35 Burst results for "Henrietta"

"henrietta" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

03:13 min | Last week

"henrietta" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Said they tried for years to get attorneys to take this case up this is this is john hopkins backyard so we wasn't getting nowhere only allies that we had was was university of maryland and glover the only ones that would would expect lacks family so when i went to texas on my first booking sign and and they embraced me and i talked to the congregation that i met a young man and he introduced me to Ben prom and that's when the light got signed on this situation. And i'm so happy so it is good. Can you talk about your family was defamed. the stories told about your family That were untrue to discredit you to try. Not to seek some kind of reparations for what happened to your grandmother well okay. If wanting revenge embarrassed he had his children. Oh four they call he called. She called my dad sunny and abdul greedy because they'd only only in his foot money but my father was in this every since nineteen seventy-three just trying to get the the rights to his grandmother's legacy so and henrietta legs. We're back as the author of the another book on. Henrietta lacks that has been multiyear bestseller. The immortal life of henrietta lacks. Go ahead run exactly and she hid in. My grandma was signed her name with x. that's why i put in a back of my book. Poem a my grandmoms john. Hancock right in. He had beautiful penmanship so and illiterate china. Burma was letter. She wasn't she was a beautiful intelligent woman that loved her family and loved her davis so mark grandmother would feed the neighborhood and now you accident her not to feed her children and also right to me. She was a wonderful one. What does it mean as you move forward your family standing together at this lawsuit. Grandchildren Speaking up for your parents. The children of henrietta lacks on next generation does saying that lex family needs to take back control of henrietta legacy so we can pass down to the next generation of lexus. So they won't have to go through this fight that my grandfather and my dad went through. So that's why. I had to speak out telling my story ron lack. I wanna thank you. For being with us grandson of henrietta lacks author of henrietta lacks the untold story speaking to us from baltimore and ben crump civil rights attorney speaking to us from houston coming up. We speak to historian. Keisha blaine author of the new book. Until i'm free fannie. Lou hamer enduring message.

henrietta Ben prom abdul greedy john hopkins university of maryland glover mark grandmother Henrietta texas Hancock Burma davis ron lack china john lex ben crump Keisha blaine baltimore houston
"henrietta" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

03:13 min | Last week

"henrietta" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Said they tried for years to get attorneys to take this case up. This is. This is john hop his backyard. So we wasn't getting nowhere. Only allies that we had was was university of maryland and glover. The only ones that would would expect lacks family so when i went to texas on my first booking sign and and they embraced me and i talked to the congregation that i met a young man and he introduced me to Ben prom and that's when the light got signed on this situation. And i'm so happy so it is good. Can you talk about your family was defamed The stories told about your family That were untrue to discredit you to try. Not to seek some kind of reparations for what happened to your grandmother well okay. If wanting revenge embarrassed he had his children. Oh four they call he called. She called my dad sunny and abdul greedy because they'd only only in his foot money but my father was in this every since nineteen seventy-three just trying to get the the rights to his grandmother's legacy so and henrietta legs. We're back as the author of the another book on. Henrietta lacks that has been multiyear bestseller. The immortal life of henrietta lacks. Go ahead run exactly and she hid in. My grandma was signed her name with x. that's why i put in a back of my book. Poem a my grandmoms john. Hancock right in. He had beautiful penmanship so and illiterate china. Burma was letter. She wasn't she was a beautiful intelligent woman that loved her family and loved her davis so mark grandmother would feed the neighborhood and now you accident her not to feed her children and also right to me. She was a wonderful one. What does it mean as you move forward your family standing together at this lawsuit. Grandchildren Speaking up for your parents. The children of henrietta lacks on next generation does saying that lex family needs to take back control of henrietta legacy so we can pass down to the next generation of lexus. So they won't have to go through this fight that my grandfather and my dad went through. So that's why. I had to speak out telling my story ron lack. I wanna thank you. For being with us grandson of henrietta lacks author of henrietta lacks the untold story speaking to us from baltimore and ben crump civil rights attorney speaking to us from houston coming up. We speak to historian. Keisha blaine author of the new book. Until i'm free fannie. Lou hamer enduring message.

henrietta Ben prom abdul greedy university of maryland glover mark grandmother john Henrietta texas Hancock Burma davis ron lack china lex ben crump Keisha blaine baltimore houston Lou hamer
"henrietta" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

03:13 min | Last week

"henrietta" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Said they tried for years to get attorneys to take this case up. This is this is. John is backyard so we wasn't getting nowhere. Only allies that we had was was university of maryland and glover. The only ones that would would expect lacks family so when i went to texas on my first booking sign and and they embraced me and i talked to the congregation that i met a young man and he introduced me to Ben prom and that's when the light got signed on this situation. And i'm so happy so it is good. Can you talk about your family was defamed The stories told about your family That were untrue to discredit you to try. Not to seek some kind of reparations for what happened to your grandmother well okay. If wanting revenge embarrassed he had his children. Oh four they call he called. She called my dad sunny and abdul greedy because they'd only only in his foot money but my father was in this every since nineteen seventy-three just trying to get the the rights to his grandmother's legacy so and henrietta legs. We're back as the author of the another book on. Henrietta lacks that has been multiyear bestseller. The immortal life of henrietta lacks. Go ahead run exactly and she hid in. My grandma was signed her name with x. that's why i put in a back of my book. Poem a my grandmoms john. Hancock right in. He had beautiful penmanship so and illiterate china. Burma was letter. She wasn't she was a beautiful intelligent woman that loved her family and loved her davis so mark grandmother would feed the neighborhood and now you accident her not to feed her children and also right to me. She was a wonderful one. What does it mean as you move forward your family standing together at this lawsuit. Grandchildren Speaking up for your parents. The children of henrietta lacks on next generation does saying that lex family needs to take back control of henrietta legacy so we can pass down to the next generation of lexus. So they won't have to go through this fight that my grandfather and my dad went through. So that's why. I had to speak out telling my story ron lack. I wanna thank you. For being with us grandson of henrietta lacks author of henrietta lacks the untold story speaking to us from baltimore and ben crump civil rights attorney speaking to us from houston coming up. We speak to historian. Keisha blaine author of the new book. Until i'm free fannie. Lou hamer enduring message.

henrietta Ben prom abdul greedy university of maryland glover mark grandmother Henrietta texas John Hancock Burma davis ron lack china john lex ben crump Keisha blaine baltimore houston
"henrietta" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

03:13 min | Last week

"henrietta" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Said they tried for years to get attorneys to take this case up. This is. This is john hop his backyard. So we wasn't getting nowhere. Only allies that we had was was university of maryland and glover. The only ones that would would expect lacks family so when i went to texas on my first booking sign and and they embraced me and i talked to the congregation that i met a young man and he introduced me to Ben prom and that's when the light got signed on this situation. And i'm so happy so it is good. Can you talk about your family was defamed The stories told about your family That were untrue to discredit you to try. Not to seek some kind of reparations for what happened to your grandmother well okay. If wanting revenge embarrassed he had his children. Oh four they call he called. She called my dad sunny and abdul greedy because they'd only only in his foot money but my father was in this every since nineteen seventy-three just trying to get the the rights to his grandmother's legacy so and henrietta legs. We're back as the author of the another book on. Henrietta lacks that has been multiyear bestseller. The immortal life of henrietta lacks. Go ahead run exactly and she hid in. My grandma was signed her name with x. that's why i put in a back of my book. Poem a my grandmoms john. Hancock right in. He had beautiful penmanship so and illiterate china. Burma was letter. She wasn't she was a beautiful black intelligent woman that loved her family and loved her davis so mark grandmother would feed the neighborhood and now you accident her not to feed her children and also right to me. She was a wonderful one. What does it mean as you move forward your family standing together at this lawsuit. Grandchildren Speaking up for your parents. The children of henrietta lacks on next generation does saying that lex family needs to take back control of henrietta legacy so we can pass down to the next generation of lexus. So they won't have to go through this fight that my grandfather and my dad went through. So that's why. I had to speak out telling my story ron lack. I wanna thank you. For being with us grandson of henrietta lacks author of henrietta lacks the untold story speaking to us from baltimore and ben crump civil rights attorney speaking to us from houston coming up. We speak to historian. Keisha blaine author of the new book. Until i'm free fannie. Lou hamer enduring message.

henrietta Ben prom abdul greedy university of maryland glover mark grandmother john Henrietta texas Hancock Burma davis ron lack china lex ben crump Keisha blaine baltimore houston Lou hamer
"henrietta" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

03:13 min | Last week

"henrietta" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Said they tried for years to get attorneys to take this case up. This is. This is john hop his backyard. So we wasn't getting nowhere. Only allies that we had was was university of maryland and glover. The only ones that would would expect lacks family so when i went to texas on my first booking sign and and they embraced me and i talked to the congregation that i met a young man and he introduced me to Ben prom and that's when the light got signed on this situation. And i'm so happy so it is good. Can you talk about your family was defamed The stories told about your family That were untrue to discredit you to try. Not to seek some kind of reparations for what happened to your grandmother well okay. If wanting revenge embarrassed he had his children. Oh four they call he called. She called my dad sunny and abdul greedy because they'd only only in his foot money but my father was in this every since nineteen seventy three. Just trying to get the the rights to his. Grandmother's legacy so and henrietta legs. We're back as the author of the another book on. Henrietta lacks that has been multiyear bestseller. The immortal life of henrietta lacks. Go ahead run exactly and she hid in. My grandma was signed her name with x. that's why i put in a back of my book. Poem a my grandmoms john. Hancock right in. He had beautiful penmanship so and illiterate china. Burma was letter. She wasn't she was a beautiful intelligent woman that loved her family and loved her davis so mark grandmother would feed the neighborhood and now you accident her not to feed her children and also right to me. She was a wonderful one. What does it mean as you move forward your family standing together at this lawsuit. Grandchildren Speaking up for your parents. The children of henrietta lacks on next generation does saying that lex family needs to take back control of henrietta legacy so we can pass down to the next generation of lexus. So they won't have to go through this fight that my grandfather and my dad went through. So that's why. I had to speak out telling my story. Ron i wanna thank you. For being with us grandson of henrietta lacks author of henrietta lacks the untold story speaking to us from baltimore and ben crump civil rights attorney speaking to us from houston coming up. We speak to historian. Keisha blaine author of the new book. Until i'm free fannie. Lou hamer enduring message.

