2 Burst results for "Henry Food"

"henry food" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"henry food" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"Burnout. Who's with me. It's taken center stage in this pandemic with remote work blurring the divide between home life and the office and for those working in person. The pandemic has added a whole different level of stress. Some companies kickstarter and unilever among them are testing a four day week to combat overworking and lift. Morale abigail marks is a professor of the future of work at newcastle university in the uk and wrote a piece for the conversation recently about the strategy. I asked her how we got the whole five day. Forty hour workweek in the first place in the. Us people tend to talk about the origins associated with henry food. People eventually move towards an eight hour. Working day five day working week in the k the resists of industrialists could rob owen. Who said eight hundred work. Eight hours leisure rest. It clearly has staying power but it seems like a lot of companies and governments are starting to rethink it. Why is it something like a four day week starting to catch on. I think there is a realization that the work that people were undertaking in the factory. And at the start of industrialization is very different to contemporary work. And that there's a lot of evidence that people are burning out they're overstressed. The rover burton. The actual intensive work is much more than it was even ten fifteen twenty years ago and is having a detrimental pet on people's well-being but in your piece in the conversation. You suggest that a four day week isn't necessarily the panacea some might want it to be. What are the shortcomings. I think the intention of reducing working hours is a really really were-they one and i think it's right. I think the problem is employers clearly going to try and force five days work into four days which is going to make already exhausted people. If more exhausted. I think only works with particular groups of workers. Some professional workers but uber drivers people working the gig economy and people work in. Hospitality is not gonna fly. So then i think ends up being quite divisive and separates the privilege from those that are in much more vulnerable positions right. And you say you know if people are working more intense -ly during a shorter number of hours. That doesn't necessarily improve. Well being absolutely. And i think you really needs to take a good careful. Look at what we can do to reduce people's where content stick whether that is reducing the volume of work changing the way that people's productivity is defined dissolves size if we had a universal basic income than it makes it much easier to reduce hours to the four day working week. But it's not so easy just to say three day weekend when we're in a twenty four hour seven day a week society. These ideas have just been highlighted by the pandemic With so many workers feeling burned out and remaining extremely productive even while working remotely. How do you think this will change the way we think about structuring that the workday as we move forward as you said from the pens on we we know homework can did not decrease productivity in fact increased but we also know it decrease people's well-being because of what content certification due to the complications of pandemic working. What worries me is that employers. Thanks to believe the hybrid working is going to equal productivity but also not think about people's workload and what they're actually doing still going to have this really complex situation with increasing wilkinson's mutation so if knocking on a day off the work schedule doesn't work for everyone. What alternative stacey. I think we need to look at what people are doing whether it is reasonable to expect people to work in the way that they're doing considering life is structured in a very different way to the way it was at the early industrialized era. Need to look at working hours because people aren't working eight hour days that taking work home with them. The looking at emails at ten o'clock eleven o'clock at night so the eight-hour working day in some ways becomes amid. So we really need to look at what we can do to support employees if they are working in our day to have really good breaks to ensure that aren't periods. Where the feeling really really stressed to make sure that the not taking work home with them. Abigail marks is a professor of the future of work at newcastle university.

abigail marks henry food rob owen newcastle university unilever uk Us wilkinson stacey Abigail marks
"henry food" Discussed on Food Safety Matters

