35 Burst results for "Hemingway"

America Has Lost Its First Principals Without the Bible

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:26 min | 2 months ago

America Has Lost Its First Principals Without the Bible

"We've lost our concept of first principles you know. As as a hemingway describes bankruptcy says it happens gradually then suddenly and this. This happened gradually for at least a century. And then i think we're sort of in the suddenly episode right now so one way. How is it that we've lost a sense of The the good turn the beautiful well because for instance. There's one book that you will not be taught in schools right now. You can be taught robin diangelo. You can be taught from candy. You could probably be taught mine comp but the one book that you can you will go to court if you teach. It is the bible in it in the twentieth century. Some some justices on the supreme court they found in the invisible ink above the nation's beneath the pin number is that the constitution says no bible in schools. It right now in schools you can have a religious liturgy. You can pray to the various secular saints. You can have rituals for or pride or we have a whole month for pride but if you any way pray to god in schools that's going to be a big problem in a lot of places and so i think conservatives fell for this trap where we believe that secular liberalism is just a neutral playing field and the left is going to do. But it's not it's obviously a rigged game and if we are not allowed to state plain truths god exists. There's a difference between good and bad men or women. We're not allowed to stay those truths than not only. We're not playing on an even playing field but we've already lost the debate before it's

Robin Diangelo Supreme Court Saints
Ken Burns on America, Selling His First Film and More

61 Minutes

02:04 min | 2 months ago

Ken Burns on America, Selling His First Film and More

"This Independence day, we turned to a man who tells the story of America in her glory and struggle for unity. Ken Burns. Documentaries range from the Civil War to baseball, country music, and this year's Ernest Hemingway. As we first told you last fall, Burns calls himself an emotional archaeologist. He excavates lost love letters, forgotten photos and overlooked heroes. Research so deep viewers can feel like strangers discovering America For the first time, his films ask what it means to be American. So we asked What does it mean to be Ken Burns? Have had the privilege of spending my entire life making films about the U. S. Capital U Capital s, But I've also had the privilege of making films about us. The two letter lower case plural pronoun that has a kind of intimacy and warmth to it in the country Music film Merle Haggard says. Country music is about those things we believe in but can't see like dreams and songs and souls. It's telling us that there is in front of us are kind of Rational world in which one in one always equals two, but that the thing that compels us forward as human beings is that we look for one and one Equalling three. We find that in our faith, we find that in our art we find that in our love of each other, and I think one of the things I discovered working on country music is that When I understood this dynamic between the US and us lowercase uppercase that I realized there's only us know them. The choice was easy because us the Americans struggle to forge union from diversity has been Ken Burns obsession since he was 11 years old at the end of this lane in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Ken Burns U. S. Capital U Capital Ernest Hemingway United States Burns Baseball Merle Haggard Ann Arbor Michigan
Michael Isikoff Has An Issue With Barry Meier and The Collusion Hoax

The Dan Bongino Show

01:53 min | 4 months ago

Michael Isikoff Has An Issue With Barry Meier and The Collusion Hoax

"I saw this this weekend had tipped Glenn Greenwald to put it out in the social media can actually does real journalism. Greenwall picked out this gym these air. This is a former New York Times reporter Barry Meyer. And a liberal reporter, Michalis two coffees on me not have trouble Connemara reporter, but whatever you get the hint This is a fascinating exchange. Let me give you some background. You want to see how we get to group think and how people believe things that aren't true. Listen to this sucker here, a little background on it. So Barry Meyer was a former New York Times journalist. And he wrote this book recently. And the book is about how the whole Russian collusion thing happened. And how fusion GPS these air basically paid spies who were paid to feed information to media outlets that we now know. Was it true, Donald Trump colluded with the Russians? You've heard it all before. We don't need to re litigate the collusion hoax here. It's all fake. Okay, it's made up, you get it. But Meyer didn't expose in his bookkeeper minds Got you sorry for The New York Times isn't right for bright Bart. Conservative Review Bongino calm. He was right for the New York Times, and he's highlighting and sounding the alarm over this. Paid intelligence operation Fusion, GPS and others who are paid to produce political information and then feed it to media. People who run with it. Well, what's the problem with them? Information often turns out to be false. Sounds like a big problem. So it's a cop who's a big lefties interviewing Barry Meyer and instead of celebrating the fact that conservative media My show, Fox news. Other shows out there. Molly Hemingway Home and Jenkins John Solomon, who got the collusion hoax story right that it was a hoax instead of celebrating it liberal Michaelis a cough is more concerned about the fact that right wing media chose to have Barry Meyer despite him having written for The New York Times on their shows. And he's not concerned at all the fact that we got it right and they got it

Barry Meyer The New York Times Greenwall Michalis Glenn Greenwald Donald Trump Meyer Bart Molly Hemingway Jenkins John Solomon Fox News Michaelis Cough
Episode 213 Phantasm 2 Director's Cut - burst 09

The Moratorium

01:51 min | 4 months ago

Episode 213 Phantasm 2 Director's Cut - burst 09

"Oh my god that guy has been million thing. what'd you say. Name kenneth tigar. That's how i'm saying. He's an hundred seventy-one credits. Yep even the lethal weapon franchise. Oh yeah i love it. Also when you look at their trivia it's like had studied to be a surgeon but Started acting in crappy movies instead. This guy it says. He's got a master's from harvard. Dermot literature like what and yet. He's in like mr belvedere some. Yes i guess those guys get that calling and it's like the wanting to save people's lives and but you know in college us being lethal weapon said he's made a great career out of playing nobody his middle name leslie loan just get that out of the way. Also he is a movie that was on cinemax. I've probably seen five hundred times. Don't know what i mean. I do know why creator yes O'toole zoll go ahead and giggling his name one more time. Well i'm i'm getting ready to about thirty eight minutes of the way through creator and you see mariel hemingway's boobs while so have a feeling. That's why i've seen it so many times. But she's playing football and you see your boobs. She flashes the they're playing like flag. Football and child lashes the other team. Gotcha so okay my contribution to making note here watch thirty two seconds of creator period and circling it. Highlighting it and rub dolla. I don't mean book that

Imdb Celebrity TV Horror Funny 1980'S Cult Obscure Movie Review Comedy Leslie Loan Mariel Hemingway Rodney Dangerfield O'toole Zoll Thirty Two Seconds Five Hundred Times Liz Girl Hundred Seventy-One Credits Mike First Part About Thirty Eight Minutes One More Time Cinemax Times Harvard Weapon Belvedere Dermot Kenneth Tigar Mr Belvedere Toole Zoll Leslie Football
"hemingway" Discussed on Newt's World

Newt's World

08:09 min | 6 months ago

"hemingway" Discussed on Newt's World

"Age of colin infant. An all in all these things will be nice to have a new hemingway ca somehow captured for us the spirit of make sense which is what he does with. The sun also rises. We were talking earlier about the book. Everybody has badly. Which i think is a terrific. Leslie terrific buck. Highly recommended what. I'm intrigued worth when you look at. All of that is was at the moment was an entire population. Sorta was waiting for somebody like hemingway to capture for them their own thoughts and it's a combination of the topics but also this new writing style which cuts through what had been the classic american literary genre to that point when you look back on that. Are you surprised. How gigantic and impacted. It's hard to say. Because i can't imagine american literature or literature of world war one without the sun also rises. It is so important and yet it's not even directly about the war. It's about the generation. Like sarah was saying and how people were damaged by this scale of loss and trauma that they had all gone through. And how do you keep on living. How do you keep on finding meaning in life. And it's such an unusual way to approach it for that time. I think it's very idiosyncratic. It's very particular to the circumstances he was in and the people he knew and the things he saw what he was interested in. So it's hard to even imagine. I think it had a huge impact on his life. That's for sure and it also was away that he showed and leslie bloom. Shows the so beautifully in her book he was willing and eager to use any everything his disposal to tell the story. He wanted to tell even at the expense of people who had really helped him and good friends that he portrayed in the book and not terribly positive. Light especially herald loeb. Who was a good friend of his and it helped him in his career and then was portrayed in the novel has robert cohn who sort of an anti hero or the villain of the story and a lot of ways and so. Hemingway didn't care he wanted to tell his story and he would take whatever he could around him to make great literature. And there's a price to pay for that and that's so your depression that he was a dangerous friend very much so very interesting very exciting but also like being next to ally him. He could bite you at any moment. So that and he was driven by hemingway. He wasn't driven very externally in that sense. The other part of that though is that hemingway also seems to me. And i'd be curious because you've been so immersed in this the clean simple short narrative model that he developed where the senses are easy to understand is driving. Momentum sorta paves the way for dashiell hammett and others see an entire american genre of a kind of clean storytelling. That's profoundly different from what went before does that fit as you look at his impact on writing and his impact on would be authors of the future. We did a series of conversations about hemingway with different experts and writers and people who had perspective and one of the people who join us. Those rachel kushner. Who's a novelist in la in her forties or fifties and to read her. You might not necessarily see the echoes of hemingway per se. And she said she thought. Her generation wasn't directly influenced by hemingway. But they were influenced by the generation that came before that was directly influenced by way so in a sense. His fingerprints are his. Dna is passing through many removed. And i think someone writing one hundred years from now will be influenced by hemingway but they may not really realize it. it's unavoidable even with six hours. Which is a remarkable documentary. Builder owen person. You must have left really interesting things on the cutting floor i guess nowadays digits. We don't actually cut anything anymore. This is a leftover from the age of film. But i'm curious. What do you think is the biggest thing you regret. Not having been able to include good question. I mean we always say that the stuff that's on the cutting room floor virtual or not is never bad stuff. It's just i mean. Ken is famous for saying this. It's too many notes. Just one too many threads for our audience to follow you. Know one of the challenges of the film. I would say is that so much of hemingway's greatest work was done in the first decade of his writing career. I would say from his early time in paris through the farewell to arms or even into the early thirties. And so we could have made six hours just on that because there's so much to explore and so in particular. The short stories has first rate burst of short stories and those are often overlooked because the novels we tend to value novels over short stories as markers of literary genius or whatever but there are many short stories that we were not able to delve into deeply in particular. I have my favorite. Which is soldiers home. I think is an extraordinary work about a young man coming home from world war one and trying to reintegrate into society after all kinds of horrific experiences and ending really not being able to do that. Fam- understanding him her. It's a beautiful story. It's very short. We don't open up and tell you about that short story and that i wish we could have done. You may not be allowed to answer this question. But i'm curious now that you have this great achievement heading to your list of great achievement. You have a notion yet of what the next one is. Aria lynn cannon. I are making a film about the. Us response to the holocaust looking at what our country knew when we knew it and what we did about it in relationship to the immigration and refugee crisis that we are still feeling the effects of so that film will come out in twenty twenty three. It's another six hour. Look at that time. ken is working on many projects. Another one that. I am directly working on is a big series where making on the american revolution. So that's a very interesting time to be doing. That and lynn is working on a big series on the history of crime and punishment. You made the book or you mean the process. Now the history. Right crime and punishment in america so the book is fascinating novel but this is really going back to the earliest european presence here up through the american revolution and the penitentiary system and then all the way up to mass incarceration and beyond over twenty years in prison reform. Very important topic. We're grateful you for that and we actually want to say. Sarah together made a film. Two years ago. That came out called college behind bars. Enough you've heard about it. But it was exploration of men and women in prison enrolled in and really remarkable college program called the bard prison initiative so they earn college degrees and they experienced the transformative power of education. And the film opens with a starting moby dick and then it goes on from there to linear algebra and mandarin and advance economics. These are incarcerated men and women are marginalized communities who are some of our most brilliant scholars that you could possibly imagine so we and we very much aware of your very important work on criminal justice reform lemay shown to both of you. As each of these new projects comes to fruition. If you'd be willing to come back and talk about a we'd love to have you come because it's absolutely fascinating you you do world classwork so it's always a great tribute. I feel great being in your presence in knowing how hard you to have worked and cans work to build this entire genre of material would love to so thank you very very much for joining us. Thank you for having us. It's been a pleasure. Thank you so much as a great conversation. Nobody concerned about san. Thanks for joining me today. And looking forward to watch hemingway part tonight at eight. Pm eastern on my local tv station for our listeners. Who missed watching. Hemingway part one. Last night you can watch it online for free on the pbs app or by going to pbs. Dot org slash. Hemingway it's an.

robert cohn Aria lynn cannon six hours today america six hour Ken lynn Last night herald loeb Hemingway Sarah fifties paris ken Two years ago rachel kushner both first decade forties
"hemingway" Discussed on Newt's World

Newt's World

07:50 min | 6 months ago

"hemingway" Discussed on Newt's World

"Producers and editors since came in nineteen ninety-seven seven. I came to florentine thumbs in nineteen eighty nine when ken was finishing civil war series. And we've had just an incredible experience of learning about subjects as far ranging as jazz prohibition the second world war and now hemingway and vietnam war action. Forget that so we throw ourselves into these subjects sort of headlong their long-term research and production effort so we got to know the people we get to know the historians and we enter into worlds that we would never have access to. And it's been incredible privilege to do it together. Sarah so i'm cursed because of your prestige because of the extraordinary achievements. You could cover almost anything. So why of all the things you picked. Why go to hemingway. I have personally been fascinated by kind of obsessed with hemingway. Since i was in high school. And that was in the nineteen seventies. When i first discovered the sun also rises in school and then read a farewell to arms on many of the short stories as a young adult and found like many people his life and his work completely fascinating and in the mid nineties. I went to key west on vacation or went to his home and saw the rumor. He worked and really felt an epiphany of if we're looking for iconic american subjects and important stories to tell. How could we not do. Hemingway and i went back to walpole and talked to. Ken burns in jeopardy. And they said yeah hemingway's great. We've sort of thought about it before. Let's think about it. It's more and we thought about it and thought about it and it took us a while to get there because of other projects we're working on and finally in around mulan working on our vietnam serious and jeff in san decided yes. We're going to do hemingway. it's time to tell the story to mazing tribute to the prestige. You bring to documentaries that the voices you had for hemingway and his four wives me jeff. Daniels meryl streep keri russell. Mary-louise parker patricia clarkson. That's really quite a group. How hard was it to draw them together just to say it is. One of our favourite aspects of our work is to find actors to read well known and lesser known. Important people in our history and this film certainly has a great cast. Jeff daniels inhabits hemingway in such a miraculous way. he not only reads the works of hemingway. But all of hemingway's personal letters. And he's hemingway young and hemingway old. Hemingway sad hemingway angry in every iteration. And he's truly truly brilliant so you know we thought of him for many many reasons and he's also from that part of the country and that wasn't why we chose him but it was a happy coincidence and i think he did bring some understanding of where and how. Hemingway grew up in his reading. And then meryl streep and ken have gotten to be friends over the years and she was an extraordinary. Eleanor roosevelt in the series. That he did a few years ago. And i think whenever we can we jump at the chance to work with her and she actually recorded martha gal horn during covid all alone in los angeles. We weren't able to be there. Because of covid ingested a miraculous job bringing her to life and then linen i had. I mean one of the most fun. Three days working with keri russell and patricia mary. Louise parker each of hemingway's wives were different. Strong independent interesting women and all of those actors brought something to the women and we feel very very lucky to have worked with them. In terms of use. A sense of reality you are actually able to film in hemingway's home in cuba. How did that come about well. We were very lucky in that. There's a foundation. The home is called the think of the hia and the think of foundation which was based in the us is dedicated to preserving that incredible place and so they helped us to make contacts in cuba with the government agency. That runs it because the home it belongs to the people of cuba and so we were given permission to go into the house to scout and then to film for several days. The curator's really want to share the story of this place and hemingway's life there and what you can glean about him from being there and as tourists if you go to cuba you can't go inside the house. You can just look in the windows. We were able to go inside with our lights and our camera crew for several days and nights and really inhabit. That place is remarkable. This if you went out to go get a cup of coffee from where you live right now and you just never came back. Everything that you left in your house would be there. You know your toothbrush and your cell phone your shoes. I mean literally everything he had. Is there from the newspaper. He was reading to his toothbrush. Everything and so when you walk in. It's like he just left. Who's he warned or did he just have an instinct. That time had come. It was over several months. He was warned. Ultimately castro came to power and he sort of thought maybe he might be able to stay there and kind of just be a neutral party and the pressure became too intense anti-american sentiment and also. Our government wanted him out of there. They had bought a home in. Idaho is kind of a safety valve and went there but they didn't know they weren't going to be able to go back to keep us so after the bay of pigs. He never went back again. We must have been a great cautioned him because he truly loved being there and he loved the caribbean now. You also got permission from hemingway family to film the original manuscripts which are at the jfk. Labor way does showing the original manuscript. Enhance the story. It's amazing that hemingway capped every version of so many of his great works and he was so phidias and enormously disciplined and would go over and over both with his written hand and the typewriter and change commas words to semi colons names of characters titles of works and all of those are kept in very pristine beautiful condition at the kennedy library and there are high resolution scans and lower resolution. Scans that academics and people interested in hemingway can access and go see and at one point. We thought. Maybe we don't need to film the original manuscripts we can just use the scans and that's fine but we went there just as we were about to finish filming and we were trying to decide whether we should do it or not. And i remember the sensation of being given the folder and opening his actual pencil of the farewell to arms and calling lynn. and calling. kenan saying you know. It's a little bit like being in a museum and actually seeing the work of art or being in a concert hall and hearing the piece of music or looking at the actual sculpture there is something truly magical to it and we brought our cameras in about a week later and spent a couple of days just reveling in the fact that we could show these documents in their original quality and the pencil feels different and the paper looks different. And it's pretty amazing. Remarkable the being done with a pencil. Yeah those of us who now live in an age. When we'll be very hard put to be able to write they will. Your story reminded me of good friend of mine. Daniel silva who's a novelist who was down in the basement of the vatican museum where he had written a things about mysteries investigating and they liked him at one point. The guy turns to him and sincere. Hold this for a second. And he's holding this unfinished painting and he said what is this he said. Oh it's a da vinci. He said the.