Ben prom abdul greedy henrietta university of maryland glover mark grandmother john Henrietta texas Hancock Burma davis china lex ben crump Ron Keisha blaine baltimore houston Lou hamer
"henrietta" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

03:13 min | Last week

"henrietta" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Said they tried for years to get attorneys to take this case up. This is this is john hop is backyard so we wasn't getting nowhere. Only allies that we had was was university of maryland and glover. The only ones that would would expect lacks family so when i went to texas on my first booking sign and and they embraced me and i talked to the congregation that i met a young man and he introduced me to Ben prom and that's when the light got signed on this situation. And i'm so happy so it is good can you talk about your family was defamed The stories told about your family That were untrue to discredit you to try. Not to seek some kind of reparations for what happened to your grandmother well okay. If wanting revenge embarrassed he had his children. Oh four they call he called. She called my dad sunny and abdul greedy because they'd only only in his foot money but my father was in this every since nineteen seventy-three just trying to get the the rights to his grandmother's legacy so and henrietta legs. We're back as the author of the another book on. Henrietta lacks that has been multiyear bestseller. The immortal life of henrietta lacks. Go ahead run exactly and she hid in. My grandma was signed her name with x. that's why i put in a back of my book. Poem a my grandmoms john. Hancock right in. He had beautiful penmanship so and illiterate china. Burma was letter. She wasn't she was a beautiful black intelligent woman that loved her family and loved her davis so mark grandmother would feed the neighborhood and now you accident her not to feed her children and also right to me. She was a wonderful one. What does it mean as you move forward your family standing together at this lawsuit. Grandchildren Speaking up for your parents. The children of henrietta lacks on next generation does saying that lex family needs to take back control of henrietta legacy so we can pass down to the next generation of lexus. So they won't have to go through this fight that my grandfather and my dad went through. So that's why. I had to speak out telling my story ron lack. I wanna thank you. For being with us grandson of henrietta lacks author of henrietta lacks the untold story speaking to us from baltimore and ben crump civil rights attorney speaking to us from houston coming up. We speak to historian. Keisha blaine author of the new book. Until i'm free fannie. Lou hamer enduring message.

henrietta Ben prom abdul greedy university of maryland glover mark grandmother john Henrietta texas Hancock Burma davis ron lack china lex ben crump Keisha blaine baltimore houston Lou hamer
"henrietta" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

03:13 min | Last week

"henrietta" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Said they tried for years to get attorneys to take this case up. This is. This is john hop his backyard. So we wasn't getting nowhere. Only allies that we had was was university of maryland and glover. The only ones that would would expect lacks family so when i went to texas on my first booking sign and and they embraced me and i talked to the congregation that i met a young man and he introduced me to Ben prom and that's when the light got signed on this situation. And i'm so happy so it is good. Can you talk about your family was defamed The stories told about your family That were untrue to discredit you to try. Not to seek some kind of reparations for what happened to your grandmother well okay. If wanting revenge embarrassed he had his children. Oh four they call he called. She called my dad sunny and abdul greedy because they'd only only in his foot money but my father was in this every since nineteen seventy-three just trying to get the the rights to his grandmother's legacy so and henrietta legs. We're back as the author of the another book on. Henrietta lacks that has been multiyear bestseller. The immortal life of henrietta lacks. Go ahead run exactly and she hid in. My grandma was signed her name with x. That's why i put in a beckham. My book poem a my grandmoms john. Hancock right in. He had beautiful penmanship. So and illiterate. China mcbrayer was letter. She wasn't she was a beautiful intelligent woman that loved her family and loved. Her davis so much grandmother would feed the neighborhood and now you accident her not to feed her children and also right to me. She was a wonderful one. What does it mean as you move forward your family standing together at this lawsuit. Grandchildren Speaking up for your parents. The children of henrietta lacks on next generation does saying that lex family needs to take back control of henrietta legacy so we can pass down to the next generation of lexus. So they won't have to go through this fight that my grandfather and my dad went through. So that's why. I had to speak out telling my story ron lack. I wanna thank you. For being with us grandson of henrietta lacks author of henrietta lacks the untold story speaking to us from baltimore and ben crump civil rights attorney speaking to us from houston coming up. We speak to historian. Keisha blaine author of the new book. Until i'm free fannie. Lou hamer enduring message.

henrietta Ben prom abdul greedy university of maryland glover mcbrayer john Henrietta texas Hancock davis ron lack China lex ben crump Keisha blaine baltimore houston Lou hamer fannie
"henrietta" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

03:13 min | Last week

"henrietta" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Said they tried for years to get attorneys to take this case up this is this is john hopkins backyard so we wasn't getting nowhere only allies that we had was was university of maryland and glover the only ones that would would expect lacks family so when i went to texas on my first booking sign and and they embraced me and i talked to the congregation that i met a young man and he introduced me to Ben prom and that's when the light got signed on this situation. And i'm so happy so it is good. Can you talk about your family was defamed. the stories told about your family That were untrue to discredit you to try. Not to seek some kind of reparations for what happened to your grandmother well okay. If wanting revenge embarrassed he had his children. Oh four they call he called. She called my dad sunny and abdul greedy because they'd only only in his foot money but my father was in this every since nineteen seventy-three just trying to get the the rights to his grandmother's legacy so and henrietta legs. We're back as the author of the another book on. Henrietta lacks that has been multiyear bestseller. The immortal life of henrietta lacks. Go ahead run exactly and she hid in. My grandma was signed her name with x. that's why i put in a back of my book. Poem a my grandmoms john. Hancock right in. He had beautiful penmanship so and illiterate china. Burma was letter. She wasn't she was a beautiful intelligent woman that loved her family and loved her davis so mark grandmother would feed the neighborhood and now you accident her not to feed her children and also right to me. She was a wonderful one. What does it mean as you move forward your family standing together at this lawsuit. Grandchildren Speaking up for your parents. The children of henrietta lacks on next generation does saying that lex family needs to take back control of henrietta legacy so we can pass down to the next generation of lexus. So they won't have to go through this fight that my grandfather and my dad went through. So that's why. I had to speak out telling my story ron lack. I wanna thank you. For being with us grandson of henrietta lacks author of henrietta lacks the untold story speaking to us from baltimore and ben crump civil rights attorney speaking to us from houston coming up. We speak to historian. Keisha blaine author of the new book. Until i'm free fannie. Lou hamer enduring message.

henrietta Ben prom abdul greedy john hopkins university of maryland glover mark grandmother Henrietta texas Hancock Burma davis ron lack china john lex ben crump Keisha blaine baltimore houston
"henrietta" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

04:35 min | Last week

"henrietta" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Hundred fifty one and have been used for decades by scientists. We'll speak with civil rights attorney. Ben crump and henrietta lacks grandson. The ledge is here together today to let the world know we want out fam- family legacy bag plus we'll look at the life and legacy of civil rights icon fannie lou hamer brain without yla dip in. We'll speak to historian key. Should blaine author of the new book. Until i am free. Fannie lou hamer's.

Ben crump henrietta Fannie lou hamer blaine
"henrietta" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

04:35 min | Last week

"henrietta" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Nine hundred fifty one and have been used for decades by scientists. We'll speak with civil rights attorney. Ben crump and henrietta lacks grandson. The ledge is here together today to let the world know we want out fam- family legacy bag plus we'll look at the life and legacy of civil rights icon fannie lou hamer brain without blah. Did in we'll speak to historian. Should blaine author of the new book. Until i am free. Fannie lou hamer's.

Ben crump henrietta Fannie lou hamer blaine
"henrietta" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

04:35 min | Last week

"henrietta" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Fifty one and have been used for decades by scientists. We'll speak with civil rights attorney. Ben crump and henrietta lacks grandson. The ledge is here together today to let the world know we want out fam- family legacy bag plus we'll look at the life and legacy of civil rights icon fannie lou hamer the brain without yla dip in. We'll speak to historian key. Should blaine author of the new book. Until i am free. Fannie lou hamer's.

Ben crump henrietta Fannie lou hamer blaine
UNICEF: Battered by pandemic, kids need mental health help

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 2 weeks ago

UNICEF: Battered by pandemic, kids need mental health help

"The U. N.'s child protection agency is urging governments to pour more money and resources into preserving the mental well being of children and adolescents the U. N. children's fund says it's state of the world children's study is this most comprehensive look so far this century after the mental health of children and adolescents globally the coronavirus crises forcing school closures that upended the lives of children and adolescents has thrust the issue of the mental well being to the fore UNICEF's executive director Henrietta full says too little investment is being made by governments to address these critical needs I'm Charles de Ledesma

U. N.'S Child Protection Agenc U. N. Children's Fund Henrietta Full Unicef Charles De Ledesma
"henrietta" Discussed on Northstar Big Book

Northstar Big Book

05:09 min | 3 months ago

"henrietta" Discussed on Northstar Big Book

"Later these three heads succeeded with seven more on our side taking others through the steps. They didn't have a book. They took them through the steps. Seeing much of each other scares an evening past someone's home did not shelter a little gathering of men and women. I underlined happy in their release and constantly thinking how they might present their discovery to some newcomer. And i wrote on the side. What are home. Groups should be thinking of what our homegrown should be thinking of so we should always be thinking of. How can i present this to someone else. In addition to these casual get togethers. It became customary to set apart one night a week for a meeting attended by anyone. I wrote on the top open meeting or everyone interested in a spiritual way of life aside from fellowship sociability. The prime object was provided time and place where new people might bring their problems The next part i wrote henrietta 's house henrietta was the person Who helped other people by opening their home. Outsiders became interested one man and his wife plays. They're large home at the disposal of the strangely assorted crowd. This couple has since become so fascinated that they have dedicated their home to the work. Many distracted wife visited this house. To find a underlined loving and understanding companionship. Among women who knew her problem and they're talking about alanon to hear from lips of their husbands underlined. What had happened to them to be advised how her own way word may be. Hospitalized and approach underlined. When next he stumbled and i wrote if an alcoholic always will if an alcoholic always. Will this next sentence. This next part over here in the next two sentences. I wrote in a big letters in that blank space after stumbled. What answer are we offering. And i have the word answer in quotation marks. What answer are we offering. So that's an important question to think about my home group. And my homeboys a big meeting and we are constantly talking about the book and the steps and how this is the way out and we're offering time before the meeting and after meeting work with other people. But i read this out loud usually before i begin my lead when i get my lead. I'll read this part. I underlined many a man yet days from his hospital. Experiences stepped over the threshold of that home into freedom. So that's a promise. And then i underline and put a star many alchoholic who entered their came away with an answer. And i circled an answer and i wrote an aside that the twelve steps will solve the alcoholics mental obsession that the twelve steps will solve the alcoholics mental obsession. So is a reminder to me when i read that that my job my obligation that night when i'm leading is to provide an answer that the answer butter make it really clear that the steps how i no longer feel the way i do think the way do he succumbed to that gay crowd inside who laughed at their own misfortunes and understood his impressed by those who visited him at the hospital. He capitulated entirely when later in an upper room of his house. He heard the story of a man who's experienced closely tallied with his own..

