13 Burst results for "Henry Dearborn"

"henry dearborn" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

American Revolution Podcast

05:54 min | 4 months ago

"henry dearborn" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

"There he underwent several more painful surgeries to remove bone fragments from his leg. The injury would keep Lincoln away from active duty for nearly a year returning to service, in August of Seventeen, seventy eight. Meanwhile General Gates sent militia under the command of militia Brigadier General John Fellows to take thirteen hundred men northward to contest any British attempt to cross the Hudson. River. While a British army retreated at least one Briton refused to go. Lady Harriet, acland had been with Burgoyne army since it had left Canada. Her husband. Major. John. ACLAND had been shot in both legs and taken prisoner. During the British retreat lady acklin decided that her place was with her husband. ACKLIN was also pregnant with her second child at the time. In the middle of the night on October eighth again, there was a driving rain then. Lady Acklin, traveled downriver to meet up with the continental. Army. General Burgoyne provided her with a note and sent her aboard ship under a flag of. Truce. Several Miles downriver she came upon sentinels under the command of Colonel Henry Dearborn. By this time, it was after one o'clock in the morning. Dearborn convinced the young woman to spend the rest of the night in a small house that he had commandeered as his headquarters. Dearborn assured lady acland that it was too dangerous to travel at night and that he had met with major acland and that his injuries were not immediately life threatening. The next day gates, his aide accompanied lady Acklin along with her made and major accolades Valet back to headquarters. There she met with General Gates. The American commander seated to her request to be reunited with her husband. She would help nurse her husband back to health while he remained an American prisoner..

Lady Acklin General Burgoyne Colonel Henry Dearborn General Gates Burgoyne army lady Acklin John Fellows Lady Harriet acland Lincoln Briton Hudson commander Canada
"henry dearborn" Discussed on PodcastDetroit.com

PodcastDetroit.com

12:03 min | 1 year ago

"henry dearborn" Discussed on PodcastDetroit.com

"I was a soccer referee before that aw that's like one of the only jobs you can get before you're sixteen legally lake as soon as i could work i wanted to work so all right like soccer referee yeah thank yeah yeah right right so yeah when i turned sixteen got my car got my license on my the sixteenth birthday and i was able to get to noble fish and work in the kitchen after school every day i was so amped just kinda do prep in the back there and listen to music and you know little things like that but i started picking up on japanese cuisine back then and and then teach i'd take ingredients home and you know roll sushi at night from family and stuff like that and take home what was leftover so the only food i knew how to make until i was like twenty four like his sushi sushi i started doctor she is the only food i knew how to make i lo- i knew how to make that i knew how to make like mac and cheese like pasta i knew how to make a key though like which is amazing savary japanese fish pancake it's incredible i learned how to make that out of the back of a giant robot magazine so is that primarily edgar that primarily the dough from the panic though the mainly egg dish and it's i mean it depends like you could do it i heavy you could do flour have is kind of what style you're going for but i mean it's exits dashi which is fish stock that's like the olive oil of japan eggs dashi flower a mountain yum yum yum oh and then whatever he wants to put a little salt in there and then a little cabbage and then it's just a party like mix because everything up in their kitchen sink style like what's going in let's put it all in there you can put noodles on it whatever but yeah it's it's it's one of my yeah i mean i miss making a it's it's fun to be on a flattop and you have these giant like spatulas and you're throwing shit all over the place and that's a good time i kind of miss that i haven't done it in a while but yeah i mean i knew how to make oklahoma rocky i knew how to make sushi i did not know how to like roasted sta chicken like so i started this business just doing sushi and then realized people wanted like other stuff like catering hitter gig like oh what else you got some like that like oh shit i gotta learn how to make dumplings i learn how to make noodles i learn how to make chicken you know like so i started teaching myself these things and my fiance was also like an avid cook so she was helping me a lot with a lot of things and i think it was twenty fifteen and i was like i gotta go get actual restaurant experience i gotta go learn how to do this stuff so i took a job as a garmisch chef at a ski resort in colorado you remember thorburn so thor for my culinary guy back then like he was working in kitchens news the one who kind of like brought me into kitchens and showed me stuff like here's this is what shark tori is like you know stuff like that and so th- origami this gig he's like called in a favor you know to this this chef at this place in colorado moved to colorado rutto yeah move there for five six months and i knew it was temporary so i didn't get stuck there felt stuck but i i you know i get out there and i just wanna wanna work as much as possible and i took over like the garbage station and i learned how to work in a kitchen and then i would just ask questions left and right and you know i learned what kofi was out there and you know learn proper cuts on like onions and stuff like that but it was it was classic french with like a new american american sort of you know twist on it but closely the kids i mean right yeah and i was like chef lake it was chef joe campbell great great chef incredible but classic french and you know learn how to make a puree like i don't know just it was it was it was bootcamp what i wanted it to be and i i said like first week joe kick my ass out here like yell at me you know if if one cut is wrong like let me know like i had so many plates sent back like caesar salad like sent back as the caesar salad had like thirteen things on it you know we made a cobb salad that was ridiculous it was like twenty six different ingredients it was deconstructed instructed casino this is two thousand fifteen hundred sixteen it was a deconstructed fifteen sixteen you know ski resort style it's twenty six dollars cobb salad with like you know fleet twenty-six ingredients on it and you know the cucumber had to be thinly sliced so you could roll it up and make a cone out of they had to be put in the right ways and like the powder goes here in the be blah blah blah the beet powder goes over here and like you know it was it's it's it's it was so hyper specific that kind of taught me like here's how you work in like a new style kitchen here's here's where it like this was good to have it under my belt so that i could come back here and like have a new fervor in a new outlook on it the smart though because you were like man i need to learn the skill uh-huh just sit there and complain about her and the skill us let me just go get a job doing i'm learning like that right i'm sure it's not going to culinary school right away what a shame that is if you wanna do it of chat is gonna take you under if you drive you're going to be fine you know you don't go to school i know didn't go to culinary school i personally didn't go to culinary school there we got so one one thing though i do you think that if you don't have that drive but you do want to work in the kitchen then maybe like a not like a full line culinary school but a culinary program and like a university or something we'll still get you what you need yeah totally agree those those like some some things like you have to be able to like implies you have to be able to understand an ice yeah i can see i can see it's application yea i can understand why people go some shifts they they don't give you that stuff they just just kind of like you know you're cooking or you don't get those soft skills to succeed but that being said i also am not an advocate of culinary elementary school in the traditional sense ikaria school because you can only learn certain ingredients that you might not be using you know i'm like an african guy they don't hire the french guy they don't hire the african guy to do french cooking there's no maffei we also although the extent though that you currently do pop-ups and catering around the city yeah so the majority of the business is setting adding up sushi bars for private events complete with a live action sushi station will provide everything but we also use pop-ups as is marketing it's like hey you know our business exists you know we're out here we're taking pictures of our food people are enticing people to come try it and convincing people that work doc their next best were good option for your private party you know one plenty of events for like quicken all those bedrock companies downtown it's a cool thing 'cause it's interactive you know you set up small sushi bar anywhere and and you're just making it in front of people it's it's a bit of a spectacle talking to people you're making them food they're snacking it's a good time so that's the majority of the business we're also subcontracted by a a ton of other culinary outfits like other catering businesses country clubs you name it kitchens whatever like apparatus room hired us to do sushi and it's because they can't do it as well as us and they want to have a good product product they're proud of food they're proud of their food they just know that they're going to get a much better deal you know we know how we know how to cut we know not cut costs but we know how to keep the cost costs down like a year if you know rochester country club wants to make sushi this weekend they're not gonna like take the time to learn how to do it they're i'm not gonna be able to get the fish on like you know where the best place to buy their fishes they don't know where the best place to buy their rices you know things like that so either either though you know we've been getting a lot of business routinely over the years by like places like the henry dearborn like where we give people preferred rates rates were you know here's what we charge a customer here's what we charge a catering business and you know it's a lot easier to work with a catering business it's less time for me meat obviously here's what i need in there they understand we speak the same language it's like the industry language you know so i don't have to make that sale to i don't have to spend and like an hour selling something large customer you know i don't have to do a site visit for the wedding you know i don't have to be like i don't have the right i mean you there's tasting you know something like that so like if another catering outfit is able to sell sushi bar and hire us for it they should definitely profit off off that so we offer an industry rate for people and say you know you can charge you can charge whatever you want and here's what we're going to charge you you know sell it however you want so well that's that's the majority of what we do yeah similar to what we kind of do the van planning sometimes you're just tell people like hey this is what we'll charge you you can pick whatever you wanna put on top of it she can make you know if you want to charge twice with the industry goals for more power power to totally know with that as long as i get my money i'm good right exactly and like you said it just stops a lot of the astronauts i'm gonna have to talk how to the customer the time to do three or four calls i can just you know taught to one person yup here's your product devout vow still get the promotion 'cause i'm gonna put my stuff everywhere l. fisher again you know you just be out of that stress yep yep so with all that being said you guys looking to get a stationary i get a brick and mortar going yes so that's that's on the that's on the horizon i've pop ups are great they serve a purpose but at a certain point you kind of hit a wall it's like you know you're you have to go buy the stuff you have to buyer ingredients you gotta take it to the commissary you gotta get it processed at the commissary julia prep there you got to pack it up yet to clean up your commissary because it's shared use kitchen right usually i mean in our case it is then you gotta head to your papa location you gotta set it all up again you gotta do your mies then you gotta do your service bruce then he had to clean it up and you gotta clean the whole kitchen you just popped up in and then you gotta go back to the commissary and then you've got to put everything away and store things properly relationship and lit log everything and label everything and this adds at least three hours of labor like for a pop up so.