Daniel silva Sarah patricia mary cuba keri russell Eleanor roosevelt Jeff daniels Louise parker Idaho Hemingway patricia clarkson kenan nineteen seventies ken second world war Mary-louise parker vietnam Three days first vietnam war action
New Documentary Examines Ernest Hemingway's Complicated Life

Kickass News

00:58 sec | 6 months ago

New Documentary Examines Ernest Hemingway's Complicated Life

"If you've never picked up a hemingway book in your life you probably have no trouble conjuring an image of the man himself. The fighter the lover the hunter the fishermen the living breathing punching shooting cursing drinking bundle of tropes about manhood but the myth that ernest hemingway created was both a blessing into curse. It turned him into a global celebrity. And it certainly didn't hurt his book sales but it also became an avatar of sorts. That master far more complex man and became more and more exhausting. Live up to as age. Alcoholism and countless injuries took a physical and emotional toll on him now revealing new three part documentary from award winning filmmakers. Ken burns and lynn novick attempts to separate the myth from the man. Hemingway airs on. Pbs tonight april fifth through seventh from eight to ten pm

Ernest Hemingway Lynn Novick Ken Burns PBS
'Hemingway' tackles the writer in a documentary as big as his tumultuous life

Valida

00:31 sec | 6 months ago

'Hemingway' tackles the writer in a documentary as big as his tumultuous life

"Will be few adjectives in this story. Ernest Hemingway avoided them. Hemingway was the writer who said he was looking for one true sentence. He wrote stories of war and love bullfighters and boxers and fishermen. PBS documentary argues Hemingway influenced all writers who followed even those who hate him. The documentary features Jeff Daniels reading Hemingway's prose, like The Ending of The Sun also rises, where the narrator shares a taxi in Madrid with a woman who can't be in a relationship with him.

Hemingway Ernest Hemingway PBS Jeff Daniels Madrid
After massive security breach, Sergeant at Arms resigns

C-SPAN Programming

02:39 min | 9 months ago

After massive security breach, Sergeant at Arms resigns

"After the attack on the Capitol last week. The House sergeant at arms, Paul Irving resigned today. The resignation was officially perceived by the House and the deputy sergeant at arms, Timothy Blodgett took over as acting sergeant at arms. Here. Is that presiding over the houses Democratic Congresswoman Debbie Dingell. The chair lays before the house, a communication the honorable the Speaker House of Representatives, Madam, I hereby submit my resignation is searching and arms of the U. S House of Representatives. It has been an honor to serve signed very respectfully. Paul, the Irving sergeant at arms without objection there. Resignation is accepted pursuant to the provisions of section 208. A of the legislative reorganization Act of 1946. The chair appoints Timothy Paul Blodgett of the state of New York to act as and to exercise the duties of sergeant of arms of the House of Representatives. Effective today, but they're without objection. The chair will now administer the oath of office. Please raise your right hand. Do you solemnly swear that you will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic? That you will bear true faith and allegiance to the same that you take this obligation freely without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion and that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you were about to enter. So help you. God. Congratulations. The House floor today. Timothy Blodgett, one of the three acting officials now leading security in and around the capital after last week's assault on the Capitol, the deputy sergeant at arms with Senate Jennifer Hemingway taking over, replacing Michael Stenger, who resigned and assistant Capitol police chief Yokel Banda Pittman has been named acting chief after former chief Steve Son also

Timothy Blodgett Paul Irving Debbie Dingell Speaker House Of Representativ U. S House Of Representatives Timothy Paul Blodgett House Madam House Of Representatives Paul New York United States Jennifer Hemingway Michael Stenger Yokel Banda Pittman Senate Steve Son
'The Great Gatsby,' 'Mrs. Dalloway' And Other 1925 Works Enter The Public Domain

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

00:57 sec | 9 months ago

'The Great Gatsby,' 'Mrs. Dalloway' And Other 1925 Works Enter The Public Domain

"Today is public domain day. As of january first thousands of books movies songs and other material from nineteen twenty five are no longer under copyright protection including the great gatsby. Npr's neda ulaby has more besides the f. scott fitzgerald masterpiece books entering the public domain now. Include mrs dalloway by virginia woolf and classics by sinclair lewis franz kafka ernest hemingway and agatha christie so are other works from nineteen twenty five like buster. Keaton silent film go west and the songs week toward brown now community. Orchestras can play music in the public domain for free scholars will not have to get permission to study. This material and books on the public domain can appear online without charge all part of living cultural conversation that anyone can join netto lippi. Npr news both

Neda Ulaby Mrs Dalloway Scott Fitzgerald Sinclair Lewis NPR Virginia Woolf Franz Kafka Ernest Hemingway Agatha Christie Keaton Netto Lippi Npr News
A Big Publishing Plot Twist: Penguin Random House to Buy Simon & Schuster for $2.2 Billion

Business Wars Daily

05:09 min | 10 months ago

A Big Publishing Plot Twist: Penguin Random House to Buy Simon & Schuster for $2.2 Billion

"Biggest news to hit the publishing industry this year. Possibly several years happened last wednesday. And we're betting that you missed it after all. You were probably contemplating cooking a turkey for two and planning zoom thanksgiving dinners with relatives right so just in case here. It is again the parent company of penguin random house's buying simon and schuster for two billion dollars penguin random house or pr h has already america's largest book publisher according to the new york times. Should the acquisition go through and there are some caveats which will get to pr. H will be. The industry's first mega publisher. The times claims. Let's delve into this just a little bit as we've talked about here before simon and shuster is among the oldest of today's big five publishing houses and one of the most distinguished dick simon and schuster founded the company in nineteen twenty four. The partners first product was hardly a literary masterpiece. It was a book of crossword puzzles. And according to simon and schuster's corporate historian it was a runaway bestseller today. Almost one hundred years. After the lowly crossword puzzle got the entrepreneurial venture off the ground simon and schuster or s operates in a different stratosphere. Today it is america's third largest publisher over the years it's published scads of famous even legendary authors including ernest hemingway and f scott fitzgerald also political figures from both sides of the aisle including jimmy carter hillary clinton and donald trump and contemporary authors. Like bob woodward stephen king and anti prue as well as judy blume s prints and authors have won fifty seven pulitzer prizes and innumerable other literary awards including several caldecott medals one of the highest honors given to children's books the company now sells about two thousand titles annually all told s and s takes in close to nine hundred million dollars a year but early this year. Parent company viacom. Cbs decided to go all in on streaming video in sports looking to cut close to a billion dollars in operating expenses ceo. Bob bakish announced that s wasn't what he called a core asset hence the sale in march the rumored price for us and s was one point two billion dollars a bidding. Were hike the final price to two point. Two billion dollars among other contenders america's second largest publisher harpercollins also vivendi. A french company. That owns a stake in. American publisher has yet and rupert murdoch's news corp clearly penguin random house's parent german media giant bertelsmann was willing to pay top dollar for s and s one reason in addition to the competition between publishers for blockbuster bestsellers the big five face. A formidable rival in certain amazon and when it comes to fighting off amazon size matters since two thousand nine amazon has been a publisher. Not just the world's largest both retailer today. It has sixteen imprints that publish everything from thrillers. To romance novels it signs. Top selling authors like dean koontz patricia. Cornwell taking them and their millions of sales away from traditional publishers in two thousand seventeen amazon published more than twelve hundred titles according to the wall street journal if those numbers have grown in the last three years amazon could well already rival simon and schuster for the volume of new works. It's producing what makes amazon such a tough competitor is a book publisher of course is it status as a bookseller. Moreover it has a number of marketing weapons that traditional publishers. Do not such as the ability to easily promote low priced e books to millions of amazon prime members and kindle owners. The wall street journal reports that along with oodles of cash to lure away big name authors as the largest american publisher penguin. Random house has the clout and logistical network to compete successfully with amazon. The merged company would have annual revenues of three billion dollars according to book industry bible publishers. Weekly but we should note here. The acquisition faces obstacles worthy of an epic novel authors and agents represented by the authors guild. Say such a deal will make it even harder for new authors and so called mid list writers to get published meaning. If you haven't written a blockbuster or a solid backlist title your chances to get published and your earnings could shrink. Pr h says. Simon and schuster will remain editorially independent and both publishing houses say they remain devoted to readers and writers still publishers weekly reports that by blending s. npr h german-owned. Bertelsmann would own about one third of the us book market. That's the number that could trigger antitrust. Investigators to closely scrutinize the deal. According to the new york times but those market share numbers are in dispute in both directions. The authors guild which causes tie up says a combined. Pr h. s. would wind up publishing half of all trade books in the us. Meaning not textbooks penguin. Random house's leadership argues not true and says future market share would be less than twenty percent and that an antitrust investigation is unlikely what happens next will likely hinge on which of these numbers comes closest to reality

Penguin Random House Schuster Amazon Dick Simon Simon F Scott Fitzgerald United States Bob Bakish News Corp Random House Shuster Judy Blume Bob Woodward Dean Koontz Patricia
"hemingway" Discussed on When in Spain