henrietta
"henrietta" Discussed on Unexplainable

Unexplainable

07:19 min | 4 months ago

"henrietta" Discussed on Unexplainable

"We've all had a moment that changes everything that instantly splits our lives into before and after changes this ever-present force shaping all of us. But what exactly happens when we find ourselves at the brink of change. That's the question at the center. Of a new pushkin podcast. It's called a slight change of plans. Dr maya schenker hosts intimate revealing conversations with people who've lived through extraordinary changes like tiffany. Haddish hillary clinton casey must raves and little known guests to like a young cancer researcher in the throes of stage. Four diagnosis black jazz musician. Who convinced k. k. k. members to leave the clan ultimately. You'll come away thinking a bit differently about change in your own life. Listen to a slight change of plans wherever you get your pockets. Innovation is in a box. You check off your to do list. It's a calling. you can't ignore a project with no end. eat an open book. That's constantly being rewritten. And you need technology that's built to handle it all no matter when or where inspiration strikes whether you're in your home office or out in the field because no matter where you are lenovo knows that high-performance comes from within that's why they're pc's and think pads are equipped with the intel yvo platform from the first foldable pc to the x one nanno in the x one titanium. They can handle your work as well as you do. That means that no matter how many applications are open or videos or downloading or apps. You're tackling through your lenovo. Thinkpad will keep up and it'll keep up for a long long time as one of the world's longest lasting and most portable. Pc's according to pc mac because after all solving the world's biggest problems and changing the way we live learn and work takes speed and flexibility. It takes lenovo sparta technology for all learn more at lenovo dot com slash. X one. You are about to take a journey out of this world into the world of the future. Forget the world around you. Forget the people around you you are entering unexplainable alone with your unexplainable. We're back here with senior reporter. Brian resnick hey. So bird was talking about henrietta levitt. And how she kind of came up with this yardstick. To measure the universe and brian. You were actually working on this story with bird from the start. Where did this yardstick end up. Taking science like i mean basically what happened. What happened next. Yeah like a lot happened next. Scientists kept improving on this yardstick. And you know once you have a yardstick you use it to measure stuff right so every time. Scientists took measurements with yardstick. It was like the whole universe fundamentally changed. It was not until we started to be able to measure distances in the cosmos that we knew that other galaxies exist talked to katie mac. About all this She's an astrophysicist. She's wearing a great book that gets into a lot of this like the power of measuring things in space. And she's saying basically that before all of this before this kind of massive measurement scientists didn't know there were other galaxies. Yes so there were these observations of what were called spiral niggly or island universes these little smudges in the sky and those were for a long time thought to be perhaps clusters of stars within our own galaxy or nebula or some kind of object nearby edwin hubble do hubble telescope in the nineteen twenties. He was an astronomer at the mount wilson observatory in california and he was looking at this mudgee area of the sky caught andromeda and hubble is studying it and he's looking out for one of these pulsating stars one of the cepheids and because of henrietta. He knows if he sees cepheids he can see how far away and dramas and he sees a steph yet. He sees one. These variable stars puts in the calculations and extra extra read all about it. Realize in drama is so far it must be another galaxy. Another universe seen by astronomer. This big front page headline-grabbing news. Dr hubble describes massive celestial bodies seven hundred thousand years away so the idea that we can use these variable stars to measure distances to nearby galaxies like the andromeda galaxy that. Lets you know that these galaxies are actually outside of our own that they're actually far away this was astounding. Yeah that that old time you newsboy were saying that this was seeing another universe. Right that newsboy and the new york times headline news reading. It wasn't right. It was just another galaxy. But that gives you a sense of just how much bigger this whole discovering made the cosmos. Okay so the first big thing that henrietta yardstick did was it allowed scientists to make the known universe way bigger. What's the next thing. So hubble once you start you know. He has his one measurement of this galaxy. He doesn't stop. He measures more galaxy. And then he realizes something even more astounding. What hubble discovered by looking at a lot of distant galaxies is that other galaxies are moving away from us. This was actually really huge up until this point. A lot of scientists had this pretty clear consensus about the universe. There was the idea that the cosmos is static that it's an eternal unchanging thing but these new measurements they. They showed something completely different. The universe is expanding. There's just more space all the time. There's more space all the time. Yeah this is just wild. Imagine you have an unfilled balloon out in front of you. And you draw dots along the surface of it When you blow the balloon up you would see that. The number of dots remain the same but the space between them keeps expanding so like the galaxies aren't growing but the space between them is growing all the time. That was a big deal to find out that that the universe changes that that. It's not just stuck there and everything's in its proper place forever so so just by measuring the universe. We realized that we totally misunderstood everything about it. Yeah and then when you see that the universe is in motion just create so many other questions so expanding now. Does that mean universe used to be different in the past and particularly when we start rewinding this.

UNRWA Launches $38 Million Appeal for Palestinians as Violence Continues

UN News

00:54 sec | 5 months ago

UNRWA Launches $38 Million Appeal for Palestinians as Violence Continues

"At least sixty youngsters have been killed in gaza and another four hundred and forty four have been injured in clashes with israel. The head of the u. n. children's fund has set in a cool for an immediate ceasefire and aid access to stave off disaster. Unicef executive director henrietta four said that gaza's one million children were reeling from the conflict and had no safe to turn every day that the conflict continues children across the state of palestine and israel will suffer. Misfortune insisted in her appeal for peace and a long-term political solution to the broader conflict. Miss four also appealed for humanitarian corridors. To be set up to deliver fuel medical items first aid kits and covid nineteen vaccines and to evacuate the sick and wounded. Meanwhile the un relief agency for palestine refugees under launched an emergency appeal for thirty eight million dollars amid the continuing violence to help meet rising needs across gaza and parts of the west bank and east jerusalem.

Children's Fund Henrietta Four Gaza Israel Unicef Palestine UN West Bank East Jerusalem
Ben Silverman - Ececutive Producer of The Office

The Office Deep Dive with Brian Baumgartner

07:21 min | 7 months ago

Ben Silverman - Ececutive Producer of The Office

"How did you discover the uk version of the office. I was at my friend. Henrietta conrad's house. I was not an agent. I had left being an agent where i had found everything from who wants to be a millionaire to cracker queer as folk and had translated them into america as the packaging agent and i laughed. Backed by barry diller to start my own company called rally and i had just begun reveling in win over to london for a work trip and was staying at my friend. Henrietta conrad's house and we were watching television. And i was literally flipping the channels and i came on to the office. This is episode one or two okay of the uk season one office. Wow and i was watching it. I wondering if it was for comedy or for real than quickly recognized what it was doing single camera no laugh track faux documentary with people who felt real and i kept watching and started laughing. And it's really hard to make me laugh. And i was falling in love with the show in that moment and then i started thinking about it the next day in the morning and i asked henrietta if she knew ricky gervais as and she said no but her friend dan. Mazer did and we organized and had dinner with dan that night. Which are twenty four hours after you after you see it for the first time on television. You're having dinner with someone who could get you to ricky. Yes and additionally. I also wanted to be with dan. Dan was sasha baron. Cohen's partner allergy was on television. Was allie ardor your then no in the uk okay. But i'm with dan mazer yep. Dan is lovely brilliant in his own. Right and i start peppering questions about the office. And he gives me ricky cell phone number and so the next day. I call ricky around eleven o'clock in the morning and introduce myself on the phone and say i'd love to meet you. Are you in town. He goes actually. Yes me in soho at the starbucks this afternoon and i coordinate a meeting and i spent an hour with ricky talking about the office and very quickly we got along because we both love television and he truly was making me laugh even in those moment right over over the coffee at starbucks and so he clearly had chosen the location of the starbucks because he then says to me oh good news. My agent is right around the corner. Let's go meet with them so it was almost like he met me confirmed. I was okay roy. Conversation was interesting and then we walked over and met with dunkin' as his agent. And then duncan and i began a three month process to secure the rights. And it wasn't until dunkin. Help me unlock it. All that i realized. Both the bbc and ricky controlled the rights. I needed ricky and stephen merchant to actually get it done and agitate to get it done otherwise. It was never going to get done. Got it so you you deal with the bbc. And you deal with ricky steven. You have this partnership in place and where do you go into the united states. I immediately start making phone calls and saying. Are you aware of the show the office. Do you know what it is. Do you think it would interest you. And this is probably now a month after are so run. The show has started to gain buzz. It's aired its cycle in the uk. Its initial six episodes and so it has an awareness. Now it's a thing right not a big thing but to anyone in england it in the television industry. You're aware so. I'm i'm back at the states reaching out to people one of the incredible things about hollywood which was a huge advantage for me to do. Well was that people in hollywood are pretty insular and don't like to travel. They think you need a passport to get from burbank to beverly hills. That is travel and so many people at this time in american television had no clue connection about anything beyond la. Right and only one exac at the time knew what i was talking about was a guy named nick grad. Who worked at fx and he knew what the show was and he loved the show. Kevin riley was running fx. At the time. I'd gone to less mooned us he passed. I went to gail berman. She passed immediately. Didn't get it. Hbo said we'll never do a remake. They clearly have altered that thinking that that time they were like. We won't do a format and showtime wasn't doing shows like this right. I didn't go to abc. 'cause i just knew it wasn't abc. Right and i was starting to tease. Nbc with it and kevin than got named the head of nbc. And i bring it up to him. And i say would you wanna do it here and kevin says absolutely little. Did he know he was actually my only buyer that time. He was the only one right who wanted everyone else. All of television everyone else had passed. Now are you in kevin's like let's do it. Like let's let's make it. You know i'll give you a pilot movement and then kevin's boss though. Who is very involved in his life. Jeff zucker didn't really like it that much because it was his single camera. Nola back injury. I got it like it was a hard pill for them to swallow. I was also like they didn't want the game show back in prime time when i brought millionaire. Everyone thought that was cheesy. Daytime like no no. This will change. Tv know you gotta look at it from how to push the genre and pushed the envelope. So that you can expand versus always play for defense right and i was like this is another level and this is potentially transformative of television and with that can come great great

Henrietta Conrad Ricky UK DAN Starbucks Mazer Sasha Baron Dan Mazer Barry Diller Dunkin Ricky Steven Ricky Gervais Henrietta United States BBC Stephen Merchant Cohen Allergy Nick Grad
Over 168 million children miss nearly a year of schooling, UNICEF says

UN News

01:19 min | 8 months ago

Over 168 million children miss nearly a year of schooling, UNICEF says

"At least one hundred and sixty eight million children. Labor missed out on classroom learning in the last year. Owing to corona virus related lockdowns the un children's fund unicef said on wednesday schools in some fourteen countries remained largely shut for almost twelve months as authorities attempted to hold back ovid nineteen infections. The un agency said in a new report in response to the findings sector jemele antonio guiterrez warned of global education crisis. Now efforts should be sped to safely. Bring every child back into the classroom. He tweeted here. He is speaking outside. Un headquarters in new york one of the most dramatic consequences of congress as being terrible suffering children and families because of the two of them. That defense school mandy. Fortunately at the chest with with the virtual means that's a or the forest populations without internet connection. We have millions of people of the school and that is a tragedy as the one year anniversary of the covid nineteen pandemic approaches on the eleventh of march unicef chief. Henrietta four underlined the catastrophic education. Emergency that worldwide lockdowns have created with every day that goes by children who are unable to access in person schooling full further and further behind and the most marginalized paying the heaviest price. Miss four added

Un Children's Fund Unicef Antonio Guiterrez UN Congress New York Henrietta Unicef
UNICEF Gears Up for Global Coronavirus Vaccine Rollout

