china february. Nine hundred seventy two and obviously he's you know it's an election year. He wants to win the vietnam war. They're legitimate concerns linda. But ross his nixon and kissinger agreeing to support the one china policy which gives wife for the normalization of saw know. American relations in han sought. Ross did nixon and kissinger give too much away to the chinese. When i said in the shanghai communique there is but one. China and taiwan is part of china. Ross terrill nixon later said that they'd given too much. But if you look at the log not the american china rapprochement that started then followed by dungs. Courage burying malodorous. That really lead on to. What now is another half century. Tom of chinese economic success and the early digging.

hanoi nixon winston lord china vietnam beijing moscow united states ben ross Terrill kissinger lyndon johnson australian national university walker iran tom Smith golf Ross terrill nixon
"henry kissinger" Discussed on Between The Lines

Between The Lines

04:58 min | 11 months ago

"henry kissinger" Discussed on Between The Lines

"I think it's fair to say on the hook but we should look at the historical context but non had replaced gordon in march of nineteen. Seventy one in a tied vote study three each way vote in gordon voted himself out. These were the last days effectively other. The conservative government whitland had secured a massive swing in nineteen sixty nine against with. And i think something like six point five percent Two party preferred so. These were effectively. The end of times for conservative rule in australia and wetlands visit to china had sort of served as a punctuation. Mac i guess in some ways and mcmahon reacted. I think it's fair to say fairly emotionally. And then when he realized that he'd been blindsided. And i've just been reading the long speech that he gave to the victorian division of liberal party. That was on the twenty eighth of july seventy one after it emerged that kissinger had indeed gone to picking on the secret mission and embarrassed the australian and government. Which of course was holding fast to. Its its previous policy. His long speech victorian division was an attempt by mc non to get himself out of a policy. Cul de sac at makes interesting reading today and it would be another twelve months before we had a change of government australia but effectively. This as china policy was concerned the die was caused as you mentioned nixon. My that spectacular announcement on july fifteen signed that not only had kissinger bane to john or on a secret mission but that he nixon would also visit china now. Of course the nixon zone state department was kept in the dock wasn't just the australians. It was the state department and all us allies. This is extraordinary. Linda this is a guy. Nixon whose rise to the presidency. Because it didn't forty-seven wrought fruit to sixty eight. When he's elected that rise had been defined by his relentless opposition to communism he even endorsed. Joe mccarthy's charged the treasonous. Us diplomats had lost china in the forty nine revolution linda. What do you make of nixon's u-turn..

gordon victorian division of liberal china mcmahon australia kissinger kissinger bane nixon nixon zone state department john Nixon Linda us Joe mccarthy linda
"henry kissinger" Discussed on Between The Lines

Between The Lines

05:54 min | 11 months ago

"henry kissinger" Discussed on Between The Lines

"Ovalles via abc lists nap. Thanks for tuning in now. Tonight on the program but i i in peking and already the. Gop delegation knows that australian wheat sales to china tied to diplomatic recognition for the chinese trade and politics. Go hand in hand. That's from the reporter. Philip coaches july nineteen seventy-one coverage of of wetlands trip to china for the chinese trade and politics go hand in hand. Well not much as changed in as well. It's hard to believe that five decades ago china was an economic backwater that had no formal diplomatic relations with either the united states or australia to washington and camera. China's revolution of nineteen forty nine represented trial. He was a wartime ally against militant japan suddenly embracing communism as us state department official. John paton davies told the cnn documentary..

China abc Gop Philip australia united states washington us state department japan John paton davies cnn
Private Undisclosed Emails Leaked From the Mueller Investigation

The Daily Beans

01:56 min | 1 year ago

Private Undisclosed Emails Leaked From the Mueller Investigation

"Got another three hundred pages or so of underlying mueller investigation emails and texts and memos and in them we learned that don jr. vodka and kushner way more involved in russia talks than previously known at least to the public. I mean we knew Ivanka reportedly informed a co co-chair of her father campaign that her brother don jr. could make recommendations for military advisers while kushner offered details about his private meetings with henry kissinger We also learned that in january. Twenty seventeen manafort. Send an email to katy mcfarland. That's flynn's number two Saying i have some important information. I wanna share with you that i picked up my travels over the last month. Well she manafort was already you know knee deep in shit by this point she immediately fired off an email to flint. Saying hey given all. That's going on. Meet with them. And flynn said i would not be with him until we're in the hot seats unknown who he is working for and perception would not be good especially now they even knew it. They even knew it the record show. Flynn soliciting trump strategist bannon as far back as september twenty fifteen before bannon officially joined the campaign steve. He wrote just reaching back out. Let me know if mr trump needs any help with national security intel an intel community issues of foreign policy. So that's i think flynn's i reach out that december. He wrote corey lewandowski. And said i wanted to send this to you this past week but had forgotten shared a link to an article from russia state run sputnik news quoted. Flynn saying the. Us must work with russia and arab countries to defeat isis. He said this is an f. y. But something trump should at least be aware of. I have been very outspoken. On the issue at this point in the conflict with our current administration has run out of good options. also i met with president putin last thursday in moscow. We actually sat at dinner together. Merry christmas

Don Jr Manafort Kushner Flynn Katy Mcfarland Ivanka Bannon Mueller Russia Henry Kissinger Vodka Mr Trump Corey Lewandowski Flint Intel Steve President Putin United States Moscow
Bangladesh Celebrates 50 Years of Independence

Between The Lines

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Bangladesh Celebrates 50 Years of Independence

"This marks the fiftieth anniversary of the independence of bangladesh. The victory of bangladeshi forces over the occupying army of pakistan on twenty-sixth much nineteen seventy one. The independence of bangladesh was declared by the father of the nation. Bangabandhu sheikh mujibur him on now soon after independence henry kissinger he was us. President richard nixon's national security advisor kissinger called bangladesh. A basket case and the people of this south asian nation of about one hundred and sixty three million. Well i spent the better part of the next five decades refuting that label the look bangladesh. Today is booming achieved an average of five point. Five percent growth for more than a decade life expectancy also risen sharply from about forty five. Can you believe this. Forty five and nine hundred sixty to seventy two today and according to the un this month no longer should bangladesh be classified as a least developed country. It's

Bangladesh Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur President Richard Nixon Henry Kissinger Pakistan Kissinger UN
Warren Rustand on Leading a Life of Design

Dose of Leadership

03:46 min | 1 year ago

Warren Rustand on Leading a Life of Design

"So excited that you hear him dose of leadership. Welcome to the show. Thank you very much. Richard lied to be with. You should have some fun today. Yeah it's a true honor really your your expertise in your your the leadership junkie of all junkies. I think i love your book. The leader within uh. It's really good and it speaks resonates with me deeply. You're the first person that use these three terms. And i've been saying this a lot for the past few years about i thought the keys to unlocking transformational leadership. The compassionate side for sure is authenticity. Transparency vulnerability. I saw those three words a coin together. Your book a handful of times. And it just. I just love that so. You're the first person that i've seen. That's coin those three together. So i appreciate very nice you to say. Thank you very much really interesting experience. When i was working at the white house as appointments secretary to president ford and it was one of these times when i'd been appointed. And maybe you've had this experience to richard where you know right away that maybe you're not quite up to the job. You got a lot to learn. And wondering as fast as i could at the people i was hanging out with you know and i don't do this to namedrop to suggest you sort of how i was feeling at the time you know. I was there with don rumsfeld. Dick cheney colin powell. Bob gates brent scowcroft henry kissinger. That was the senior team. Now i was a part of that team. And so i and i was new to the white house. Twenty nine years old new politics and that's didn't feel like i was quite up to it quite good now. So we had a meeting of that group in the oval office one day with the president as they drifted out. I hung behind. Speak to present. I said mr president. I speak with these. Yes sit down. I said mr president not experienced enough. I'm not smart enough. I'm gonna make a mistake. It's going to embarrass you. And and here's my letter of resignation. And i put on his desk and he looked at it for a moment and he swivelled his chair to look out across the south lawn of the white house rose garden and he came back to me and he said you know warned. The very fact that you've said this to new to me makes you qualified to be here. The fact that i was vulnerable transparent and honest with him he knew he could trust me from that point in time as a result of that he trusted this whole farm kid with a lot of stuff that he showed it ever trusted to do but it worked out to be a really nice relationship. I learned early on that. Those three words are key to really deep relationships. I agree a hundred percent. And i love that story. I remember reading that book. You're right. That's where the first time i saw this phrase those three words together based on that story. What a great baptism by fire for for being around the greatness in being the witness as you open up the book to a standing there once nixon official he was going to resign. And you're able to witness ford kind of sit. There process. what was happening the gravity of what was happening and then go into action. I love that kind of inside baseball aspect of that. Of course. I remember that moment when it happened to but just to be there to witness that. It's just amazing when you're in your twenties late twenties but still you know just honored to be there to to witness the transfer of power and the ability of someone to grasp the significance of what was happening. You and then act upon that significant at that moment in time was really a profound leadership lessons for me. It is stayed with me my whole life to to gather in the data and the information the facts and then to have a plan to act on that and In the precise moment when you need to act yeah right is some of us could have said well. Let me step back from this for six months and figure this out that day he said i. I'd like to have the following six people here at seven. Am tomorrow morning for a transition team. Me and we walked into that room the next morning. He pulled from his jacket. Five pages of notes. He had a vision for what that transition was going to be. And that was a significant leadership. Lesson