When in Spain

30:45 min | 11 months ago

"hemingway" Discussed on When in Spain

"The international brigades in with one-pass. When he came as a correspondent, who was he wanting for an agenda list of capacity bank? I know it was with the Toronto Star at one time. Then we got involved with them a documentary called Spanish fact, we've got a picture of in here. This is Tiara spaniel spaniel. It's a big titius down that's going to be overrun by the fascist and the men are going to be slow. But the Republic is helping them prior to that for irrigation. So this Raley Field is Faith. You are the son a non grata your car. You can't come back in. Here's a lovely picture of Hemingway stand winter. 1978 is in the emerald is got a got so he's got his office and this is really better there. Is this photograph is Herbert Matthews who was writing for the New York Times you look at this picture. There's militia off. After Republic debit, Macho's and him and woke up cigarettes, but all of these have been superimposed. If you look at that, they don't look amazing smoke and Thursday the same thing. This was a propaganda issue by the Republic holding Madrid. The first casualty of war is truth and it didn't want to know that they are subject in The Siege by the Nationalist and this shows that there is tobacco there is wine there is risk in cuz the ones I'm surprised I didn't superimposable answer a glass of wine. He's off when the Spanish Civil War and the first of April 1939 this thing that Franco had that he captured it wasn't true. There was no one to defend that was it so they matched in his a pinch from marching down the ground Vita the great Boulevard and downtown. And they're all music Italian of carrying Italian or Nazi Germany weapons don't know paid for by NASA Jim even the uniforms from Thursday to Germany and showing now we have Franco during the fascists. Hello, and it's because of Nazi Germany and fascist Italy that one on the wall and so often way is not allowed back but not to be deterred. He marries Martha Gellhorn. It should never have happened. He blamed her being a lousy lover song Shape limit a Melody know it was over a snoring invite anyway his back in the States and he writes This Magnificent story of the Spanish Civil War of the international brigades. And that was For Whom the Bell Tolls and then the second world war comes in. This is Hemingway. Again. He's now in Britain as a war correspondent being walked off. And now it's a war correspondent and Brent and yet it's in an area and hurry up in uniform with the oxygen mask. And what happened? I know Hillary Hemingway grandfather joined they are he didn't the deal was because he was such a good propaganda fabrication for the area that will have this great job right Ernest Hemingway and he agreed not to sure if it got wounded or his family wouldn't so and so here he is and he went on the ignition, but it wasn't a bombing mission that flew over Holland which had just been liberated but it went at night menu could see a big grin on his way. And then in June 1944. We're seeing him now Normandy and he's in as an officer in the United States uniform and he got castigated for this because it was dead. Only the corresponding have you seen that he's got to know because I am in this one is the United States Second World War. I mean issue and this one you said I took off a debt German main person in this respect. He'd like to be seen as this kind of birth control guy who was throwing himself into the midst of these kinds of situations. What kind of person do you think he really was depends which which are often suppose. He was very good looking in the twenties. He was very much in love with a delay. He loved pirating then we see him off to Pamplona the running of the bulls and he wants to get involved in that he wanted to get involved in the Corinthian seen he lives happily for paulinho. And she's a devout Catholic because he was married so times in total in the end it like mean same as you then lived in Pauline for Martha Gellhorn off Master Gellhorn actually leaving him the others he left them but she left him and then the he attaches so to marry who she could not drink by just like him and she outlived him and we see a picture here Hemingway is allowed back in nineteen fifty-three. So strong here is at Pamplona in the Bullring front row seats and they standing up and he's got a wineskin. I bought it. And it's leaning back in and there is a merry standing next to him smiling at him. But look at the Spaniards behind him. I mean they have dog this American not because he fought against Franco. I mean it wrong. James Franco not Embrace bullfighting how many Europeans are Americans Embrace such a bloody spectacle you his name and here they are 8 a.m. Afternoon in 1972-73 and it does the appendix here in the elementary and I'm when it comes back in nineteen fifty-nine. He has to offer very close friends goes by domain gained iknow donia's and they were brother-in-law's and in 1959. They know the scheduling Amelia was it street bullfighters? So the six potion 157 another than in the outside, but this time in 59 off and it was friends with both of them. They decided to take each other on which is called in Spanish and Mano a Mano and they traveled that summer around a new fellow dinner sometimes wage. The problem is he was too many close friends or onions and mrs. Are done yet and they were having drinks and the Palace Hotel and not sexual done yet. He was a millionaire the number one book later tonight. I invite for dinner. Yo. Marry Mrs. Daniel the whole world. Anyway, I know done this says here at The Palace Hotel. No, no the rich no, no. No, it's a place. You don't know it's one form, which is like a one in stock off when it's not ready to get punched are right. When was that? It's just have to pull up the guide how the restaurant only done with the restaurant cuz she was off a wonderful Spanish restaurant. They've changed into Cuban a little Cuban restaurant, but the back room is a dong with photos of Hemingway and right in the middle off. It's a picture of Hemingway with the bay window behind him. Yeah and mrs. Are done yet to is left owed on yesterday's ride hot think he's taking the pictures. It was a very you're too young a great American actor called Tony Curtis. Oh, yeah and Tony Curtis in 1972 paid off Spanish sculptor to do a bronze bust of Hemingway and put it in the little room at the back of the restaurant and then it is winter picture of Tony Curtis dead. And there's another picture of Hemingway and all photos when he was a war correspondent during the pictures of Barry pictures of polling pictures of month ago on the Adamo trying and that's when I took Hillary Hemingway and Key West Society right at the end. It was a Saturday night and there was life children music off. That's when the doctor said. Okay, yes or whatever you call it the keyless tequila slowing and that's when they said goodbye and sadly. They said the last photo before the committed suicide Thursday is 62 years of age, but we can sing that the heavy drinking had started to take its toll already taken this tone in a hard-nosed papa Hemingway off. We went into October from the hotel Palace into the Alimentum. It doesn't say we were sitting in the bay window. It was a sin yarrow remembers him here and they ordered the wrong line of lamancha and shrimps. So I'm going to I'm allergic to shellfish, but I'm now going through all the red wine of lamancha make it to mention Burr Elementary. Anyone come into maturity is a Hemingway fan is to just touch on a few of the other locations that people mention the one that left on Clayton, Georgia. And we used to go down to the method Arrow to watch the Slaughters in to watch the young David where they called a movie or see a junior the the trade in both Fighters practicing. Well, he mentions it took me with open in the nineteen twenties is now a cultural center, but you can still smell it still smell the blood. It's a very curious off of The Slaughterhouse Chambers is a bar and it's funny about the doors. It knows I think somebody says like heard of those so-and-so off because we're just being poured a glass with a red my manager wine, which anyway would have enjoyed with shrimps the Main Street just south of metric Toledo area. It's the biggest package and wine regions and all those main we are sitting in the bay window of Hemingway. I watch them to take the bitching and flag down with she's never done only if I log And then we can request our complimentary shuttle. We can get close. I think we could we could just to that just don't like the story about an exact same way going to 15 sitting upstairs and eventually befriended me the owner of the time and the resistor about making paella how he he wanted to be taught how to make paella off between and he tried on numerous occasions and and was terrible at it and said, he was better off sticking into writing from him about teens. It came to terroristic him back in the twenties even in the fifties. It said it's becoming very interested and we're talking about fourteen the oldest continuously functioning restaurant in the World Cup. I know disagreements. I don't know whether going to win such a good thing. She got a lease on the Granville and that's a cocktail bar off. Hotel van he wrote racial starters the butterfly me out of time. I went he describes that chakotay and it's exactly the same thing. That show me chakotay was a real character. He had one is Travis and I'm going to open nineteen thirty-three. I'm going to open the first New York cocktail. Unprecedented only actors the famous Hollywood actors and actresses Ava Gardner Frank Sinatra over there and I've got a picture of Hemingway. I think it's about nineteen fifty-eight shaking hands with chakotay the both smiling and the book cocktails and so lovely pitch and so here's a pink tree wonderful shot star has two years ago. I have the University of Israel and they wanted Hemingway's and they wanted a cocktail sauce. Record this and I read part of one of the show's Stars which incredibly they didn't know and I had to explain to them. What a knocking shop was a Brussels just in case anyone's wondering it wasn't Nebraska know it was Terrible Pick-up joints, not quite. So what I did with the with a professor and they said you see on these stools at the bar. This is where the high-class prostitutes off would hang out and you would go up and you would talk to them maybe buy him a cocktail and then they would go out and you see the far end there is shut down with a little shutter and knock knock you would knock and the shadow and you were going to go so it was very discreet. So Henson a knocking shop. Well, that's the expression comes from one of these shows are my favorite is that it's 1937 Madrid is defended by the Republic. It's under siege by the Nationalist breakfast and two Republican office is going to check Chipotle's, you know, they've been at the front friends blown up so they're pretty Nervous and apparently it was the last bottle of whiskey and tell them and that would be a great medication and was a drunk and a nice a water pistol and he went up to one of the officers and squirted in his career if you don't do that to enough. So anyone who's who's coming from the front so they hit him and took him out from the surround into the Grandview pavement and they got the Whiskey Still shaking and they drink him off the drunk came back in playing and squirting again. And this time the guy pulled out his service revolver going away with three bullets to the head office and they dropped then and the police were on it. And of course all journalists were that these are Republican offices and Republican police come off. Tucked away and they leave and the police Republican police related to Republican offices flame. You said any Witnesses and one thousand American? I'm sorry. Oh, where's your papers? Actually I didn't say anything. So it's it's a great story choice is another story that started with hot Smith and it's done it around. It's not he's in France 1953 and it's a word off Frank Lewis said you can come back and you're going to trust the word those just executed some thousands and thousands of Republicans. Nothing written. You can come back Choice with hot chocolate and Two Italians and that is the border with friends and and spayed and Holiday Inn, Columbia, Maryland the French Pub. Why should that Blue Shield little thing and they go over and he hasn't been since nineteen in nineteen thirty-nine. So it's it's off the fourteen years now. So this is a handsome. They came over in the middle of the Civil guard, unshaven sunglasses machine gun off and mostest and there's no Buenas Dias bienvenida Espana, none of that. They just want the password and there's two Italian into American one is coming right off and the captain of the Civil guard examining Hemingway and then the user two imperatives in Spanish. Where does the coach a get out of the car? It's better key you wait here off function or whatever. It was got his hands on the wheel. So it's not looking as if it's going for like that the Italians cost of petrified and Hemingway down there and it's really Punchy massage. Stem is just fourteen years and it was persona. Non. Grata. Only the world girlfriend and the Civil Guard Captain goes into the Civil godhood comes back with the book opens it off the same here. Why don't you think he was so obsessed with the fighting first of all in getting the afternoon. She is convinced. He's not going to like it. I remember he is the first to rain in English about bullfighting finds no novel his talking about the great bull-fighter off of the dining and also how they change and a lot of them know chain, but they have this concept of he's going to say death and it's also going to say off the death of a brave bold and they think is that both either going to be brave. Remember when that bull comes out it's bred to kill it spread to smell birth. Limit phone's preferably human blood and all the bullfighters got a ballerina slippers came across but that's when it comes out. So people see this and off the bullets dead because it's not Anglo-Saxon. It's not justified best sideways, but how will we die off and this was a Fascination for Hemingway. His father won't commit suicide and one of his sisters Community has happened was a history of suicide and her family was involved in himself committed suicide looking at death and it's looking at the pageantry of hours and the passing wine where else on this planet could this happen but not Rings true of me as well. The second half of the quote is Madrid is the most Spanish of cities, but he starts to quote saying birth. Not the kind of place that really grabs you at the beginning and you don't feel in love with it. It makes you work for inspection and that's in the afternoon and his introduction. They said it's quite normal life in Madrid to arrange to meet someone of midnight. That's certainly true. Yeah, it's quite the norm. What infuriates me is I arrived here in 8075 saw Mister but fifteen years, but I still have I can still remember the ambience in 75 this place the elemental it was less the bullfighting fraternity and more of international journalists. And one day Franco secret police came and you could change those settings on the bar and then going around asking people for their passports and they famous journalist. She still needed the card with the double stamp off. Hemingway needed with the with the Republic honestly, nothing has ever changed km from 45 years ago when I first came off the chandelier submit it really simply means a German be a house 1905 and so we see like to be a yeah, yeah off the photos from having wasting there's a a bullfight photo of that where to pick the dogs horse is not protected as they are today. And so many of them died in the ring and yet Hemingway argues that it defends it in one respect but life is strange was saying here in his bay window when it did the appendix for the draft in the afternoon, which is your favorite Hemingway really where you're sitting opposite me off. I wouldn't know I had a private are just too and they said we're just one the two of us and I couldn't look at him because he took a little break the pictures and stuff. Yeah, go ahead, letting you know greyhame. I sent you you look like the picture of it up there. The in-system the bay with the you know with smoke and they said yeah, I was in the Key West Hemingway look-alike. Apparently they do a Hemingway look-alike and sloppy joes system off and I said, what did you win? It should know I came side I said what the hell did first look like and then they said The Old Man and the Sea what did Hemingway change in the office in addition? And I said, I don't know. I've never read it. You've never read the old man in the say I said, sir. I don't have any ways Madrid. And as far as I know, there ain't no say anywhere off. Drip I do hemenway's Madrid. My favorite book is death in the afternoon is my Bible cuz when I came in seventy-five, I I want them to understand bullfighting how cruel it is and can I do what Hemingway did then understand? What is happening spaniels? Don't mold in whistle there very often. They can be waving young kids to cut in the air and then they can be throwing questions that you know, it's just if you're not Spanish or you don't understand both saving then it is cruel. And it's a. And I'll never go you need someone explaining to you what's happening. You need to understand why Hemingway was in that suction section nine. There are ten sections. I was told many years ago that the pole going section 456 in several critics khong Volume eight. They really well to acknowledge balls going nine the president of the day since that time and all the Japanese and Koreans go in section one month after the second plane. I say they had enough to consider. Yeah, but it's expensive also with Hemingway. It's not just that you are in the shade but it's all the choice is a made in from because the president of the day is watching only actions having much closer to you. So yeah and in the summer, you'll be solid some have neither the cheap seats are in the silent off some rest, recently some brown and three is where the ball comes out. It also goes back in that in another game section 8 directly opposite is the only place where they pick it off. So if you want to hear the ball smacking into heavy canvas, I can't mention the name because I was sworn to secrecy but one of America's famous actresses said I am You take me in my friend and I say where do you want to sit during said? Well, we've got the money you choose the tickets. So we went to 9 and it was packed off. So the pageant showed the dress like aspects of the 17th century on horses and but then comes the passes then comes to blood and it was a bad kill off. She'll blood was coming out of the the snouts of the and the actress Hollywood and contribute to that. He was going to give us a clear off the topic and over the head know a friend. She says, oh my God, we've gotta get out of here. It's a week on right now because now the second bullet off and no one can move because that would distract and it could kill the bull failure. You have to late. So that was Stephen Drake Jones. What a lively character really interesting. I could have spent a lot longer sitting in the sort of ethereal alemanha chatting to him. If you want to check out his website which has all information about the well history of Madrid and Spain but also information about the tours that he runs he runs small customized tours particularly in Madrid, but I think other parts of Spain as well check out his website. It's well-stocked. Org, which is w e l l s o c. I'll put a note to this and other information about Stephen Jones in the show notes of this episode and just going back to the theme of bullfighting incidentally. I did make an episode all about bullfighting a couple of years ago now, I think it's going back to late 2018. It's episode number 18, and it's called bullfighting. All Blood Sport now. I've noticed that many people tend to avoid this episode because I'm imagining they don't like bullfighting and I don't either I am not a fan of bullfighting. I don't Advocate it took it's cruel pretty horrible thing to experience. However, having said that I think it's kind of, you know something which is very deeply Spanish and that it gives quite an interesting insight into Spanish culture. And even if you may disagree with bullfighting, I would suggest go and give that episode a listen because well in the middle of the episode I did go to a bullfight my first and my last month and lots of people slated me for it and said that I was complicit and even by going to a corrida I was supporting bullfighting blah blah blah. Okay. Well, whatever your opinion is or whatever your view is on that page. Yeah, maybe maybe not. I felt that I had to go and see it with my own eyes. Once in order to be able to talk about it with some reasonable degree of authenticity and to really get a real insult. And let me tell you that going to a bullfight for real is very different to what you see watching it on a TV screen, but in the middle of that episode, you hear me at Las ventas Bullring here in Madrid watching a couple of grade as talking about what's happening talking about how I'm feeling describing what's happening all of that kind of thing. But if you're not interested in that part of the episode the beginning of the episode and at the end of that episode, I look in quite some detail all of the history and origins of bullfighting and Man vs Beast going right back, you know thousand years and how it gained momentum and popularity in Spain and at the end of that episode. I also look at the future of bullfighting where it's going how it's perceived today in Spain and the politics of money, which is deeply connected with it as well as episode number 18 bullfighting heart or Blood Sport, and I published that in October 2018. So yep. Therefore this episode. Thank you for listening. I hope it's been interesting. I've got more guests lined up recording more episodes this week and next as well. So do stay tuned in the meantime. Don't forget to check out when Iraq and Instagram account the handle is when in Spain one go and check that out for photos of Madrid and wider Spain and indeed photos that relate to the various podcast episodes that I published. I will accomplish some photos on the Instagram account of Stephen of the third of a 30 alemana bar and some other locations around Madrid so that you can kind of visual you can actually see them for real. And also don't forget to check out the weather in Spain website, which is when in Spain podcast. I publish all of the episodes as I make them on the website which are available there to stay the same. So if you prefer listening to episodes on your desktop or laptop computer instead of on your smartphone device, you can do that. They're and they're include a bit more detail in the show notes photos and links and other things. Well, which relate to the given episodes are going head over there. It's when in Spain podcast.com and also don't forget. If you do enjoy this podcast, please please do consider signing up to support it and I went to Spain Patron. I'm just an independent podcaster here no backing or support from Big media operations and appetizers and sponsors. It's just me in my free time doing it for the love of Spain and sharing my love of Spain with other people who also loves Fame. So if you do enjoy it, please do consider signing up to become a patron at patreon.com in spent if you're not in a position to do that. Another thing which really really helps is to leave a review of the podcast on the platform where you listen to it. I know not all platforms are for the opportunity to do that. But certainly if you listen on apple juice or any of the other Android platforms leave a little review give it a five-star write a sentence or two about your thoughts about it. You've had some new reviews recently, which were fantastic is lovely to get your feedback and also. All of the people share word of mouth is a great way to help the podcast get more listeners more support more followers. So if you know someone who you think might be interested in Spain Spanish culture in Spanish travel insights and observations from right here on the ground where I am in Spain let people know anyway, so I'll stop rambling on thank you so much for joining me, and I hope you enjoyed this episode and I look forward to speaking with you again very soon until then.

Hillary Hemingway Madrid Hemingway Spain James Franco papa Hemingway Martha Gellhorn Tony Curtis Raley Field Toronto Herbert Matthews Germany bulls New York Times Pamplona Macho officer
"hemingway" Discussed on When in Spain

When in Spain

08:05 min | 11 months ago

"hemingway" Discussed on When in Spain

"Madrid because Ernest Hemingway had a lifelong love affair with the Spanish capital and many locations around Madrid inspired his writing in particular The Sun Also Rises death in the afternoon. And for how long The Bell Tolls which was inspired by his experiences working as a reporter and journalist during the Civil War in Spain and joining me in this episode to pick up Trace Hemingway's footsteps around Madrid and widest pain as well is Steven Drake Jones now Stephen is a historian lecture and tour guide who has an encyclopedic knowledge of numerous periods of Spanish history, but it's also an expert on Ernest Hemingway's Madrid. And in fact, he runs an Ernest Hemingway tour of Madrid among many other tools that he's also the chairman of the Willington society which he sets up and why wild because the Duke of Wellington is his speciality, especially the. Covering the bank of Wellington's campaigns on the Iberian Peninsula. We're not going to be talking about the Duke of Wellington in this episode. We're going to be talking about Ernest Hemingway, but a bit more about Stephen Stephen moved to Spain in nineteen years. 75 he taught English and he subsequently joined the Spanish Navy curiously. He didn't go to see though. He joined the Spanish Navy in the capacity as a history lecturer and an English teacher off and then he continued to lecture in history here in Madrid at numerous different universities and I met up with Stephen in one of Ernest Hemingway's favorite Madrid Hangouts, and it's called thought of etheria al-amana the German beer house, which is on the leafy platter Santana right in the Centre of Madrid. I'm sure many of you who've been to Madrid no place for Santana Moss may have even been to the state of Alabama and we pulled up a couple of chairs inside at the exact table in the bars window where Ernest Hemingway often used to come and sit down and drink and write and fraternize with the bullfighting Community which used to hang out there less. So nowadays, but back in Hemingway's times the wage Service was a hub of the bullfighting Community bullfighters journalists who wrote about anyone connected with bullfighting would spend time in the third of a thirty-year Allen mom. Now, you might not be a fan of bullfighting. And nor am I to be honest, but we're not going to be talking all about bullfighting in this episode, but it would be remiss not to say that Ernest Hemingway was a huge bull fighting off fan and it was actually in the third of etheria al-amana where he gleaned a lot of information for his book death in the afternoon, which is all about bullfighting thing. It's a nonfiction work really you can always look at it as a kind of guide to bullfighting and it was in the set of etheria Hannah Montana where Ernest Hemingway wrote the appendix to death in the afternoon because he used to pick the brains of the bullfighting fraternity there. I'm looking for specific vocabulary that would help describe the very specific parts of a bullfight home. Karida, we're going to be talking about that and lots more about Hemingway's relationship to Madrid and the time that he spent here. But before we throw ourselves into the interview with Stephen Drake Jones, I will just run through a list of Ernest Hemingway's Works, which relates specifically to Madrid and to Spain. I've only read one of them. I hasten to admit and the other thing I would like to quickly do before the interview is a special shout-out that I always do two new when in Spain patrons, so a special shout-out and muchas gracias to new when in Spain patronage Jennifer now, I'm apologize for my pronunciation of your surname Jennifer and we had a quick chat on the wedding Spain Instagram account, but I didn't ask you how to pronounce your name b l e at a new blush or blusher blade. I don't know in Spanish. I guess we take Blackie, but I don't think that's the pronunciation. Anyway, Jennifer. Thank you so much for signing up to become a wedding Spain Patron real name. Appreciate it and anyone else who enjoys this podcast and would like to support it and support me in the work I do and putting it together and bring it to you. You can also become a patron to super easy. You just head across patreon.com forward slash in Spain. It's a crowdfunding website called Patron and you can find when in Spain on there to patreon.com forward slash when in Spain and off the page and it's all very self-explanatory about how you go about supporting this podcast. Anyway enough of that. So Ernest Hemingway or Don Ernesto actually as he was known affectionately by the Spanish spent numerous students in Madrid. In fact, he was here for chunks of the late nineteen twenties late nineteen-thirties and also parts of the nineteen fifties before his last visit in nineteen sixty as many of you may well already know Hemingway produced most of his work between the mid twenties and the mid fifties and in fact, he won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction wage. In nineteen fifty-three and the Nobel Prize in literature in 1954 know I guess we could say that Ernest Hemingway's a bit of a sort of controversial character is not like you either love him or loathe him a bit of a love-hate relationship going on here from lots of people that I've spoke to about Hemingway's some people say it was not really a very nice guy. Well, I don't know read his books make up your own minds and one thing is for sure is that Hemingway was a person of personas I suppose and that you could perceive him as being rain a bit shallow may be entitled wage, but he wrote about these things in Spain from a kind of very privileged point of view. We see Hemingway as a bullfighter. We see him as a brooding Kathy Wilburn dweller surrounded by wine bottles. We see him as a blooded War veteran hard-drinking hard fighting hard loving all in the name of his art of writing and I guess yep. His life additional personas attached themselves to him. We see him as a rugged deep sea fisherman Big Game Hunter post-war Liberator and the later in his life is a white beard Papa as it was known in his native us and he relished all of these identities and I think so did his fans and so did the Press. Anyway, let's look at some of his works that relates specifically to Madrid and indeed Spain in nineteen twenty-six. He writes The Sun Also Rises and which was translated in Spanish as Fiesta. And this is a novel about a group of expats living in Paris that decides to visit Pamplona during the Festival of Sanford mean the famous running of the bulls and it's a Loosely autobiographical account which talks about how Hemmingway came to enjoy the July festivities in Pamplona during the 1920s while he was stationed in Paris in 1932. He published his death in the afternoon, which was just talking about a nonfiction book about the art page. How many and traditions of Spanish bullfighting and it also kind of delve deeper into the human nature and looking at fear and courage, that's the only Hemingway book that I've read. I enjoyed it gave me a really interesting insight into bullfighting and I'm not a fan of bullfighting in nineteen thirty-eight. He publishes. Well really his lesser-known work called the fifth column and this is a place which is set during the Spanish Civil War and its main significance is that it was a work about the war published while the Spanish Civil War was still going on and the title helped popularize this term fifth column and the fifth column was coined by one of Franco's generals Emilio mola to refer to any clandestine group of people who work from the inside to help an outside force over of a throw a besieged city..