UN News

01:10 min | 8 months ago

UNICEF Gears Up for Global Coronavirus Vaccine Rollout

"The head of unicef the children's fund urged the security council on wednesday to support the agency's call for all countries to roll out inclusive national vaccination plans to end the covid nineteen pandemic this means regardless of their legal status or if they live in areas controlled by non-state entities. Henrietta four told the meeting on ensuring equitable access to new coronavirus vaccines in places affected by conflict and insecurity. Her comments come as the agency steps up plans for the global distribution of covid nineteen vaccines unicef aims to procure two billion doses of covid nineteen vaccines by the end of the year. In addition to the two billion doses of other vaccines that obtains annually on behalf of one hundred countries miss for highlighted the difficulty of reaching an estimated sixty million people living in conflict areas under the control of non-state armed groups as well as refugees and migrants who are routinely excluded from national immunization drives after repeating the un secretary. General's call for a global ceasefire. Which would help aid vaccine delivery. The unicef chief urged the security council to restart Immunization campaigns we cannot allow the fight against one deadly disease to cause us to lose ground in the fight against others. She said

Unicef Security Council Henrietta UN
UNICEF chief’s appeal for access to children caught up in Ethiopia’s Tigray

UN News

00:57 sec | 9 months ago

UNICEF chief’s appeal for access to children caught up in Ethiopia’s Tigray

"Three months since fighting began in ethiopia northern state of tigray great concern for the plight of youngsters there. The un children's fund unicef has warned in an alert on wednesday the agency's executive director henrietta. Four said that the very little was known about the impact of the conflict was deeply troubling because of difficulties getting humanitarian access. The warning comes almost two weeks since unicef and partners dispatched twenty nine trucks filled with emergency nutrition health and protection supplies entity gray where central government soldiers have confronted tigray people's liberation front forces. That convoy was a step in the right direction but nowhere near the level of access and scale of support. That is actually needed. Miss four said unicef cited reports of three hundred unaccompanied or separated children among the more than fifty seven thousand people who fled to neighboring sudan the are potentially many more among the approximately two hundred eighty thousand internally displaced in tigray and neighboring regions the un agency said

Un Children's Fund Unicef Tigray Unicef Ethiopia Henrietta Sudan UN
Fauci: Up to 90% of population needs vaccine for herd immunity

This Week with George Stephanopoulos

03:20 min | 10 months ago

Fauci: Up to 90% of population needs vaccine for herd immunity

"The cdc is now requiring a negative test for any travelers coming from the uk but officials had been downplaying the threat of these of these new strains that we are seeing these variations in the uk. I think you had said earlier this week. That a mutation doesn't mean the virus more dangerous or more deadly. Dr fauci said that these these these variations may already be here in the united states. So why why this new step. Why this new restriction important for people to know that we're layering protection on top of protection on top of protection. No individual protection is going to be one hundred percent. A lot of americans don't know that back in march through the presidential To twelve f authority we restricted. The ability of people to come to the united states from the uk and travel is down ninety percent even pre knowledge about this new variant from the uk. So we've already had severe travel restrictions from the uk. testing within seventy. Two hours isn't one hundred percent. It's not perfect but it does. Further decreased the number of people who will come in and then what we recommend to people according to the. Cdc is that once you get here you still isolate for seven days if you've had a negative test or for further longer than that if you don't get a test on this end ten to fourteen days so those things layer together. We'll significantly decrease chance of exposure to a new variant. But here's what the american people most need to know. Mitigation works the shows that it works. So if you're worried about a new potentially more contagious variant. It that much more important that we follow the four ws. Where a mask wash your hands. Watch your distanced and the fourth one is weight on gatherings especially with one last holiday coming up new year's we need to be very careful. You said that you understand the skepticism. From many african americans about the vaccine obviously given the history of medical racism in this country and you of course got vaccinated on camera to to to to send a message. What else needs to be done to convince people including some of those most vulnerable that this vaccine is not only safe but it's effective and necessary. Well we need to continue to acknowledge what's happened in the past. And i've talked about ski. Talked about henrietta lacks but they were real issues going on today right now in this country when you look at seven hundred women dying pregnancy related complications. Most of them black and brown in the united states. When you look at not just cova hypertension and cancer disparities. We need to acknowledge these things. And we need to show people meaningfully in a real sense what we're doing to improve on these measures and that's why a surgeon general before covid health equity was a critical part of everything that i did. And then we need to engage with trusted influencers. We need to make sure our pastors in e moms in rabbis. All of whom. I'm working with. Have the facts so that they can spread it to to their congregants and we need to walk the talk and that's why i got vaccinated on live tv. I want people to know that as a scientist at the doctor. I've looked at the data. I know the protections that are in place. I know an african american female helped. Develop this vaccine and tony foul. She and i made sure that the trials were were enrolled with diverse participants. And i got vaccinated because i trusted and how we end this pandemic

UK Dr Fauci United States CDC Henrietta Hypertension Cancer Tony
"henrietta" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:32 min | 11 months ago

"henrietta" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"He stressed the need for education about the vaccine in communities of color, specifically black communities. And it's worth adding that we have people of color represented among the researchers who developed the vaccine, the scientists and doctors who reviewed it. In the tens of thousands of study participants who bravely volunteered so they could prove this vaccine safety and its efficacy. But and this is an important but Having a vaccine is only the first step. We must now move from vaccines to vaccinations, and it would be a great tragedy if disparities actually worsened. Because the people who could most benefit from this vaccine take it. We know that lack of trust is a major cause for reluctance, especially in communities of color, and that lack of trust Is not without good reason at the Tuskegee Studies occurred within many of our own lifetimes to truly combat vaccine hesitancy and encourage diverse enrollment in clinical trials. We must first acknowledge this real history of mistreatment and exploitation of minorities by the medical community and the government thing we need to explain and demonstrate. All that had been done to address these rooms to make sure tragedies like the tough Gigi syphilis study, or the exploitation of Henrietta lacks never happen again. The black man who participated in that study, given free medical exams in payment, but never offered treatment for the disease, even after penicillin became the main form of treatment. Four. Syphilis..

Syphilis Tuskegee Studies penicillin Henrietta
Kitsap school districts, NW of Seattle, eye reopening schools in January

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:57 sec | 11 months ago

Kitsap school districts, NW of Seattle, eye reopening schools in January

"District leaders across kits at county still hoping to reopen schools for in person learning after the first of the year. That update from comas Connie Johnson kids have school District announced Friday. They're still aiming for a phase return to in person classes beginning January. 11th North Kids have school district has also sketched out a tentative return to school buildings. January 11th. Starting with the youngest grades. First UNICEF, The International Child Welfare Agency, last week issued a dire warning of a generation lost to the long term effects on Children of remote learning. As the pandemic drags on. Henrietta Fore is UNICEF's executive director. Those schools not only threatened their education Being out of school can lead to poor health, Mental and physical it covert case rates remain as high as they are today, though going back to classrooms likely would not happen. Kids that counties 14 day rate for new cases per 100,000. Is that 169 more than twice what? The rate was just 2.5 weeks ago.

Comas Connie Johnson International Child Welfare Ag Unicef Henrietta Fore
COVID-19 vaccine: UNICEF to stockpile more than half a billion syringes

UN News

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

COVID-19 vaccine: UNICEF to stockpile more than half a billion syringes

"Countries around the world gear up to distribute covid nineteen vaccines, the UN Children's Fund. UNICEF. has begun laying the groundwork for safe and efficient delivery by buying and pre-positioning key equipment. The agency said on Monday it will begin by stockpiling around five hundred, twenty million syringes in its warehouses to have a billion ready for use throughout twenty twenty one to ensure syringes arrive before vaccines are distributed. This will be on top of the roughly six, hundred, twenty, million syringes that it will purchase for other vaccination programs to US next year against diseases such as measles anti. FLOYD UNISEX CHIEF HENRIETTA FOUR Spelled out that in order to move fast later, we must move fast now noting that by the end of the year over half a billion syringes should be in place that's enough syringes to wrap around the world one and a half time she said

Un Children's Fund Henrietta Four United States Measles Floyd Unicef.
"henrietta" Discussed on The Rural Health Voice

The Rural Health Voice

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"henrietta" Discussed on The Rural Health Voice

"Strikes me is that in modern medical experiments you always have a test group and a control group in the test group gets the drug and the control group gets jealous Cibo and then the researchers see if and how much the people in the test group improve over those who have the placebo, you know, but as you stated treating syphilis, not the goal documenting the process was the goal which brings me to the next question in the book you use the phrase devalue black bodies. Tell me what that means, Sure. So really what I mean by that when we think about devaluing black bodies is that we know that the first slaves were brought over and sixteen nineteen and since then what many people don't know is that African American slaves especially were used during the time of slavery for a lot of testing they were not seen at home. Time as people. They were seen as Beast of Burden. They certainly were less then at one point they counted as three-fifths of people and so testing on them simply made since the same way we test on Lab Rats now and so one of the most shocking I think examples of this is really a lot of modern Gynecology off. So many people have probably heard of Henrietta Lacks at this point where her cells were used without her consent, but what people don't know is that a lot of the medical procedures in modern Gynecology office were tested on African American female slaves without anesthesia. Additionally. We saw a lot of sterilization of African-Americans for various reasons again, without their consent. And so there's been this continuous devaluation of the bodies of black people and it didn't stop at slave. What we can link it to now and I know that you just did a podcast about maternal health is actually that so one of the things that we know is that we don't know why African American women are dying at a higher rate in childbirth because nobody has studied them and honestly, it's because there wasn't a lot of value placed on studying them. There wasn't a lot of funding Place specifically on looking at maternal health and maternal outcomes for people of color. And so again, and that is devaluing that body that is devaluing the access to adequate Healthcare the access to Real and True health care that communities of color are facing every day. And with that at the beginning of the pandemic, we were told to stay home work from home. Stay away from those not in our immediate family unit as much as possible wife. Is it harder for minorities? Sure. What we find is that it is harder mainly for people of color to abide by those rules because of I'm going to talk on two main issues. The first is employment. So often times what you see is that individuals of.

Cibo syphilis Henrietta
Stillbirth rate rises dramatically during pandemic

UN News

00:58 sec | 1 year ago

Stillbirth rate rises dramatically during pandemic

"Nearly. Two million babies are still born every year or one every sixteen seconds a figure that could worsen due to the covid nineteen pandemic according to a new U. N.. report. Most stillbirths or eighty four percent occur in low income countries but high income nations face this challenge. Losing a child at birth or during pregnancy is a devastating tragedy for a family said Henrietta four executive director of the UN Children's fund UNICEF. Many of these deaths could have been prevented with high quality monitoring, proper ante, natal care under skilled birth attendant she added. UNICEF issued the report alongside the World Health Organization who the World Bank Group and the U. N. Department of Economic and Social Affairs. The partners warned that a reduction in health services due to covid nineteen could cause nearly two hundred thousand additional stillbirths over a twelve month period.