Don Rumsfeld White House Rose Garden Bob Gates Brent Scowcroft Henry Kissinger Ford Colin Powell Mr President Dick Cheney Richard White House MR Nixon Baseball
Ethiopia: a Nobel Peace laureate goes to war

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

01:39 min | 1 year ago

Ethiopia: a Nobel Peace laureate goes to war

"There is no hostage to fortune. Quite like the nobel peace prize. Just as the peacemaker of today you can often be the munger of yesterday. They can also be the warmonger of tomorrow. Abi ahmed. Prime minister of ethiopia was two thousand and nineteen nobel peace laureate recognized for finally ending eighth european hostilities with its neighbor and former province eritrea a year later ibm prize. Looks like one of the nobel. Peace committees hastier. Garlanding along with those of yasser arafat. Suu she and henry kissinger ethiopia is at war with tegray. A region in the country's north the immediate cause was to graze decision to hold in september a local despite being told not to by abbey national government sheduled elections across the european were postponed due to the covid nineteen pandemic behind that lies to gray and resentment of amid efforts to reduce to graze dominance of ethiopia's national politics before abi ahmed became prime minister. The to gray in people's liberation front had effectively governed all of ethiopia for nearly two decades. It's hard to know exactly what is going on into gray right now. Phones down. the internet is off. It's not much easier to speak to theo. Paeans elsewhere in ethiopia several people. We asked to participate in this program. Responded that they were simply too scared but over the news there is none of it is good

Ethiopia Abi Ahmed Tegray Abbey National Government Eritrea Yasser Arafat Henry Kissinger IBM
"henry kissinger" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:12 min | 1 year ago

"henry kissinger" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Strip the names of Confederate generals from several army basis. The president has vowed that won't happen. Theis you might not even be resolved before Election Day. Meanwhile, the Navy is charting a whole new course. J price of member station W. UNC reports Henry Kissinger called super carriers 100,000 tons of diplomacy. That power is reflected in the Navy's conventions for naming them the U. S. Says John F. Kennedy, the Reagan the Lincoln but one super carrier now on the drawing boards break sharply with tradition, the USS Doris Miller. That is the first time that that ship of that class would be named after one enlisted person. And an African American Regina Acres as a historian with the Naval History and Heritage Command. Doris Dorie Miller was one of the first American heroes of World War two during the attack on Pearl Harbor. As his ship was sinking and captain dying, Miller jumped behind a machine gun and shot a Japanese planes until his ammunition was gone. Then he began rescuing sailors from the fiery waters of the harbour as a black sailor in 1941. He wasn't even supposed to fire a gun. One of the ways in which the Navy discriminated against African Americans was that they limited them to certain types of jobs. So for African Americans, not all but many were missin. Are stewards. During Miller was Ah Messman, which meant that he basically took care of an officer laid out his clothes, shined his shoes and serve meals on official Navy Commendation list of those whose actions during the attack stood out mentioned the black sailor, but it didn't bother to name Miller, a 22 year old sharecropper's son from Waco, Texas. The Black press, though discovered and published Miller's name, and so the African American community just swells up with pride, But at the same time, they're mad at the Navy for not having formally shared What dorm Miller did. Black leaders at the time were already pressuring President Franklin D. Roosevelt for more opportunities for African Americans in the booming war industry and in the military. Roosevelt barely averted a march on Washington. At one point, Admiral Chester Nimitz, the commander of the Pacific Fleet, wanted to take the bold step of awarding Miller the Navy cross. Then the third highest honor for heroism again, Regina Acres, So a Nimitz mine the award would be good for the Navy. And contradict the institutional racism that the Navy was known for. Roosevelt, eager to keep the nation United behind the war effort, agreed Miller's heroism was all but ignored by White America. But in the black community Miller I mean it, just like the flip of a switch becomes a celebrity heat because one of the first hero's period of the war but certainly one of the first African American heroes of the war. He was on recruitment posters. His image was everywhere. And then Miller. Suddenly the black newspapers had a weapon they had been looking for. It was a catalyst that gave them a lot of strength very early in the war. And they were determined to promote him publicly. Baylor University history Professor Michael Perish as co author of Doris Miller, Pearl Harbor and the birth of the Civil Rights movement. He says that in war after war, African Americans had fought for their country, hoping their service would be rewarded with more rights, Then had their hopes dashed until Miller step behind that gun. Things came together at Pearl Harbor. For Doris Miller and for the civil rights movement, probably to maximum effect. So World War two was really the turning point in that long struggle. Even before he got the medal, the Navy began training black sailors for jobs like Gunner's mate, Radio Man radar operator. Later, it began commissioning black officers. Finally, in 1948. President Harry S. Truman ordered the military desegregated. All of that parish says can be traced to Dorie Miller. The decision to name the new super carrier for Miller was made by Thomas Mode Lee, who was acting secretary of the Navy until April. I think it was probably long overdue mode, Lee says. It's simply seemed like the right thing to do. Given the U. S. Navy's diversity the Navy is made up of every single element of our population is probably the most diverse. Representation of the country. But we have about 340,000 active duty sailors and they come from every part of the country, every skin color every ethnicity. Miller didn't live to see the biggest effects of his heroics. He went back to see in the Pacific and in 1943, his ship was torpedoed and sank. 644 men died. Miller's body was never found. His name, though, still graces, schools, roads and community centers around the country and the Navy that at first wouldn't even share that name will soon give it equal footing with the names of presidents. For.

Doris Dorie Miller U. S. Navy President Franklin D. Roosevel president Regina Acres Pearl Harbor Henry Kissinger Naval History and Heritage Com Thomas Mode Lee Admiral Chester Nimitz Theis John F. Kennedy Civil Rights movement Pacific Fleet Texas Washington
Why China’s Move to Rein In Hong Kong Is Just the Start