Ernest Hemingway Madrid Spain Stephen Stephen Spanish Navy Wellington bullfighting Community Centre of Madrid Iberian Peninsula Spain Instagram Jennifer Willington etheria al-amana Stephen Drake Jones Pamplona reporter Steven Drake Jones Santana Moss
Novelist Donald Ray Pollock On Factory Work And Finding Fiction Later In Life

Fresh Air

20:21 min | 1 year ago

Novelist Donald Ray Pollock On Factory Work And Finding Fiction Later In Life

"Today's first guest is author Donald Ray Pollock, whose novel the devil all the time has just been made into a new netflix movie premiering next Wednesday. It Stars Tom Holland and Robert Pattinson, and here's a taste in this clip. A young boy has just watched his father pulverized two guys after they made lewd comments about the father's wife, the son's mother. Afterward the father gives his son some advice. You remember what I told you. On. The buzzer gave you. That's what I mean. got. To. Sir. Good sons of bitches out there. One hundred. These that many. Cannonball. In, both the movie and the novel the characters in the devil all the time are driven to extremes whether their fathers and sons, serial killers or preachers. The story begins in the small town of knock him stiff a real place in southern Ohio where Donald Ray pollock grew up. He didn't become a writer until he put in over thirty years at the local paper mill and got sober. But. Once he did start writing. He was noticed quickly receiving both awards and critical. Acclaim. Terry, gross spoke to Donald Ray pollock in twenty eleven when the devil, all the time was first published. Donald, Ray pollock welcome to fresh air. I'd like to start with reading from your new book, the Devil, all the time It's about the second paragraph from the prologue. So would you just set it up for us? What we have here is A young boy's name is Arvin Eugene Russell and he's following behind his father Willard and there and place called knock him stiff and they're going to Willard's prayer logging as a log in the woods where he Wants to communicate with God and So this is where they are. You know early in the morning and their. have finally reached this log. Willard eased himself down on the high side of the law and motion for his son to kneel beside him in the dead soggy leaves unless he had whiskey running through his veins Willard came to the clearing every morning and evening talk to God. Arvin didn't know which was worse the drinking or the praying. As far back, as he could remember, it seemed that his father had faulted devil all the time. Arvin little with the damp pulled his Co. tighter. He wished he were still in bed even school with always miseries was better than this but it was a Saturday and there was no way to get around it. Through the mostly bare trees beyond the cross Arvin could see whisper smoke rising from a few chimneys, half a mile away four hundred or so people lived in, knock him stiff in nineteen, fifty seven nearly all of them connected by blood through one godforsaken clam or another be it lust were necessity or just plain ignorance along with the tar paper shacks and Cinder Block houses the Holler included two general stores and a Church of Christ in Christian Union and joint known throughout the township as the bullpen. Three days before he'd come home with another black I I, don't condone no fighting just for the hell of it but sometimes, you're just too easy going Willard told him that evening then boys might be bigger than you. But the next time one of them starts his stuff, I want you to finish it. Willard was standing on the porch changing out of his work clothes. He handed Arvin Brown pants stiff with dried blood and Greece. He worked in a slaughterhouse in Greenfield and that day sixteen hundred homes had been butchered a new record for RJ Carol meat-packing. Those boy didn't know yet what he wanted to do when he grew up he was pretty sure he didn't WanNa kill pigs for eleven. Let's Donald Ray pollock reading from his new novel, the Devil, all the time. You know in the reading that you did the father tells the sun that the next time. So many beats him up the sun has to fight back and that seems to be. A recurring theme like in the opening story of your collection of short stories, the collections called knock him stiff. The opening sentence reads my father showed me how to hurt a man one August night at the torch in when I was seven years old it was the only thing he was ever any good at. You certainly seem interested in the idea of a father. Kind of indoctrinating a sun on the need to fight back and then egging on to do it even when it's inappropriate. so was is this a story that played out in your life? Well, not so much in my life I. Mean as far as I don't my dad really didn't push me to fight or anything like that. But you know when I was growing up my father and I had a very Uneasy relationship. You've got to understand my dad was born in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thirty he's still alive. You know he's eighty years old and he's still kicking but He was born in. Nineteen thirty grew up in the depression I went to the eighth grade. He was working on the railroad by the time he was sixteen, and then he was in the navy. And, my dad is a very tough. Hard. man Stra very strong man. As and in contrast to that, my mother is very shy kind. Small Bone woman. and. Either fortunately or unfortunately for me, I took after my mother and I believe. When I was a kid, my dad was. Maybe disappointed for not taking after him more. So. You know that's where I guess part of that comes from it and part of it also comes from. Lived in stiff. That's where I grew up and I saw a lot of other fathers who were you know drinkers and hell raisers and they didn't treat their families very well You know maybe they went and worked for a while and. I got enough money to go on another band or whatever, and pretty much left the family to take care of themselves. So, yeah father's have a pretty rough time and my work I just. It's just. You know I'm a father. You know I have a daughter WHO's I'm thirty years old now and I have always felt that I. Wasn't. As good as I could have been. Her mother and I were divorced when she was very young she was like a year old and and I wasn't around that much and. That's probably the best explanation. I can give for why treat father's like I do my work. Were you bullied in school. You said you, you took after your mother who wouldn't hurt a fly. So and if you were bullied, would you fight back? Did you know how to actually I wasn't bullied in school I? Never really had any problems with that and yeah, I. Mean a would fight back if I had to but. That situation you know didn't come about very much probably you know just. No more than any other normal kid you know might face that sort of thing. But. Yeah. I mean I wasn't really interested in Working on cars or farm or anything like that was more of A. I won't call myself a bookworm because we really didn't have that many books but you know I like to read and watch old movies and drawl and stuff like that and My Dad. Just you know he's a very practical man I mean, even today you know his idea of success is. Owning your own farm, starting your own business or something like that and I know that he probably looks on what I'm doing now is. A pretty useless way to spend your life trying to write books. Would you describe what the town of knock him stiff was like when you were growing up well, when I was growing up there it was. You know relocated for us. Ok we'll knock him stiff. is about thirteen miles west of chillicothe Theo, which is you know southern Ohio. It was its own little place. You know there wasn't much else around there but it was a community There were three small general stores and a bar and a church, and probably four hundred, fifty, five, hundred people now I probably was related to. At least half those people. So did you find this nurturing being in a town where half the people in it were related to you or incredibly claustrophobic? I think when I was a kid when I was a kid I was claustrophobic for me. You know I was one of those kids I was always unsatisfied I always wanted to be. Else and somewhere else. And so from a very early age. You know I was thinking about escaping from the hauler. I just Thought that I'd rather be somewhere else are somewhere else. But where you are as in Chile coffee which is. PHILADELPHIA, which is about thirteen miles away like you got out but you didn't go very far. I, really didn't get out I mean that's the weird contradiction of that whole thing you know i. Wanted to escape and them what I finally got my chance or whatever I. I chose to stay I'm out at knock stiff at least once a week even today Ladder parents go to visit. My parents are still alive. You know I have a brother and two sisters and they all live fairly close to there and So I. Think though as far as escape goes what happened with me was I quit high school when I was seventeen. And I went to work in a meat packing plant much like Weller work, Dan? And then when I was eighteen I moved to Florida you know that was going to be I was going to get away that you know by moving to Florida and I was down are working a job in a nursery and I wasn't making much money or anything only been there a few months my dad called and said. Hey, I can get you a job at the paper mail if you come back up here so. I chose to come back. You know the paper Mills Calling it was union job and great benefits and. And I knew you know for a high school dropout that was probably going to be the best job I. Ever got. You had that job for. How many years did you work at the paper mill? I? was there thirty two years and you didn't start writing till you were around fifty or is that is fifth well I'm fifty six now and I started writing when I was forty five. Okay. So how come it took so long did you know? When you weren't writing did you know that you had that in you? Well. You know I'd always been a big reader as I said and I love books. And I think maybe in the back of my mind, you know always thought writing would be a great way to get by in the world and you know, of course, I was very naive about it. The principal reasons for me you know as far as being a writer were one, you were your own boss. To you could do it anywhere. And three, you made lots of money. Wasn't until actually began writing it. I found out. That was a real true. But I. Think you know Sorta like maybe a fantasy that? It was in the back of my mind for a long time. I had a problem with drinking and for a number of years and you know it was one of those fantasies that when you got half loaded and You started daydreaming or whatever it was. One of those things that you thought about right thought about. But it wasn't really. You know I went to school when I was in my thirties I went to college I went to Ohio University and I ended up with a degree in English and You. Know even while I was there though I wasn't thinking about being a writer I never took any writing workshops or anything like that. But then finally when I was forty five my dad retired from the paper mill. And there was just something about watching him retire and go home. and. You know that was you know pretty much the end of his career and it really. Bothered me and I. Just. decided. I had to try something else you know. To some other way to. Spend the rest of my life. So. When you decided, you wanted to learn how to write what did that mean? Any. Writers or anything in for a while I just sort of scribbled and struggled. And then I'd read an interview with a writer and I can't recall her name now or no it was a lady. But she talked about typing out other people's stories as a means of maybe getting closer to them or just learn how to put a story together. and. So I started doing that. Who did you type out? I typed out a lot of different stories I. I was typing out a story at least once a week and that went on for about a year and a half. So John. cheever hemingway. Flannery. O'Connor Richard. Yates Dennis Johnson the you know the list just goes on and on if it was a story that I really liked and it wasn't. Long I, type it out, and then I carry it around with me for a week and you look at over and you know jot notes on stuff like that, and then I'd throw it away and do another one. Typing a story out, just was a much better way for me to see how you know person puts dial together or you know. Moose from one scene to the next that sort of thing. Was it hard for you to find your subject matter as a writer? Well when I first started. Trying to learn how to write. As. I said like maybe I would copy out John cheever story. So then I would try to write my own story about some East Coast suburbanite having unfair. Something like that or maybe I'd write about a re Rita Andrei debut story, and then I'd write about a Catholic priest. and. So I did that for maybe two years or so and it just wasn't working at all for me. and. Then filing maybe at about two and a half years, I wrote a story that's included in the book. Knock him stiff called back teen. And it's a very short story. and. It's about these two losers sitting in a donut shop. And that was the first thing that I had. Written that I thought wasn't too bad. And so then I increasingly started focusing on you know the people that I knew about instead of nurses, lawyers, that sort of thing that I had absolutely no idea. How to write about There's a passage in your new novel that's about a bus driver and the bus drivers father had gotten a certificate from the railroad for not missing a single day of work in twenty years and bus drivers. Mother always held this up as like what you could do. If you really you know were strive and tried to accomplish something when the bus drivers father died the bus driver hope that that certificate would be buried with his father's. We didn't have to look at it anymore, but instead his mother just like. Put It on the wall, display it in the living room. And then the bus driver thinks it wore on you after a while other people's accomplishments. I love that sentence did you ever feel that way I mean he kochman here seems. So relatively small like a good attendance record and not to knock that. But for that to be like, you know the zenith of somebody's life is. You. but did you feel that way that a war on you? Other People's accomplishments? I don't think that I paid so much attention to other people's. Successes or whatever. But I, know that I was aware you know by the time. I was thirty two or so and I've been working at the mail for about fourteen years. And I knew that all the guys that I had come in with you got hired about the same time as mayor guys even much later than that. You know they own their own home. Maybe. They owned a boat and they had two or three vehicles and they were married and had kids and on and on and on. You know in contrast to them. I've been divorced twice. I'd filed bankruptcy when I got sober I was living in this little very small apartment above this garage. Of. Motel Room and I've been living there for about. Four or five years. I owned a black and white TV that my sister had given me and I had this seventy six chevy that had the whole side of smashed in and that was it. You know for fourteen years of working there. That's what I had. And so you know there was that sense I guess of me just being a failure. Wasn't really that I wasn't jealous of those people or anything like that. I, mean I had enough sense to know that you know where I ended up was my own fault. But there was always that that idea in back of my head that. I could have done more you know I could maybe went to college or something you know. I'm sure you know if I'd wanted to go to school when I was eighteen, my dad would try to help me. and. That's not the route that I chose though how has your life changed? Now as a published writer, you have a collection of short stories. You have a new novel you got a thirty five thousand dollars cash prize, the pen, Robert Bingham Award. So, what's different about your life? well, I have a lot more time to just set on the porch and. Smoke and daydream. Think it's a legitimate. Yeah well, at least that's what I tell my wife. But my life hasn't really changed that much I. Mean I get a lot more emails. Now you know that sort of thing, but you know I still live in the same house I still pretty much. You know my daily routine is. I really can't say that it's changed that much. It's a good life and I'm thrilled that you know I've got a publisher and. You know had at least a little bit of success. You know I know a lot of writers out there a lot of writers out there who are much better than I am. And would. Probably give their left arm. To be setting, you know where I'm setting today. Well Donald Ray, pollock thing you so much for talking with us. Terry I appreciate. It. Made my day. Donald Ray pollock speaking to Terry Gross in twenty eleven. The devil all the time a new movie based on his novel of the same name.

Writer Donald Ray Pollock Willard Terry Gross Ohio Arvin Arvin Brown Netflix Ray Pollock Donald Trump Donald Ray Arvin Eugene Russell Robert Pattinson Tom Holland Robert Bingham Chile John Cheever Ohio University Dennis Johnson Greenfield
Google bans ZeroHedge from its advertising platform, issues citation against The Federalist

Tony Katz Today

03:49 min | 1 year ago

Google bans ZeroHedge from its advertising platform, issues citation against The Federalist

"Happened just twenty four hours ago NBC news reports the story is that Google has banned zero hedge and the federalist from their ad platforms so you've never been to zerohedge zerohedge does some really really good work and they do a lot of work on on economic stuff but they do some political stuff as well and I've utilized zero hedge as a source before and I want you to know I will again I have never once looked at read zero hedge and say man this is some there's some far out conspiracy theory stuff I've never done that but as the story is written in N. B. C. news Google has banned zero hedge a far right website that often traffics in conspiracy theories from its advertising platform over policy violations found in the comments section of stories about recent black lives matter protests now two things here first far right trafficking in in the conspiracy theories that sounds a lot like what someone thinks versus what someone knows secondly they're getting thrown off an advertising platform because of the comments the comments not the articles comments now the federalist which is run by Shawn Davis you may know Mollie Hemingway's work over there I have had shown on the show before I I'm I'd like the federalist I don't agree with everything but I do read it I don't know where I have to say we're like oh I agree with everything I don't agree with everything over national view I read it I don't really agree with everything over the grill but I read it so they're saying that these people can't be on the platform right they can't be a part of the absolute form because what happened in the comments now this happens because of this writer Adele moko Frazier it turns out that she god together with another group in Europe the UK's center for counting digital hate countering digital hate they got together to complain about these two websites now the story says that it was a report by nbcs is NBC NBC's verification unit the N. B. C. news verification unit according to Sean Davis of the federalist here we have a foreign unit N. B. C. that with your well your name the N. B. C. news verification unit the irony there he says is enough to make you laugh speaking with another left wing foreign group to the platform and American media organization this woman I was a child is probably connected to the political left in the U. K. and yet somehow was able to use her position with NBC to be able to go after two websites hoon she doesn't like what they say so the answer is the fund them the answer is the platform then the answer is destroyed destroyed destroy anybody who disagrees with me not Cajun debate not prove your case but to destroy your enemy and do not allow debate that's what's happening

Google NBC
Jet Tila: Thai Food in America

Asian Enough

05:51 min | 1 year ago

Jet Tila: Thai Food in America

"How do you describe the explosion of Thai Food in America and in Los Angeles? You know I think you have to trace it back to Vietnam right. Most major campaigns were flown out of Thailand right because of the Golden Triangle because our our relationship Thailand is his never been occupied or controlled by a foreign power was allies with the US so they gave Thai people visas so nineteen sixty six. The first group of Thai people came in in mass. My parents were in that group. So there's the beginning second. There's always been this romance of of this this American Romance Thailand. It's exotic that people are nights. It's so beautiful I mean and there's also the the really not so nice side of that the sexual tourism and all that but no matter what right. There's there's this halo effect. I think Thailand has on on Americans and then when we started the food all these flavor the flavor range European food is like herbs and salt and pepper and olive oil and garlic and Mir Poi and all of a sudden I got hot and sour and salty and sweet. It's so exotic. Yeah one of the things. I remember from the book though I thought was funny. Was that at first. Thai food is marketed as like a better tasting Chinese for exactly. Yeah and and it's because you know Cantonese foods little sweeter and richer or whatever and they wanted brighter flavors. Yeah but yeah like. What did people know about Thai food? And how much of that did you guys teach them? I would say pad Thai chicken Satay Dome Yum dum car guy. It was Thai food. Then you even chow main because you gotTa Games order start because again Americans new Cantonese style Chinese food for years. This was just like a departure and the image you get you know what I mean. It's like each gradually acclimate and learn. And then you start to get curious and Thailand is always has always been really aggressive about tourism right getting people to visit right right named ty culinary ambassador. How did that happen? By the way the truth. You guys want the truth right of course Jones version of very sort. Which is the the brutal truth right? You know the consul general in myself Three CONSUL-GENERALS AGO. Right because the post transitions every few years. You know we had a lot of Thai chef. That was were starting to become notable in America. We Ricker. You've got guys in Chicago then. There's so. There's a lot of mixed messages about Thai food. What is Thai food? Who SPEAKS FOR THAI food? We we sat down a room and we're like we need a position that that basically allows the government to say this person plants. The holds the torch for Thai food. So we need a culinary ambassador right. We need the guy and we need to create a fund marketing term for it. So I was like Dude. GimMe the ambassadorship. It sounds awesome. Any says a great idea. So you know we we have a we have a few program. Thais elect which is a government program that acknowledges Thai restaurants that are that are doing very well or or you know are good at certain things we have trade shows around the country around the world. Can you speak for Thai food because we also wanted someone that was in media? That was recognizable right. I was the only one at that time doing a lot of television. And so as part of your ambassador ship you're going around to different tire restaurants in really out into the field hundred percent and when I'm on television. Which is the best way to go anywhere right when Elton Brown says this? Is You know on our new shows Culinary Ambassador of Thailand like that sinks in but I just have to ask this on same. Whose idea was it to get matching tattoos and tattoos or have to my right forearm. That's is never be daunted. So Alton Brown and I did a bunch of episodes of a show called cutthroat kitchen together and over those episodes in hundreds and hundreds of hours in months and years we became very close. Friends like very very close friends. We were just sitting around one day. And he's like I haven't gotten a tattoo. I get attached to every decade. He said let's get together. Let's get hammered. Let's do it. Let's do it. So it really is a symbol of our friendship. And it's never be daunted as hemingway quote and the way that came to be was. We're sitting around the trailer I'm like okay. Let's let's get imagine to. Who's going to pick what it is? I am not A. I'm not a cerebral scholarly. Guy Like Elton. I'm like if I win this. Whatever we're going to get an octopus chef with eight utensils one each arm. Thank God he won. Thank God you want so you can actually watch the video of you. Google jetty loud. We actually wanted to put it out on social media. While we're getting Tattoos Watch we livestream did and it and it existed lives in the world now so there was this moment where like Thai food was cool and there was this moment where like no one knew anything about it. Yeah what was it like for that thing that you grew up with like all of a sudden be cool. Yeah I'm trying to think back through those years. Try to kind of like articulate. What was the tipping point? It had this phenomenally fast. Rise to UBIQUITY. Do you know what I mean. And it had to be between the eighties. Probably the nineties. Wow 'cause town was founded in two thousand right and I would say we were already firmly ubiquitous. Yeah that was the recognition right so I would say between the eighties and nineties for some reason. Thai food became