soccer
"henry dearborn" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

12:32 min | 1 year ago

"henry dearborn" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Beauty has been protected by such visionary says Benjamin bossy who bequeathed as a state to Harvard College for what is now the Arnold arboretum and Henry Dearborn the former mayor of Roxbury who established Forest Hill cemetery so in many ways it is truly the key of America and when we look at it we begin to realize the emerald necklace is a major parts of Jamaica plain old you used to have our own civil war time yet to have a the Boston Providence railroad come through the second about that well the Boston Providence railroad was something that when it was laid out in the eighteen thirties would connect of course the city of Austin the city of Providence Rhode Island Henry Alston who lived in Milton was somebody who served as the first president of the railway and they created the terminus at park square in Boston no a real road could be a passenger railroad but it could also be a freight railroad and of course by connecting the two cities what they did was to provide transportation but it was mostly phrase in that period they had deep boats all the way along not everywhere but the concept was that began to provide the eighteen forties and fifties the aspect of living outside the city and commuting to Boston for business one of the aspects was there was a station that was actually at Forest Hills and it was the J. serves to what eventually became the station for the elevated railway call Forest Hills and there you would actually have people beginning to commute to the city so they have the Boylston street and eventually you would see it coming into Boston through Roxbury and it was something that really have revolutionized up people travels back when they were belching smoke steam or smoke out of a big deal because it was it was just incredible you have a photograph there that actually shows that going through a pristine the state and you have these coal fired engines the belch smoke and you begin to realize it was a sense of progress the railroad was something the transformed a glint so when it was introduced in the United States one began to realize that it wasn't just the Boston and Providence that was the Boston and Maine the Fitchburg line each one of these with the terminus of Boston was something that was connecting New England and now you actually have the ability don't really to travel but you also have the ability to set for eight and it was done efficiently cost effective way and it was something that was received within a day or two how about the Jamaica plain police station is that still there the one with it is folly from attic roof it's in the condominium Ascanian style exactly for us get it thank you that's actually a great way to look at it it was totally red brick but as you see it had the lancet windows and everything of that sort it was something a lot of ways that was I guess one of the first city buildings to be built in Jamaica plain during the period of eighteen seventy three the city of Boston after the great fire of eighteen seventy two which destroyed most of downtown Boston appointed a city architect and the city architect in eighteen seventy three was George cough off with somebody who actually would design not just this police station which was the Jamaica plain district thirteen station but he would also designed every school every municipal building every thing that had to do with the city during his tenure but he was the first of thirteen city architects so the police station itself was something that when it was built in eighteen seventy five on Stevens Avenue served as the police headquarters and I have wonderful photographs of these books that actually show the policemen lined up in front of it it not only had red brick lancet windows it had a magnificent polychromatic slate roof which was a red and grey but it also had projecting dormers and it survives until the nineteen eighties when it was re purposed in it became condominiums so here's this magnificent structure which once served as a police station and now it's a place of residence one thing I noticed is that these buildings are built in the time line money was tight yet somehow this city would make these ornate buildings and now when there's much more money floating around they don't they come up with things like Boston city hall or some very boring structures what what's different now who was it was architecture more important to them than that it is all just took cliff was a major architect but he was followed by people like say bill abatement Harrison that would of course began to realize that some why is that these were people that normally had been educated either at at my tea which was the first school of architecture of the United States or their cold oppose up Paris but these were people in some ways that were reflecting the tastes of what was considered to be sophisticated architecture of the time with the twenty thirty years many times that sophisticated tasted changed and we began to see in some ways the cloths Ross giving an gothic police station was very different than what we were seeing built of the early twentieth century and to give you an example is horticultural hall this is a magnificent structure it's really a derivative of the banqueting house and loved it but you have to realize that this was a magnificent structure that was built by the city architect at that time two different styles of architecture in its within one generation so in a lot of ways it's not just the fact that architecture would be changing but it was the taste of the architecture of a time when you talk about city hall brutalism is something a lot of ways that was thought to be a major feature it really evolved out of the boathouse and we saw are in the forties and fifties these structures that would be introduced by the American institute of architects and in Boston you know city hall is something a lot of ways that does not have a sense of place it's not connected to anything not even the JFK buildings of the federal buildings it's a block of brutalist architecture within a plaza that was supposed to create a piazza that involved in some ways from the Italian derivatives but I think in a lot of ways it fell short many people actually enjoy that type of architecture but I like in some ways to see some sort of a connection and if it could ever be done is to always re purpose of building that actually sabbats save the exterior facades and of course create something within the new building but also leaves of subways that bark of a previous architect it seems like they're just not willing to spend the money these days everything was kind of cheap well in a lot of ways much of new Boston I begin to see a lot of these new condominiums that are being built of the neighborhoods they built of ward the confident tie backs then they usually covered with vinyl side yeah I don't think they'll have a lifetime of war the for the fifty five like you have cheesy vinyl siding and I can somehow lost and you see a lot we'll have it wanted David town but yes that what you're thinking I went to Harold by barber of forty years I have had this hair cuts since I was five years old it doesn't grow very fast fast they went the other day in South Boston and I said to him what is going on they said every corner has a new condominium and then the other day when I found out that Sturgis cleaners by cleaner for the last forty years is selling is building and he's retiring but of course I'm sure they'll be a new condominium all the slot what was the status of Farah or maybe try a little bit about the evolution there's a picture of the fire department here yeah and they have their engine which looks very complicated with dials and boilers and wheels and cranks we have to realize the fire department really didn't involve of Boston until the early part of the nineteenth century they always had what we'll call pulverized gins you would actually have a little fire buckets you would fill it up for you know convenient water trough put it into the bucket you would pop but to create a pressure that would then hopefully put the fire out if the building had not already been consumed but in the early nineteenth century the Hahnemann family of Roxbury created what we're basically steamer engines the steamer engines were eventually something that revolutionized how we fought fires well Hahnemann company went on for many many years and by the period of the latter part of the nineteenth century they created chemical engineer in these chemical engines used a combination of different chemicals that with van with water be able to hopefully fight fire in a more professional aspect in the city of Boston fire department itself which should once spent primarily volunteers had now a professional force of people but not really used these engines but initially drawn by horses later become motorized in this book I actually have a picture of the engine company eighteen on center street near myrtle street in nineteen oh four and three horses were required to pull that chemical agents so you can imagine the wait was probably between one point five in two towns but it was something that basically one needed because buildings were now three four stories in height sounds like a joke but that was something that was a major feature but you didn't just have chemical engines and fire engines but you also had whole could ladders now the ladders were an important feature these were things that allowed you to actually put them up to try and save people but a lot of ways these were things that revolutionized how we fought fires this thing looks so complicated this chemical engine and heavy as you mentioned I can't imagine a really ever saved a bill I can I suppose you could save the adjacent buildings by putting water on them but could you could you really put the fire out with one of these well the chemicals the chemicals were much more official focus plain water but I think in some ways they did say buildings but it was primarily in some ways to also say for people they had to realize the people in an older house might use fireplaces later of course you had kerosene stove sorry half would implode and you also had the aspect of coal furnaces what a flame and water wouldn't of glee and that was something a lot of ways the buildings would dry hours in a spark could ignite the and I think sometimes you know you look at it and you say well it's the evolution together have a fire department but in this book I try to show the police the fire department the schools as well as places of worship if you see sometimes all of these in unison along with Forest Hill cemetery Jamaica pond the Arnold arboretum that each one of them created subway is the sense of god navy let's talk to Caroline a in Hyde Park after this break and talk about some of your upcoming books WBZ talking.

Benjamin bossy Harvard College Arnold arboretum Henry Dearborn forty years twenty thirty years five years Milton
"henry dearborn" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"henry dearborn" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Day yes WBZ at two beautiful Kulish dry days partly sunny partly cloudy beautiful puffy clouds that look like lambs it's gonna be great and after I give you more details later in the night when you can really concentrate now it's hard to concentrate this was so excited that Anthony some markers with us and then a you know it's funny when you look at these two books Jamaica plain images of America the Jamaica plain that are now in a lot of ways they're very similar they have wonderful photographs many people loaned them but the concept is in some ways the chronicles the neighborhood well one of the stories that I did which actually talked about it is the introduction to the other now book and I say the Jamaica plain today is one of Boston's great suburban neighborhoods but it is not always been connected to the city the area has a rich and colourful history that stretches from its role pastoral beginnings of the seventeenth century Jamaica plain became a part of Roxbury and later west Roxbury and served as a sub a playground for influential Bostonians before becoming a part of Boston in eighteen seventy four today the neighborhood is a bustling suburban spot that is preserved its natural beauty and resources and stories abound as to how Jamaica plain derived its day some trace the to the flow of rum shipments to the port of Boston following Oliver Cromwell sees it of Jamaica in sixteen sixty but regardless of how the name came to be many agree that your medical plan is one of the loveliest areas of New England the neighborhoods beauty has been protected by such visionary says Benjamin bossy who bequeathed as a state to Harvard College for what is now the Arnold arboretum and Henry Dearborn.