MSNBC Morning Joe

06:31 min | 2 years ago

Why China’s Move to Rein In Hong Kong Is Just the Start

"China's move to exert greater control over the semi independent city of Hong Kong caused more turmoil over the weekend does protesters to fide social distancing rules and clashed with police who fired tear gas and a water cannon arresting at least one hundred eighty people critics of. Beijing's move to impose a national security law on Hong Kong. Say that it is an attempt to stifle descent putting an end. The city's independence. The White House said yesterday that China will likely face sanctions for its actions in Hong Kong. So admiral the China is becoming more aggressive by day. Fairly remarkable if you look at it just in recent history that they are responsible for the unleashing of a pandemic that has wrecked the world. Economy killed So many people. We don't know where that death count is going to end up and instead of being back on their heels or working aggressively for a vaccine or are reaching out to the world community. They are actually Acting more aggressive whether it's toward Hong Kong toward Vietnam or even in the concentration camps inside their country what what is going on what. How is the United States failed in its response to Shave Power? And why in the world can we do moving forward? Let's start with the premise. Here let's go back to twenty one thousand nine hundred twenty nineteen teams like a long time ago. We already had a rich basket of disagreement. China South China Sea huge body of water. China claims it in its entirety. Five G. The network controversy as you mentioned the territorial disputes around the edges of the South China Sea with Vietnam the Philippines Taiwan additional pressure on them trade and tear disputes. So we have this very rich. Unfortunately basket of disagreement. Now you drop a nuclear bomb in the middle of that which is called Kobe. Nineteen irresponsibility of the regime in allowing that to get into the wild so to speak. And so you really have this witches brew of relationships and Newsflash. It's occurring during an election year in the United States in which the trump administration predictably is going to maximize the ability to use China. Like opinion OUGHTA and beat it for electoral advantage. So terrible fact pattern. At the moment I think the real question you nailed it show is. What do we do about it? And I'll tell you three things very quickly. I we need a strategy that means not just episodic responses but thinking about diplomacy economics military deterrence bringing that Inter Agency sensibility to the challenges of China. Secondly even more important. We need international coalition. That's all of our allies. In the Pacific and many Japan South Korea Australia New Zealand Malaysia Singapore Thailand be at Phnom Increasingly. We need to internationalize the response to China and that includes the response to co did in third and finally we need to recognize. We've got a bend this relationship with China. We've got to change the terms of it. But we don't want to break it. I E get ourselves stumbling into a Cold War. It's going to be complicated and from now to November is going to be a very difficult stretch water. Well as you talk about. Strategy the United States needs to develop a long-term strategy. We just need to start by having a coherent message to send to the Chinese. We've been so erotic if you look at the president's fawning praise of President Shea and of course we always talk about what he said on January twenty four th when he thanked president she for his transparency and all the great work China was doing. That was a bizarre tweet to send out at the time. This is also the same president. Who who saluted she for consolidating power in the past has more power than anybody since Chairman Mao in that country? But you have that fawning praise one moment Max moment you have a continuation of these erratic trade skirmishes where the president doesn't have an overall strategy and then follow that up with occasional master tweets and insults toward the people of China just because seems to be checking that off his list for the campaign. It's really hard to figure out where Donald Trump stands when it comes to China because any any attack of China any critique of China is usually followed up by the president talking about what a wonderful leader Person President Xi is exactly and reference our earlier conversation. What do you want leaders to do? You want them to bring order. Out of the chaos. He want them to have a plan. You want them to communicate in steady waves and what we don't want to do with China is treated like an on and off switch on the wall that we turn on. Oh we love China. Then we turn it off ups. We're going to get into a war with China. We've got a dial it in. It's like estate like the dimmer on the wall. In your dining room we have got to be able to have a coherent strategy. That is steady and finds balance not this jagged on and off. Switch all the time and again. I'll close on this Henry Kissinger said late last year that we were in the foothills of a Cold War I think we are continuing to ascend that mountain. It is a mistake for both nations. We need to confront where we must when the behavior warrants but we ought to try and find ways to cooperate where we can confront where we must cooperate where we can build a strategy Admiral Stavridis. Thank you very much for coming on this morning

China South China Sea Hong Kong South China United States President Trump Vietnam Beijing White House Henry Kissinger Chairman Mao President Shea Admiral Stavridis Person President Xi Donald Trump Pacific Inter Agency
"henry kissinger" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"henry kissinger" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Savagely back tomorrow well we got plenty of trillions we just don't have any real solutions we've got a lot of interest battling to weaponize this but not enough real solutions so summer saying well this is the big globalist fight this is about Bill Gates and George Soros and Henry Kissinger and globalism need to get trump out of the way or it's about global warming or it's about the jams trying to win the election or the media went to war against trump the course the answer is it can be all of the above if you're not careful here's another montage warnings to be done in the next package now that we've seen these appalling historical unemployment numbers already just today yeah I mean there's a long list of things the OSHA family medical leave more broadly interpreted as free testing of the list goes on and on are you taking into consideration green jobs green infrastructure yes we need we need to call us and we need a futuristic which means green has a long list of things and construction clean water community health centers of the list goes on and on this is a case for universal health care if we absolutely have to transform our healthcare system absolutely we see this as an opportunity to reshape the way we do business and how we govern fully paid sick leave for all our workers and student loan forgiveness cost free treatment for the co in nineteen what what what what what what what what whatever the costs are related with which you can hear is everyone wanting to take advantage of this moment for their agenda the problem is the timing when people are in a crisis like this and they're focused on staying alive protecting those around them who are vulnerable to keep them alive and then get back to work as soon as possible you have their undivided focused attention so when you try to play games you get away with every day when everyone's busy and you try to play those games when they are forced to be pause they have ultimate skin in the game the star really hearing they start really noticing they're.

Bill Gates Henry Kissinger George Soros OSHA
White House or Fight House? Tevi Troy’s new book looks at tiffs and turf wars among White House staffers

THINK! America

08:20 min | 2 years ago

White House or Fight House? Tevi Troy’s new book looks at tiffs and turf wars among White House staffers

"With us and we're gonna talk about that you know the fussing and fighting vet says going on in the White House and don't think for a second that that's exclusive to Donald trump's administration you know it's kind of interesting anytime it's its whatever you're closest to write in history and other things they have to be the worst you know and so Donald Trump his administration's wise it just has to be the worst all the fussing and fighting in in fighting that's going on like no other president before well before you really jump that shark and think that that is the case then you start believing you're hyperbole I once you get your hands on this new book called White House from doctor Tevye Troy bestselling author and former White House adviser okay he's been on the inside he's known as and researched and studied this and he's right about now with his book White House rivalries in the White House from Truman J. trump Dr Troy welcome to the show good to have you with us thanks bill Bradley on talk about played out hello this is this is it this is exciting you know that you know to put this out because you know this conversation has come up from time to time and you always hear from you know the hyperbolic that downhole trump is the worst ever and then you you start bringing back some of the the stories and histories and now here it is you've documented it I imagine if you wanted to go back even before Truman we we have to do episodes inch you know volumes of all the fussing happening in the White House right no absolutely and and we know that they were fighting before experiment where we are perfect I mean you look at the administration of Washington and Hamilton and Jefferson murder each other's throats but the difference is they were cabinet members and when I try to get that in my house how the dynamic change once we had the creation of a White House staff there was no real White House staff before Roosevelt and Truman the first person to enter the White House staff and make change the dynamic in that certainly you have the people who are close to the president meaning in the same building advising him on foreign policy and economic policy and then you might have a treasury secretary or spectators biggest ticked off that somebody else is inviting in his area that was one thing that changed in that that meant that I wasn't quite interesting to note that that the dynamic in the entrance of more humanity just because the more issues right yeah look and government was growing mistake became higher and then also you have this right the best celebrity White House aide the whole idea of a White House staff was supposed to be people with a passion for anonymity but that went away pretty quickly especially in the Kennedy administration when he hired people who are already famous like orcas lessons or to work in the White House is suddenly how celebrity White House they had its own reputation has long ties to the craft and they they could get their word out there if the policies were not going their way and to suddenly you have this idea of leaks and counter leaks you can make you look good in the press and that also at the White House right now make that I talk about the book in the course that is continued and become almost like a to the degree of a tender green black belt when you talk about all this and leaking and stuff going on you know but bad enough that it happens in DC but now of course with the most recent refill we understand that even ambassadors in our state department is running rampant with it as well yeah well you talk about ten degree black belt and that that was Henry Kissinger I'll tell you one great story that's been quite how's that Kissinger was dating Jill St John a very attractive bond girl actress Mandy comes out in the papers that Kissinger's dating this woman and Kissinger ghost and extending complains that his rival Christy William Rogers leaked the information about your retaining but the truth is that your lease it because a he wanted everyone to know he was dating that the truck the bond girl would be he wanted to hurt Rogers any internal wars and bribery deposit so what happened what was it what was the conclusion that well well written exam would rail about all the leaking that happened at the state department and constant complained about it but just not your fat it but at least some of the time we know the kiss your will the guy doing the leaking and then blaming the state department and of course everybody knows because your date of birth second longer up there with a win win corrective measure like you would can degrade black belt in Plato's exactly so he gets the he gets the reward and the award let's talk about president Truman we touched a little bit on that I mean he he he was I guess the modern era of the expanding the staff and and really kind of bringing this into play and of course it's just been kind of kind of a a monolith that like the blob is just been growing unto itself right yes Sir but instrument you have the right there were just unbelievable I don't I'm a presidential historian I've been putting this stuff for decades and the story behind in spite house were were things I'd never even heard of and one breaks during the ministration is that the secretary of state George Marshall as opposed to the recognition of the state of Israel which is flabbergasting to update the business interest on July especially right there at that critical time because it was true and that led the battle for inferred knowledge meant of Israel that would that would be very fight with marshals on the wrong side of it Clark Clifford a junior White House beat it on the right side of it make an argument in front of Clifford Clifford and Truman and Marshall are all arguing out in the White House Clifford wins the argument Truman recognized Israel Marshall is still mad that he never again the clippers or mentions his name for the rest of life right yeah right because so it's pretty petty but yeah such as such as you can't be the government the illusion of the Kennedy Camelot regime you said was not devoid of conflict as well of course in Kennedy do you have this notion of Camelot music wonderful people sitting around a table can you never even heard the term Camelot elections administration that comes from our interview that took place after the administration after he was dead yes but even in the administration there was fighting taking place especially between Lyndon Johnson and Robert F. Kennedy canteen was the product any would be turned general and the president brother Lynn Johnson vice president that you hated each other going back to their time in the Senate together when we can't even the lowly staffer and Johnson with the Senate Majority Leader and they had these nasty nicknames for him brought Robert if they reported Johnson is ruthless corded phone and get a canny referred to by Johnson as bunny boy really didn't like each other and they're always trying well anyway and we've known that that that tension what is it was pretty extreme there between them what else within the Kennedy at Camelot compound anything else that you discovered yeah there was a a a a rivalry between artists less intervention before they collect their prize winning historian who came to the White House when the first intellectual ever worked in the White House and then there was Ted Sorensen it was not as well known but he was closer to Kennedy and there was tension between them that continued even after the administration because the two of them we're kind of bracing to get their books out first hand stories then asked her to stop and stop writing his books but it's different in different book out first plus you're obviously would not agree and there were and the race was on and it it colored their relationship there's tension between them that went on for a long time and I got to imagine especially after the assassination these rivalries it would increase all the more would they not yeah and if there is one great story that dean Rusk with the sector state did not like that Slazenger called him brutalized in silence in meetings during the Kennedy administration implying that he wouldn't say anything that's a rough put it out there the only reason he was silent in meetings this lessons are within the facilities are respected leaker and we would talk about everything that he heard needing three wins Mr this is this is great fun Dr Chevy try I'd say it's good fun because you know the politics is just right for comedy it's it's when we take it too seriously like at times we're doing right now in this current environment then we deprive ourselves of of the little bit of humor in thank you Dr drive for presenting