Thailand Culinary Ambassador Of Thailan America Vietnam Los Angeles Elton Brown United States Mir Poi Chicago Google Consul General Ricker Alton Brown Jones Hemingway
Deborah Treisman Reads David Foster Wallace

The New Yorker: Fiction

08:05 min | 1 year ago

Deborah Treisman Reads David Foster Wallace

"Chosen a story to read and I asked listeners to submit questions for me to discuss through our twitter and facebook pages. The story I've chosen is good. People by David Foster Wallace which was published in the New Yorker in January of two thousand seven all the different angles ways. They come at the decision together did not ever included the word for had he wants said. It avowed that he did love her. Love Cherry Fisher then it all would have been transformed. It would not be a different stance or angle but a difference in the very thing. They were praying deciding on together. I chose a story in part because it was the last piece that I worked on with David Foster Wallace before his death in two thousand eight and because our correspondence about the story stayed very vividly in my memory and came to mind when he died. The story was eventually part of the Pale King. David Foster Wallace's posthumous novel which was published in. Two thousand eleven at the time that he sent it to me in December of two thousand six. Though I'm not sure that he knew it was going to end up as part of the novel he was working on. It may have been a separate story then or it might have been an outtake that he wasn't planning to include in his note to me. He identified it as a short fiction. Submission the fact. The story is in a sensory thinking of Hemingway's nineteen twenty seven story hills like white. Elephants also makes me suspect that it was first written as a self contained piece. In Wallace's story and in Hemingway's a young couple for would not be convenient to have a baby talk awkwardly around the idea of abortion without ever using the word in the Wallace Story. Unlike in the Hemingway. The young couple are devout Christians who have to grapple with the concept from that point of view as well as you will hear. I'll be talking some more after the story but now here's good. People by David Foster Wallace good people. They were up on a picnic table at the park by the lake by the edge of Lake with part of a down tree in the shallows half hidden by the Bank Lane Dean junior and his girlfriend both in blue jeans and button up shirts. They sat up on the tables top portion and had their shoes on the bench part that people sat on a picnic or fellowship together and carefree times it gone to different high schools but the same junior college where they had met in campus ministries. It was springtime and the parks grass was very green in the air suffused with honeysuckle and lilacs. Both which was almost too much. There were bees and the angle of the sun made the water of the shallows. Look dark there had been more storms that week with some down trees in the sound of chainsaws all up and down. His parents street their postures on the picnic table. We're both the same forward kind with their shoulders rounded and elbows on their knees in this position the girl rocked slightly and once put her face in her hands but she was not crying. Lane was very still an immobile and looking past the bank at the down tree in the shallows and it's ball of exposed roots going all directions and the trees cloud of branches all half in the water. The only other individual nearby was dozen space tables away by himself standing upright looking at the torn up hole in the ground. There were the tree gone over. It was still early at an all. The shadows wheeling right and shortening. The girl were thin old checked cotton shirt with pro coloured snaps with the long sleeves down and always smelled very good and clean like someone you could trust and care about. Even if you weren't in Love Lane. Dean had liked the smell of her right away. His mother called her down to Earth and liked her thought she was good people. You could tell she made this evident in little ways the shallow slapped from different directions at the tree as if almost teething on it sometimes when alone and thinking or struggling to turn a matter over to Jesus Christ in prayer he would find himself putting his fist in his palm and turning it slightly as if still playing and pounding his glove to stay sharp and alert and center. He did not do this now. It will be cruel and indecent to do this now. The older individual stood beside his picnic table. He was added but not sitting unlooked also out of place in a suit coat or jacket and the kind of men's hat lanes grandfather wore and photos as a young insurance man. He appeared to be looking across the lake. If he moved lane. Didn't see it. He looked more like a picture than a man. There were not any ducks in view. One thing lane did was reassure her again that he'd go with her and be there with her. It was one of the few safer decent things he could really say the second time. He said it again now. She shook her head and laughed in an unhappy way. That was more just air out her nose. Her real life was different where he be was the waiting room. She said that he'd be thinking about her and feeling bad for her. She knew but he couldn't be in there with her. This was so obviously true that he felt like a nanny that he'd kept on about it and now knew what she thought. Every time he went. Set it it hadn't brought her comfort or ease the burden at all the worse. He felt the stiller. He sat the whole thing felt balanced on a knife or wire if he moved to put his arm up or touch her. The whole thing could tip over. He hated himself for sitting so frozen. He could almost visualize himself tiptoeing. Pass something explosive. A big stupid looking tiptoe like in a cartoon the whole last black had been this way and it was wrong. He knew it was wrong. Knew something was required of him. That was not this terrible frozen care and caution but he pretended to himself did not know what it was was required. He pretended it had no name. He pretended that not saying aloud. What he knew to be right and true was for her sake was for the sake of her needs and feelings. He also worked dock and routing at ups on top of school but a trade it to get the day off after they decided together two days before he had awakened very early and tried to pray but could not. He was freezing more and more solid. He felt like that he had not thought of his father the blank frozenness of his father even in church which had once filled him with such pity. This was the truth lane. Dean junior felt son on one arm as he pictured in his mind an image of himself on a train waving mechanically to something that got smaller and smaller as the train pulled away. His father and his mother's father had the same birthday. A cancer Sherry's hair was coloured almost corn blonde very clean the skin through central part pink in the sunlight. They'd sat here long enough. That only their right side was shaded. Now he could at her head but not at her different parts of him felt unconnected to each other. She was smarter than him and they both knew it. It wasn't a school lane was an accounting and business and did all right. He was hanging in there. She was a year older twenty but it was also more. She had always seemed to lane to be on good terms with her life. In a way that age could not account for his mother had put it that she knew what is she wanted which was nursing and not an easy program at Peoria Junior College and plus she worked hostessing at the embers and had bought her own car. She was serious in a way lane light. She had a cousin that died when she was thirteen. Fourteen that she'd loved and been close with only talked about it that once. He liked her smell and her down the arms and the way she exclaimed when something made her laugh he like just being with her and talking to her she was serious in her faith and values in a way that lane had liked and now sitting here with her on. The table found himself. Afraid of this was an awful thing. He was starting to believe that he might not be serious. In his faith he might be somewhat of a hypocrite like the Assyrians in Isaiah which would be a far graver sending the appointment. He has decided he believed

David Foster Wallace Hemingway Wallace Story Dean Lane Pale King Twitter Cherry Fisher Facebook Peoria Junior College Isaiah Stiller
Rebecca Solnit: Recollections of My Nonexistence

Bookworm

09:03 min | 1 year ago

Rebecca Solnit: Recollections of My Nonexistence

"Of my nonexistence. It's a profound book. It moved me deeply and let me say furthermore that this is the first time we're doing a show under these corona virus situations. I'm in my home. Rebecca's in her home and we're going to talk to one another without being able to see one another a real I for bookworm. Hi Rebecca Hello Michael. What do you mean by my nonexistence? I had the title before I wrote the Book and the book in some ways a reflection on it. It's most of all about all the forms of violence against women. The literal violence that leaves some women. Did some woman silent. Some woman pushed out of full participation in different social arenas but I also wrote about other social groups game in native people etc who face other kinds of erasure and I also wrote about reading as a positive form of non existence where you withdraw from your own life and your own physical being to enter another world and kind of float disembodied in somebody else's imaginings in somebody else's language. Wow let me say that as I was reading the book although I regard myself as I hope sensitive gay man I was made aware of how frightening it is used say at a certain point partially ironically that in your childhood your hobby was not getting raped. To what extent is that true. I-in it's completely true and I was really writing about my adolescence and early adulthood. We've had a really valuable and significant conversation. Last several years thanks to black lives matter and the response to the killing of Trayvon Martin about black parents giving talk to their sons about the dangers. They faced because of their race and gender. Most girls get different forms of the talk. Telling them often in roundabout evasive ways that they can't wear this. They can't do that. They can't aspire to this. They can't move freely. They can't go out at this hour. They shouldn't go to the party. They shouldn't have a drink and that it's entirely on them to prevent men from harming them and that society has no interest in taking responsibility for that but Democrat violence against women. So as young woman I had to constantly think about safety and strategy as I move through the world and every situation walking out in the world public transit meetings classes social situations parties Cetera and it was constant and it took a toll. I remember when I was first in college. This is around. Nineteen seventy the first feminist movements. Were starting in it in phone stickers. That said this exploits women but it wasn't yet clear that we were in a culture that exploits women altogether and that when I started to join gay men's liberation groups. We discovered how much we had grown up being teased being heard being disregarded in the language of the Normative Patriarchal Heterosexual Culture held one. Live in such a culture. You know I think if you add up those who are not male those who are not white. Those are not straight those who are not conventionally able bodied et CETERA. You end up with the majority of facing these forms of non existence. I think that you know it is a burden that people shouldn't have to carry That a lot of kinds of people carry these burdens and I wrote this book partly to try and home in on some of the nuances and complexities around gender. That I didn't feel we're talking about enough but I also wrote this book very much as a first person account of my formative years in San Francisco and gay men were a joy and support and inspiration in those years You know I lived about a neighborhood away. You know a fifteen minute walk from the Castro to see these men who had said we're going to refuse our assignment. We're going to refuse our role because we've decided it's worth paying the price rather than the price of avoiding who. We are and conforming. But I also WanNa talk about another form of non existence that really had an impact. And I think has an impact on young queer people even now on people of color the non-existence of being given reading material stories histories in which people like you don't matter don't exist aren't the protagonists. I grew up reading. Very male centered white centred literary Canon and I should say Christian centered and I feel like there was a non existence that to imagine myself as the protagonist of the great stories. I had to D- imagine myself as a woman and it always felt like I was wavering. Between who I was in my bodily identity and who I was if I wanted to be like Odysseus Sir Lord Jim more so many of the adventurous people in the books that I love when I was growing up the used to as a regular thing on once book reports ask. Who Do you identify with in this book? And since there were no queer characters and no Jewish characters except extremely negative. One says in the case of the sun also rises. I mean hemingway was particular corporate for giving us no one that we could know who would be like us. We would want to grow up into and my parents intern. They were the children of immigrants or immigrants themselves and they were given Ivanhoe to read when they got to school and suddenly they were saying words like pretty young maiden where did that come from. They weren't learning American English in their English classes. That will earning Sir Walter Scott so when I was reading your book. Rebecca this idea of non existence and the ways in which it's pressed upon us move me so deeply that I'll tell you the truth I was breaking into tears every ten or fifteen pages. Wow thank you I will say if I'm not mistaken. Ivanhoe has a beautiful Jewish named Rebecca in it but it is a very anachronistic archaic book. Rebecca Soni is an explorer of the American West and when she became involved with her younger brother in anti-nuclear demonstrations. She was there at the test sites in Nevada. Exploring what it was lied to beyond Shoshoni lands. Yes yes and actually that was such a formative place for me. I like to say the Nevada test site taught me to write because the place was so extraordinarily it demanded. I learned to integrate the different modes. In which is writing journalism criticism and kind of lyrical personal essays but also was a place in which the protagonists were Western. Schone elders Mormon down winters atomic survivors from Japan Lesbian Pagans and anarchists and just really remarkable coming together of a lot of people who already weren't part of the central narrative to exert real power make real alliances about the future of the world against the dominant narrative being told by Cold War America and then nuclear physicists and politicians who were mostly white men and it was an extraordinary movement with many

Rebecca Soni Ivanhoe Nevada Normative Patriarchal Heterose Japan Sir Walter Scott Trayvon Martin San Francisco Shoshoni Intern Castro Lord Jim Hemingway
Dems go on attack at fiery Nevada debate

Red Eye Radio

08:30 min | 1 year ago

Dems go on attack at fiery Nevada debate

"Man so many things to take from this debate I would say though out of this season I don't know if this is the best debate I forget who it was that you read from the best of a jump yeah ever but but certainly if if it's up there on the books you know it's of of this political season it's the best so far no doubt but it makes you wonder what Bloomberg was thanking you know you look at the delegate count here for the primary they change the way the super delegates vote at the convention after twenty sixteen because you have these pre I'm essentially pre pledges by some of the super delegates going to Hillary and the day date so the Democratic Party changed that to where the super delegates won't vote unless there is a a second round or there's no doubt that what what the first round unless there is no doubt of a winner in other words Bernie would have to get nineteen hundred and ninety one or more of those delegates right now he's in the lead that's what we say burning but you go to Nate silver's forecast and it has him hundreds right now hundreds shy of that nineteen ninety one mark I'm it is a it is a very odd very odd position for the party to be on extremely extremely rare but you look at the idea of a brokered convention anybody believe Bloomberg's going to just drop out before super Tuesday that's not gonna happen we don't know for such an high on my vitamins good gains if if now where do you know he's blown he's got at least see how he does well it or Zachary even though you've done yet whether it was like laying down about walking away from the table you're not gonna do that until you spin the wheel but the the whole thing with with blackness is all right Bloomberg's following it let's say there's a falloff goes where you and I were discussing this during the break some of the go to burning and you made a good point that you know people get on the Bernie bandwagon because they see him as the winner okay I want to be somebody who is with the winner I'm or they go back to fighting do they go to boot a judge I think you'll probably see that support drop but it won't drop is zero four but before Bloomberg it's not gonna drop zero so he's still remains the spoiler going in this super Tuesday I was so I was just reading this was an article yesterday before the debate mauling Mollie Hemingway from the federalist dot com fox news contributor talking about this was not how the twenty twenty race was supposed to be the end talking about Bloomberg even if he can buy the democratic nomination he's not what their base voters want a talks about that you know what the establishment was trying to do and after looking at the options and all that the plan was to give Joe Biden president Obama's vice president the nomination the media did their part suppressing negative messaging about the seventy seven year old who has never won a presidential primary or caucus they pushed an impeachment designed to suppress president trump's numbers heading into the election year and instead it blew back of them gonna help trump and hurt the Democrats and when Bernie Sanders seemed poised to win Iowa they drastically limited news coverage about the caucuses and she actually references to the the actual research that was done leading up to Iowa and how as they got closer thinking burning was gonna win that the news coverage actually on the networks just drop the stories on the actual well I will call causes but Biden underperform their than under performed in New Hampshire coming in an embarrassing fifth place you may do better in Nevada and North Carolina but his path is looking more like a slog when but Biden faltered the media looked at others in the center left field Democrats have two lanes essentially the Bernie Sanders lane and the center left lane sometimes misnomer by liberal journalists as a moderately pain despite none of the candidates in that lane being politically moderate sure the establishment would take Amy Klobuchar or even put people to judge or Elizabeth Warren over Sanders but if they're being honest with themselves they're worried that those candidates don't have what it takes they spent years getting high on their own supply about Biden's strain and trump's weaknesses but now they're coming out of their narco haze and they're panicking they're so desperate that they're willing to sell the party nomination to Mike Bloomberg of all people while his views are at odds with many of the Democratic Party base voters it's hard to get more establishment than Bloomberg who made billions selling his terminals to Wall Street this week the establishment is really amping up its flirtation with the wi New Yorker the billionaire businessman has not won any votes yet and isn't even on the ballot in the next two states holding elections but he has won support of many of the major media figures The New York Times yesterday had eight stories about Bloomberg on the politics page of its website compared to zero nine for the delegate leader and young mayor but a judge that is not an accident last Sunday's political shows featured nonstop questions and commentary about Bloomberg not the current odds on favorite to win the most delegates Sanders up until and unless he crashes in the debate or underperforms on super Tuesday there's an argument to Bloomberg should be presumed to be the front runner because he is the establishment's clear favorite of the remaining contenders and in the Democratic Party the establishment support means a great deal Bloomberg is spending on herds of amounts of money to essentially purchased the nomination he has spent more than four hundred million dollars in advertising get this now compared to eighteen million for the next non billionaire candidate mmhm he's providing ridiculously fancy food spreads as voter events and he's hiring people and good salaries through November regardless of whether he wins the nomination or not it's unclear how many people are simply agreeing to be bought and how many think his wealth is his biggest comparative advantage for defeating trump perhaps it's a combination of both but even if the media and democratic establishment are more than willing to be bought off our Democrat voters that pathetic possibly but there is reason to think the voters won't be as cheap a date as their leaders are proving to be so there you go let's note that some analysts are already comparing him to trump himself apparently on account of them both being brash New York billionaires Bloomberg is to be sure far wealthier than nearly every other human being on the planet but trump has charisma a base of support built around his brand and an actual agenda that is coherent in easy to understand he took on the establishment wing of his own party and legitimately excited a base that was sick of not getting his way on illegal immigration analysts interventional ism and trade agreements they deemed unfair trump hits on issues GOP voters a lot of it he won most of the votes in twenty sixteen most of the delegates and has extremely strong support inside of his party Bloomberg lacks charisma has no base of support and his campaign messages Mike will get it done and our sisters to claim it says nothing of substance in fact it is similar to Hillary Clinton's self focused I'm with her slogan down rather you guys how to read parts of it yes okay she goes on and talks more of you know about it there but I've you know you you think about that today and so you wonder what the response will be from the establishment media today that was putting their hopes in in in Bloomberg it look it was a terrible performance yeah I was horrible by the optics alone I mean he just looked it looked angry he looked fully unprepared because he was fully unprepared he looked you you said earlier deer in the headlights totally on so many things it looks