America Boston Jamaica Roxbury Oliver Cromwell New England Benjamin bossy Harvard College Arnold arboretum Henry Dearborn Kulish Anthony
"henry dearborn" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

08:13 min | 1 year ago

"henry dearborn" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"At the Mitchells Markos and and we're going to focus on Boston area town in a kind of teaser other than ray program and now and anyone veil that that we're going to talk about I want to thank you for having me and we're going to speak tonight a little bit about Jamaica plain MA giveaway excellent I held in my hand the then and now Jamaica plain book is beautiful what's on the cover Anthony well it's actually center street which is now the site of JP lex and of course many of us know center street it's a thriving commercial community it has everything from boomerangs to JP elects to all sorts of different restaurants but center street was truly one of a center streets in what was then known as Roxbury Jamaica plain was the Jamaica end of Roxbury when it was annexed to Boston in eighteen seventy four when west Roxbury was an accident was a sub neighborhood of west Roxbury along with Roslindale the area itself became in some ways the street because suburb and the concept was between eighteen seventy four the time a World War one one begin to see the housing stock at your Beck a plane going the gamut from magnificent one family houses designed by a very well known architects two family houses and even three attackers and it evolved into a neighborhood in some ways that today has been reinvented as a place not only to live but as the destination so I think and sometimes into the neighborhoods of the city go through demographic shifts but Jamaica plain has become a place of choice you know I want to point out one thing that makes to make plain cool and I wish other towns would adopt is there are a lot of independent shops not a lot of chains I agree one of the concepts here is it isn't just restaurants and they really do go the gamut of Turkish restaurants tight Chinese Acapulco which is my very favorite from Mexican food but the whole idea is you're right small shops as something that normally allow you to shop locally but also to support people have children in the public schools also own property and in some ways by patronizing them in lieu of the larger chain stores that sometimes we can avoid not patronizing but these some things in some ways to truly make a community special and unique and my concept is if you can shop locally one shot so do I complain as hot a town it's a neighborhood it's a neighborhood of the city of Boston someone had to realize that when Boston became a municipality in eighteen twenty two the city itself was what is downtown Boston the north and the south and the west stand Beacon Hill and the back bay but in the period of eighteen sixty eight Roxbury would be annexed to Boston but previous to Roxbury's annexation it it already split and Roxbury which was the old town settled in sixteen thirty by the Puritans would remain an independent town but the town of west Roxbury had split away in eighteen fifty one west Roxbury that went from Jamaica plain all the way to the Dedham line was something in some ways that was more bucolic and world whereas the city of Roxbury is a devolved became more industrial and we saw normally the Stony Brook valley with numbers of beer breweries and different types of concerns that were instigated by the German immigrants we begin to see the population swelling so the annexation beginning with the city of Roxbury in eighteen sixty eight what eventually absorbed not just the town of Dorchester in eighteen seventy the city of Charles town in eighteen seventy four the town of Brighton which would include a sub neighborhood of all state in eighteen seventy four but also in eighteen seventy four the town of west Roxbury that included Jamaica plain and Roslindale so in that period we began to realize that went from really a country town into an inner city neighborhood that would evolve thanks to the municipal aspects of the city six one seven two five four ten thirty as you know in Anthony's and you're always welcome to call feel the warm embrace of J. talking especially when Anthony's on I think a lot of ways many people look at Jamaica plain as a place that is not just a bedroom community many people live there but it's also something that people go there to dine and I think in some ways when I look at it I realize how often on ago but it's also a place that was once known as the evening of America I was gonna ask you if you remember what that how they got that so Riquet well when you think of an evening you think of all these wonderful lush green spaces and gardens but of course what is Jamaica pond this wonderful area that have once been an ice cutting pond with wonderful buildings along the sides that actually allowed for the storage device during the warm season but you also have places such as Forest Hill cemetery no one doesn't always think of a cemetery as basically a place this green space but Forest Hills was the first rural arboretum cemetery to be laid out of the city of Boston the first in New England was mount Auburn which was on the Cambridge Watertown line but the idea was in eighteen forty eight Henry Dearborn who was the mayor of the city of Roxbury what actually lay out a new municipal cemetery and called Forest Hills it was something that was owned by the city until a few years later it was sold into what became known as a proprietorship or a cemetery that was owned by the people the purchase the logs today it's operated by a George Bailey a wonderful man who actually does not only the humans work as the president but a wonderful staff and the grounds keeping crew of that keep Forest Hill cemetery is the true arboretum cemetery and with over two hundred acres of cultivated land yes it is a cemetery but it also has like a biscuit from the center with swan's docks magnificent shade trees Arbor VD dogwoods all sorts of Conor furs and it actually allows in some ways for people to commune with nature so when Jamaica plain got the wonderful connotation of the eating of America yet to realize they were part of the emerald necklace it connected not only the Boston common and the outlay of the Commonwealth Avenue ball it would go out through the Fenway and then to Jamaica plain so Frederick Law Olmsted and later Olmsted Olmsted Eliot which was the successor firm to Frederick Law Olmsted would maintain this aspect of green space right through Jamaica plain that would eventually continue on which was rude to three but also we'd see in some ways along Columbia road in Dorchester that with that connect to marine park in South Boston the emerald necklace was the major feature of fact green space and as the eating of America Jamaica plain was fully vetted as the place that had the wonderful suburban aspects but was a neighborhood of the city of Boston at six one seven two five four ten thirty as always welcome to call in and chat about Jamaica plain give any connection to Jamaica plain any any questions about it if probably been there certainly I want to ask and today about some of these photos like the photo of the elevated Boston elevator elevated railway and maybe actually gets a restaurant tips for the Jamaica plain area and anything you want to talk about we got in Jamaica plain at this point will be welcome six one seven two five four ten thirty is WBZ I.

Mitchells Markos Boston eighteen forty eight Henry two hundred acres
"henry dearborn" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

11:48 min | 1 year ago

"henry dearborn" Discussed on KGO 810

"I'm John about so this is the John Batchelor show great fun with Jim Lacey to go through history so quickly on the basis of battles that become parts of the stories that determine the map we live on and also the opinions the prejudices the memories of whole political organizations today here in the twenty first century certainly the battle of Hastings this is William the conqueror who is related generally to everyone else in the area because there's lots of crossing back and forth between brides and ambitious princes in the tenth and eleventh century but ten sixty six is a date that's burned in the minds of all school children who passed through London's private and public schools and we've remembered it as well because there's a beautiful tapestry in bio in France that pictures this battle ten sixty six and what's important to me from Jim's book is that there is a crisis moment in the battle of Hastings when William has to take control of the battlefield I'm reminded Jim of that their crisis moments in all battles when you can say here's the weakness and here's the moment if it doesn't happen it turns around this is the moment when we recognizes the danger to his line and he sees that there's a rumor sweeping the battle field this is fog of battle without gunfire talk about that he's dead and so he has to ride to the front and can we confirm that that's the moment his troops started to rally again yes quite obviously the moment they start to rrod caused a word it is one flight crews already breaking the able was about to follow it when the army of that era lost its leader that was almost always the kiss of death the the cohesion of that organization sought to break down they would start to retreat of press they would be routed in that would be the the end of it Hugh he read he wrote right to the front right to the middle of me let took off his helmet a very very dangerous thing to do in a medieval battle sort it all these troops could see that it was him and that he was alive he's very distinctive to look upon big man probably reddish hair so everyone could see him and that was it and they would wrap deal de de de the emotional impact of seeing you great wall leader on a large warhorse we were you for was dead suddenly in the midst of the battle and swinging his sword in all directions and yelling for support just can't be under estimated and knock on that type of in that kind of battlefield or dies medieval environment it would have been a decisive factor in rallying his forces the same time the Saxons who forty winning would have become disorganized in the pursuit their leadership would have been trying to catch up with the troops and it is the perfect moment to counterattack all you need is a leader who could see what no leader could organize his forces quickly to take advantage of it William was both of those we'll find that again in the battle of Saratoga and of which were coming to but first the other side of this battle is that later on in the day after the counter attack Herald who is the opponent to weigh him leading the Saxons is also on the battle field with his helmet on and arrows are flying all over and it's his death that breaks the Saxon army and overwhelms England with the calm of the Norman conquest and the picture on the bio tapestry has an arrow in his side we believe that's a fact Jim we don't know yeah I think most historians now say or say yes interesting to do a tapestry is just a wonderful document and if you go to day it's war if the war were visiting it's a beautiful museum and it's well laid out well explained unfortunately the bay tapestry is going through a lot of wear and tear over the years it during the Napoleonic era it was rediscovered as a toppling over artillery shells on a wagon which is being used as a covering cough and tremendous amount of damage was done to it we have a G. roaring of the day tapestry for the nineteenth century somebody copied it all down and that arrow in the eye is not there Roberts a spear being thrown by Harold and we believe some but there's a good up chance of somebody you reconstructed the bay tapestry in the preservation techniques put that are India I based on some of our stories and there's lots of stories about the battle of Hastings some reputable some not reputable we don't know who wrote some of them we don't know what years they were written the fact of the matter is Harold was killed so with two of his brothers of the senior leadership was wiped out and from that point on it was only a matter of time into the socks and force was defeated most of the Saxons would have melted away except for what they called the house calls which is for lack of a better Dicks description the the body guards of the senior officers like Carol they were surrounded dead dead dead dead leader and for two deaths which you know it has its good points but has a tremendous bed point does your most disciplined and battle ready soldiers and losing the meant that there was no chance for the Saxons to regroup and reform and create a new army to come back and have William at a later date me William when the dollar store to conquer England had there been a quorum nuclear's of fighting soldiers to build a resistance around it would have been a much more difficult job battle of Breitenfeld this is very little known bought a gym and Williams and pick it out because it's the transformation of battlefield fire power what wins is fire power now we're into the second half of the second millennium and gun powders on the battlefield there is an innovator he is the king of Sweden Gustav us all dolphins and we'll spend less time on the politics of Breitenfeld and more to emphasize that at this point there was a Spanish there was a Spanish battle a concept called the tear CO I and that was musketeers surrounded by Pikmin and they fought in one great big steam roller jam in Williamson describes it the Pikmin protect the will of the musketeers as they rearm but they also limit their fire power fifteen hundred sometimes three thousand sometimes fifteen hundred and that conquers everything in its way especially if you're fighting mobs and that's true for the count of Chile who is fighting for the Catholics this is during the counter reformation wars the mid seventeenth century however here comes first office of dolphins and what I want empathize here is that he seems to have introduced the concept of mixed arms Calvary infantry muskets and at the same time artillery and Jim what I take is that he invented light artillery can I say that that he's the one that bottom part copied in the ad nineteen century well yeah it's it's relatively safe to say he's the they they may have had lied a Tory different places but he was the first one to create a doctrine of having me autori mobile and dancing with the combat formations as they advance instead of sitting on a hill and support them a deep between the Calvary went forward territory came forward from to provide immediate fire support all of that is coming out of the changes in the the brilliant doctrinal advancements and the creation of staffs that they do on a professional people were professional bureaucracies I'm this carries over into future centuries it's not so much that we may better cannons that allowed the Europeans to conquer the world it was better organization of the military forces the staffs ability to maneuver on the battlefield bird firepower to bear at any point they wanted all this grows out of the changes can stop the savopoulos made in first unveiled on the European battlefield that at Brighton felt let's go forward to the eighteenth century this is the battle of Saratoga which is actually a combination battle of Bennington in Saratoga September October seventeen seventy seven the plan is a very good general respected buys man is name is bar going gentleman Johnny who's also play right and they're wonderful quotes of his idea of how do inspires troops by being you'd have to say floored with his language many that he's to March down from Canada what is now Canada while how it New York is to March up and split New England half which is the plan will see in the civil war split the enemy and half how doesn't get the message bad communication how moves on Philadelphia that's another story to do with what Washington bought we're going pushes on and he's facing gates and Arnold and what I take from this is that Arnold is by far the more gifted commander comparable to William on the battlefield he sees the I understand he has a sense of his men and this is the one battle I think that the Continental Army ever one they lost everything else in retreat but they outlasted the lobster backs the British shore now following all of those lessons we had from the seventeenth century uniforms all of one cover a color great fire discipline no backing off a veteran soldiers and they're up against a mixed mob of continental soldiers farmers and then there's Daniel Morgan's Virginia riflemen and Henry Dearborn's lights and on the critical battle field at Saratoga your sense Jim how Dearborn and Morgan behave when they hit the what they flanked the British are they working on anybody's orders are they feeling the battlefield is there anyone directing them that way they did cut in general direction but they haven't gotten specifics gates is in commanding gates is a inferior battle till commanded with the lead a much much better hired person of his own abilities and was actually the case he was also a former British offices server fig going insane battalion a same regiment three decades before this event you don't have a lot of respect for the Continentals and Morgan's riflemen then the of allied forces might specially mortgage right from them when they arrived it would decisive in a number where it was we're going for started out he has a tremendous intelligence advantages Indians the colonists didn't have a waste of the militia did not have a way of fighting those Indians Adam but indeed troubles not part of frontier in decades and they've lost the skills were Morgan's riflemen who had tremendous amount of experience before the war fighting Indians arrived to try to suddenly turn the Indians found that they were up against light forces you to kill a particular delight and stalking Indians a matter of fact and most Burgoyne's Indians evaporated they went home they were going to put up with this from that moment on the intelligence decisive intelligence advantage switch to the Continentals the Americans forces on the battlefield could see and knew everything but going did amber going was blind and that's it and it it would stir slice intelligence advantage that led to the final defeat of Burgoyne's force note here Arnold he's as gifted on the battlefield as William is that a fair judgment only the best battlefield commitment you maybe George Washington has something to say and I put on a would probably be my estimation the best battlefield commander of the revolution have you not turn traitor he would be in the pantheon of great American heroes of and probably up there in the.