White House Donald Trump
"henry kissinger" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"henry kissinger" Discussed on WGN Radio

"The slot he dishes to the right wing boards for con show the the hawks Mannheim war broke that up the other way Utusan rice left wing side shot a cross the ring model to put over the center a circle Zacks right there from the heart to fire down the boards and behind the door hi Morrissey leave them behind that African brands of the camp the one FOR steel either flexes a lot of lifted a stick of a duck player but taken back by steel still behind the long racing in the near corner put it back in behind the Jones Jones around the right circle turns around and fires and that the flex off of complete sticking up off the glass when Bill hotline right wing victory White House Slater precluded from the the duck in behind the medic goes into the recorder deals on shot at a place and Henrik will way with the rest of the way we get a whistle for racing against Anaheim to one off the goaltender's Gibson the matter themselves from the last two plays there's a lot of folks can not thinking what they're doing with the fox just gone through this with our purpose but the last two parts went by the goal to the should have both of them plan to stick out the last one that kind of put those on order for a position where he was in panic mode just through a simple Jacob Larson your corner off the draw doc in behind instead of the far side I'm sure that gave the puck away in the middle of the ice inside the dot point at the docks that is the clear there in Henrik incinerates left side shut the **** off of her movies helmet down into the hawks soon the land or handling it between the circles tosses the fourteen rating board for Murphy we listened through the air down into the dock the finishing his check on deals on behind the instills on moves the puck out the Larson to Henry Kissinger rice he lost the puck against the four four talk to just put it over to Murphy and noni lander along the reports the Gustafson between the circles paying off the hawks bench drop their order to Murphy particularly ice fires and that the flex what I think are going to stick in there the lander passing up the right wing carpenter at center ice Gustafson the wind was blowing the chips are down the portico finance a quick pass up like the two one one years get slapped Neil plop on the park just outside the airline grease well done by six four four two hundred forty pounds with brown industries all right two one nine thirty four left in the second period this is Blackhawks hockey on seven twenty WGN.

brown industries Neil center ice Gustafson Henry Kissinger Henrik incinerates Bill Morrissey Mannheim WGN Blackhawks Utusan rice Gustafson Murphy hawks Jacob Larson Gibson Anaheim Slater Jones Jones
"henry kissinger" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

07:15 min | 2 years ago

"henry kissinger" Discussed on KGO 810

"Of your book from Henry Kissinger one of the major characters in your telling this is a mass of work up detail so I begin with a dramatic moment in your telling is April nineteen seventy three the central cell this is an organization a military organization in North Vietnam I believe the famous general gap is part of it what is the central sell what is its proposition in April of seventy three central cell was a very very secret planning organization formed by journal shop in the in their journal staff and basically what he had asked the several high ranking offers to do was to go out and create a planet to conquer South Vietnam militarily the next couple of years and their job solely with the take a look at historical precedents take a look at the existing balance of forces on the ground the potential for resupply from their own allies and US three intervention and to see if they could calculate a military plan to conquer South Vietnam within two years and bear in mind age signed the Paris peace accords two months earlier saying that they would not do that right so what we have here is the military unit charged with conquering what has just affectively been turned into a cease fires on an armistice with the lengthy negotiations between the U. S. South Vietnam North Vietnam and other players in Paris there are ironies within everything but I take one of the quotes in your book George more than any other a I think it's something like a I've I've got a coalition government is what you agree to in order to destroy a coalition government and that's pretty much that methodology that the north was using what about that all the many common issues they were trying to sort of if they couldn't win militarily they try to win politically which is to make the American force to Q. government out replace them with some sort of neutralists or they called third force people and then once they were in power little while the comic would eventually take over without a shot being fired there are factions in the north in North Vietnam in Hanoi that George identifies and they are all organize themselves around the prime minister in a previous prime minister all one femme femme dong and the other trong Kim now you put this as guns versus potter but with the way I read it George's North Vietnam was exhausted and have been badly bloodied in nineteen seventy two and there wasn't unanimity in committing troops again to taking on South Vietnam is that correct that's correct they were a are very much afraid of destroying the social experiment North Vietnam they weren't sure if they could get their their own resupply frown allies their troops were exhausted they had big battle taken heavy casualties in seventy two and they were just little appetite among a certain group of people in the bowl of beer to restart military well warfare because there was an economic plan and they were very much interested at least part part of the politburo with continuing the conversation with Henry Kissinger because part of the Paris peace accord was a lot of money a lot of U. S. cash to be directed to a Hyundai I and they there were some who wanted the money more than they wanted to shoot well they wanted the money but they wanted the money buying strings attached there was certainly yeah the heavy bombing in seventy two would destroy what little infrastructure they had left up there and so they they didn't want to simply you know because we I'm might be gone back to the stone age but they have go back to rebuild their country Z. past peace accords called for a ceasefire an armistice zone but some parts of the Viet nam the north Vietnamese army the people's army of Vietnam continued to fight you name one particular senior colonel which is like a brigadier general in our ranks in M. R. nine lead doc on and he was insubordinate in in launching attacks is that correct that's correct it would act again what what a surprise to us that then leader gonna actually became the president of North Vietnam about Vietnam combine Vietnam in nineteen eighty seven so obviously is disobedience didn't decorous political career but basically the MRO nine was the lower half the delta the furthest point away from North Vietnam you can possibly get and basically he said I'm not going to stop fighting because to do so we retreat back in the order zones will mean the sure death of us and so he continued to push forward aggressively he pushed forward aggressively and her no I watch this and was looking for ways to read whether they we have whether they had strange to push the fight ugh yeah you mentioned him a very significant figure often given credit is sort of the Napoleon meets Eisenhower of North Vietnam there were all these anecdotes your George in your book to tell me what history might have been for example a for example **** goes to of gallbladder operation in Moscow in January seventy four he was very ill and his sub commanders were also weigh on medical leave so the leadership was not vigorous at this point of the war well he went away his deputy had gone away but there was another deputy who'd gone earlier for some heart issues along when Ty who would come up out of the of the B. two front which is a southern command of us out of Vietnam and he took over he knew what job wanted he was close to the polar bear with so he knew what to do and he did a very good job of monitoring and hearing to build their strangling for without the presence of a job in an event in his own or was it the commander will speak of the Americans in the south Vietnamese in a moment where Jon just identifying the factions and the thinking and the young society that's what I get from your book charge the anxiety in the north to take on this American backed military in the south that have lots of very good equipment and also could call on air which North Vietnam could not call on a detail here also the north Vietnamese continued to act as if they were of following the Paris peace accords in you ironically say that they they tried to find passages that didn't exist to allow them to continue to attack but one of the ways they strongly Americans along was to not talk about M. I. A.'s did they understand American psychology that the M. I. A.'s was a persuasive political issue absolutely they were well aware of the impact of the the MIA issue one Americans in many ways that they have a guesstimate that we would do anything to get our prisoners back so they were trying to use that leverage at least a little bit to gain political confessions economic concessions and also don't forget they want to get some other high ranking cadre that the south Vietnamese of kind of kept back themselves they wanted those guide released to sell in by the late seventy four the politburo has made a decision to go and we're going to speak of a battle that's critical for their understanding of the state of Vietnam a south Vietnam's army at this point but can I have this date written down thirty September nineteen seventy four the politburo votes that they have a small window to overwhelm the south is that the date to where they all you unite on this idea of attack no that actually made a decision to launch military attacks back in may of nineteen seventy three so within three and a half four months of signing in Paris peace accords they made the decision to resume military offensive so from that time until September of seventy four they were planning they were testing if thou be the me there are rebuilding their forces and by that time the timbre of seventy four they decide okay we rebuild our forces the south Vietnamese have dramatically weekend we think it's now time to launch another major offensive the book is black April the fall of South Vietnam is nineteen seventy three to nineteen seventy four George fight is the author when we come back the American as in the south it.