Writer AE Hotchner, friend to Hemingway, Newman, dead at 102

All Things Considered

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Writer AE Hotchner, friend to Hemingway, Newman, dead at 102

"Author and play right Erin Edward Hotchner has died at the age of one hundred two after service in World War two was a journalist in the U. S. Army Air Corps Hotchner became close friends with Ernest Hemingway writing is nineteen sixty six biography Papa Hemingway who's working also adapted for place in television later with another close friend and Westport Connecticut neighbor actor Paul Newman archer co founded Newman's own which donates all profits to charities they co wrote a memoir about the project called shameless exploitation in pursuit of the common good he also wrote bestselling biographies of Doris Day and Sophia Loren in a book about his childhood king of the hill later adapted into a Steven Soderbergh

Erin Edward Hotchner Ernest Hemingway Doris Day Sophia Loren Steven Soderbergh U. S. Army Air Corps Westport Connecticut Paul Newman
Tobias Wolff: This Boys Life

Bookworm

11:00 min | 1 year ago

Tobias Wolff: This Boys Life

"This show began over thirty years ago and one of the first books that was on. This show was a book. A memoir called this boy's life. It's by my guest Tobias Wolff now the original publisher Grove has published a thirtieth anniversary edition of this boy's life. I'll tell you if you do a book show and I know you don't you. Don't get to re read the books that you read thirty years ago and so I re- read this boy's life. It's better than I remembered it even originally and I loved it originally. Tell me. Did you ever expect that your hands would be dirty? Buy this book again. Oh you never know what to expect with With a book what sort of life. It will have When you finish a book you're pretty much thinking then about the next book Elliott has a wonderful line in the four quartets. He says For us there is only the trying the rest is not our business and it it that something that Iraq had better take to heart. Will this always life? It's one of the first memoirs in this huge movement which restored memoir to respect ability. But also although you insist on its factuality it stands at the beginning of what becomes the train of auto fiction people who are writing about their lives as honestly as possible. The question is what about? The structure of the book. Turns it into readable fiction then as I was reading this boy's life what I saw again and again in each chapter was that you'd structured the events around crises and capitulation 's that allowed the book to make its way from beginning to end without seeming like a memoir seeming instead as if life itself the thing we hope is an adventure But this boy's life sees him through his mother's divorce his first and terrifying stepfather his escape from home to a prep school. He is thoroughly unprepared for and in the process allows US SOC- what goes the making of a writer's life pretty good for someone who really was at the start of a career. It was one of those books that I almost didn't choose to right at that. Sounds mystical and and and writers should avoid mystical language about their about their projects in their process but It it always seemed to me a a genre to be avoided the memoir and even though I loved some memoirs Mary McCarthy's memories of the Catholic girlhood is a great favourite of mine. Loves NABOKOV SPEAK MEMORY AND My own brothers Duke of deception. Which in fact was yet another reason. I thought that this was something that I wasn't going to do. I thought go get my family's been covered in this way so it really hadn't because my brother grew up with my father continente way from my experience growing up with my mother and we rarely saw each other but No I was Sort of in some strange way dragged kicking and screaming into the writing of this book but once I got started and and I don't mean by anybody else I mean by inner promptings But once I got started I threw everything else. Aside I found myself caught up in these memories and I suppose like many writers I tend to remember the past in terms of stories. I've told stories about my past. And there's no doubt that without my meaning to the shaping of a memory and two story involves SOM editing that that I'm even unaware of And but these-these. This is what happened this noise life was your entrance into my permanent memory. Not only that it have unforgettable beautiful cover still does. They've kept this cover But somehow or other the care with the writing is something different from the care with a story and sentence by sentence. There's so much betrayal of the care being taken this no show of stuff. It's very carefully done but not artfully done. You're concerned with the pains of this boy's life. Because Boys Life. The magazine that was for scouts was telling about every boy's life and now we were going to hear about this boy's life now too biased. Wolf can you remember at all about talking about this book on Bookworm years ago? Oh I remember talking with you about it I don't remember exactly what we talked about though. Yeah I would I loved was just as I recognized. Jewison Reiner you recognize me as a reader and subsequently you would sign your books to my best reader and I was saw flattered and honored by that and I think I want to talk to you about the relation between writers and readers because over these years between the people who've read the book and the People who've seen the movie that is very loosely based on the book There are people in the world who think they know you? How do you feel about that? I especially feel uncomfortable about it when When they think they know me because of the movie. Okay like I've had people come up to me and say Y I I read your book. And how did you know so much about your mother? Sex Life and I try to be polite but there's nothing in in the book that would lead them to ask that question. That would have been in the movie. Which as you say is very loosely adapted readers people who are readers They understand understate. You know look they understand that. We shared difficult experiences that And that's why they would read a book like this and finish it and so the kinds of conversations I have with people read it. Have been actually very gratifying to me. Often they'll say I had a you know. I had a young boy in my class. Who really seemed to be going off the rails and I gave him your book and it seemed to mean a lot to him. He felt like he had some company in the world. And that didn't have to go badly. And you know if somebody says something like that to me. It just lifts my heart and gives me fuel for the work ahead so I on the whole. I'm I'm very grateful for the way in which people respond to this book. I'M TALKING TO BIAS. Wolf on the thirtieth anniversary of his memoir. This boy's life a book that I had the pleasure to go back and reread. And you know. It's such a detailed book that on my first reading. I didn't realize how haunting it is in Hemingway's Nick Adams stories. We remember phrases. That are unforgettable. You specifically rejected. It seems to me that kind of writing for writing. That's much more detailed and to the point of the places you lived so there's a town up north called concrete. Yes that's where I went to high school. I didn't actually live concrete. Was the metropolis if you will. Where I went to high school. I lived in a little village. About thirty five miles up the Skagit River from concrete And we took the school bus down every morning and back home at night through this wind e dangerous road And and that was but that was the name of the the town where I went to Crete. High-school hundred high school scribes the dust. The cement plant left a pall of dust on everything. Sometimes it would be so thick in the air that they would have to cancel football practice and because they didn't have any concept of people wearing masks or anything but all the cars were all eaten by the lime in the cement dust and I mean it was. It was a company town The Lone Star Cement Company pretty much owned it And now the since the cement plant is closed. I've been back I went back. In fact during the filming of this and and now they errors pristine and they're these beautiful cascade mountains in the background and it's kind of a destination now for fishermen and stuff like that but it was rather squalid company town when I went to high school

Wolf Tobias Wolff Skagit River Iraq Nabokov Publisher Jewison Reiner Grove Elliott The Lone Star Cement Company Mary Mccarthy Writer Football Crete Bookworm Hemingway Nick Adams
"hemingway" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"hemingway" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Would you look at that. Thought had lost these to his past provided some refuge at least eastern work although Ernest and Mary left Cuba behind for good in nineteen sixty ernest was able to craft and manipulate his old journal entries into the definitive memoir of the lost generation. A moveable feast yet. Even this seems like a victory lap of sorts. He would never publish another novel in his lifetime. The permanently relocated located to his rural land in Ketchum Idaho but like his father before him concerns over money and overdue taxes along with more out there. Theories regarding government surveillance wants drove hemingway deeper into depression in January nineteen sixty-one Mary Checked Ernest into the Mayo Clinic. Under a pseudonym where he received as many his fifteen rounds of electroconvulsive therapy three months passed as Mary kept close watch on her husband's declining state ernest. Where have you gotten to ernest own my Lord Ernest? Please Darling put that down. It's closing in now. Mary my whole life is wrapping around me like a shell. I can't can't see anything anymore. Wouldn't wouldn't the hell. Am I supposed to write. If I can't even see you don't have to write not anymore. We can live the rest of our lives together here or anywhere anywhere you need to go please. But put the gun down here. Please just drink a little. Put Down The gun taste the same as always Mary. What is there left to discover after all whom I fully? Mary was able to sedate hemingway that morning and he returned to Mayo further treatment. He was released yet again. A few months later in July Mary we had moved all of his guns to the basement but two days after his return ernest arose before the dawn and retrieved his favorite shotgun on July the second one thousand nine hundred sixty one ernest. Hemingway ended his own life early. Press coverage clouded the true cause of death calling it an accidental death. It took five years for Mary to admit to the press that her husband had committed suicide later. Research into the Hemingway family has shown there may have been a shared genetic disorder known as his haemochromatosis that broke down both body and mind over time in five generations of the Hemingway family line for generations contained members who killed themselves along with his father Ernest sister brother and much later. Granddaughter took their own lives. Tragic Mark in their collective story this inability to reckon with death and the lifespan of the body plagued ernest hemingway throughout his entire life though it also pushed him to find a new way to illustrate the very depths of the human soul. His work rarely ended happily. His characters rarely found remedy for their sick souls yet. The dog pursuit of meaning of redemption option or most simply of love was the secret fuel for his writing. It was never an obsession with masculinity or dominating women or conquering enemies which drove Rove Hemingway forward. It was a search for some truth in our loud crowded increasingly violent modern times his Nobel prize acceptance speech sent by mail to be read aloud as if by a ghost focused in on his life's true craft the impossible struggle of honesty in anyone's life. Writing at its best is a lonely life. Organizations for writers Paleikud the writers loneliness but I doubt if they even improve his writing. It grows in public stature. As he sheds loneliness and often as work deteriorates free does his work alone. And if he's a good enough writer he he must face eternity or the lack of it each day if nothing else Ernest Hemingway face down his days and revealed as much as any writer possibly could about our collective personal human eternity. Thanks for listening you can find more episodes of famous fates and all other park has originals for free on spotify defy famous fates is a spotify exclusive. Not only does spotify already. Have all of your favorite music but now spotify is making it easy for you to enjoy all all of your favorite podcast originals. Like famous for free from your phone desktop or smart speaker to stream famous fates on spotify. Just open the APP and type hype famous fates in the search bar remember. It's a spotify exclusive so you can only find the show right here and don't forget to follow us on facebook and Instagram at par cast in twitter at podcast network. We'll see.

ernest hemingway Mary spotify writer Cuba Ketchum Idaho Mayo Clinic Darling twitter Nobel prize Mayo facebook Mark Instagram
"hemingway" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

11:19 min | 1 year ago

"hemingway" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Cafe e lead chuck a lot though in Yori multiple nomadic on perhaps alcohol Parmi pay a medic on on a vote. TROPPO INTELLIGENT MIA madre ditching shaken by the mortars. No doubt have no fear though tonight nothing Out The sort Cherie chess but it they they medicom not likely. I think something's hit my legs. God the blood must go. Red Cross did not sign you up to die for us. Unfortunately it did tell Ya know. Now gimme your damn hand. We're GONNA crawl out of this mess. If it kills US and kill him almost did Hemingway's act of Heroism Zero Ism just a month into his tour under the Red Cross earned in the Italian silver medal of bravery at eighteen years old however the shrapnel hits taken to both his legs were a harsh cost young ernest was shipped back to Milan. Where surgery saved his ability to walk? Still it took six months to recover any semblance of normality malady. But leave it to Hemingway to get down to romance while under duress during his stay in Milan he met and seduced his older nurse. Agnes von Kurowski agnes became the prime inspiration. For one of Hemingway's most famous characters. Catherine Barkley from a farewell to arms agnes was earnest's first great love and when the time came for his return to America he refused to let their connection die goodness ernest. You're drunk on your beautiful. Well hope you had a sloppy must be America calling out. You shouldn't drink. You're still on medication. I'm disappointed agnes. It has a nurse at the front. You must know what the most important medication of all this. None of that on the street. No Oh why the secrets anymore were to be married. Aren't we all we OUGHTA. Don't be coy. You accepted my proposal two nights before sealy boy. If I knew all that was waiting for me across the sea I would have made this journey ages ago and you definitely would've died then. Do not pretend not love me. Agnes I know you do. It would be hard not to my idea. Promise me I'll settle back into Chicago. I'll send for you. My parents will be amazed that they will be. Please Watch your today because as you move about. Forget my legs I I know only you promise me agnes I promise silly boy. I plum Earn assailed home with dreams in his head dreams that were quickly. Vanquished wants back in America Ernest. Receive word from Agnes Agnes that she had married an Italian officer. There loves possibility was simply and illusion of war. This shook ernest to his core stranded back at his parents house with two bum. Legs no prospects. He nearly drifted away at the last moment. Three things saved him a job offer a new city and the girl who reminded him of that beautiful nurse. He lost to time in one thousand nine hundred twenty ernest. Hemingway met Hadley Richardson a vivacious. Girl from Saint Louis much like Agnes. She was older than Ernest. Unlike agnes she did not have the good sense to perhaps not marry a guy you met a few months ago. Their engagement came quicker than in his entire relationship with Agnes and freshly equipped with a new posting as a foreign correspondent for the Toronto Star newspaper Hadley and Ernest took their lives to Paris. If he could not have a European girl he would have a city in her place. Although the move was justified by favourable exchange rate for American cash Hemingway's ulterior career. Motives soon became clear perhaps inspired by his war. Comrade John Dos Passos. Hemingway came to Paris for the culture specifically the art and literature. That you're seeing gathering around a peculiar American expats home. The Salon of Gertrude. Stein around comes Joyce once more out of his Gaelic Gaelic mine on Sangria pissing on the print. She stole from Picasso itself because at this sounds vaguely to take gets not one of his best. This is incredible Sherwood was right. Had this room is the center of the city again. Mr Pound and Mr Joyce. The stories are wonderful but everyone might actually like to hear themselves. Think now why here themselves when they can hear me. Perhaps they'd like to make a proper introduction to everyone our new guests tonight Hadley and Ernest Hemingway. We'd like to express how pleased we are to be here. Pleased have we are scholar here. This is not the university son and certainly. Isn't the only three quarters of the people here. Alcoholics out to drink to that. We'll return to our story in just a moment. Hi It's Carter. Sure you're a fan of true crime but are you ready to put your skills to the test and be crowned undisputed expert. Then try your hand at par cast new Trivia. PODCAST killer knowledge. Join me every Tuesday as to competitors go head to head to to correctly answer multiple choice true crime questions. Whoever gained the most points after twenty questions wins? It's all the murder mystery and suspense suspense. You've come to expect from podcast now. In a fast paced interactive format each episode dives deep into different shocking topic from history such says the Manson family Jimmy Hoffa and even the Jonestown massacre with each question and answer comes additional context surrounding the event enlightening even the most most knowledgeable true crime lover. You can play by yourself. Challenge your friends and prove your prowess by sharing results with Park. Cast on social media you. You never know you may even find yourself in the hot seat one day. Follow killer knowledge free on spotify or wherever you get your podcasts now back to the life of Ernest Hemingway Ernest. I'd love to chat for a moment. Of course I hear you've come to Paris to right. Well I've been tinkering with the thought. I respect the idea. Is it play over here but I think the American style Exa a strong clear perspective your inner journalist coming out no not like that but the words used to convey the news can be reimagined reapplied side two fiction to the inner self well and never thought of it quite that way but yes I've read a few of your pieces all right then you have touch earnest and meeting makes it clear to me your one of my lost. Excuse me you you hold it well but the world has shaken. The most recent generation caused them to lose a step some in the process however gained a slight insight a lost generation the lost generation. You see that in me enough to turn the pages yes I do in the Montparnasse quarter were Stein lived. She gathered together. The greatest minds of this lost generation and fostered an artistic culture that would resonate for decades. It's it was during these years as argued with Ezra pound drank with James Joyce and studied under Gertrude. Stein that Hemingway's signature style came into existence stance. Hemingway himself later described it as the iceberg or theory of omission instead of diving deep into the emotions the romantics or or engaging in deep psychological deconstruction of characters hemingway brought his journalistic skill of brevity to the page by saying the absolute bare minimum about out characters and crafting simple description of setting and plot. Hemingway believed he could focus the reader's attention onto filling out the outlines themselves so basically Gli. He believed that by showing as little as possible. The audience would actually be able to perceive the emotional enormity of esteems stories to give them a spiny sense for detecting protecting the full iceberg. That is human existence. Hemingway style perfectly sinked with the modernistic artistic movement of time putting together the transatlantic antic review with Ezra pound and others. Hemingway began releasing his short stories. His first story Indian camp was about a boy forced to watch his father. Perform an emergency agency c-section on a native American woman themes of death life and women were already at the forefront of his mind. The modernist audience responded very well so so much. So that after befriending F Scott Fitzgerald who had just found great success with the Great Gatsby. Hemingway decided that a novel was also his next mountain to climb on his professional. Life was not the only thing influx Hadley was a lively companion for Ernest in these European days and they would often travel with friends is to pimp blown a Spain for the festivity of the bullfights they had their first child in nineteen. twenty-three named John Hadley Nick Noor. After his mother and earnest's is favorite. bullfighter gertrude. Stein became the child's godmother but his earnest reputation increased. He found himself increasingly at odds with his motherly mentor. This initial dispute dispute evolved into a decade-long scandal regarding who truly coined the term loss generation young vain and arrogant and his new-found dominance of the local scene. Hemingway was happy to claim it for himself in front of the press and as he wrapped up work on his first novel the Sun also rises inspired by Hadley and his travels to Pamplona and channeling the weariness and Philistine nature of the loss generation. Hemingway found a stronger source of support from a friend named Pauline pfeiffer. We're Hadley Hadley hoped. Ernest would be more selective and cautious in his choice of publisher. Pauline thought the novel needed to be released as soon as possible. So earnest took the first offer given to him followed quickly by a divorce. Order from Hadley. Hemingway was married to pauline within months of a separation old ernest. Never want to rush into things. All of this occurred as the sun also rises became a sensation. It contained many elements considered scandalous for the time it detailed the excessive lifestyle of the lost generation. They're drinking partying and sex in fact. The novel drew criticism from his own friends as hemingway had clearly based the characters and their dirty little secrets on people. Well he knew Hemingway's mother was not a fan either hoping he would go back to the less sensationalist pursuit of journalism. Yeah on the world. Stage it struck a modernist dischord critic Henry. James Believed Hemingway's writing was an echo of the effects of world. War One that in his words hemingway saw.