John Batchelor Jim Lacey Hastings nineteen century three decades
"henry dearborn" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

12:00 min | 1 year ago

"henry dearborn" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Organizations today here in the twenty first century certainly the battle of Hastings this is William the conqueror who is related generally to everyone else in the area because there's lots of crossing back and forth between brides and ambitious princes in the tenth and eleventh century but ten sixty six is a date that's burned in the minds of all school children who passed through London's private and public schools and we've remembered it as well because there's a beautiful tapestry and by the way in France that pictures this battle ten sixty six and what's important to me from Jim's books is that there is a crisis moment in the battle of Hastings when William has to take control of the battlefield I'm reminded Jim of that their crisis moments in all battles when you can say here's the weakness and here's the moment if it doesn't happen it turns around this is the moment when William recognizes the danger to his line and he sees that there's a rumor sweeping the battle field this is fog of battle without gunfire **** about that he's dead and so he has to ride to the front and can we confirm that that's the moment his troops started to rally again yes quite obviously the moment they start to rrod because they were this is one flight crews already breaking the able was about to follow it when in the army of that era lost its leader that was almost always the kiss of death the the cohesion of that organization sought to break down they would start to retreat of press they would be routed in that would be the end of it he he read he wrote right to the front right to the middle of me let took off his helmet a very very dangerous thing to do in a medieval battle so did all these troops could see that it was him and that he was alive use very distinctive to look upon big man probably reddish hair so everyone could see him and that was it and they would wrap deal Dee Dee Dee the emotional impact of seeing you great wall leader on a large workforce we were you for was dead suddenly in the midst of the battle with swinging his sword in all directions and yelling for support just can't be on the estimated and act on that type of in that kind of battlefield or dies that medieval environment it would have been a decisive factor in rallying his forces the same time the Saxons who forty winning would have become disorganized in the pursuit their leadership would have been trying to catch up with the troops and it is the perfect moment to counterattack all you need is a leader who could see no leader could organize his forces quickly to take advantage of it William was both of those we'll find that again in the battle of Saratoga and which were coming to but first the other side of this battle is that later on in the day after the counter attack Harold who is the opponent to weigh him leading the Saxons is also on the battle field with his helmet on and arrows are flying all over and it's his death that breaks the Saxon army and overwhelms England with the calm of the Norman conquest and the picture in the bio tapestry has an arrow in his side we believe that's a fact Jim we don't know yes I think most historians now say or say yes it's very interesting the tapestry is just a wonderful document and if you go today it's war the war were visiting it's a beautiful museum and it's well laid out well explained unfortunately the bay tapestry is going through a lot of wear and tear over the years it during the Napoleonic era it was rediscovered as it toppling over artillery shells on a wagon which is being used as a covering cough and tremendous not to damage was done to it we have a G. roaring of the day tapestry for the nineteenth century somebody copied it all down and that arrow in your eye is not dead Roberts a spear being thrown by Harold and we believe some but there's a good up chance of somebody you reconstructed the bay tapestry in the prison techniques put that are a windy I based on some of our stories and there's lots of stories about about facing some reputable some not reputable we don't know who wrote some of them we don't know what years they were written the fact of the matter is Harold was killed so with two of his brothers of the senior leadership was wiped out and from that point on it was only a matter of time into the socks and force was defeated most of the sections would have melted away except for what they called the house calls which is for lack of a better Dicks description the the body guards of the senior officers like Carol they would've surrounded it dead Jeff dead dead leader and for two deaths which you know it has its good points but has a tremendous step point does your most disciplined and battle ready soldiers and losing the man that there was no chance for the Saxons to regroup and reform and create a new want me to come back and have William at a later date we William one about we store to conquer England had that been a cool new keyless of fighting soldiers to build a resistance around it would have been a much more difficult job battle of Breitenfeld this is very little known by a jam and Williams and pick it out because it's the transformation of battlefield fire power what wins this fire power now we're into the second half of the second millennium and gun powders on the battlefield there is an innovator he is the king of Sweden Gustav us all of the office and we'll spend less time on the politics of Breitenfeld and more to emphasize that at this point there was a Spanish there was a Spanish battle a concept called the tercio I and that was musketeers surrounded by Pikmin and they fought in one great big steam roller jam in Williamson describes it the Pikmin protect the with the musketeers as they rearm but they also limit their fire power fifteen hundred sometimes three thousand sometimes fifteen hundred and that conquers everything in its way especially if you're fighting mobs and that's true for the count of Chile who is fighting for the Catholics this is during the counter reformation wars the mid seventeen th century however here comes the stuff is a dolphins and what I want empathize here is that he seems to have introduced the concept of mixed arms Calvary infantry muskets and at the same time artillery and Jim what I take is that he invented light artillery can I say that that he's the one that bottom part copied in the ad nineteen century wow yeah it's it's relatively safe to say he's the they they may have had light artillery different places but use the first one to create a doctrine of having the artillery mobile and dancing with the combat formations as they advance instead of sitting on a hill and support them as if the tree the Calvary went forward territory came forward from to provide immediate fire support all of that is coming out of the changes in the brilliant doctrinal advancements and the creation of staffs that do you own professional people were professional bureaucracies and this carries over into future centuries it's not so much that we may better cannons that allowed the Europeans to conquer the world it was better organization of the military forces their staffs their ability to maneuver on the battlefield to bring firepower to bear at any point they wanted all this grows out of the changes could stop the stop was made in first unveiled on the European battlefield that I Breitenfeld let's go forward to the eighteenth century this is the battle of Saratoga which is actually a combination battle of Bennington in Saratoga September October a seventeen seventy seven the plan is a very good general respected buys man is name is Burke going gentleman Johnny was also play right and they're wonderful quotes of his idea of how do inspires troops by being you'd have to say floored with his language in any event he's to March down from Canada what is now Canada while how it in York is to March up and split New England in half which is the plan will see in the civil war split the enemy and half how doesn't get the message bad communication how moves on Philadelphia that's another story to do with what a Washington bought we're going pushes on and he's facing gates and Arnold and what I take from this is that Arnold is by far the more gifted commander comparable to a William on the battlefield he sees he understands he has a sense of his men and this is the one battle I think that the Continental Army ever one they lost everything else in retreat but they outlasted the lobster backs the British shore now following all of those lessons we had from the seventeenth century uniforms all of one cover a color great fire discipline no backing off a veteran soldiers and they're up against a mixed mob of continental soldiers farmers and then there's Daniel Morgan's Virginia riflemen and Henry Dearborn's lights and on the critical battle field at Saratoga your sense Jim how Dearborn and Morgan behave when they hit the what they flanked the British are they working on anybody's orders are they feeling the battlefield is there anyone directing them that way they did cut in general direction but they haven't gotten specifics gates is in commanding gates is a in theory about until commanded with lead to a much much better hired person of his own abilities and was actually the case you is also former British officer with the going to the same battalion a same regiment three decades before this event you don't have a lot of respect for the Continentals Morgan's riflemen then the other allied forces with specially mortgage right from them when they arrive to would decisive in a number when it was one per quarter started out he has a tremendous intelligence advantages Indians colonists didn't have a way of demolition did not have a way of fighting those Indians Adam but indeed troubles not part of frontier in decades and they both the skills when Morgan's riflemen who have tremendous amount of experience before the war fighting Indians arrived to try to suddenly turn the Indians found that they were up against light forces you to keep a particular delight and stalking Indians a matter of fact and most Burgoyne's Indians evaporated they went home they were going to put up with this from that moment on the intelligence decisive intelligence advantage switch to the Continentals the Americans forces on the battlefield could see and knew everything we're going did amber going was blind and that's it and it it was decisive intelligence advantage that led to the final defeat of Burgoyne's force note here Arnold he's as gifted on the battlefield as William is that a fair judgment only the best battlefield commitment you maybe George Washington as something to send out but on a would probably be my estimation the best battlefield commander of the revolution had he not turn traitor he would be in the past three and a great American heroes and probably up there in the top five all time great American heroes in each case it basically gates takes credit for most of Arnold's achievements during the war it sets on old that ms love affair in Philadelphia for a Tory woman that these two events interacting and said all along the path of Futch treason he's he's disgruntled these are getting their credit he received he expects to get and he's back at the command expects to get out of your.