Food Safety Matters

07:40 min | 1 year ago

"henry food" Discussed on Food Safety Matters

"Hello everyone and welcome to food. Safety matters the podcast for food safety professionals. I'm stacey atchison publisher foodsafety magazine. And i'm here with my co host. Barbara van retro hem editorial director of the magazine and joining us today for an update on our food safety. Insights column is bob ferguson of strategic consulting. So good morning team. Moore's daisy morning more morning on morning unless you're listening at nine greed greed greed house. That's good so in today's episode can say if it's morning i missed a day i probably did anyway. Sorry go ahead okay. So today's episode. You're going to hear. Barbara's discussion with phil calf. Iraq's president of the specialty food association. So you know just. Hearing specialty food association brings up fond memories of attending those fancy food. Shows a anybody who's been to those knows what i'm talking about so i better shake that one off because i'm getting hungry. The back to business phil has a deep background. In the food industry spanning association leadership as well as positions at multinational food companies fills experience lends itself to a wide range of topics. And he and barbara get into some areas that we haven't before like the impacts of political uncertainty on our supply chains as well as it of course bismah imports and more so definitely stay tuned for that so as it is with all things. It is with food safety as well or so. We hope no news is good news because we looked we looked we looked and we looked to find some important stories that we bring you this week and that was weird looking over the last two weeks and i'm sorry to say or happy to report. We got nothing so the few things that caught our attention were updates. One is that fda continues to release materials and resources from the three public meetings that they had at the end of twenty twenty Around the proposed rule requirements for additional traceability records for certain foods. I don't some some of the foods some of the time right We'll put a link in the show notes to make that easy for you to find if you're interested. We also noted that fda's core response teams continue to update the new outbreak investigation table. This is still a new tool and it's interesting to get and stay familiar with so we'll put a link in shown us to that as well all right. I guess all this leaves me some time to mention that we here at foodsafety magazine in partnership with loan jespersen of cultivate food safety and three m global food safety have opened registration on the second of our five part series examining how regional implications of where your company's located impact your company's food safety culture in the second. We will be covering australia. And this webinar will be broadcast. Live on march twenty third. You can register for free by visiting the web page on our new website. Food dash safety dot com. And even if you're not able to attend the live broadcast they will all be available on demand and if you listening to this episode when it first airs you there's still time for you to register for the first in our series which covers europe that will air live on february twenty fifth. So you can still register for that registrations going very well. It's being very well received so we're pretty excited really through the roof. These numbers that gets big. Woo pretty great. I thought it was woo worthy of saying stacey you said that's long jespersen right it is loan jespersen who you know. I wish you could also see my my earnest face of just smiling and nodding about loans. She's just so awesome. And so we're just so pleased to be working with her on this series so yeah you may come up in the podcast again. I'm just saying she just might come up very quickly here. Actually because now. It's time for our food safety insights partner bob ferguson president of strategic consulting to give us his overview the latest food safety insights article from our feb march issue entitled twenty twenty one. What changes of the past year are likely to stick now in print. There's a subject so you know when something he has to titles. You know it's good right. Twenty twenty one and beyond experts weigh in. Well it's it's good enough to have two titles. I'll say that it was a lot of fun to work on all the food. Safety insights are fun to work on. And i hope they're interesting to the readers as well but this month's insights was particularly fun for me because it was a somewhat a different format as well coming off the changes and disruptions that we saw covid we wanted to get some more expert opinions. About what the recovery might look like and what changes we've seen. That might be permanent. And which ones may be more fleeting which ones might go away so what we did this time as we wanted to find some expert opinions. So where do you go for expert. Opinions on food safety so that turns out food. Safety magazine is a pretty good source of all places. I know who would. And we have a very good pool of experts in the form of our own editorial advisory board so we went there so we could go right. To the civil. I handle little thing we've got. We've got her. That's right and so we convened a virtual roundtable has to be virtual just to go with the theme of everything. If it's twenty. Twenty one is virtual and i had the privilege of interviewing our team of industry experts that included wendy white industry manager for food and beverage safety project. That georgia tech's enterprise enterprise innovation institute. Craig henry food safety consultant at intro inc. This woman loan jespersen. I think i've heard of before aforementioned jespersen from cultivate food safety. Steve mander knock executive director at the association of food and drug officials. Stow and we'll daniels president of the produce division of eh laboratories and. I'm gonna take a little plug here and it turns out that. I'm also on the editorial advisory board and i might slip an answer to a question in the article at some point. Not too many answers. Don't have that many answers. But i tried to answer. Yeah that's like the shoemaker's family like we're so familiar bob like oh gosh. I guess we should put bob on the board. If anybody deserves that we finally remembered who of course there are really really interesting group and with with a great view of food safety in a lot of different areas so it was a it.

Barbara bob ferguson Steve mander february twenty fifth phil calf today second stacey atchison march twenty third australia feb march europe five part Moore two titles Craig henry first Barbara van retro daniels this week