Ernest Hemingway Hadley Hadley Agnes Agnes Hemingway Agnes von Kurowski agnes James Believed Hemingway Stein America Ezra pound Red Cross Pauline pfeiffer Paris Milan Hadley Richardson MIA madre Yori Cherie John Dos Passos James Joyce
"hemingway" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"hemingway" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Hi I'm Vanessa. Richardson and I'm Carter Roy. Welcome to famous fates apar- cast original exclusive to spotify notified each week. We'll release five. Fresh episodes centered around a common theme such as Hollywood icons influential women or music legends in each episode. So we'll take a close look at the remarkable life of a different person with the help of voice. Actors will dramatize their incredible lives reimagining. Their greatest hand and weakest moments then will examine their controversial deaths. Some dads came too soon. Some remain shrouded in mystery and some change the world forever today covering Ernest Hemingway. A seminal author in the American Literary Canon for his book the old man and the sea it was awarded the Nineteen fifty four Nobel Prize in literature but despite his success was haunted by a deep sadness and no amount of travel more women are alcohol. Could ever help him escape. You can find episodes of famous fates and all other podcast originals for free on spotify defy to stream famous fates for free on spotify. Just open the APP and type famous fates in the search bar famous fates is a spotify exclusive so you can the only find it on spotify at par cast grateful for you our listeners. You allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram instagram. At podcast in twitter at podcast network now back to the life of Ernest Hemingway. The man who single-handedly developed the dominant style of Twentieth Century American literature the man who made it to both world wars without even being a soldier the man who constantly constantly strove to outdo himself to perfection simplicity to return America to its naturalist roots. There we go over elaborating keep it simple stupid internist. Hemingway lived as he did to defy death and in many ways he might have succeeded in eighteen ninety nine Ernest Miller. Hemingway was born in an Affluent neighborhood called Oak Park right outside of Chicago. A true twentieth century. Life was ahead of him. His Father Clarence was a respected physician and his mother. Grace was an Opera singer and musician both were easily welcomed into a high status community and raised their children within it but their parenting methods did diverge to some degree while L.. Clarence emphasize the importance of nature. Grace was a city lover and forced her children into the arts. Hemingway later claimed to despise his mother playing cello and and even his own name which he believed to recall the WORC- protagonists of Oscar Wilde's famous play. Historians agree that Little Ernest got most of his spark and artistic talent Alan from his mother this divide in his soul would be there for the rest of his life. Ernest would never be able to settle down or choose a permanent home. Both the city and the country entry held their appeal for the young boy. He was a consummate Jack of all trades excelling in music sports like boxing and football hunting but most importantly early journalism. His work for the High School paper earned him a job as a cub reporter for the Kansas City Star at a mere eighteen years of age. Such a job pleased both of his parents who thought it was a career worthy of the hemingway pedigree but hemingway always had his eyes set on a bigger canvas the world stage and right now that stage was consumed by the fires of the First World War as nineteen eighteen. Don America was finally pulled deeper into the conflict unable to let go of the guiding hiding wisdom if his father Ernest knew he had a duty. Instead of directly enlisting he signed up to be an ambulance driver for the Red Cross. An interesting choice for someone. Someone considered by history to be the ultimate ideal of a man some see many contradictions in the man's life. But this choice rings true despite his macho posturing there. There was a gentle side. The Hemingway that only wished to guard and protect life and that wish was quickly fulfilled along with other volunteers. Ernest left his comfortable American American life behind for the Italian front and the horrors of war. Once they're as fate would have it. He had his first meeting with death and another ambulance driver. We're on course. For literary greatness John Dos Passos with whom Ernest would share both friendship and intense rivalry over the coming years damage need alight friend service American to glad to hear a familiar voice in this carnage fresh to the war then easy to tell these. Corpses they're hauling from that decimated munitions conciliating not the front. They're beautiful compared to what you'll see soon wasn't being yellow just unused all this noise. The Cross shouldn't hire from the crib. Charip you High School Footballer. Something a reporter writer really good Lord just what they needed another one wanna me your journalists as well. Let's straighten one thing. Being a journalist and being a writer writing is about truth not spinning stories. Well my father always told you'll be dead days of you. Don't forget everything your father told you. Keep the lighter I imagine Eh. You'll need it arrogant bastard. We should get a drink. One night is involvement on the front was as dos. PASSOS predicted did brief but explosive moved from Alan to a station directly on the Italian front known as for Salta DP AVIC. It took only a month for Hemingway's ways war to become personnel.

Ernest Hemingway Ernest spotify Clarence Ernest Miller Alan Twentieth Century American lit reporter American Literary Canon Nobel Prize Hollywood facebook John Dos Passos twitter Richardson Grace you High School Red Cross Oscar Wilde
"hemingway" Discussed on Parcast Presents: Summer of '69

Parcast Presents: Summer of '69

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"hemingway" Discussed on Parcast Presents: Summer of '69

"But one thing is certain Hemingway's writing was profoundly the effected by the theft. The moment of loss was wedged deep in his psyche. He coped by making his characters. Relive the same pain that that he had suffered and if his audience sympathized with his characters then he was in turn gaining their emotional support for example apple in his novel. The Garden of Eden Fictional author David Born and his young wife Catherine spend the summer traveling through Europe during their time in France. They meet a young woman named Morita and both fall in love with her creating a Seductive Love Triangle by Katherine Decides to burn all of David's stories and clippings out of spite and when David discovers that the suitcase where his materials were once stored George's empty he too becomes empty inside another example comes from a deleted excerpt from nineteen forty-five islands islands in the stream in this narrative. The protagonist Roger meets a young girl named Helena. Who constantly asked to see his early work doc? He tells her that his earliest stories were lost and when she asked how it happened. Roger Refuses to go into detail. He's still L. Stung by the pain of the Memory while the manuscript disappearance was painful. This first critical loss taught hemingway coming way how to use his trauma as a tool to become a better author. In fact Hemingway believed the loss is talent were inextricably linked he spoke about it in a moveable feast saying his previous works still had the lyric facility of boyhood that was perishable struggle and deceptive as youth was in his semi autobiographical story about his time in Africa titled True at First Light. Hemingway Anyway surprisingly claims that it's rewarding having someone steal from you. The loss of these manuscripts was symbiotic with his later success. Hemingway may never have become the legendary writer that he was had he not been forced to let go of the past. Thanks again for tuning into gone. We'll be back in two weeks with another episode. You can find more episodes of gone and all other podcast originals for free on spotify not only does spotify already. Have all of your favorite music but now spotify is making it easy for you to enjoy all of your favorite podcast originals. Just like gone for free from your phone. Desktop or smart speaker to stream gone on spotify. Just open the APP and type gun in the search bar her and don't forget to follow us on facebook and Instagram at our cast and twitter at Parkas network. We'll see you next time. Just because it's gone gone doesn't mean it can't be found gone was created by Max Cutler. In his parking studios original executive creative producers include Max and Ron Cutler sound design by Andy Weights with production assistance by Ron Shapiro Harley Madden Travis Clark Enjoy Stein. This episode of Gone was written by Lori Gottlieb with writing assistance by Maggie Admire and stars Molly Brandenburg and Richard Rosner..

Hemingway Roger spotify Max Cutler David Born theft Lori Gottlieb Morita apple Helena Ron Shapiro Harley Europe First Light France Africa Catherine facebook Maggie Admire twitter Parkas network
"hemingway" Discussed on Parcast Presents: Summer of '69

Parcast Presents: Summer of '69

11:22 min | 1 year ago

"hemingway" Discussed on Parcast Presents: Summer of '69

"It wasn't because he changed it because the world changed around him. The the war was finally over and ringing in the New Year also meant winging in a wave of cultural change. People were moving out of the suburbs and into cities Commercial Radio and motion pictures were laying the foundation for pop culture wages increased and prices fell leading to a spike in consumerism. Sumer ISM women cut their hair. They smoked they drank. They were sexually liberated. The average American had more money than ever before to spend and they chose to do so on jazz cars ready to wear clothes home. Appliances and illegal consumption of alcohol. They openly violated prohibition during lavish parties in the fall of nineteen twenty twenty twenty one year old Ernest. Hemingway met a beautiful woman eight years his senior at one of these ostentatious gatherings twenty nine year old had me. Richardson was a talented musician. Who seem to lose sensuality? Hemingway was immediately drawn to her and she was equally taken with him in less than a year. The couple decided to marry and start their lives over in Paris France. Paris in the nineteen twenties was known as is an artist's playground. The on the four or crazy years in French were coming to ahead which meant cultural social and artistic collaboration specifically among the you hear the rent was lower the booze was legal and the young artists were not only accepted but encouraged to experiment and thrive. It was exactly the environment where a burgeoning author like Ernest. Hemingway could flourish the newlyweds. Only words began their new lives in a meager apartment. With no running water they survived on heavily inheritance and Hemingway's job as a European correspondent with a Toronto Star. Hadley was Hemingway's biggest supporter. She believed without a doubt. The Hemingway would become the novelist he aspired are to be. She constantly validated. His ideas encouraged his ambitious endeavors in even worked as his assistant throughout the process. The only person more confident than they authors skill was hemingway himself. He truly believed he was destined for greatness. He was charismatic. Intelligent and open minded. These qualities brought him into circles of some of the most influential artists of all all time. Sure would anderson a fellow novelist and a close friend of Hemingway introduced him to his friend. Gertrude Stein up a progressive novelist poet and playwright intern. Hadley and Hemingway were granted an invitation to twenty seven Rue de Fleurus the infamous. Home of Gertrude. Her Partner Alice B Toke lists and their notorious alone there. She hosted some of the most influential artists artists of the time Cosso Patisse F Scott Fitzgerald and Ezra pound all drank and collaborated in her home. She began to mentor. The young and hungry hemingway but felt that many of his short stories still had too much description and unfortunately none Donovan was very good. She pleaded with her new apprentice to start over and to concentrate on his work and she gave thorough notes about how he could improve move he spent hours wandering the halls of Gertrude home as she took a pen to his fiction. He stared at her collection of Picasso's Monet's season seasons. Hemingway wanted to be an author in the way that these men were painters he respected their ability to sustain define emotion and through Palette and tone. He only hoped his own literature would reflect a similar level of mastery with this inspiration. He started writing a story about his time at war but that novel never reached completion. He left it behind in Paris when his paper dispatched him to work from Switzerland for months. Hemingway Road Hadley letters begging her to come visit him. He finally convinced her when he I was introduced to the fame. Investigative Journalist Lincoln Steffens while working at the peace conference in Geneva. Stephens wanted to see Hemingway's work. It was the perfect opportunity to send for heavily and his manuscripts before setting out she packed every piece of Hemingway's writing into a suitcase including the beginning of his war novel then when she boarded that fateful train all of Hemingway's manuscripts witnessing when Hemingway greeted his wife at the train station. In Switzerland Hadley was frantic. She searched for the right words and individually told her husband that his life's work had been stolen. It was all her fault at first. Hemingway laughed after the ridiculous claim after all he had carbon copies of his compositions back in Paris but had lead tearfully confessed that she'd rated every corner of his office. She brought everything she could possibly find including the carbons in a fit of panic in disbelief. This belief hemingway raced back to Paris. Hoping that it wasn't true when he arrived at their apartment he discovered that had these remarks or correct years of hard work and creativity were lost in an instant. It was as if a piece of hemingway died with the loss of those manuscripts scripts the author felt that he had nothing left to show for himself. Nothing laughed that he was proud of. He declared that he would never right again coming up hemingway puts out a reward for his lost materials and is forced forced to reinvent himself now back to the story in one thousand nine hundred twenty two twenty three year old. Hemingway was on assignment in Geneva Neva Switzerland and invited his thirty one year old wife Hadley to visit. She gathered all of his previous works only to lose them during the train. Trine right over. The couple had plans to travel onto Schambori Switzerland after their time in Geneva but according to a stamp in his passport hemingway returned return to Paris on December third to search for the lust material. He tore through his apartment frantically checking every cabinet habit and drawer in the home but Hadley had packed it. All the writer later recounted his emotions around this loss in a short story story titled a strange country. He claimed I felt almost as though I could not breathe when I saw there. Really were no folders with originals. Your folders with typed copies are folders with carbons to pour salt in the wound. Hadley had also packed all of his stationery pens pencils envelopes and postage coupons. He later joke that Hadley was trying to put me out of business a week. After Hemingway's anyways tragic loss. His colleagues Lincoln Steffens and Guy Hickok traveled to Paris to help him investigate the theft. They searched the city's lost and found bound. Bureaus and repeatedly checked in with geared Dalil after hitting multiple dead ends Hemingway's friends encouraged him to put an ad in the newspaper newspaper. But William Byrd a fellow journalist told hemingway that it wouldn't be worth the cost of running the notice unless he planned to offer a substantial Stanford reward hemingway proceeded with the recommendation but his finances were tight his reward of one hundred fifty francs equivalent to a one hundred and fifty dollars. Today wasn't enough to entice anyone to return the stolen beliefs. Stephens eventually sat the author down and told him I'm afraid. This stuff is lost him. Hemingway succumbed to defeat and gave up on finding the lost manuscripts but moving on was incredibly difficult. He turned to some of the new friends he'd made in Paris for comfort. One of those companions was fellow. American ex-pat poet and critic as pound in January of Nineteen Twenty three twenty four year old. Hemingway wrote to thirty eight year old. Ezra looking for guidance he said I suppose you heard about the loss of my Juvenille. IAEA you naturally would say good etc.. But don't say it to me yet. Reached that mood as we tried to. Brighton Hemingway's dark mindset framing the event as an act of God. He believed that an artist early work was meant to be forgotton. Ezra advised hemingway to recreate whatever was worth salvaging aging from memory. But Hemingway had a hard time accepting this advice considering his most prized piece was a novel reflecting upon his his time at war. His recollections simply wouldn't suffice to recreate those intimate details. He'd already started to repress. In an effort to re-inspire the author Ezra invited Hadley and Hemingway to his home in Rapallo Italy in the early spring spring of Nineteen twenty-three the retreat was supposed to encourage hemingway but he failed to accomplish anything new during the trip. The legendary author author felt he was hitting rock bottom. He was certain that this was the end of his short-lived writing career. What he didn't realise was there was one one piece of his old writings still to be discovered a letter that actually held the key to getting the author back on his feet in the spring ring of Nineteen twenty-three a short story titled Mild Man had been returned to Hemingway from a magazine editor along with a rejection letter? Uh the envelope was buried. Deep in a pile of old mail still unopened in Hemingway's Paris apartment until he returned home and reviewed his pending correspondences as a last ditch effort. He shared the peace with an editor from New England. Who happened to be seeking fiction Shen for an annual compilation? The editor loved the story so much that he went on to publish it. Mild man was included in the best short stories. Stories of one thousand nine hundred ninety three. Finally Hemingway was taking control of his destiny.