Hastings William nineteen century three decades
"henry dearborn" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

12:12 min | 1 year ago

"henry dearborn" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"I'm John dot so this is the John Batchelor show great fun with Jim Lacey to go through history so quickly on the basis of battles that become parts of the stories that determine the map we live on and also the opinions the prejudices the memories of whole political organizations today here in the twenty first century certainly the battle of Hastings this is William the conqueror who is related generally to everyone else in the area because there's lots of crossing back and forth between brides and ambitious princes in the tenth and eleventh century but ten sixty six is a date that's burned in the minds of all school children who passed through London's private and public schools and we've remembered it as well because there's a beautiful tapestry in bio in France that pictures this battle ten sixty six and what's important to me from Jim's books is that there is a crisis moment in the battle of Hastings when William has to take control of the battlefield I'm reminded Jim of that their crisis moments in all battles when you can say here's the weakness and here's the moment if it doesn't happen it turns around this is the moment when William recognizes the danger to his line and he sees that there's a rumor sweeping the battle field this is fog of battle without gunfire **** about that he's dead and so he has to ride to the front and can we confirm that that's the moment his troops started to rally again yes quite obviously the moment they start to rrod because they were it is one flight crews already breaking the able was about to follow it when in the army of that era lost its leader that was almost always the Kisah dusty the cohesion of that organization sought to break down they start to retreat of press they would be routed in that would be the the end of it he he where he wrote right to the front right to the middle of me like took off his helmet a very very dangerous thing to do in a medieval battle so did all these troops could see that it was him and that he was alive use very distinctive to look upon big man probably reddish hair so everyone could see him and that was it and they would Raffaele de de de the emotional impact of seeing you great wall leader on a large warhorse we you for was dead suddenly in the midst of the battle would swinging his sword in all directions and yelling for support just can't be on the estimated and act on that type of in that kind of battlefield or back to that medieval environment it would have been a decisive factor in rallying his forces the same time the Saxons who forty winning would have become disorganized in the pursuit their leadership would have been trying to catch up with troops and it is the perfect moment to counterattack all you need is a leader who could see what no leader could organize his forces quickly to take advantage of it William was both of those we'll find that again in the battle of Saratoga and which were coming to but first the other side of this battle is that later on in the day after the counter attack Herald who is the opponent to William leading the Saxons is also on the battle field with his helmet on and arrows are flying all over and it's his death that breaks the Saxon army and overwhelms England with the call of the Norman conquest and the picture on the bio tapestry has an arrow in his side we believe that's a fact Jim we don't know yeah I think most historians now say or say yes interesting the tapestry is just a wonderful document and if you go to day which war the war were visiting it's a beautiful museum and it's well laid out well explained unfortunately the bay tapestry is going through a lot of wear and tear over the years it during the Napoleonic era it was rediscovered as the toppling over artillery shells on a wagon which is being used as a covering cough and a tremendous amount of damage was done to it we have a G. roaring of the day tapestry for the nineteenth century somebody copied it all down and that arrow in the army is not dead Roberts a spear being thrown by Harold and we believe some but there's a good up chance of somebody you reconstructed the bay tapestry in the preservation techniques put that are a windy I based on some of our stories and then there's lots of stories about about facing some reputable some not reputable we don't know who wrote some of them we don't know what years they were written the fact of the matter is Harold was killed so with two of his brothers of the senior leadership was wiped out and from that point on it was only a matter of time into the socks and force was defeated most of the sections would have melted away except for what they called the house calls which is for lack of a better Dicks description the the body guards of the senior officers like Carol they would've surrounded the dead dead dead leader and for to the death which you know it has its good points but has a tremendous debt point does your most disciplined and battle ready soldiers and losing the meant that there was no chance for the Saxons to regroup and reform and create a new want me to come back and have William at a later date the William one about we store to conquer England had that been a core nuclear so fighting soldiers to build a resistance around it would have been a much more difficult job battle of Breitenfeld this is very little known buy a jam and Williams and pick it out because it's the transformation of battlefield fire power what wins this fire power now we're into the second half of the second millennium and gun powders on the battlefield there is an innovator he is the king of Sweden Gustav us all dolphins and we'll spend less time on the politics of Breitenfeld and more to emphasize that at this point there was a Spanish there was a Spanish battle a concept called the CO I and that was musketeers surrounded by Pikmin and they fought in one great big steam roller jam in Williamson describes it the Pikmin protect the will of the musketeers as they rearm but they also limit their fire power fifteen hundred sometimes three thousand sometimes fifteen hundred and that conquers everything in its way especially if you're fighting mobs and that's true for the count of Tilly who is fighting for the Catholics this is during the counter reformation wars the mid seventeenth century however here comes ghost office of dolphins and what I want emphasize here is that he seems to have introduced the concept of mixed arms Calvary infantry muskets and at the same time artillery and Jim what I take is that he invented light artillery can I say that that he's the one that bottom part copied in the ad nineteen century while yeah I've it's it's relatively safe to say he's the they they may have had lied a Tory different places but he was the first one to create a doctrine of having me out Tory mobile and dancing with the combat formations as they advance instead of sitting on a hill and support them as you between the Calvary went forward territory came forward from to provide immediate fire support all of that is coming out of the changes in the brilliant doctrinal advancements and the creation of staffs that did you on a professional people were professional bureaucracies I'm this carries over into future centuries it's not so much that we may better cannons that allowed the Europeans to conquer the world it was better organization of the military forces their staffs their ability to maneuver on the battlefield to bring firepower to bear at any point they wanted all this grows out of the changes to stop the savopoulos made in first unveiled on the European battlefield that at Brighton filled let's go forward to the eighteenth century this is the battle of Saratoga which is actually a combination battle of Bennington in Saratoga September October seventeen seventy seven the plan a is a very good general respected buys man is name is Burt going gentleman Johnny who's also play right in that wonderful quotes of his idea of how do inspires troops by being you'd have to say floored with his language any of that he's to March down from Canada what is now Canada while how it New York is to March up and split doing live in half which is the plan will see in the civil war split the enemy and half how doesn't get the message bad communication how moves on Philadelphia that's another story to do with what Washington bought we're going pushes on and he's facing gates and Arnold and what I take from this is that Arnold is by far the more gifted commander comparable to William on the battlefield he sees I understand he has a sense of his men and this is the one battle I think that the Continental Army ever one they lost everything else in retreat but they outlasted the lobster backs the British shore now following all of those lessons we had from the seventeenth century uniforms all of one cover a color great fire discipline no backing off a veteran soldiers and they're up against a mixed mob of continental soldiers farmers and then there's Daniel Morgan's Virginia riflemen and Henry Dearborn's lights and on the critical battle field Saratoga your sense Jim how Dearborn and Morgan behave when they hit the what they flanked the British are they working under anybody's orders are they feeling the battlefield is there anyone directing them that way they did gotten general direction but they haven't gotten specifics gates is in commanding gates is a interior battle took command did with the lead to a much much better higher impression of his own abilities them was actually the case he was also a former British offices server fig going insane battalion a same regiment three decades before this event you don't have a lot of respect for the Continentals and Morgan's riflemen then the of allied forces with specially mortgage right from them when they arrived it would decisive in a number where it was Wilbur going first on that he has a tremendous intelligence advantages Indians the colonists didn't have a waste of the militia did not have a way of fighting those Indians added that indeed troubles not part of frontier in decades and they've lost a skills when Morgan's riflemen who have tremendous amount of experience before the war fighting Indians arrived to try to suddenly turn the Indians found that they were up against light forces you to cure particular delight and stalking Indians a matter of fact and most Burgoyne's Indians evaporated they went home they were going to put up with this from that moment on the intelligence decisive intelligence advantage switch to the continental Steve Americans forces on the battlefield could see and knew everything but going did amber going was blind and that's it and it it was decisive intelligence advantage that led to the final defeat of Burgoyne's force a note here Arnold he's as gifted on the battlefield as William is that a fair judgment only the best battlefield commitment you maybe George Washington as something to send out but on a would probably be my estimation the best battlefield commander of the revolution have you not turn traitor he would be in the pantheon of great American heroes of and probably up there in the top five all time great American heroes in its base it basically gates takes credit for most of Arnold's achievements during the war it sets on old that ms love affair in Philadelphia for a Tory woman that these two events interacting and said all along the path of of which treason he's he's disgruntled these are getting their credit.