Henry Kissinger
"henry kissinger" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"henry kissinger" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"And traffic stop which was so season one of history's most amazing demonstration the state the demonstration makes me very happy the kids as well losing this is December thirty nineteen seventy two president Nixon orders a halt to the bombing of North Vietnam to help with peace talks as we hear from secretary of state Henry Kissinger the president and for all of us who have been engaged in these negotiations not saying that we have done has meant more than attempting to bring an end to the war in Vietnam which actually took about another two and a half years Paul has the top record in America this day back in nineteen seventy two this is twenty seven past the back into.

president Nixon North Vietnam Henry Kissinger Paul America
Why is Aung San Suu Kyi at the International Court of Justice

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:13 min | 2 years ago

Why is Aung San Suu Kyi at the International Court of Justice

"Awarding someone the Nobel Prize for peace is always tempting. Fate saw cha the vagaries of human affairs. Yesterday's warmonger is tomorrow's peacemaker and vice versa. That it's not really the Norwegian Nobel Committees Fault when Pulse Charity Makes Mockery of some of their judgements. When you give a piece Gong to someone like Henry Kissinger oh Yasser Arafat? It's just a risk you run. And it is nevertheless startling to see an actual Nobel peace laureate appearing at the International Court of Justice in The Hague to defend the government they lead against allegations of genocide. It's pretty much the one thing that isn't supposed to happen. History had given us the opportunity to give up our best just for a cause in which we believed when the Nobel Committee chose to honor me. The road had chosen of my own free will aw became less lonely path to follow sang suci daughter of the founder of modern Myanmar Aung San and a formidable politician diplomat and and activist in her own. Right won the Nobel Peace Prize in Nineteen ninety-one at the time she was rivaled only by Nelson Mandela as a universally admired Royat. Avatar of all. That was good displaying exemplary courage in resisting. All that was bad. She led the National League for Democracy as it faced down only terrifying and ruthless military GIONTA which had turned Myanma into North Korea with Palm. Trees saying SUCI spent most of the period between Nineteen nineteen ninety nine and two thousand and ten under house arrest. She was a hero aside from the Nobel Peace Prize. She was awarded the Sakharov Prize. US Congressional Channel Gold Medal and Presidential Medal of freedom an honorary order of Australia. Honorary Citizenship of Canada and Amnesty International's ambassador of conscience since award. Luke pestle made a film about her. U2 wrote a song about and in time she triumphed the NLD won a landslide election victory in two thousand and fifteen though denied the presidency on a technicality. She became state councillor effectively. Myanmar's prime minister it. It was hailed worldwide as a victory for decency determination and patience and now she's denying that she is some kind of an accessory to crimes against humanity he sang Succi has been fair to say on a journey. These ban mind this complex situation and the challenge to sovereignty and security already in our country when you're assessing the intent of those who attempted to deal with the rebellion. Surely under the circumstances genocidal decider intent cannot be only hypothesis loan and it is important to be clear that while Aung Sang. SUCCI is in The Hague. She is not in the dark. She is appearing voluntarily and has not been charged with any crime the allegation before the ICJ EJ is against her country. Not Her the case has been brought by the Gambia. Backed by the fifty-seven members of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation Asian a coterie which includes several nations who might want to pause before mounting their high horses where human rights are concerned. The allegation is essentially essentially that Myanmar's recent persecution of the Hindu people Myanmar's Muslim minority. Who lived mostly in the country's raccoon state amounts to genocide this? This is a term with specific legal meanings and it will be for the court to determine if events in Myanmar meet the threshold. What is known is bad enough? Enough since two thousand and sixteen perhaps a million ranger have fled Myanmar mostly to neighboring Bangladesh journalists NGOs and the UN win have reported a consistent pattern of atrocious violence much of it directed at civilians not excluding children Myanmar's military known as has the top Madore have consistently claimed that they are waging a counter insurgency against Islamist terrorists though Sang Suci does not directly command the Tatmadaw. Aw this is also the line that she has held. The most sympathetic imaginable interpretation of aren't sang Suu Cheese behavior. And it's a reach is that that she is still in some respects the prisoner of the same military which once held her under house arrest. She may have calculated. This is a compromise. She has to to make to maintain such democracy as me unmanned now has that if she takes hold in the military the military will once again take charge of the country. This is a question unlikely to interest the hundreds of thousands over hinge in now wondering if they'll ever be able to go home again and they of course are the ones who have have survived the Tatmadaw's pogroms justice for the victims. If it is coming at all maybe years away

Myanmar Sang Suci Nobel Prize Myanmar Aung San Norwegian Nobel Committees Succi Aung Sang NLD Nobel Committee Sakharov Prize Suci Luke Pestle International Court Of Justice Henry Kissinger Yasser Arafat Nelson Mandela Royat Gold Medal Gambia
"henry kissinger" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

03:05 min | 3 years ago

"henry kissinger" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Richardson and Henry Kissinger wrote it talk to Martin so there at the time put it in their diaries their letters this Kissinger wrote quote deeply insecure Nixon first acted as if cruel fate had singled him out for rejection and then he contrived to make sure that his premonition came to pass it was said of Kissinger though he was a self made man who worships his creator that was not Richard Nixon Nixon was not an easy man to life and he knew it and it hurt he had a Dickens in childhood his dad was brutal and abusive a miserly tyrant two of riches brothers died in childhood won the golden curly haired baby in the family Arthur died in days from tubercular meningitis the oldest the prize the family Harel took years to succumb from tuberculosis splitting the family as his mother took took a what took him away to care for wrecking the family's finances young deck the middle brother made it into Yale and Harvard but his family could not afford to send them and he came to believe that it was his father's stubbornness there was a fault for refusing to describe the family cap who's tubercular tainted milk had killed his brothers his mother was cold should retreat into her closet to pray and is Nixon said famously never once did she tell him that she loved him that was not his family's way he came to feel as you told David frost in the famous television interviews that he wasn't lovable human being I left him plagued by an intense painful insecurity and self doubt he became Iago to his own whispering in his own here your low some creature no one like she no good in so many campaign the campaign with ferocity and ruthless aggression and in doing so he became a truly tragic figure we can glimpse the seeds of Watergate Nixon's actions as the precursor kind of John the Baptist for Joe McCarthy his red baiting campaigns which helped launch the McCarthy era were infamous but no worries that tragic flow clearer than in the matter of race here we come to another and yet well the good that he didn't is present a United States his record on race is checkered and revealing he wrapped in Whittier the quicker outpost in southern California in college he was the founder of a social club that remarkably for the nineteen thirties recruited and accepted black members when he first ran for Congress in nineteen forty six he spoke out for racial justice in the local and double ACP made him an honorary member in the same season that the Klan was burning crosses in southern California to defeat a referendum on fair employment WCS pier from which means someone is first Senate race in nineteen fifty one of his great supporters was guy named Kenny Washington a.