Unicef World Health Organization U. N. Department Of Economic A World Bank Group Henrietta Executive Director Un Children
Want To Dismantle Racism In Science? Start In The Classroom

Short Wave

09:25 min | 1 year ago

Want To Dismantle Racism In Science? Start In The Classroom

"All right today in the show were unscrewing what's not working in science education around representation and racism, and how to teach science in a more inclusive way and idea from listener and scientists Esther Kunle yes. Thanks to Esther we went looking for K., through twelve teachers teaching at the intersection, of Science, and racial justice at all grade levels I want to start with. Let me see fears. She's a post doctoral fellow in the collaborative for stem education and outreach at Vanderbilt. Okay. She's a black scientist. Out in science classrooms Tennessee in among fifth graders. At this one particular school, she is a total rockstar. So walk into a classroom and they'll be like. Yeah it's me. It's me everyone autographs today. We lit up each others world. Our say, let me see a drops into fifth seventh and eighth grade. Science classrooms like a real life. Miss Frizzle I'm not kidding you. She wheels the cart between classes clattering with beakers and different very interesting looking chemicals and students. They're so intrigued they run up to our like remind wife we've. Just all that stuff and then when she's in the classroom, let me see a doesn't just help them run experiments. She'll also delve into the ethics of designing an experiment. Okay. She'll talk about how wrong the Tuskegee study was, which is winning scientists studied syphilis in black men and withheld treatment Sushi's like introducing bioethics to kids as important part of the curriculum. Yup. Scientists are presented as very human herself included and her students can totally handle these conversations. We see what's happening with this generation with them protest and they're speaking out on, they're not having it. They're not. They're not going to allow us to continue to destroy their and our point is that if science teachers can tap into that compassion and That curiosity and show the way that scientists have messed up. Kids might take an interest in science I love, and if we can't do that, then we are GonNa lose them and I think it's hard for minority kids. They already don't see themselves as the teacher or the Christmas doing the science. So that already unemployed simple block of well, that's just what the old white man with the crazy hairdo. and. So another thing let me see Ya does is namedrop scientists of color as often as possible. She'll talk about a physicist did Eisler medical physicists had he and Ecole, green astronauts, Joseph Akaba, and genetic APPs. She designed a paper rocket lesson around them and this helps kids develop a mental picture of a career in stem beyond a doctor or a dentist. This is so cool because it's not just about teaching science history, right? It's also helping students see themselves as scientists and for Gretchen Craig. Turner. The next teacher I, want to introduce you to. This level of engagement becomes even more important students get older and start to you know get into their teenage years and develop their own opinions their own opinions about science. Yeah. You know to be critical of it. Oh. Yeah. That was not in my k. through twelve science education hers either I don't remember a lot of writing or opinions being a part of science. In fact, it was very much I believe taught the opinions didn't belong in science right that it was supposed to be a right answer Gretchen teaches. At Burlington Edison High. School. In Washington state she is white and her classroom to be as inclusive as possible and to reflect the diversity of the student body and in her first year of teaching a biotech class. This was back in two thousand, ten in English teacher gave her a copy of the book. The immortal life of Henrietta lacks was like you should teach the steer students. Yeah. So the history of the Hilo Cell Line Yep. So Henrietta, lacks cancer cells were used for years by scientists without her family's knowledge cells that. One. Of the most important cell lines in medical research, her case raises so many questions about patients, rights. Yep questions raised in this book. So Gretchen got a bunch of hardcover books for her class and we read it and. It shaped how I teach in tremendous ways because the students responded to it. So strongly, you know they were excited maybe not at first I still get a lot of Turner. This isn't an English class, right but but they got into it. So into it, it is a six week unit the book in a Science Class. STUDENTS DO SELL labs while they're reading and they journal to. Okay so they're jotting down notes on different themes like medical apartheid informed consent lab science, and at the end they write a big paper and also oftentimes in class, there will be students who who's own families have experienced medical apartheid in the. Effects of that and I think some of the students and see themselves in the story of the lacks family. The conversations become really personal and probing not. You know necessarily what you'd expect in science class but exactly what Gretchen is hoping for well I, think what you know many young people ultimately want from their teachers is to be seen into be heard. And so if the science curriculum. if they feel seen and heard through that curriculum, they're more invested. So when her students learn about genetic testing, Gretchen includes a film about the innocence project and they're a group that uses DNA testing to exonerate those who've been wrongfully imprisoned. And Gretchen has her students, write poetry and songs as kind of oaths to those wrongfully convicted my blood, my skin, my hair, all held the key to my freedom DNA. My eyes glazed over desperate for relief with a pain. I now understood my hand reaches for I. Don't Know How often you're around teenagers. But the. Teenagers of this just tremendous sense of justice and what is right you know, and so those conversations are often very passionate for students But it's also the world that they live in. Wow I mean kwong, there's so many things in here. That are so powerful in and I know there's a lot of science teacher who listened to shortwave who might want to incorporate racial justice in history into their teaching too I mean, where do they look well Gretchen and let me see a- had the same advice which is at teachers should fill in the gaps in their own racial understanding I learn about the history of science or their field, and that's exactly what the last teacher I spoke with is doing. Vigia satiety is a college professor at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and looking critically at her own field statistics has been hard painful work. You know I honestly I just feel like I'm I missed something that was really important to learn about my discipline and I'm I'm a little bit mad at myself for not being curious on my own to figure out the origins of things and she has been startled to realize the full extent to which modern statistics draws upon the work of you. Genesis Francis Colton Karl Pearson Ronald Fisher. Some of the most foundational tools and stem like the normal distribution curve were applied to support their racist and eugenicist theories tools that we. Use today, but we don't really stop to think about the people who created them and why they created them. So the is trying to stop to teach yourself where these came from, but to not rush the process with some slapdash curriculum, she wants to incorporate these historical into her classes with care I want to give it the space deserves and of course, and not not to feel like this awkward add on that people can optionally engage in in a way that centers the students Vigie like all the teachers I spoke with designs, her classes by asking herself who's being left behind with this material, and how can I bring them along? That's what can be gained from. And anti-racist science education I think all of us in our minds have been in or heard of course where the professor says look to the laugh looked the right. One of you won't be here at the end of this time or you know something horrible this should not ever be uttered in a classroom. I say look to your left to your right like I. Want you all to stay. I want you all the love my field as much as I. Love my field because there's so many interesting things you could do with it and we really could use your wonderful mind and our discipline. We could use your perspective and the things that you bring. So basically to change science, we have to change how we teach science. To fix the lab gotta fix the classroom.

Gretchen Craig Science Class Henrietta Esther Kunle Turner Vanderbilt Doctoral Fellow Scientist Tennessee Hilo Burlington Edison High Tuskegee Professor Francis Colton Karl Pearson Ro Washington Physicist Ecole
RBG in Her Own Words

Can We Talk?

05:18 min | 1 year ago

RBG in Her Own Words

"Hi It's no rouse and Judith Rosenbaum. And this is, can we talk the podcast of the Jewish women's archive where gender history and Jewish culture meet in this episode we're honoring and mourning the loss of Supreme Court. Justice. Ruth Bader GINSBURG. The first Jewish woman to sit on the nation's highest court Justice Ginsburg died on the eve of Russia China after a long battle with pancreatic cancer. In the days and nights following her death the steps of the Supreme Court have become an impromptu memorial. Thousands of people have gathered to express both grief and gratitude leaving flowers, writing messages and chalk lighting yard site candles. Some have even blown show far in her honour Ruth Bader GINSBURG was not only unapologetically Jewish but she and her experience as a jewish-american really guided her work. The Biblical Dictum Setback Sabatier Dove Justice Justice. You shall pursue adorn the walls of her chamber and the Word Setback Justice was embroidered into one of the lace collar. She famously war with her robes though tiny person justice GINSBURG was larger than life a Jewish hero and an American and feminist icon she stood for gender equality and racial justice and modeled fighting steadily for what you believe in. Her famous friendship with Conservative Justice Antonin Scalia showed that you can disagree and still get along. She was a role model for so many people, but it's important to remember that she had role models to in two thousand and four justice Ginsburg spoke at a Jewish women's archive event marking three, hundred, fifty years of Jewish life in America. She talked about some of the Jewish women who inspired her. One of them was Henrietta sold. Zolt was born in eighteen sixty in Baltimore and like Ginsburg was both visionary a doer who faced in overcame many obstacles as a woman. She founded DASA and helped build the social service infrastructure of what became the state of Israel. So here's ruth. Bader. Ginsburg one of our heroes talking about one of her heroes, another inspiring Jewish woman from history. In my growing up years, my mother spoke of glowingly. Though new had to say no. Better than any other person whose words I have read. Sold had seven sisters. And brother. When her mother died the man well known for his community spirited endeavors. Hi, imperative. Offered to say the codfish. The mourners fair that Ancien customer instructed to be recited only by men. Zone responded to that carrying offer in a letter dated September sixteen. Nineteen sixteen here Kuenssberg reads the key passage of the letter Henrietta sold wrote in response. It is impossible for me to find words in which to tell you. How deeply I wish touched by your offer. To Act as. Well my dear, mother. What you offered to do is beautiful beyond thanks. I shall never forget it. You will wonder then that I cannot accept your offer. I know well and appreciate you say about. Jewish. Custom. That only male children recite the prayer and if there are no male survivors. A male stranger may act as substitute. And Jewish custom is very dear and sacred to me. Yet I cannot ask to say after my mother. The cottage means to me. That the survivor publicly manifest. His intention to assume their relationship to the Jewish community, which is parents had. So that the chain of tradition remains unbroken. From generation to generation. Each adding its own link you can do that for the generations of your family I must do that. For generations of my family. My. Mother had eight daughters and no sun. And yet never did I hear a word of regret. Past, the lips of either my mother or my father. That one of us. WAS NOT, a son. When my father died, my mother would not permit others to take our daughters place. In saying the cottage. Until I am sure. I am acting in her spirit. When I am moved to decline your offer. But beautiful you offer remains nevertheless. And I repeat I know full well. That it is much more in harmony with generally accepted Jewish tradition than his might while my family's conception. You understand me don't you. Flee or celebration of our common heritage while tolerating indeed appreciating the differences among us. Concerning religious practice. Is, captivating, don't you agree?