John Batchelor Jim Lacey Hastings John dot nineteen century three decades
"henry dearborn" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"henry dearborn" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Two hundred eight four seventy co texts in person road is named after general person Pershing and Elston was set up as a bypass for Milwaukee avenue. Yeah. The old angled streets. Yep. Fun. Yeah. Yeah. We use those shortcuts. So. Let's see back to Clark. Now, you here we this major thoroughfare was named after George Rogers Clark revolutionary war general who led the Illinois campaign and notched victories over multiple British strongholds throughout the area. The street was named after the general in eighteen thirty three before that he was known as Green Bay road because it went north all the way to Green Bay, Wisconsin. Really what we can you still do that? I don't think. So if only. Along the green Clark. Clark straight degreen bay. Wisconsin Palo is gonna take you about today's. Yeah. See then. Clinton street. Clinton street honors de Witt Clinton, the nineteenth century, mayor of New York who was responsible for the Erie canal a project that hugely aided the commercial growth of Chicago. Clinton. Guess we'll you in New York de Witt Clinton. Clyborn? Which by the way, I think if this if this is true, I think clyborn is misspelled. A couple of times on street corners, like I think at one I think at one point there's a sign that has an e at the end of it. And there's another one that like is missing the you. I think there's I think there are certain street signs that have been replaced over the years where they've actually misspelled clyborn. Really? Yeah. I'm almost positive of that. I I remember that story from from a while. Maybe I heard it on Schwartz this show. Sure. The avenue takes its name from early Chicago settler Archibald clyborn. We're names better in the past than they are now because you look at this guy DeWitt Clinton who Archibald clyborn makes you wonder what you know, your name might have been eighteen hundreds knows he built the first slaughterhouse in Chicago slaughterhouses in the windy city became a dominant industry and would later earned infamy Upton Upton Sinclair's set his novel the jungle in one sparking a movement in favor of increased oversight for food processing ever read the jungle. Yeah. I am not a vegetarian or vegan by any stretch. But back I'll be close. It made me sick to my stomach. Yeah. Clyborn also served as Chicago's first constable. He was appointed in that position in eighteen twenty five. Constable and clyborn another angled street. So about Damon. David avenue. Honors Catholic priest father Arnold Damon who was born in Holland in eighteen fifteen after studying in Saint Louis, he moved to Chicago eighteen fifty seven and founded, Holy Family, church and state Ignatius high school. Diagne eighteen ninety nineteen twenty seven. What was then called Robie street was renamed for him. Roby? As in Margot Robie. Why that's not how she spells her name isn't. No, I think she's our e. So Damon father Arnold Damon? Dearborn. This one was obvious, right? Self explanatory. Dearborn shares the name within your by fort Dearborn. Demolished in eighteen fifty seven both so-called to on a revolutionary hero. General Henry Dearborn. And for the site of Dearborn not far from here. Not far from here at all right at the corner. Yeah. Right at the corner. There is weird to think that like because that would have been on the shoreline almost at the time or no, no, no just on the river. Yeah. Right on the river. Yeah. But yeah, I mean, you can see you could see it's in the sidewalk. The site of your born. They've got the statue. Right down right down the street. Can you imagine still having the fourth there? Yeah. Diversey avenue slash Parkway. Another angled street. This took its name from Michael diversity, a prominent German board, Chicago businessman in the nineteenth century, he owned the prosperous diversity. And Lil brewing company. Which was the largest American brewery outside of New York until it was burned down in the great, Chicago fire. Eight hundred seventy one business never returned. Diversity also helped with the creation of the Saint Michel Catholic church which sits on landed. He donated to the diocese in eighteen fifty two. Unlike his brewery, the church still stands to this day. Brewery. So that's diversity comes from. At least one hundred more popped up in its place. We mean, bars bars breeze. A bar like on every corner in Chicago seriously. There's a there's a tavern on every other every other black. I think that's why my family when they come across from the UK, they feel so at home. Lot of drinking establishments in the city. Yes, sir. When I was a drinker, I went to all of them. No, not all, but I went to many so. All right. We're gonna break here. We got the news coming up after the news more stories behind the naming of streets here in Chicago. And if you want to jump in its three one two nine eight one seven two hundred news is up after this Steve.

Chicago DeWitt Clinton Arnold Damon Archibald clyborn Michael diversity George Rogers Clark New York Henry Dearborn Saint Michel Catholic church Margot Robie Green Bay Dearborn fort Dearborn Upton Upton Sinclair Pershing Wisconsin Palo Wisconsin Constable Illinois degreen bay
"henry dearborn" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

12:44 min | 2 years ago

"henry dearborn" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Political organizations today here in the twenty first century, certainly the battle of Hastings. This is William the conqueror who is related generally to everyone else in the area because there's lots of crossing back and forth between brides and ambitious princes in the tent at eleven century. But ten sixty six is a date. That's burned into the minds of all school children who pass through London's Bryant and public schools, and we've remembered it as well because there's a beautiful tapestry in bio in France that pictures this battle ten sixty six and what's important to me from Jim's book is that there's a crisis moment in the back. Battle of Hastings when we has to take control of the battlefield. I'm reminded. Jim other there crisis moments in all battles when you can say, here's the weakness. And here's the moment. If it doesn't happen. It turns around this is the moment when William recognizes the danger to his line, and he sees that. There's a rumor sweeping the battlefield this is fog of battle without gunfire fog about that. He's dead. And so he has to ride to the front, and can we confirm that that's the moment. His troops started to rally again. Yeah. It's quite obviously to moment. They start derived because they were one was already breaking. And the other one was about the follow it when I army of that era lawsuit leader that was almost always the case a death de the cohesion of that organization would start to breakdown they start to retreat, if press they would be routed, and that would be the end of it. He he he wrote right to the front. Right into the middle took off his helmet. He's very very dangerous thing to do in a medieval battle. So did all these troops could see that it was him. And that he was alive. He's very distinctive to look upon big man, probably reddish hair. So everyone could see him. And that was it. And they would you know, the the emotional impact of seeing your great wall leader on a large warhorse were you fought was dead. Suddenly in the midst of the battle swinging your sword in all directions and yelling support just can't be under estimated in on that type of in that kind of battlefield that medieval environment. It would have been a decisive factor in rallying his forces the same time, the Saxons who they were winning would have become disorganized in the pursuit daily leadership would have been trying to catch up with troops. And. The perfect moments to counterattack. All you need is a leader. Who could see it in the leader could organize forces quickly to take advantage of it. And William was both of those. We'll find that again in the battle of Saratoga and which were coming too. But I the other side of this battle is that later on in the day after the counterattack herald who is the opponent to William leading the Saxons is also on the battlefield with his helmet on and arrows are flying all over, and it's his death that breaks the Saxon army and overwhelms England with the Norman conquest and the picture on the bio tapestry has an arrow in his I do we believe that's a fact Jim we don't know yet. I think most historians now say say, yes. It's very interesting to bail tapestry is just a wonderful document. And if you go to bay, oh, whoa. It's well worth visiting. It's a beautiful museum and its well laid out in Wilkes plane. Unfortunately, the Deo tapestry is gone through a lot of wear and tear over the years during the Napoleonic era was rediscovered as it kopplin over artillery shells on a wagon was just being used as a covering cloth. And a tremendous amount of damage was done to it. We have a drawing of the oh tapestry from the nineteenth century somebody copied it all down and that our win. The I is not there Roberts spear being from by Harold, and we believe somebody. There's a good chance that somebody who reconstructed bay. Oh, tapestry in the preservation techniques, put that arrow in the eye based on some stories, and there's lots of stories about the battle of Hastings some reputable, some not reputable, we don't know who wrote some of them. We don't know what years they were written. The fact of the matter is Harold was killed and so two of his brothers senior leadership was wiped out and. From that point on. It was only a matter of time into the Saxon force was defeated. Most of the Saxons would have melted away except for what they call the house calls, which is for lack of a better description. The the bodyguards of the senior officers like Harold, they would've surrounded a dead. Dead leader and fought to the death, which has its good points. But as a tremendous bad point does most disciplined battle ready soldiers and losing the meant that there was no chance for the Saxons to regroup and reform and create a new army that could come back at William at a later date. William we still had to conquer England had been a core nucleus of fighting soldiers to build a resistance around. It would have been a much more difficult job battle of Brighton foul. This is very little known. But a gym and Williamson pick it out because it's a transformation of battlefield firepower. What wins is firepower? Now, we're into the second half of the second millennium and gunpowder is on the battlefield. There is an innovator. He is the king of Sweden Gustavus Adolphus, and we'll spend less time on the politics of Brighton. Fouled and more to emphasize that at this point. There was a Spanish. There was a Spanish battle a concept called the test CEO. And that was musketeers surrounded by pike men, and they fought in one great big steamroller Jim in Williamson describes it the pike men. Protect the musketeers as they rearm, but they also limit their firepower fifteen hundred sometimes three thousand sometimes fifteen hundred and that conquers everything in its way, especially if you're fighting mobs, and that's true for the count of Tilly who is fighting for the Catholics. This is during the counter reformation wars in the mid seventeenth century. However here comes Gustavus Adolphus. And what I what infra size here is that he seems to have introduced the concept of mixed arms, cavalry infantry muskets, and at the same time artillery, and Jim what I take is that he invented light artillery. Can I say that? And he's the one that Bonaparte copied in the nineteenth century. Wow. Yeah. I I it's it's relatively safe to say, he's the they may have had light artillery in different places. But he was the first one to create a doctrine of having me artillery mobile a dancing with the combat formations as they advanced instead of sitting on a hill and supporting them as between the cavalry went forward territory came forward with them to provide immediate fire support all of that is coming out of the changes in the the brilliant doctrinal advancements. And the creation of staffs that do on professional people were professional bureaucracies. I'm this carries over into future centuries. It's not so much that we made better canons that allowed Europeans to conquer the world. It was better organization of military. Forces their staffs their ability to maneuver on the battlefield to bring firepower to bear in any point. They wanted all this grows out of the changes Gustavus adopted Lewis made and I on bailed on European battlefield that at Brighton failed. Let's go forward to the eighteen th century. This is the battle of Saratoga, which is actually a combination battle of Bennington and Saratoga September, October seventeen seventy seven the plan is a very good general respected by his man. His name is Burgoyne gentleman. Johnny who was also a playwright in. They're wonderful quotes of his idea of how to inspire his troops by being you'd have to say floored with his language in any of that he's to March down from Canada. What is now Canada while how New York has to March up and split New England and half. Which is the plan will see in. The civil war split the enemy in half. How doesn't get the message bad communication? How moves on Philadelphia? That's another story to do with Washington, but Burgoyne pushes on and he's facing gates and Arnold. And what I take from. This is that Arnold is by far the more gifted commander comparable to William on the battlefield. He sees. He understands he has a sense of his men, and this is the one battle. I think that the continental army ever one. They lost everything else in retreat, but they outlasted they lobster backs the British or now following all of those lessons. We had from the seventeenth century uniforms all of one cover color. Great fire discipline? No backing off a veteran soldiers and they're up against mixed mob of continental soldiers farmers. And then there's Daniel Morgan's Virginia riflemen and Henry Dearborn lights and on the critical. Battlefield at Saratoga. Your sense. Jim how Dearborn and more? Organ behave when they hit the flank the British are they working on her anybody's orders. Are they feeling the battlefield is there? Anyone directing them that way they'd gotten general direction, but they haven't gotten specific skates is in command engages in theory. Battlefield commanded with who had a much higher impression of his own abilities than was actually the case. He was also a former British Walker serve going in the same battalion same regiment free decades before this event, you didn't have a lot of respect for the continentals Morgan's riflemen than the other light forces, especially Morgan's riflemen when they arrived. They would decisive in another way was when going study out he had a tremendous intelligence advantages Indians, the colonists didn't have a way of the militia did not have a way of fighting those Indians and Indian troubles in that part of the frontier decades, and they've lost the skills when Morgan's riflemen who had tremend-. Lendus amounts of experience before the war fighting Indians arrived at tied to suddenly turn Indians found that they were up against light forces. You took your particular delight and stalking Indians. A matter of fact and most of Burgoyne Indians evaporated they went home they weren't gonna put up with this. And from that moment, dawn. The intelligence decisive intelligence advantage, which to the continental Steve Americans forces on the battlefield could see a new everything Burgoyne did and Burgoyne was blind. And that's I and it was decisive intelligence advantage that led to final defeat of Burgoyne force note here Arnold. He's as gifted on the battlefield as William is that fair judgement. The best battlefield commitment. Maybe George Washington has something to say on that. But on would probably be my estimation. The best battlefield commander of the revolution. Had he not turned traitor. He would be in the pantheon of great American heroes and probably up there in the top five all time, great American heroes. And it's based basically gates takes. Credit for most of Arnold's achievements. During the war sits on old data and his love affair and Philadelphia for Tori woman that these two events interacting and said on on on the path of of treason. He's he's disgruntled these not getting credit he expects to get and I command you expects to get a feel performance. Obviously tells the many people that he deserves better. And when he doesn't get it. He switches sides battle the twenty clashes the change the world, James Lacey. Williamson Murray next we'll turn to the twentieth century and two battles that changed the map of the world. That's of course, midway and Normandy. I'm John Batchelor. This is the John Batchelor show. Valance of nature's fruit and veggies capsules contain one hundred percent, vine ripened fruits and vegetables tested, pure with no.