John Senate Henry Kissinger Kenny Washington Klan ACP Congress California Whittier United States Joe McCarthy Richardson David frost Harvard Yale Harel Arthur Dickens Richard Nixon Nixon Kissinger
Perspectives on China and global power

FT News

12:48 min | 3 years ago

Perspectives on China and global power

"How will the struggle for power between China and the US play out. And how will it determine the future world order, Fred Stedman, put this question to China expert, Ron meter he was reviewed a series of books looking at the issue from different perspectives. Ron, thanks for coming in. You looked at a number of books for us in a book Sesay about China and the west. And what struck me right? From the get-go was that you talked about this interaction between these great powers, China and the west, the US is being almost unique in its complexity, and I thought, why is that? Why is this more complicated than other great power interactions, that we've witnessed over the centuries? I think it is different. And the reason fundamentally is that we've never seen an engagement between two different types of regime that are so closely intertwined so different in terms of their values. So if you think back to the Cold War, we had at that time, basically, to political and economic systems, which were fiercely opposed to each other, but they didn't actually connect all that much. Of course, we were all terrified at the threat of nuclear war, but the Soviet Union's economy was not a major factor for the west and vice versa that AKU. It's not remotely true for the People's Republic of China. It is the second biggest economy in the world. It is now a primary economic actor in pretty much every single continent of the world and the United States. Of course, in China have been entwined in terms of finance for more than twenty years, more like thirty. Really? So the fact that we now have a rising China, which from the point of view of many liberals in the west but elsewhere has variety values particularly, of course and authoritarian type of government that is very different from what a liberal government would put forward, but it's not a place that we can simply close off or ignore that provides dilemma that was still right in the middle of solving on both sides, and one of the aspects of that. I think I'm right and say you say there's a choice there. Do we engage more with China and we're seeing this stuff that's happening in the world of technology while way, and whether it should be allowed to be part of the five G project or do we push back and one comes with a security risk? And the other one comes up tension financial economic risk that. That's lemon. But let me give you a specific example. Let's take away, which, of course, it's become this company that in the UK where we're sitting. Now, nobody had heard of probably not nobody very few people a year ago. Now, of course, is a headline every single morning on the news usually pronounced in a variety of other creative ways Hawaii audit wrong is not an upset. Right. I've heard is one prominent politician refers to it as Hawaii, which is not quite the same thing. I think that's not so much of an issue. So ten twenty years ago, we might have said that the biggest threat from the Chinese technology sector was that they were basically borrowing without commissioners, the polite way to put it intellectual property from the western world from the US from Britain from Europe Chinese would basically, taking technology that they hadn't paid for an putting into their machines had to be stopped. That is no longer the main problem does exist. But the wider problem is that actually China is now producing its indigenous technology to a very very high standard. So the reason that the United Kingdom, for instance is having a debate about whether or not, they put while way equipment in the five G network is nothing. With intellectual property theft. It's the fact that the cheapest highest quality most effective broadband network. You can have is made by hallway, and if you don't have that, then you're basically saying that you have to give an alternative company, the rights to put in the network that may actually not be at the moment, overs, higher quality. So there's a genuine balance between quality. And as you say, the question, whether there's a security risk or not, that's a new dilemma, not just for the UK but for the entire liberal world fascinating, I wanna come onto the books now because we get a perspective from China. So it's a bit more about a few from Beijing in terms of how these relationships are going to develop, what China sees its role and the other they have different conceptions of types of political systems, one of the books. I've reviewed in this particular China books essay is book leadership in the great powers by yen Shu at home. Professor yen is a very senior scholar in China. He's at Ching-ho university, one of the top institutions in that country. And he's become known. I'd say of the last. Twenty years or more in that particular field as probably one of the three or four best known most respected analysts of China's international relations. Now international relations terms without getting too technical. He's what's known as a realist is the accusation that sometimes put Henry Kissinger, Henry Kissinger, his pushes back and says, he's an idealist in realists, clothing, or was that effect. In other words, what professor yen believes is that power is the thing that actually makes a difference. So that's the position he's always had. That's why this book is so interesting, not just about him, but about China, because it makes actually in some ways rather, different case, a case that, if China is going to take fullest vantage of its rise in the world. The fact that it is now the second biggest economy in the world, and may by GDP be the biggest one within ten years. The fact that it is this huge international actor than it has to change the way, that looks the world, not just talk about power relationships, but also about what you might call the human relations, the narrative, that surround saddened, professor Yannis jesting that it will be time, maybe not yet but. Quite soon for what he calls, a more humane, the what he used the humane view of how China should relate to the rest of the world. Now that is in a sense, part of a process that we've also seen earlier with the most recent hegemony in world politics, the United States, which of course, became a power that had more battleships and more fighter planes, than anyone else particular during World War Two, but really seduce the world through what's become known as soft power. In other words, having a story to tell the world, I read professor Jens Booker saying that China has got the military. It's got the realist power. Now, it has to find the story and does he believe the Chinese leadership is current inclination to they buy that will this is one of the things that you have to read quite carefully in the book. It's not I would say a book to necessarily put next to a thriller at an airport. You know, it does take a bit of time. But I'd say get a glass of wine, give it a good going over, because it's well worth it prevents. The end doesn't at any point in the book talk about the current leadership, so Xi Jinping. The current president of China is not mentioned for Donald Trump is Donald Trump is along. With a few other names. So the United States certainly comes into the line of fire, you might say, but the wider question that he also is one that is very relevant China, which is, is the current system that China's operating, which, as we know is one that has been economically, very, very effective in terms of growth rates in terms of creating a kind of middle class, that's now, see very, very powerful in China and creating a sorta prosperous lifestyle that many consumers in China very much enjoy, but also really closing down political discourse. Is that going to be the way in which trying to get to the next stage in the implication? It's an implication of a statement but it isn't implication, is that maybe China's going to have to go beyond that if one looks at conclusions that he comes through. And again, this is very interesting because it is so much view from Beijing from thinker who is well respected both in the western China in that field, is that there's not going to be a war. This is not a story about a confrontation between China and America on the military front. But the is going to be a sort of battle for ideas and the dominance. Spouts largely economic in the Asia Pacific region. He does say very firmly the Asia Pacific region is where you're going to have to look, if you want to see what comes next for world politics. It's moving away from Europe moving away from North America. The Pacific for yen is where it's at right. Which is also the subject of one of the other books, that you looked up as referrals, China and Japan which comes to some interesting conclusions. I think it's fair to say it makes some interesting observations. It absolutely does Ezra Vogel is a scholar, but also a diplomatic figure who has actually sort of seen the rise and change in America's relationship with Asia, over the decades, he served in the Clinton administration, as secretary of state, and he became very famous in the seventies earliest that with the book who Japan as number one, which was on every business leaders bookshelf, as well as the cost many scholars, but he's always been a speaker both Chinese and Japanese and this book is about China and Japan, their shed history, which he points out, actually is not always as confrontational as it sometimes appears. We tend to think, of course of. The second World War when the two countries did have a massive conflict, of course. But he also points out that, for instance, if you look at statistics in the last few years, a few years ago, when tensions were pretty high between the two countries something like a million million a half Chinese visited Japan pass, not that many that number last year two thousand eighteen is more like eight million. So if you look below some of these surface rhetoric is saying, actually, there is a more cooperative story about economics about tourism about cultural values that are shared the maybe means the countries aren't as far apart as they might be. And this is I think, part of the white of Vogel, viewpoint because he comes from that generation of Americans who sought as part of their duty. I think in the post World War Two era to try and create a sort of agreed shed set of values in a stable community in East Asia America course, encouraged that in Europe, very successfully European Union NATO and so forth. It's never quite worked out in the same way in Asia. But that hasn't stopped a lot of those people actually, I think trying over and over again to create that similar sorts. Of stability for go. Yours decided mentioned former administration official, but other American voices take sort of more by guessing old money once say hawkish view new picked up on one someone. I believe you're actually at one point taught Jonathan ward who's written a book China's vision of victory which sounds alarmist oil is very concerned, and feels the American needs to be much more assertive in its response. That's right. Yes. New Jonathan ward. I taught history when he was an Oxford where I teach. But this book is very much about current affairs, and it's very much about policy not about history as such. And yes, I think it's fair to say that the argument he puts forward in the book is one that says that China is used the phrase hawkish, I'll say, clear and present danger, that's probably the phrase that comes to my mind. When reading it now, should say the book is one that has a great deal of information in it. It's got a lot about military power, and how China's building up its navy in particular. It's got a lot about economic power, and also of course a lot about values and the argument there, essentially is that. The United States, whether it wants to or not is going to have to deal with the fact that China is there to challenge the United States. So in a sense, that's a different story from the end should tone story where he's basically saying look the Americans and the Chinese are both going to be in the Pacific, where they're going to have to engage with each other. What story will, maybe it's time for America to actually set down the red lines if you can set down the red line in the Pacific Ocean. And actually say thus far and no further so between them those books actually point out in some ways, where the difference of view comes in terms of what's going to happen in the next decade in that Asia Pacific region. You mentioned around all the books that sort of sense that there are tensions, there is a competition of ideas, but the, the authors dancing, we're heading towards some military confrontation. And that things will be settled through dialogue to share that. I think you can see a generational difference in these books, which was as I say, in the essay, it's was reading them in tandem, because they all say something slightly different than they make up out of the picture for. Yang Tong speaking from Beijing. But, you know, with I think quite measured frame of mind. The argument is about to powers that have to live with each other, which have the potential to be confrontational, but not necessarily military sense. Maybe more on the economic sense. I think it's fair to say that as revivals book is talking about the areas where you can find agreement rather than disagreement between the actors and that in a sense, reflects his long decades of experience in the region. Jonathan ward is of a different generation. He's in his thirties. He's living, right there in the policy world of Washington DC right now, and the world, he sees is a much more confrontational. One, one in which America and China have different goals, different values different viewpoints. And that maybe just maybe those can't be contained together. Now, we're going to have to see what happens to work out in say the trade war between China and the US whether that actually could reach something more like a confrontation, but reading three books makes you realize that actually all of these viewpoints exist simultaneously. In part of the existential struggle almost is about what? Which one of them is going to prevail. Ron amid. Thank you very much. Thank you for it. That was Fred Stephen F teabags editor talking to Ron Mischer director of the Oxford University, China center. Thanks for listening. And if you're interested in events in China and Asia Pacific, lookout for latest episode of world weekly, where we talk about the protests in Hong Kong. Thanks again. If you missed our recent episodes on the US standoff in the Gulf China's threat cheese. Rare earths as a trade weapon, or the fall