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Justice Antonin Scalia Supreme Court Henrietta Judith Rosenbaum Pancreatic Cancer Ancien Israel Russia Zolt Baltimore Kuenssberg China America
Tackling Systemic Racism in the Fashion Industry

The Business of Fashion Podcast

07:59 min | 1 year ago

Tackling Systemic Racism in the Fashion Industry

"I everybody and welcome to today's be O. F. Live event. I'm Lauren Chairman Be Offs Executive Editor and I'm joined today by Brandis Daniel Chief Executive of Harlem's fashioned row Sandrine Charles founder of Sandrine. Charles. Consulting Henrietta Galina Brandon creative consultant, and today we're GONNA be talking about a really important topic always but you know especially in the last few months, how to tackle system racism in fashion it's a really big question I'm sure we'll only. Get Two to one or two points here. But but we want to do as much as we can, and in this hour that we have what I wanted to do I is for each of you to introduce yourselves and what you do in your own activists as well. So maybe talk a bit about what you've been working on in the last couple months as the civil rights movement has really come to the forefront in the US, Henrietta maybe we can start with you. I, everyone I'm Lena. I am a direct up by way of saying have been in the fashion industry for. About fifteen years now. What can range of. Brands. DIFFERENCE CASS grades. and. So. My wife is always been rooted increase efficiency inclusions I've asked. My wife tens of mocks stories. An image making and I would say, miss recently I WANNA be. confounds the cut initiative which Let's have a appoint Yucky. Great. Thank you brandis. What about you? I am the. Founder Pearl Fashion Row and icon sixty Harlem's fashion row has been doing this work thirteen years we on started really kinda focusing on designers of color in creating opportunities for them, connecting them with brands, press, and with consumers as well. we've also done several brand collaborations have been a great way to really bring diversity to brands who who may not have had. It were win couvert hit on the pandemic. We started a nonprofit icon sixty, which is basically a fine or designers of collar and We've been able to raise thanks to the NBA took over a million dollars in donations for designers of. Car. It sandrine last but not least I am. Sandrine. Charles of I have been working in the industry for thirteen years. Now, I own Sandrine Charles Salting, which is a week. Calms and Everything encompassing that agency her fashion and lifestyle brands. In addition, I'm the founder alongside Lindsay People's or the black and fashion council. Thank you offer for sharing that so. I think to start. This is a really big question, but obviously, the civil rights movement that's happening right now has been. Very prominent in the news in the last month, it's obviously never not existed but it suddenly. You know the fifteen percent pledge. Protest every single day. Brands are really saying I. WanNa make a difference they're publicly. Saying I'm going to do all these things to be more diverse, etc, etc. Now, a lot of their ex employees or or. You know. Consumers are calling them out for not practicing what what they are are pre chain and I'm curious to know from you all your all veterans in this industry you've you've witnessed this the systemic racism that is particular to fashion. What what do you think? The biggest issue is Ashen and that we can start working on or You know people are already working on but what is the? Biggest point that we need to tackle in order to start fixing all the little problems that have come out of this. Don't know if one of you wants to start. I'll. Brand half. Start I think on what Sandrine Lindsay is doing is asking with the Black Fashion Council asking brands to actually put a quantitative solution in place it's the same thing that Aurora Jane tasked with a fifteen percent pledge i. think the brands have to fully commit and the way that they can fully commit being you know here's exactly what we're going to do. So when you say I want my sales to get better you don't say go out to your. Team and say, you know what we want better cells next year what you do is you say WanNa ten percent increase we want to fifteen percent increase you know right so you create very clear goals so that you know if you're successful in meeting those goals or not successful meeting notes and if you're not successful, there are things you put in place to make sure you overcome that in me that all it's the same thing with this rain so I think. The first thing that Branston do is say, what is our commitment? What is our our firm commitment? Let's start with a very clear commitment and work our way back because my fear is that if we just start having conversations in conversation is a really key piece to this in having with lack people in non black people ruling to have honest dialogue. But my fear is that if we're only talking is the passion Unin die down in another. Year and I. think that's Oliver Fear Rate. But if you put a very clear plan in place and you say, this is what these are the numbers. We're GONNA hit across our organization that means in our leadership and on our boards because let's talk about boards and how they're barely any black people boards. There's only one black. CEO in the entire fashion industry. So that's just say what are we gonNa do across the Board in our organization? And then you work backwards from the air and doing what you have to do to to meet that goal. I one hundred percent agree into because of that I think about what the solutions, all the problem. I always come back to equity. And that's ultimately I think about risk driving for and I think what makes this time so ready Angry special in many ways, is that the asking leadership to support us with? Of. Traditional tax. Supporting. Mental. Internships I think already doing now is we're actually asking our structures like quite literally reopen is themselves to include us and then from where all collectively dying today. Tearing structures, things I. think that's really the only way that detained from a call out that house structure best is the Cha I'm. Deploying mechanisms to. Erase. Racism, I I think it is about equity. Entering do you have anything to add to that? Now I think this are. Really great points. I. It's definitely. A lot of things that Lindsey and my style and the executive or have been working on in terms of. What our goals out of its in having a long term strategy with friends is really essential. There's no way you can teach someone to unlearn something that was you know systematically in place for all of this time. So it's essential for us to not only educate work alongside people who are really willing and ready to make those changes. Over time in for us, it's a three to five year period with benchmarks and timelines and touch points. To see where are in how they are evolving

Founder Black Fashion Council Harlem Sandrine Charles Salting Sandrine Charles Charles Henrietta Galina Brandon Board Sandrine Sandrine Lindsay United States Brandis Daniel Chief Executive NBA Consultant Lindsay People Chairman Executive Editor Branston
Tackling Systemic Racism in the Fashion Industry

The Business of Fashion Podcast

06:11 min | 1 year ago

Tackling Systemic Racism in the Fashion Industry

"I everybody and welcome to today's be O. F. Live event. I'm Lauren Chairman Be Offs Executive Editor and I'm joined today by Brandis Daniel Chief Executive of Harlem's fashioned row Sandrine Charles founder of Sandrine. Charles. Consulting Henrietta Galina Brandon creative consultant, and today we're GONNA be talking about a really important topic always but you know especially in the last few months, how to tackle system racism in fashion it's a really big question I'm sure we'll only. Get Two to one or two points here. But but we want to do as much as we can, and in this hour that we have what I wanted to do I is for each of you to introduce yourselves and what you do in your own activists as well. So maybe talk a bit about what you've been working on in the last couple months as the civil rights movement has really come to the forefront in the US, Henrietta maybe we can start with you. I, everyone I'm Lena. I am a direct up by way of saying have been in the fashion industry for. About fifteen years now. What can range of. Brands. DIFFERENCE CASS grades. and. So. My wife is always been rooted increase efficiency inclusions I've asked. My wife tens of mocks stories. An image making and I would say, miss recently I WANNA be. confounds the cut initiative which Let's have a appoint Yucky. Great. Thank you brandis. What about you? I am the. Founder Pearl Fashion Row and icon sixty Harlem's fashion row has been doing this work thirteen years we on started really kinda focusing on designers of color in creating opportunities for them, connecting them with brands, press, and with consumers as well. we've also done several brand collaborations have been a great way to really bring diversity to brands who who may not have had. It were win couvert hit on the pandemic. We started a nonprofit icon sixty, which is basically a fine or designers of collar and We've been able to raise thanks to the NBA took over a million dollars in donations for designers of. Car. It sandrine last but not least I am. Sandrine. Charles of I have been working in the industry for thirteen years. Now, I own Sandrine Charles Salting, which is a week. Calms and Everything encompassing that agency her fashion and lifestyle brands. In addition, I'm the founder alongside Lindsay People's or the black and fashion council. Thank you offer for sharing that so. I think to start. This is a really big question, but obviously, the civil rights movement that's happening right now has been. Very prominent in the news in the last month, it's obviously never not existed but it suddenly. You know the fifteen percent pledge. Protest every single day. Brands are really saying I. WanNa make a difference they're publicly. Saying I'm going to do all these things to be more diverse, etc, etc. Now, a lot of their ex employees or or. You know. Consumers are calling them out for not practicing what what they are are pre chain and I'm curious to know from you all your all veterans in this industry you've you've witnessed this the systemic racism that is particular to fashion. What what do you think? The biggest issue is Ashen and that we can start working on or You know people are already working on but what is the? Biggest point that we need to tackle in order to start fixing all the little problems that have come out of this. Don't know if one of you wants to start. I'll. Brand half. Start I think on what Sandrine Lindsay is doing is asking with the Black Fashion Council asking brands to actually put a quantitative solution in place it's the same thing that Aurora Jane tasked with a fifteen percent pledge i. think the brands have to fully commit and the way that they can fully commit being you know here's exactly what we're going to do. So when you say I want my sales to get better you don't say go out to your. Team and say, you know what we want better cells next year what you do is you say WanNa ten percent increase we want to fifteen percent increase you know right so you create very clear goals so that you know if you're successful in meeting those goals or not successful meeting notes and if you're not successful, there are things you put in place to make sure you overcome that in me that all it's the same thing with this rain so I think. The first thing that Branston do is say, what is our commitment? What is our our firm commitment? Let's start with a very clear commitment and work our way back because my fear is that if we just start having conversations in conversation is a really key piece to this in having with lack people in non black people ruling to have honest dialogue. But my fear is that if we're only talking is the passion Unin die down in another. Year and I. think that's Oliver Fear Rate. But if you put a very clear plan in place and you say, this is what these are the numbers. We're GONNA hit across our organization that means in our leadership and on our boards because let's talk about boards and how they're barely any black people boards. There's only one black. CEO in the entire fashion industry. So that's just say what are we gonNa do across the Board in our organization? And then you work backwards from the air and doing what you have to do to to meet that goal.

Black Fashion Council Founder Henrietta Galina Brandon Sandrine Charles Sandrine Charles Salting Harlem Charles Board Sandrine Sandrine Lindsay Brandis Daniel United States Chief Executive NBA Consultant Chairman Lindsay People Executive Editor CEO
Ceasefire during COVID-19 pandemic essential, to safeguard 250 million children

UN News

02:13 min | 1 year ago

Ceasefire during COVID-19 pandemic essential, to safeguard 250 million children

"N Children's Fund UNICEF F. One on Friday that two hundred and fifty million children around the world living in the waking nightmare of conflict desperately need warring to stop fighting as the cave in nineteen pandemic spreads in an appeal UNICEF Executive Director Henrietta. Four urged belligerent. To consider that they would not be able to battle the disease while still fighting each other to the children through these waking nightmares. A ceasefire could mean the difference between life and death. She said adding that it would protect children from being killed maimed or forced from their homes and stop the attacks on health centers water and sanitation systems. Misfortune call comes nearly a month after you and chief. Antonio Guitarist appealed for a global ceasefire which has resulted in a temporary lull in hostilities. In eleven countries violent conflict continues nonetheless in parts of Afghanistan became a facile Libya Mali Myanmar Syria Ukraine Yemen and elsewhere. The unions have appeal coincides with the release of UN research suggesting that the recession caused by cave nineteen could cause hundreds of thousands of additional child deaths this year responding to the findings which would reverse gains in reducing infant mortality. Un Secretary General Antonio guitarfish called for urgent action to protect youngsters wellbeing even before the pandemic childhood malnutrition and stunting were at unacceptable levels. He said now with classrooms closed almost everywhere. Nearly three hundred ten million children who rely on school meals are missing out on this. Daily dose of nutrition children are victims and witnesses of domestic violence and abuse with schools. Closed and important early warning mechanism is missing the UN chief explained reviews household income will force poor families to cut back on essential else and food expenditures particularly affecting children pregnant women and breastfeeding mothers and the self-services become overwhelmed. Seek children are less able to access get with the global recession gathering base there could be hundreds of thousands of vicious child deaths in twenty twenty in addition to the suspension of polio vaccination campaigns measles immunization has also been halted in at least twenty three countries the UN secretary general continued

UN Secretary General Antonio Guit Libya Mali Myanmar Syria Ukrai Unicef Antonio Guitarist Afghanistan Executive Director
Detained children at 'grave risk' of contracting COVID-19

UN News

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Detained children at 'grave risk' of contracting COVID-19