William Burgoyne Jim Saratoga Hastings Williamson Murray Daniel Morgan Arnold Harold Brighton England Philadelphia commander John Batchelor London Canada Saxon army Gustavus Adolphus Sweden Gustavus Adolphus James Lacey
"henry dearborn" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

12:39 min | 2 years ago

"henry dearborn" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"With Jim Lacey to go through history. So quickly on the basis of battles that become parts of the stories that determine the map we live on. And also the opinions the prejudices the memories of whole political organizations today here in the twenty first century, certainly the battle of Hastings. This is William the conqueror who is related generally to everyone else in the area because there's lots of crossing back and forth between brides and ambitious princes in the tenth and eleventh century, but ten sixty six date that's burned into the minds of all school children who pass through London's private and public schools. And we've remembered it as well because there's a beautiful tapestry in bio in France that pictures this battle ten sixty six and what's important to me from Jim's book. Doc is that there's a crisis moment in the battle of Hastings when William has to take control of the battlefield. I'm reminded. Jim are that they're crisis moments in all battles when you can say, here's the weakness. And here's the moment. If it doesn't happen. It turns around this is the moment when William recognizes the danger to his line, and he sees that. There's a rumor sweeping the battlefield this is fog of battle without gunfire fog about that. He's dead. And so he has to ride to the front, and can we confirm that that's the moment. His troops started to rally again. Yeah. It's quite obviously the moment they start throughout because they were. This one flank already breaking in the everyone was about to follow it. Army of that era lost it's leader. That was almost always the kiss of death St. the cohesion of that organization would start to break breakdown. They would start to retreat if press they would be routed, and that would be the end of it. He he he wrote right to the front right into the middle of took off his helmet. A very very dangerous thing to do in a medieval battle, so did all of these troops could see that. It was him. And that he was alive. He's very distinctive to look upon big man, probably reddish hair. So everyone could see him. And that was it. And they do. The emotional impact of seeing you a great world leader on a lodge. Warhorse? Will you fought was dead. Suddenly in the midst of the battle swinging his sword in all directions and yelling to support just can't be under estimated on that type of in that kind of battlefield. Oh that medieval environment. It would have been a decisive factor in rallying his forces the same time, the Saxons who what they were winning would have become disorganized. The pursuit leadership would have been trying to catch up with the troops. And. It is the perfect moments to counterattack and all you need is a leader. Who could see it in the leader could organize forces quickly to take advantage of it. And William was both of those. We'll find that again in the battle of Saratoga, and which we're coming to. But I the other side of this battle is that later on in the day after the counterattack herald who is the opponent to William leading the Saxons is also on the battlefield with his helmet on and arrows are flying all over, and it's his death that breaks the Saxon army and overwhelms England with the Norman conquest and the picture on the bio tapestry has an arrow in his I do we believe that's a fact, Jim we don't know. Yeah. I think most historians now say say, yes. It's very interesting to barrow tapestry is just a wonderful document. And if you go to bay, oh, it's war. Well, we're visiting it's a beautiful museum and its well, laid out and welcome. Unfortunately, the bay oh tapestry has gone through a lot of wear and tear over the years it during the Napoleonic era was rediscovered as a toppling over artillery shells on a wagon was just being used as a covering cloth and tremendous not the damage done to it. We have a drawing of the day. Oh, tapestry from the nineteenth century, somebody copied it all down, and that arrow in the is not there Robert spear being from by Harold, and we believe somebody does a good chance that somebody who reconstructed bay. Oh, tapestry in the preservation techniques, put that arrow in the eye based on some of the stories, and there's lots of stories about the battle of Hastings some reputable, some not reputable, we don't know who wrote some of them. We don't know what years they were written detected. A matter is Harold was killed and so two of his brothers. So the senior leadership was wiped out and. On that point on. It was only a matter of time into the Saxon force was defeated. Most of the Saxons would have melted away except for what they called the house calls, which is for lack of a better description. The the bodyguards of the senior officers like Harold they would have surrounded dead dead dead dead leader and fought to the death which. It has its good points. But it has its bad point those most disciplined and battle-ready soldiers and losing the meant that there was no chance for the Saxons to regroup and reform and create a new army that could come back at William at a later date mean William we still had to conquer England had that been a core nucleus of fighting soldiers to build a resistance around. It would have been a much more difficult job battle of Brighton. Fouled. This is very little known. But a gym and Williamson pick it out because it's the transformation of battlefield firepower. What wins is firepower? Now, we're into the second half of the second millennium and gunpowder is on the battlefield. There is an innovator. He is the king of Sweden Gustavus Adolphus, and we'll spend less time on the politics of Brighton. Fouled and more to emphasize that at this point. There was a Spanish there was a Spanish battle a concept called the tests. Jio and that was musketeers surrounded by pike men, and they fought in one great big steamroller Jim in Williamson describes the pike men. Protect the musketeers as they rearm, but they also limit their firepower fifteen hundred sometimes three thousand sometimes fifteen hundred and that conquers everything in its way, especially if you're fighting mobs, and that's true for the count of Tilly who is fighting for the Catholics. This is during the counter reformation Moore's in the mid seventeenth century. However here comes Gustavus Adolphus. And what I want emphasize here is that he seems to have introduced the concept of mixed arms, cavalry infantry muskets, and at the same time artillery, and Jim what I take is that he invented light artillery. Can I say that then he's the one that Bonaparte copied in the nineteenth century? Wow. Yeah. I I it's it's relatively safe to say, he's the they had light Tori in different places. But he was the first one to create a doctrine of having me artillery mobile advancing with combat formations as they advanced instead of sitting on a hill and supporting them as the EPA tree in the cavalry went forward territory came forward with them to provide a media fire support all of that is coming out of the changes in the the brilliant doctrinal advancements. And the creation of staffs that do on professional paperwork professional bureaucracies. And this carries over into future centuries. It's not so much that we made better canons that allowed Europeans to conquer the world. It was better organization of military. Forces their staffs their ability to maneuver on the battlefield debris firepower to bear at any point. They wanted all this grows out of the changes Gustavus adopted Lewis made and I on bailed on European battlefield. Let's go forward to the eighteenth century. This is the battle of Saratoga, which is actually a combination battle of Bennington and Saratoga September October seventeen seventy seven the plan is a very good general respected by man. His name is Burgoyne gentleman. Johnny who was also a playwright, and they're wonderful quotes of his idea of how to inspire troops by being you'd have to say floored with his language in any event. He's to March down from Canada. What is now Canada while how New York has to March up and split New England and half. Which is the plan will see in the civil war split the enemy in half. How doesn't get the message bad communication? How moves on Philadelphia? That's another story to do with Washington, but Burgoyne pushes on and he's facing gates and Arnold. And what I take from. This is that Arnold is by far the more gifted commander comparable to William on the battlefield. He sees. He understands he has a sense. Of his men, and this is the one battle. I think that the continental army ever one. They lost everything else in retreat, but they outlasted the lobster backs the British or now following all of those lessons. We had from the seventeenth century uniforms olive one cover color. Great fire discipline? No backing off a veteran soldiers, and they're up against a mixed mob of continental soldiers farmers. And then there's Daniel Morgan's Virginia riflemen and Henry Dearborn lights and on the critical. Battlefield at Saratoga. Your sense. Jim how Dearborn and Morgan behave when they hit the what they flank the British are they working under anybody's orders. Are they feeling the battlefield is there? Anyone directing them that way? Gotten general direction, but they haven't gotten specific skates is in command and Gates's as interior battlefield commander with who had a much higher in of his own abilities than was actually the case. He was also former British officers served with going insane battalion same regiment free decades before this event, you didn't have a lot of respect for the continentals and Morgan's riflemen than the other light forces, especially Morgan's riflemen when they arrived would decisive in another way it was going study out he had intelligence adapted. She's Indians decolonised didn't have a way of the militia did not have a way of fighting those Indians and Indian troubles in that part of the frontier in decades, and they've lost the skills when Morgan's riflemen who had tremendous amount of experience before the war fighting Indians arrived at tight suddenly turned Indians found that they were up against light forces who took your particular delight in store. Talking indians. A matter of fact and most of Burgoyne Indians evaporated they went home they weren't gonna put up with this. And from that moment, dawn. The intelligence decisive intelligence advantage, which to the continental Steve Americans forces on the battlefield could see a new everything we're going did and Burgoyne was blind. And that's I and it was decisive intelligence advantage that led to two final defeat of Burgoyne force note here Arnold. He's as gifted on the battlefield as way is that a fair judgment. The best battlefield commitment. Maybe George Washington has something to say on that. But on a would probably be my estimation. The best battlefield commander of the revolution. Have you not turned traitor? He would be in the pantheon of great American heroes and probably up there in the top five all time, great American heroes. And it's basically gates takes. Credit for most of Arnold's achievements. During the war sets on old data and his love affair in Philadelphia for Tori woman that these two events interacting and said on on on the path of of treason. He's he's disgruntled he's not getting credit. He expects to get and he's not getting the Comanche expects to get feel performance. Obviously tells the many people that he deserves better. And when he doesn't get it. He switches sides of battle the twenty clashes the change the world, James Lacey. Williamson Murray next we'll turn to the twentieth century and two battles that changed the map of the world. That's of course, midway and Normandy. I'm John Batchelor. This is the John Batchelor show..