China United States People's Republic Of China America United Kingdom Beijing Europe Ron Mischer Asia Pacific China Center Fred Stedman Soviet Union Jonathan Ward Pacific Gulf China Professor Yen
"henry kissinger" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"henry kissinger" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Or letter saying I am concerned about the American prisoners of war. It would probably be one of the most helpful things. They can do will publicize Jane Denton became another prominent activist for POW's. It was her husband in a video message released by his captors who famously blinked the letters of the word torture in Morse code. Jane and simple were very different, but very effective advocates. But neither of them had been prepared for this. Jane was very much a southern Belle, very southern in her ways hated conflict was the last person on earth. He wanted to be an activist. She wanted to be a wife and mother. And a hostess, and she was really what you think of when you think of the perfect military wife that was gene. And she was also highly diplomatic that turned out to be what set her apart from some of her other colleagues assert diplomacy. Her ability to mobilize people. She was one of the biggest advocates for POW's and MIA's and went to great lengths to work with different contingencies to bring her husband home. Those different contingencies proved. Vital, civil and the other wives of POW's. We're talking to the media to congressman to Henry Kissinger, even but they couldn't talk to the people. They wanted to hear from the most their husbands. One of the women told me one of these POW, I've said we would do a deal with the devil. If we had to you to get information through to our men, and they sort of did when they turned to an unlikely alliance is so these are very traditional hat, and gloves, military wives, very prim and proper. Oppor not the kinds of women who typically associated with antiwar activists. I think the POW is a lot of them do not get along with the women that I studied this is Jessica Frazier. She studies a group of women antiwar.

Jane Denton Henry Kissinger Jessica Frazier congressman
$1 Billion Downfall: Elizabeth Holmes and Theranos

John Williams

03:01 min | 3 years ago

$1 Billion Downfall: Elizabeth Holmes and Theranos

"By the way, I was doing my. Elizabeth Holmes voice because I watched that documentary last night. I don't know if you've done that. Have you watched that HBO documentary called the inventor out for blood and Silicon Valley, it's about the woman who was behind? She really was theranos that company that said with prick on your finger. You'll get a drop of blood and be able to test for all sorts of diseases and ailments who's going to revolutionize the world. She was the Stephen judge was the Bill gate. She was the Archimedes. I mean, she was like one of these great transformative human figures, she was a fraud. She was a sham the book about that by John Kerry, you which is referenced considerably in. The doc is really the go to source for me. There was an article in the New Yorker, the book followed that now the documentary, then a feature film, when we interview John from the Wall Street Journal about this his I think reporting telling of it was really really good. And you know, how the books are always better than the movie. This really is a classic case. And point the documentaries. Good, and she's she's bizarre. And it's it's fine. But it to me it leaves more questions unanswered than it does answer. And the big one is what was her motive was. She scam artists from the beginning. Or was she just faking it until she could make it were her intention sincere producer Griffin doesn't think that that's as critical a question at the end of the day that technology would not did not in does not work. It doesn't exist in the real world. And it was a scam. Whether she intended it to be or not, I think that's a distinction worth pursuing. But one of the really interesting parts about the documentary is that the old white men lover here. She is this twenty year old blonde with really red lipstick on and she's thin, and she wears dark turtlenecks the way Steven Jobs did and Oliver closer that way. You know, why she dresses that way? Not because she wants to emulate her hero that would be almost juvenile. But no because she's so focused on the corporation. She still living and breathing turnovers that it be easier for her to go into her closet and just grabbed the black turtleneck and put it on. That's why she does it that way. She can focus more. She's not worried about a close. She's worried about changing the world. So there's George Shultz former secretary of state, George Shultz going y'all have some and there's Mike Mattis, and there's Henry Kissinger, and there's venture capital guys. And they're all going. Well, she doesn't really know any science, and we don't know any science. But I think I'll give her one hundred million dollars and that happened Walgreens did that for crying out loud. I'm interested to see the feature film on this. If you watch the dock at least, we'll get a chance to look at her and to see the wacky -ness of it. See how thin it is. But if you want to a sort of a thicker dive on it, then read the book, which is called bad blood, bad blood is the book that you want to read if you really

Fraud Elizabeth Holmes Walgreens George Shultz HBO Silicon Valley John Kerry Wall Street Journal Bill Gate Producer Henry Kissinger Steven Jobs Griffin Mike Mattis Oliver One Hundred Million Dollars Twenty Year
"henry kissinger" Discussed on Between The Lines

Between The Lines

03:47 min | 3 years ago

"henry kissinger" Discussed on Between The Lines

"I max what about the role of Richard Nixon and Henry Kissinger during Vietnam what we've now got product stolen, these White House tapes, which the last bachelor any release. In fifteen. So it's been mild as I've been one of the first stories able to make good use them. And these White House tapes they providing controversial evidence, and they got Nixon comes into office sixty nine with his national security advisor Kissinger supposed-, the smallest guy that's ever being Washington and all the rest of it these people they knew from the beginning. But the wall was absolutely no chance of winning. But all day were preoccupied like all the other presidents wis to find a way of making it look. Okay. So they could win the seventy two reelection campaign. And the amazing thing on this tapes. Is that Kissinger out supposedly the great academic, intellectual, egghead? He talks more about the seventy two election on the tapes, the Nixon does he's more cynical and want to me one of devastating moments. Is they've been at it for three us kissing just been negotiating secretly with with an all fit means in Paris. Twenty two thousand Americans of died on Nixon's administration and countless more Vietnamese all to find a political way out of this. Well, October seventy two month before the election when Nixon's running against George McGovern, the democratic candidate a Nixon comes rushing Kissinger come rushing into the White House back from Paris. And he said, Mr President he said, I've got a deal better than you could ever imagine. Then he doesn't say this is going to bring peace. It's going to save countless lives. He said, this will absolutely totally screw McGovern and the cynicism of these people. You can say if you want to be generous to Nixon you can say he did what he was paid to do. He did get America out of it now, but any pretends that he got America out with on on some of the conversations again recording on the White House tape when he says things like to one of Nixon's cabinet. He says my dearest wish is. Two Vietnamese nations get each other's throats and kill as many each other as they can't because he was so fed up with negotiating with both of them. It's not pretty I'm chatting with Max Hastings about his new book, Vietnam, he's the author of other groundbreaking books, including all hell, let loose catastrophe and the secret war quick time out here and look at some of these grouping stories you max, the North Vietnamese civilian diet of stewed rat, the US captain who read the US, captain who reads Conrad and Heidi during action patrols the experienced US soldiers who rarely wore underpants because of the humidity is a treasure trove of these anecdotes might what you're you're. You're very kind to say so, but I suddenly realized when I started out writing books about wars. I thought I was writing books about soldiers about which division went which way. But in the course of my career, I'm not only I but a whole generation of historians. I think we've all realized the wall. Doing as much social history as as military history on whenever I'm going through my manuscripts. I Chan cut out as many as I can the divisional names and numbers and all rest of it on the on. I concentrate only human stories because that's what people must fascinated by. And I must fascinated by I still I'm getting old. I may be seventy and I thought when I started out on this book called on Guinea Bill to be traveling around the well doing all these interviews creeping around the middle of night, South Carolina, staying Moto, but actually stories these people tell I mean, I live in England in a middle class bubble..