"Hundreds of thousands of children in detention around the world are at grave risk of contracting Kobe. Nineteen ahead of the United Nations Children's fund UNICEF said on Monday calling for the original release executive director. Henrietta four painted a picture of children detained in overcrowded spaces with inadequate access to nutrition health care and hygiene services conditions. Hardly conducive to spreading disease and outbreaking. One of these facilities could happen at any moment. She said in a statement adding that these children were also more exposed to neglect abuse and gender-based marlins especially with low staffing levels or care negatively impacted by the pandemic

United Nations Children Executive Director Unicef Marlins
Making Do

Your Brain on Facts

09:36 min | 1 year ago

Making Do

"Dissolve one packet of Lemon Jello in one can or one cubes worth of Beef Bouillon. Add lemon juice and allowed to cool. Add three hard boiled eggs diced. One Cup diced celery. Half an onion grated one cup miracle whip and one can of corn beef chopped chill until set slice and serve congratulations. You've just made corned beef luncheon salad. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. Use It up where it out make it do were do without my grandmother would say. I thought that was clever saying from her side of the family but it was actually a slogan from World War Two encouraging the public to use fewer resources so more could be diverted to the war effort. We're all getting a taste of that as we're hunker down unable to shop at the spur of the moment and much more limited in our choices when we do thankfully we do have precedent to fall back on after all people are still alive today it through the Great Depression children. The roaring twenties came to an abrupt stop with the Stock Market Crash of Nineteen Twenty nine which saw billions of dollars evaporated into thin air. The crash wasn't the sole cause of the Great Depression. There were things like the dust bowl wherein incorrect farming methods turned the fertile American planes into a desert but the crash did act to accelerate the global economic collapse by nineteen thirty three. Nearly half of America's banks failed and thirty percent of the workforce was unemployed. You had to make the most of what you had and you had to get good at that fast to women. Help struggling homemakers to be able to feed their families. Eleanor Roosevelt an aunt. Sammy beginning in nineteen twenty. Six and Sammy had a popular weekday. Radio show called housekeepers chat about cooking and other domestic concerns as well as chitchatting about whatever else was going on at the time and Sammy was very popular especially in rural areas. Thousands of people wrote into her for recipes by nineteen thirty to one hundred and ninety four stations broadcast aunt. Sammy show and she published aunt. Sammy's radio recipes. Parenthetically the Great Depression Cookbook. It would be the first cookbook published in Braille. Interestingly enough though I struggle to think of how difficult it would be to cook on wood or old timey gas stove without good eyesight on Sammy's recipes. Were meant to be simple healthy and easy to cook. She's even credited with helping Broccoli. Find widespread acceptance prior to which it was only found in insular Italian neighborhoods and Sammie helped many wives and mothers through the Great Depression but once that was over then country was back on its feet. People lost interest. The show was cancelled sometime in the nineteen forties. Though sources don't agree when exactly. There's one other fact about aunt Sammy. That's worth mentioning. She didn't exist in the latter half of the twentieth. The Department of Agriculture Bureau of Home Economics created a wife for uncle. Sam The on creatively named Aunt Sammy. The character was voiced by different women at each individual radio station that way the listener would hear an accent similar to their own and feel more connected to aunt Sammy. Three women worked behind the scenes at the USDA to prepare the script each week that all the regional aunt. Sammy's would use fanny Walker. Contested Recipes Josephine. Harmful wrote the chatty portions of the show and Ruth Fan demine coordinated all of the Menus and recipes. The other woman who guided homemakers through was the very real first lady. Eleanor Roosevelt. When Franklin Roosevelt entered the White House in Nineteen thirty three? A record number of people were hungry but being president is not without its perks and the first family eight well even extravagantly while people stood inbred lines. Eleanor Roosevelt. Who didn't know how to cook realized that the way she and the president ate in the White House had the potential to influence and even help the nation through the depression. She hired an acquaintance. Henrietta Nesbitt whose husband was out of work to be the new White House housekeeper housekeeper at that time more like how we use the term homemaker today and not as we use a euphemism for cleaning lady. Nesbitt and Roosevelt retooled the entire kitchen installing modern appliances and coaxing the skeptical White House staff to use them. This was the first kitchen in America and it wasn't even sanitary recalled. Nesbitt in her memoir. Meanwhile Eleanor turn to home economists for menus that would balance nutrition and economy the healthiest recipes in the world wouldn't help people if they couldn't afford the ingredients what's more she resolved to serve these humble dishes in the White House. Her efforts were covered by national newspapers and followed closely by housewives. There was a catch. These nutritious economic meals were awful. The first kitchen was turning out some of the most unpalatable meals in modern memory. The president himself was usually the test subject for these new dishes and he obligingly choked them down. Things like deviled eggs with tomato sauce and prune pudding in place of lavish dishes. The White House table was the stage for things like Spaghetti with boiled carrots. Cold jellied billion and bread and butter sandwiches served so much mutton that being grown sheep which is cheaper than lamb. Because it's much tougher that it became a joke throughout Washington. The first lady experimented with foods like milk corno a mix of dried milk powder and cornmeal developed by Cornell University milk. Porno could be eaten as a gruel like dish or worked into recipes. I was not brave enough to research. What those recipes might be. The bland meals became so notorious that visitors to the White House would eat before they went nutrition. Not Taste was paramount in the time of soup. Kitchens and bread lines and eleanor. Roosevelt was trying to use her table as a way of encouraging and inspiring other Americans to get through this uniquely challenging historical moment. It was just as well they got used to eating a limited range of food because FDR's presidency also included World War Two and the Roosevelt's eight rationed food just like everyone else Roosevelt's White House eight modestly in an act of culinary solidarity with the people who were suffering. Jane's Eagle men. The CO author of a square meal told The New York Times. Here's a sampling of menu items. The first family and the public general might have enjoyed in massive bunny ears spaghetti with carrots and white sauce. The sauce was basically just milk. Meatless loaf made with peace oatmeal peanuts. Rice and or cottage cheese. Whatever you could get your hands on Mulligan's stew any animal. You could kill or find dead with whatever veggies you could manage or anything. That would keep hungry. They for a few hours without killing you like sawdust. It was reportedly created by the massive homeless population during the depression. Where people in homeless or migrant worker camps would pool their resources so that everyone could eat none of my sources mentioned where the name Mulligan might have come from. We do know the name origin of another STU. Hoover Stu Herbert Hoover had been elected just in time for the crash. But Unlike the Roosevelt's he continued to live the good life in the White House. Shantytowns BECAME HOOVER. Villes and the soup from soup. Kitchens became hoover stu the weirdest one of all and this report is opinion was peanut butter in baked. Onions was a whole onion hollowed out stuffed with peanut butter and baked. Just because we have two things on hand doesn't mean we should eat them at the same time as Eagle men succinctly put it. Peanut butter has nothing to say to a baked onion. Some recipes sound like they shouldn't work but surprisingly do like mock Apple Pie. Apples weren't readily available. But Americans weren't willing to give up their conic Apple Pie. The apples in mock apple pie were actually Ritz crackers and it worked. If you're not already familiar with Youtuber Emmy made in Japan. I'll link her hard time series in the show notes and on the website. She all kinds of dishes from times of deprivation including hot water pie grapefruit. Peel steak toast soup. And even the Haitian dirt cookies which you can hear more about in episode number ninety four. My name is mud while we can be grateful that recipes like ketchup soup and peanut butter and mayonnaise. Sandwiches are behind us. Some food created during the depression is still with us. Meatloaf is a comfort food classic and shaping food into loaves go to during the Great Depression. The same goes for casseroles which were a good way to use up odds and ends or to mask less palatable ingredients the depression also gave us the mother of all comfort. Food Kraft Macaroni and cheese or kraft dinner for my friends up. North in Nineteen thirty seven craft heard about a salesman from the tender Roni. Macaroni Company of Saint Louis. A Scottish emigrant aimed grant Leslie going rogue and selling his noodles with packets of greeted kraft cheese attached. They hired him to promote the concept and started selling it for nineteen cents for four servings.

Eleanor Roosevelt Aunt Sammy White House Depression Franklin Roosevelt President Trump Great Depression Cookbook America Stu Herbert Hoover Henrietta Nesbitt Sammie Hoover Washington Cornell University Mulligan Department Of Agriculture Bure
9 million children could die in a decade unless world acts on pneumonia, leading agencies warn

UN News

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

9 million children could die in a decade unless world acts on pneumonia, leading agencies warn

"Boosting efforts to fight. Pneumonia could avert nearly nine million child deaths. This decade from pneumonia and other major diseases is a new analysis is found ahead of the first ever global forum on childhood pneumonia taking place this week. According to a new model from Johns Hopkins University in the United States scaling-up pneumonia treatment and prevention services can save the lives of three point. Two million children under five that would create a so called ripple effect that would prevent five point seven seven million extra child deaths from other major childhood diseases at the same time if we're serious about saving the lives of children said UN Children's Fund Executive Director Henrietta four. We have to get serious about fighting pneumonia. The current corona virus outbreak shows this means improving timely detection and prevention. She added it. Pneumonia is the biggest single killer of children. Worldwide claiming the lives of eight hundred thousand last year or one child every thirty nine

Pneumonia Fund Executive Director Henrie Johns Hopkins University United States UN
"henrietta" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