Jim Lacey William Burgoyne Saratoga Hastings commander Williamson Murray Arnold Harold Daniel Morgan Philadelphia England Canada Brighton John Batchelor London barrow tapestry France James Lacey Saxon army
"henry dearborn" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

07:20 min | 2 years ago

"henry dearborn" Discussed on WGN Radio

"O'Hare, we have forty three and forty seven at both midway and Chicago's lakefront and today are far flung forecast. Takes us out to New England north Hampton New Hampshire. Population four thousand three hundred and one thousand three hundred one one don't forget that. The latest addition latest the newest addition to north Hampton New Hampshire as you might expect a New England town this goes back quite a ways it was first settled in sixteen thirty nine. It goes back that far on time ago day long long time ago, but we mentioned north Hampton today because it is the birthplace of a man named. Henry Dearborn is named for Henry Dearborn. Henry dearborn. Michigan. You're in the right track. Brian in the automobile in history. Well, no, not really, but the name is appropriate. Henry Dearborn was one of our first secretaries of what they called war. It's now Defense Secretary on the cabinet. Okay. And one place in particular here in Chicago was named for him four Dearborn which I was telling Andy. Dawned on me when I was putting this together this morning that the original fort Dearborn the Ford Dearborn site is steps away from where we are right now at Michigan in Wacker drive. Correct. So one of the stars on the Chicago slag. Got an asset CRA. I thought it would be nice to mention this in light of our bicentennial for the state of Illinois, which actually the actual birth date of Illinois statehood is tomorrow two hundred years December third. Wow. And we don't look a day over three hundred and eighty. Well, last the last few years, we're looking our age but Henry Dearborn born in north Hampton, New Hampshire. And yes, exactly you mentioned Dearborn. Michigan. How about Dearborn station here in Chicago Dearborn street all nave Dearborn park all named for Henry Dearborn and north Hampton New Hampshire dealing with weather pretty much like we're having rain forty five degrees in New England. There's our far-flung forecast for today. A little bit of Chicago in Illinois history tied in as well, you give us everything. Dave. It's like a whole service. It is. It's very full service. We get weather. We get knowledge we get some history. Get everything wrapped up in one. That's what we shoot for. Your aim is true as Elvis Costello. It's just like having an apple shot off my head last month that tree time. Did you do that? Well. I watched the real deal. I wanna hold Isaac Newton who actually pulled the pulled the train did. But it was that it was at a picture of me. I was not sure how would it have an airline is cheap. Yeah. Big acne, scar in my left cheek now as a result, the seventeen is not the he's not the catnaps ever dean. He's certain he's better than I could be with a Boeing close. Did come close. Yeah. This is a big camp. One of those giant compound bows. Oh, no, no. But the the people that were shooting the bows and arrows before he remains count. Those guys did have some of those, you know, the fifty added. Oh, it's amazing. The size of the man. They were splitting arrows that were in the bullseyes. Yeah. Really? Oh, yeah. I thought that was just in the robinhood Cortana recite live. It's real don't kid yourself injury. Dean does seem to have a proclivity for wanting to shoot things off of her or hit his co workers pictures of them. I don't know if you saw the when we had the snow. He was throwing snowballs at pictures of the of the morning show team. Does he have interests? Choice of word proclivity. Yeah. Little kernel of fury. I think down deep in DC. Anger. Yeah. I don't know. How will exceed? No, david. You know? And that's everybody's got it. So you just I I I don't know about the arrows. That seems like it might be excessive. Just a picture. He's not lining you guys up. I didn't know what was going to happen. And a half hour before he came over to the he said, aren't you curious? I like you Dave just goes with the flow. Nervous. They call one for the team. Yeah. But how how big a one do you have to have? Got an arrow to the face that seems above and beyond. I'll get up early and drive to a remote. I'll do you know. Maybe I'll I'll try some food that came in that might be a little unusual aero is where I draw the line. But I did now I do remember years ago when we were doing sports night, I offered to sit we had been talking to an FBI agent. And they have this thing at their range where they'll sit somebody down and shoot the sniper will shoot something off their head. And I was like, oh, I'll try that. You know, a well trained military sniper. He should be able to take something off my dome. Thankfully that never had never came to pepper material. That's something you try once. Well, I tell you if you're lucky. You're either successful your alleged not a good ledger memory your cautionary tale. That's that's more. What what you had to do you need to wrap things up? All. Say all I need to do is see if I can get back to the page. I was on. I'm David one and the WGN radio newsroom, and these are the stories that matter on seven twenty WGN. There you go. All right. Well, that I I didn't wanna leave the I didn't want to leave that putting the bow on wrapping things up officially we had to tell everybody where we were sure. Because people sometimes they tune in. And they forget forget. Yeah. Like, hey. Where's that TOTO? Song you promised us. We didn't promise. You TOTO song. Oh. It's not the morning. I was looking at all the line. Love isn't always on tyrod. Or you know that. I know you do. Oh, boy that flashed me back there. What happened? Love isn't always on time. I feel young again. Wow. I'm sorry. How old is that? Don't do it. But. Requires the the buzzer. But I yeah. Wait and see if Dave can hit the post coming back. We go full circle. Do you have total? It's got some good panel on. Yeah. I do. Of course, he does have a Tomba's on Tom wants to play the forty year rule buzzer that we violated. Zero zero buzzer. You can't go back more than forty five. Talk about nineteen sixty two. I get hit in the face with this. Wow. There's a lot of hitting on this program. Dean said, hey, can you fill in for me on Sunday? He never mentioned hitting. He didn't. Maybe he figured I'm not gonna come in swing. But he didn't tell me that you guys may actually, you know. This weekend. Yeah. Just come after me. Now that song more than four songs not more than forty. No. No, no, no, no..

Henry Dearborn Dearborn fort Dearborn Chicago north Hampton Hampton New Hampshire New England north Hampton New Dave Michigan nave Dearborn park New England Dean Illinois david New Hampshire O'Hare Elvis Costello Brian
"henry dearborn" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"henry dearborn" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Course i served to the forest hills educational trust i basically gave lectures that i always gave walking towards the forest hills because i think it's not just a place where we beria family and friends of after they tied but it's also something in some ways that has a very rich history since eighteen eight so when i was doing the research though i talked about the buildings i talked about the grounds and how it was developed by henry dearborn who was donald of the first mayor of the city of roxbury but his gardner daniel brennan um so scotsman and he would actually develop atas hills dell's and fields began cemetery so of course everyone knew the various important people that will buried there but i was wandering with yellow pads of paper gis every single pathway and things of that sort and i hate to say this because people will think that i'm probably quite peculiar but i remember sang allowed of this one little pathway few wannabe of this book you better come to me now because of only got two more days before i start writing in earnest and it was one of those is picture perfect fall afternoons of gautier tober the sky was sunny the sun was warm the leaves were giving off with the row moro fall it was just wonderful and i'm wandering around it i had a wall jacket on.

henry dearborn roxbury donald dell