Richard Nixon Henry Kissinger White House George McGovern Vietnam Paris Max Hastings US Washington advisor South Carolina America Guinea President England Conrad Heidi seventy two month
White House Summit With Big Tech Tackles AI, Job Losses

WSJ Tech News Briefing

06:02 min | 3 years ago

White House Summit With Big Tech Tackles AI, Job Losses

"Late last week tech leaders discussed at the White House hopes for closer collaboration with the government on artificial intelligence and support for US workers likely to be impacted by its rise Ivanka Trump helped convened the roundtable with the CEO's, including Microsoft's Saatchi, Adela, Google, Sundar Pichai and other notable attendees, including former secretary of state Henry Kissinger here to talk about what we know happened. And what we don't is the Wall Street Journal's Douglas MacMillan joining us via Skype Douglas, either it appears as though there's been a heightened level of concern, it almost appears as though, you know, all the adults are getting into the big room and about to discuss something serious. So what is the state of concern as it pertains to a is impact on the US workforce and our central future as a whole? Yeah. There's a number of topics that they covered at this meeting. The main one probably was a I. I and this concern that as more and more of our world gets automated and more and more industries become automated that a lot of jobs will be replaced by robots and that millions of American workers truck drivers and retail cashiers inmate probably many others that we're not thinking of yet will potentially be out of work that those people will be searching for new jobs. So the the White House has been thinking about this and has been von Trump in particular has been leading some efforts to try to think about how we can prepare those kinds of American workers for jobs of the future. Try to get them new skills. Try to arm them with some data about the job market. But really what what is crucial about this push. And and really the only way that is going to work is if they have the support of industry, and if they have leading company is like, Google and Microsoft involve at the very beginning and coming up with solutions for. For this potential crisis and the American workforce in the American economy, and I know it was very closed door meeting. But you know, there is such such question about where that relationship stands where big tech stands with big government. It's it's certainly had a rocky relationship and going into it. There were a lot of questions about where that dynamic stands actually, surprisingly very little from inside. The meeting has leaked out we run able to get much information about actual content of the discussion, we do know that President Trump himself made it a brief appearance towards the end of the meeting. But we don't know exactly what what happened. We don't know. Exactly. What people said, I think to some extent this is not a formality. But this is a way to kind of help the relations between White House until validly. Those relationships had become a little icy in the first few months of President Trump's tenure in office. You know, he enacted the travel ban that the CEO's tech companies protested against. They have been vocal outspoken critics of other policies, including his immigration policies. It's climate change policies. So there has been kind of this this tense relationship between tech and the White House. I think what we saw was evidence that CEOs such as do not CHAI at Google while they may have their disagreements with Trump's policies. They see a needed to work with this administration and a see an opportunity to build some initiatives together to work together on key areas. Such as a I where more and more tech companies are calling on the government to help regulate that right? And you know, what's really sort of interesting. You look at this. Impressive list was almost more impressive is who's not on it the top three tech companies were missing. So what do we know about any of those relationships? Yes. So three of the largest tech companies in the world. Amazon Facebook and apple were not invited to this meeting. According to senior administration official it's unclear how much to read into that their signs that the White House is engaging with some of those companies of oncology, Trump personally had breakfast in a in a meeting with Tim cook the CEO of apple on during an event see weeks ago in Idaho, where they were talking about the need for stem education, science technology, engineering mass skills for young people in America. I'm so so at least in that case, it doesn't seem like apple was snubbed, you know, Facebook a lot of its own issues going on right now with Washington. So perhaps there, you know, not is not the best relationship there. But you know, I think we should keep an eye on that. And see these are the companies that are involved in these discussions going forward. Certainly if you're having a discussion about the future of a. I you wanna have the key leaders in that at the table Amazon Facebook, Microsoft, Google, apple these are the US titans of artificial intelligence and from from a competition standpoint from an American competition standpoint, the US government needs these companies in order to compete with China, which is quickly becoming a world leader in artificial intelligence and its own companies are going head to head with these American companies in this field of AI for talent for new products that they put in the market, and for, you know, radical new uses of AI that we haven't even thought of yet. So the US government needs to have a close foster close relationship with relationships with all of these companies in order to make sure it's it's an you into compete on a global stage. Good. Yeah. Like, you said, it's, you know, we don't know much. But we know that there's an important conversation. That's been. Started. So it'll be interesting to see how this all pans out. Douglas as usual, thank you so much. Thank you for having me

Ivanka Trump White House Google CEO United States Apple Microsoft Douglas Macmillan Facebook Donald Trump President Trump Amazon Wall Street Journal Sundar Pichai Skype Douglas Henry Kissinger AI
John McCain, Dr. Henry Kissinger and America discussed on The Daily Article

The Daily Article

00:39 sec | 4 years ago

John McCain, Dr. Henry Kissinger and America discussed on The Daily Article

"Filled with paradoxes. Begin with a name. We honor America's one hundred sixty million laborers by giving them a day free from labor. Then we call their holiday Labor Day. However, the name is unfortunately appropriate for our largest labor group retail employee's. They'll have one of their longest workdays today as Americans flood into stores for Labor Day sales Labor Day could have led to a four day weekend, but congress intervened the first labour day was on a Tuesday in eighteen eighty two. In eighteen ninety four. Congress moved the holiday to the first Monday in September. So when you go back to work tomorrow, blame them, the good news is that the

John Mccain Dr. Henry Kissinger America Jim Denison Congress Washington National Cathedral Charles Spurgeon Sern Writer KAT Ohio Nishit Lord Ninety Four Year Four Day
Right-wing protests fueled by anti-immigrant sentiment continue in Germany

Red Eye Radio

00:29 sec | 4 years ago

Right-wing protests fueled by anti-immigrant sentiment continue in Germany

"A protest in Germany over immigrant, rights turned, violent Saturday, night, the demonstration in the city of Chemnitz was organized by right wing groups angry after Syrian and Iraqi immigrants were arrested for stabbing and killing a thirty five year old German citizen. Thousands of counter-demonstrators also showed up yon Henrik Viva from the site t-online. Was there I experienced violence against myself because, a right wing people attacked. Me and my timer I lost my.

President Trump John Mccain CBS Executive Mccain Henry Kissinger Liberty Mutual Insurance Brad Kavanagh Bush White House Annapolis Nicole Canada New York Times Sheryl Stolberg Henrik Viva Vietnam Chemnitz Andrew Gillum Idaho Washington Tom Foty
China Strikes Back at the U.S. With Plans for Its Own Tariffs

Bill Handel

02:40 min | 4 years ago

China Strikes Back at the U.S. With Plans for Its Own Tariffs

"His in how extraordinary martin luther king was and that is there are very very few people who get to these positions without being pure political animals who are not don't have this kind of humanity in them it just doesn't happen that often mahatma gandhi surly abraham lincoln martin luther king and i'm putting them in the same category because i think they have to be that's not to say they weren't very clever various political animals if you look at what abraham lincoln was about he knew politics meant he understand understood the noose nuances otherwise you don't get to be the president the same thing with martin luther king he understood the politics of what he was doing nothing he did was by accident but at the same time on the overleaf here here was a man that for the humanity came out of him when you look at presidents man it's all politics or it's a fluke like in donald trump's position i mean how many people have this kind of sort of nobel peace winning philosophy comes out 'cause the humanity i mean a lot of it is just politics yasser arafat winning the nobel peace prize boy there was a humane person henry kissinger winning the same pri boy there is humanity martin luther king was very different kind of person and as i think about him there's a reason why a national holiday is named after dr king and it is no mistake because he was able to put together like very very few people in history both his humanity and the politics of his a mediate life of the circumstances of where he was and when he was and his success you put all of those three together and that never happens but for a handful of times in modern history all right coming up dean sharp the house whisper and how to properly seal off your your home from your spouse no i have that wrong kfi am six forty there's jennifer china has proposed new tariffs on fifty billion dollars a year with of american products it's in response to a new round of tariffs on china announced by president trump the stock market opened down on the news but the president's new top economic adviser larry cudlow told reporters the market shouldn't overreact sometimes the path to this to this kind of.