07:04 min | 3 years ago

"henrietta" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"And DNA analysis services up to ten thousand dollars. And they are moving into unsee Quance places like Mongolia, Micronesia and pretty much all of Africa and the Middle East and in return twenty three and me gets to add all that DNA to its database. The researchers don't have to geneticists either to take the DNA from individuals that can be photographers. They can be geologists. They could be whomever. They could be doing missionary work. Okay. And they can say, hey, I idea I'll work for one three and me are twenty three and me and ancestry dot com and Biogen, and I'll sit down I'll talk with them about Jesus. And then I'll have them spit in a Cup. Spitzer for Jesus that's a horrible idea. So horrible horrible idea. Not only are these companies analyzing DNA, there'd be getting bio harvesting operations in these countries. Bio harvesting and bio prospecting are two terms. I never thought I never guessed that. I would hear these words being used in my lifetime. So they are bio harvesting people they are bio prospecting for DNA glitches and DNA smoking guns. I don't know what they're looking for. They're looking for the alien medical orient. I don't know what they're looking for harvesting from people in other countries sounds like some nightmare scenario for science fiction novel. Then what are they gonna do with that DNA once they get it? Comparable to the story of Henrietta lacks the story about Henrietta lacks. Right. Henry Henrietta lacks. Never consented to having her tissues taken from her. She had cancer. I saw the I saw the movie on each be. Oh, there's movie and HBO that has Oprah Winfrey. Ray job. She plays a great character. And so Oprah's doing this. She's I think she's the sister of Henrietta as a few mental problems. But she's like, you know. Really well played by Oprah. And what they did is they took Henrietta lacks. They took her tissues. She never can can send it to it. And then they were used around the word world for health research. She had these like super cells. He's super they call them superhero cells. I guess, and if you read the book, which I have immortal life of Henrietta lacks, we read that Henrietta laxest family never knew about the fact that they took her sells. They never knew it even as the cells were used around the world and research, and then here's something else. The family themselves were asked for blood samples twenty years later. And they were compensated for that either. And the book describes the indignity other family's ordeal. Even is giant corporations profited. Immensely. From Henrietta laxest cells, they took herself, and these corporations have been benefiting from her cells. For for years. They're called. Hello. Or he Lau in medical terms. Hello or hitting on. Sorry. Halo. Sales are called halo halo. That's a different thing. That's how that's being Islam or Muslim. He LA is. What is their? He lot sale sells their sales and her children, basically again without their knowledge had their medical records studied and even published. Now, I was reading also that group of scientists at the European molecular biology laboratory in Heidelberg actually published a paper where they sequenced the entire genome of a healer sell basically putting Henrietta lacks DNA sequence up on their internet site for you look at. And amazingly they failed alert. Anyone anyone who lacks family about their intentions or they didn't even ask permission? Wow. Isn't that surprising? Did they have been abusing this woman? I mean, we have benefited from Henrietta lacks cells. Okay. Home world has benefited from her cells and the family of Henrietta lacks. Well, I mean compensation. No, thanks. No, nothing. You know, struggling to get that information out there and a group of scientists then publish the cell on their website. They're basically put the DNA sequence up for everybody to see. Ever since twenty three me and announce that they struck a deal three hundred billion dollar deal with GlaxoSmithKline. The reason why they wanted exclusive rights. The twenty three in meets customer data for drug targets. Many customers have expressed their anger about it. But. Zombie discovered that this was the deal along. This is what they were planning on twenty three and me was going to bio harvest there were going to co modify DNA for the highest bidder that was their intent from the very beginning. Twenty three and me with its hybrid model has been co modifying helping genetic data for years, and it's waiting further into the field of drug discovery. And in two thousand fifteen there was an expose Forbes reported that the company had inked its first pharmaceutical company deal. With a company called Genentech. They they pretend million up front and then up to fifty million if it's data turned out to be useful for developing Parkinson's treatments. Fizer signed a data sharing agreement of its own shortly after that was back with twenty three and me had data from only six hundred and fifty thousand consenting individuals proprietary database. Now when they first started, no, one knew the value of the information. So it's a lot of fun. You get to find out. What your ancestors come from? And critics were unsure of the value of any information. It was self reported as it was and still is a database has grown into the millions differences in how customers interpret survey questions matter less and less now to the company's potential research partners. What they're looking for now is to get the help to get this kind of health and behavioral information from people, and then twenty three and me is continually pushing surveys out to the customers few questions here if you questions there, and it's kind of like going on a first date every time you log on and people love talking about themselves on volunteer. All the information, even thinking, wait a minute. Are they using this information to phenotype me? Yes, they are. Pheno typing you. What are they phenotype you for more and more data? They can send the drug companies. Now, that's good. Maybe it will find a cure for cancer. Who knows we just got a report that people are dying less and less cancer. These days. That doesn't mean that doesn't mean they have the cure because we Janine and I did a show this. No, it's not good business to find a cure for cancer. The what are they using it for well GlaxoSmithKline three hundred million investment with twenty three twenty three says it separate for the research? Collaboration. Gives a good sense of just how valuable your spit.

Henry Henrietta Henrietta laxest GlaxoSmithKline Oprah Winfrey Cup Biogen Middle East Africa unsee Quance Jesus Mongolia Spitzer Micronesia LA Genentech HBO Ray Janine Lau
"henrietta" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

10:36 min | 3 years ago

"henrietta" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Numbers to call tonight. Six seventy three thirty seven hundred. Triple eight six three three seven hundred. Show. I did a lot of people don't know who she is a lot of people do Henrietta lacks. And I brought it up because of what we're talking about tonight. And in that is the voluntary releasing of your DNA to companies like twenty three and me. Because they're not only in the business of analyzing your DNA. But also, they're into something called bio harvesting and bio prospecting. Now, you heard these terms I did not know that I would ever in my lifetime here, this type of term bio harvesting and bio prospecting of DNA, but it seems this is a new form of vampirism in a lot of ways because taking your DNA would be is the same as taking your blood, and they're using it without your permission. And I said during the last hour, I said, well, you know, reminds me the Henrietta lacks story and while. A lot of people know who she is a lot of people don't Henrietta lacks. Was it African American housewife? She was a mother of five children. She went to Johns Hopkins hospital in Baltimore in nineteen fifty one. She was bleeding. Doctors discovered. But she had a malignant tumor on her cervix and collected cells from that tumor without her knowledge or consent. Now lacks died on October four thousand nine hundred eighty one she was thirty one years old. But her cells continued to live announced because scientists in the lab discovered to their amazement that unlike the sales bid collected and other experiments which expired almost immediately outside of human body hers. Thrived Henrietta Alexa sales would thrive. And in fact, they were doubling growth every twenty to twenty four hours. That's according to a report from Johns Hopkins medicine now the line of cells, which scientists now call, hey, LA or Henrietta lacks. Hey, LA, the hayloft cells. Those cells would go on to contribute to significant advances in scientific research. They also led to two Nobel prizes in research and the development of vaccines cancer treatments in vitro fertilization and a genome sequence it was actually published last year. Two years ago. Actually, it was post twenty seventeen I keep you know, we're still in that transition period. So twenty seventeen they published the genome sequence of Henrietta lacks. So the cells have been used in research and a lot of reasons to research toxins hormones viruses. These cells are being used to study the effects of radiation and development of polio. Vaccine all of this was because of a very courageous woman who after death did not realize just how much of a hero. She was. To science how much of a hero. She was to medical science. There are seventeen thousand United States patents that involved. He lost sales or Henry, and Alexa cells, and they are theoretically continuing to make money. I mean, big pharmaceutical medical corporations are making money to this day. Off his woman cells after she died in nineteen fifty one. In two thousand seventeen Johns Hopkins University released a statement saying that they had not profited from her cells. But. What had happened? It will Hopkins was saying this because I know that the family had sued wanting a little compensation compensation is, you know, none of this was you know, to their knowledge, they did not know this was happening. And and even when they gave their own blood. They didn't know there's going to be used for other experiments so Hopkins had to make a statement saying that when the cells were taken from Henrietta lacks in nineteen fifty one. There was no established protocol for informing patients are getting consent for research of cell or tissue specimens since they didn't have the protocols back. Then they don't know what the hell will just take the cells replicating, we can take them in. And no one knows the better because she's dead family. Doesn't know and we won't tell him and scientists across the world have used the cells in research, and as I said in the last hour, the scientists in Heidelberg Germany, actually published a paper announcing today had sequence the entire genome of Henrietta lacks the hell I'll sail they they basically sequence the entire genome. Basically put Henrietta lacks DNA. The sequence on the internet for everybody. You see they didn't even ask for permission to do this. And so when it comes to your body, if you're not alive to defend yourself you become prey for. Called bio harvesters, which I say is it's probably the new form of vampirism. Or people just taking you know, people's D. I mean, ever since twenty three and me we're talking about DNA here ever since Twenty-three in be had announced that they had struck a deal, which is three hundred million dollars with GlaxoSmithKline. They did it. They announced it just recently. In fact, we announced it months before. And then they came forward. It was leaked. I the GlaxoSmithKline struck a deal three hundred billion with them. And then of course, they made it known that they struck a deal in a lot of people were angry about it. However, it has been discovered that this was the deal all along that win twenty three and me began. The idea was to bio harvest and have people voluntarily give their DNA and the way they did it is they were just basically, look, hey heinous is a lot of fun. Find out who your ancestors are find out a lot of things about you. So it was basically a way to co modify DNA for the highest bidder. In two thousand fifteen Forbes reported that the company twenty three and me. At inked its first company deal with Genentech. Ten million dollars? They wanna ten million dollars up front and up to fifty million dollars of its data turn out to be useful for developing Parkinson's treatments. Fizer signed a data sharing agreement of its own shortly after and that was back when twenty three and me had data from only six hundred and fifty thousand consented individuals is proprietary database. Now, I I'm sure nobody knew the value of the information. You need something about Henrietta lacks. You know? Yeah. It's very valuable, and yeah, they'll take it from you. And they won't ask. But is the database has grown into the millions. Now. Differences in how customers interprets survey questions that they're getting? Well, you know, what are they doing with survey questions? They send you survey questions survey question after survey questioned the reason why is because they're pheno typing. You. Pheno typing you. And you know, a lot of times, you know, how they interpret the survey questions made me less than Alaska. They're thinking we're to get more money here when you get more money there. So they get all this health and behavioral information, and then they're continually pushing surveys out of the customers because a few questions here a few questions there and people just love to talk about themselves. You know, for example, Instagram Facebook Twitter, they'll they'll tell you when what they're eating they'll tell you when they're taking a dump tell you anything. On facebook. So here we have this GlaxoSmithKline three hundred million dollar investment. Which Twenty-three in me says is separate for the research collaboration. Basically, it gives us good sense of just how valuable your spit is just how valuable spit kid is. Here's the deal. I asked in the first hour of anybody got spit kit for Christmas. I've had a few people tell me they got through it out. Nita called who's from zuri African American woman called and said, yeah, she threw hers out, and she she actually stated the reason why is because she remembers Henrietta lacks. She remembers the Tuskegee experiments were black servicemen were injected with syphilis. And here's the deal Twenty-three Mia saying, well, we have a problem guys in that is not in a black. People are using our services, we need to find out how we can go in and basically become bio harvesters in Africa. And the people that are taking the DNA from these people in Africa. They don't have to be geneticists can be anybody. For example, a missionary and say, hey, you know, I believe in Jesus Christ spitting this cop. And we're going to find out about your DNA or we could be geologists. Hey, we're doing we're doing an investigation into the plant and environmental lives of this, blah, blah. Oh, by the way this cop. We got a send that to twenty three and me. So even as it's adding an additional revenue stream to its drug development Twenty-three in me. They're expanding into a worldwide phenomenon. And they want to stay in the published. Good graces by saying. Well, we won't sell any of your information. That is not de identified. But, you know, doing best practices, which they're attempting to do is it going to impact any Twenty-three means medical research because there are no restrictions on the use or the release of de identified DNA data. I mean, so there's best practices going in and saying, hey, we're gonna go to a firm called future of privacy forum, and we're gonna we're gonna right? They will never share that information. This guaranteed is that going to be a hack or someone ripping it off or some rogue labs saying, hey, we have this information where to use it to create some sort of an artificial intelligence or some artificial life form or whatever. And so. And you'll Craig Venter's done. I mean, he was the he's the guy has been creating synthetic lifeforms. We're talking about that. What was it? The other night. We were talking about the the lab meat, and I was talking about synthetic lifeforms. I was talking about you know, the crisper using it on cattle. To create the meat or the the the meat in a lab. We were just talking about vegetarian. Meet the other nine people were freaking out about that saying how dare you eat that. Oh my God. Well, I mean, you know, I haven't eaten the Schmidt yet. I haven't eaten this fake meat yet or the meat that synthetic.

Henrietta Alexa GlaxoSmithKline Johns Hopkins hospital Johns Hopkins University Johns Hopkins medicine Hopkins Craig Venter Baltimore Alexa United States Genentech facebook Africa Instagram Henry Heidelberg Germany Alaska