Brighton Hemingway Hadley Paris France Ezra Ernest Switzerland Hadley Lincoln Steffens Geneva Stephens Gertrude Stein Richardson Switzerland Mild Man Paris Toronto Scott Fitzgerald Donovan Schambori Switzerland editor
"hemingway" Discussed on GONE

GONE

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"hemingway" Discussed on GONE

"When he emerged hemingway's paranoia had subsided but now the author was unable to remember much of anything anything from his past those lost manuscripts his love for Hadley the brutal images of war and the decades of insatiable. Wanderlust it all felt like a distant dream. He was now completely numb to the past. Never able to write again on July second back in nineteen sixty one three days after his last release from the Mayo Clinic Sixty one year old. Hemingway hold a shotgun off the wall and and entered the foyer of his home. He placed the firearm to his temple and pulled the trigger taking his own life. Hemingway died that worn July afternoon without ever knowing what had happened to his stolen works. EXP Back in one thousand nine hundred twenty two but much. Like the trunks that resurfaced three decades later at the Ritz other. Bits of Hemingway's early materials. I have found a way to reemerge over the years in two thousand three seventy two year old Donald Stewart Junior uncovered one of Hemingway's early early short stories in a letter addressed to his father. Hollywood screenwriter and notorious bullfighter Donald Ogden Stewart senior. The elder Stewart was the inspiration. For the protagonist of Hemingway's enclosed tail the short piece written in nineteen twenty four demonstrated the authors unrefined in crude style. Unfortunately it didn't give any clues as to where the rest of the lost manuscripts could have gone in. Two thousand in Seventeen Hemingway's hundred-year-old notebook turned up in Key West Florida the journal contained one of Hemingway's very first short stories. Ever written back in one thousand nine hundred nine when the author was only ten years old. The fourteen page story shows Hemingway's early Wanderlust as his is character travels from the US to Ireland and Scotland. The notebook had been forgotten in the storage room of a small canteen called sloppy. Joe's Joe's bar it was yet another instance of Hemingway's carelessness with his materials after the initial manuscript theft yet his lost suitcase from nineteen. Twenty two still remains a complete mystery. No one has any idea what could have happened to it after after it left the train that afternoon at the geared to Leeann although some modern day authors have offered their own fictional theories. The the hemingway thief by. Sean Harris tells the story of a fictional author who gets a hot tip about the location of Hemingway's mysterious suitcase case. He follows literary treasure map down to Mexico where he mixes with a series of cartels and Hitman the hemingway hoax the by Joe Haldeman turns the mystery of the lost police on its head by introducing the idea of time travel and multidimensional exploration to uncover the artifact but these theories are conjured from the imagination of Modern Day fiction authors. What really happened to his treasured? It works the most likely scenario. Is that those manuscripts met an anticlimactic fate after after taking had lease unsupervised valise whether by accident or on purpose. The new owner most likely opened the case to find that there was nothing of value. You inside if only they had hung onto the property for another fifty years. The thief would have been able to make a fortune on the stolen goods but seeing as hemingway was an unknown when his manuscripts were taken the works were as good as trash. At least that's how a thief might right if seen it. And that's likely were the manuscripts ended up in the trash. So Hemingway's suitcase is yet to be discovered and it may no longer exist whether it lies at the bottom of a French landfill in the basement of the guard. Dalil or in someone's attic waiting to be discovered covered. Only time.

hemingway Donald Ogden Stewart Donald Stewart Joe Haldeman Mayo Clinic Hadley Key West Florida Hollywood Sean Harris Stewart Leeann Modern Day theft Mexico US Scotland Ireland
"hemingway" Discussed on GONE

GONE

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"hemingway" Discussed on GONE

"When he emerged hemingway's paranoia had subsided but now the author was unable to remember much of anything anything from his past those lost manuscripts his love for Hadley the brutal images of war and the decades of insatiable. Wanderlust it all felt like a distant dream. He was now completely numb to the past. Never able to write again on July second back in nineteen sixty one three days after his last release from the Mayo Clinic Sixty one year old. Hemingway hold a shotgun off the wall and and entered the foyer of his home. He placed the firearm to his temple and pulled the trigger taking his own life. Hemingway died that worn July afternoon without ever knowing what had happened to his stolen works. EXP Back in one thousand nine hundred twenty two but much. Like the trunks that resurfaced three decades later at the Ritz other. Bits of Hemingway's early materials. I have found a way to reemerge over the years in two thousand three seventy two year old Donald Stewart Junior uncovered one of Hemingway's early early short stories in a letter addressed to his father. Hollywood screenwriter and notorious bullfighter Donald Ogden Stewart senior. The elder Stewart was the inspiration. For the protagonist of Hemingway's enclosed tail the short piece written in nineteen twenty four demonstrated the authors unrefined in crude style. Unfortunately it didn't give any clues as to where the rest of the lost manuscripts could have gone in. Two thousand in Seventeen Hemingway's hundred-year-old notebook turned up in Key West Florida the journal contained one of Hemingway's very first short stories. Ever written back in one thousand nine hundred nine when the author was only ten years old. The fourteen page story shows Hemingway's early Wanderlust as his is character travels from the US to Ireland and Scotland. The notebook had been forgotten in the storage room of a small canteen called sloppy. Joe's Joe's bar it was yet another instance of Hemingway's carelessness with his materials after the initial manuscript theft yet his lost suitcase from nineteen. Twenty two still remains a complete mystery. No one has any idea what could have happened to it after after it left the train that afternoon at the geared to Leeann although some modern day authors have offered their own fictional theories. The the hemingway thief by. Sean Harris tells the story of a fictional author who gets a hot tip about the location of Hemingway's mysterious suitcase case. He follows literary treasure map down to Mexico where he mixes with a series of cartels and Hitman the hemingway hoax the by Joe Haldeman turns the mystery of the lost police on its head by introducing the idea of time travel and multidimensional exploration to uncover the artifact but these theories are conjured from the imagination of Modern Day fiction authors. What really happened to his treasured? It works the most likely scenario. Is that those manuscripts met an anticlimactic fate after after taking had lease unsupervised valise whether by accident or on purpose. The new owner most likely opened the case to find that there was nothing of value. You inside if only they had hung onto the property for another fifty years. The thief would have been able to make a fortune on the stolen goods but seeing as hemingway was an unknown when his manuscripts were taken the works were as good as trash. At least that's how a thief might right if seen it. And that's likely were the manuscripts ended up in the trash. So Hemingway's suitcase is yet to be discovered and it may no longer exist whether it lies at the bottom of a French landfill in the basement of the guard. Dalil or in someone's attic waiting to be discovered covered. Only time.

hemingway Donald Ogden Stewart Donald Stewart Joe Haldeman Mayo Clinic Hadley Key West Florida Hollywood Sean Harris Stewart Leeann Modern Day theft Mexico US Scotland Ireland
"hemingway" Discussed on GONE

GONE

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"hemingway" Discussed on GONE

"When he emerged hemingway's paranoia had subsided but now the author was unable to remember much of anything anything from his past those lost manuscripts his love for Hadley the brutal images of war and the decades of insatiable. Wanderlust it all felt like a distant dream. He was now completely numb to the past. Never able to write again on July second back in nineteen sixty one three days after his last release from the Mayo Clinic Sixty one year old. Hemingway hold a shotgun off the wall and and entered the foyer of his home. He placed the firearm to his temple and pulled the trigger taking his own life. Hemingway died that worn July afternoon without ever knowing what had happened to his stolen works. EXP Back in one thousand nine hundred twenty two but much. Like the trunks that resurfaced three decades later at the Ritz other. Bits of Hemingway's early materials. I have found a way to reemerge over the years in two thousand three seventy two year old Donald Stewart Junior uncovered one of Hemingway's early early short stories in a letter addressed to his father. Hollywood screenwriter and notorious bullfighter Donald Ogden Stewart senior. The elder Stewart was the inspiration. For the protagonist of Hemingway's enclosed tail the short piece written in nineteen twenty four demonstrated the authors unrefined in crude style. Unfortunately it didn't give any clues as to where the rest of the lost manuscripts could have gone in. Two thousand in Seventeen Hemingway's hundred-year-old notebook turned up in Key West Florida the journal contained one of Hemingway's very first short stories. Ever written back in one thousand nine hundred nine when the author was only ten years old. The fourteen page story shows Hemingway's early Wanderlust as his is character travels from the US to Ireland and Scotland. The notebook had been forgotten in the storage room of a small canteen called sloppy. Joe's Joe's bar it was yet another instance of Hemingway's carelessness with his materials after the initial manuscript theft yet his lost suitcase from nineteen. Twenty two still remains a complete mystery. No one has any idea what could have happened to it after after it left the train that afternoon at the geared to Leeann although some modern day authors have offered their own fictional theories. The the hemingway thief by. Sean Harris tells the story of a fictional author who gets a hot tip about the location of Hemingway's mysterious suitcase case. He follows literary treasure map down to Mexico where he mixes with a series of cartels and Hitman the hemingway hoax the by Joe Haldeman turns the mystery of the lost police on its head by introducing the idea of time travel and multidimensional exploration to uncover the artifact but these theories are conjured from the imagination of Modern Day fiction authors. What really happened to his treasured? It works the most likely scenario. Is that those manuscripts met an anticlimactic fate after after taking had lease unsupervised valise whether by accident or on purpose. The new owner most likely opened the case to find that there was nothing of value. You inside if only they had hung onto the property for another fifty years. The thief would have been able to make a fortune on the stolen goods but seeing as hemingway was an unknown when his manuscripts were taken the works were as good as trash. At least that's how a thief might right if seen it. And that's likely were the manuscripts ended up in the trash. So Hemingway's suitcase is yet to be discovered and it may no longer exist whether it lies at the bottom of a French landfill in the basement of the guard. Dalil or in someone's attic waiting to be discovered covered. Only time.

hemingway Donald Ogden Stewart Donald Stewart Joe Haldeman Mayo Clinic Hadley Key West Florida Hollywood Sean Harris Stewart Leeann Modern Day theft Mexico US Scotland Ireland
"hemingway" Discussed on GONE

GONE

10:55 min | 1 year ago

"hemingway" Discussed on GONE

"On a busy weekday morning in the winter of nineteen twenty to thirty one year old Hadley. Richardson held her hat. Got To her head as she passed through the gates of the guerre de Leon the infamous Paris railway station was bustling. She was traveling alone. Often meet her husband who had been away on business. She carried an overnight bag and a small suitcase filled with precious materials. A porter are examined the woman's ticket and offered to help with her bags. She politely accepted and followed him to her seat. Once she was situated Hadley aptly worried that she didn't have enough provision for the eight hour. Ride ahead she got up from her chair leaving her suitcases behind. She wouldn't be gone for more than a few minutes. Hadley exited the train and quickly purchased a bottle of water and a small snack to get her through the long journey from France to Switzerland Toland. She gathered her supplies and made her way back to the locomotive but when she returned to her seat her heart sank into her stomach. Her suitcase was no longer wear. She'd left it. She frantically hailed the porter praying that the bag had simply been misplaced. The train pulled out of the station. Together Hadley in the porter searched every car but the suitcase was nowhere to be found. Hadley cried for the entire eight hours of that journey. She was terrified of telling her husband. Ernest Hemingway way that all of his works dade had been stolen due to her negligence. The contents of that suitcase would never resurface. And because of it. Hemingway suffered a traumatic loss. One that would inspire him to change the landscape of American literature. Richard Welcome to gone along park against original. I'm molly and I'm Richard. Every other Monday we examined mysterious disappearances and the theories they spawned from the amber room to Michael Rockefeller Cosso paintings to the trust in language the roanoke colony to the lost Russian cosmonauts. If it's it's gone we're looking for it. You can find all episodes of gone and all other podcast originals for free on spotify. Or wherever. You listen to podcasts. Stream gone for free on spotify. Just open the APP and type gone in the search bar at podcast. Were grateful for you our listeners. You allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram at podcast and twitter at podcast network. And if if you enjoyed today's episode the best way to help us is to leave a five star review. Wherever you're listening? It really does help today. We're looking at the mystery. History behind Ernest Hemingway's lost manuscripts in nineteen twenty to his wife packed bag with every scrap of writing he'd composed to date then. The valise vanished without a trace. That unforgettable train ride would haunt earnest and heavily equally for the rest of their lives every one of Ernest short stories along with the beginning of his war memoir went missing that November afternoon in nineteen twenty two no matter where they looked or what leads. They followed. Hemingway never saw his manuscripts again so instead the hunt and for his missing materials turned into a search inside of himself born in eighteen ninety nine nine ernest. Hemingway was a child of the new century. Raised in a period of rapid progress early on his mother exposed him to a life of art art and culture through her work as an opera singer and painter his father. A successful doctor introduced him to fishing in the great outdoors first. Hemingway gained a strong sense of traditional masculinity as he was taught how to build a fire hunt and shoot a gun in his early years but those weren't his only interests in one thousand nine hundred five six year old. Hemingway developed an affinity for literature as soon as he learned to read read he devoured Robinson crusoe and other tales of travel and adventure by age. Fifteen Hemingway began writing short stories of of his own. He also developed an interest in becoming a reporter but his high school graduation came closer. Hemingway opted not to go off to college college instead. He wanted to be the hero of his own story and travel the world so when World War One broke out in the. US has joined the fight in one thousand nine hundred seventeen eighteen year old. Hemingway begged his parents to let him join the army the idea of seeing new countries. He's while carrying a rifle. Santa like a much more experiential form of education but a childhood injury and the insistence of his parents kept kept hemingway from fully achieving this goal instead he went to work as a reporter for the Kansas City Star. Traveling around the state looking for for a scoop was enough to satiate his wunderlist with his first paid writing job secured. Hemingway was now making a total of fifteen dollars week. The equivalent of three hundred twenty five dollars today but the true value of the experience was the wisdom he received from his boss and Mentor Seiji. Wellington the style sheet for the newspaper read use short sentences US short first paragraphs US vigorous English be positive not negative in fact hemingway continued to use this mentality throughout his career. The author took pride in his ability to be direct and unadorned while still succinctly conveying emotion. He enjoyed his work as a field. Reporter quarter honing his craft and witnessing stories firsthand. He often received invitations to right around police. Cars or the occasional ambulance ambulance but deep down he longed for a different kind of adventure. This inspired hemingway to become a volunteer rescue. EXCU driver for the Red Cross in Italy he would essentially be an ambulance driver on world. War ones frontlines. In one thousand nine hundred eighteen the eighteen eighteen year old finally set sail for Europe encountering brutal weather and multiple bouts of seasickness along the way one night while stationed Info Salta D. p. r. v.. Italy hemingway was overcome with a momentary fit of boredom and decided to take a stroll down to the battlefield. Soon opposing soldiers began to fire and hemingway instinctively grabbed a gun in joined the battle after a deafening blast. It was momentarily blinded as his is refocused. He saw another of his fellow soldiers lying beside him severely wounded. Hemingway tossed the comrade over his shoulder and carry the bloody commando back to their post along the way hemingway took a shot to the knee running on adrenaline. He made it back to the camp during subsequent medical treatment. He had twenty eight pieces of shrapnel and a handful of machine gun bullets extracted from his limb. Then key documented every moment of the nearly deadly experience in fact hemingway thoroughly recorded every day of combat. He filled journals with his experiences vividly. Capturing the bloodshed heartbreak and heroism of his fellow soldiers. He hoped that the stories he recorded. Could one day be used to write a great novel and so- L. Hemingway's. Diaries became some of his most prized possessions throughout his service. But when twenty year old hemingway returned home from the front lines things in one thousand nine hundred nineteen. He struggled with feelings of loneliness. The usually charismatic young man now felt completely disconnected. It did from the world around him and it wasn't until nineteen twenty that hemingway finally began to feel like himself again. It wasn't because he changed it because the world changed around him. The war was finally over and ringing in the New Year also meant ringing. Being in a wave of cultural change. People were moving out of the suburbs an into cities commercial radio and motion pictures. Were laying the foundation sure pop culture wages increased and prices fell leading to a spike in consumerism. Women cut their hair. They smoked. They they drink. They were sexually liberated. The average American had more money than ever before to spend and they chose to do so on jazz. Cars ariss ready to wear clothes home appliances and the illegal consumption of alcohol. They openly violated prohibition during Lavish offish parties in the fall of nineteen twenty twenty one year old Ernest. Hemingway met a beautiful woman eight years his senior at one of these us. tentation gatherings twenty. Nine year old Hadley. Richardson was talented musician. WHO seemed to lose sensuality shoe? -ality hemingway was immediately drawn to her and she was equally taken with him in less than a year. The couple decided to marry and start author lines over in Paris France Paris in the nineteen twenties was known as an artist. Playground the full or crazy years in French were coming to ahead which meant cultural social and artistic collaboration specifically among the youth here the rent was lower. The booze was legal and the young artists were not only accepted but encouraged to experiment and thrive. It was exactly exactly the environment where a burgeoning author link Ernest. Hemingway could flourish. The newlyweds began their new.

Ernest Hemingway hemingway -ality hemingway Hadley Richardson reporter Paris guerre de Leon spotify France Switzerland Toland Paris France Paris Europe Michael Rockefeller Cosso facebook Richard Welcome porter US
Adina Hoffman: Ben Hecht: Fighting Words, Moving Pictures

Bookworm

09:37 min | 1 year ago

Adina Hoffman: Ben Hecht: Fighting Words, Moving Pictures

"I'm Michael Silver Blah this bookworm arm and today I'm very pleased to have as my guest. Adina Hoffman the Dina has written a life of the great almost mind boggling screenwriter Ben. Hecht the book has the Subtitle Fighting Words moving pictures this Ben Hecht had his. Oh would you say finger in so many tries He starts out now having moved with his family to the mid West as soon as he graduates from high school. He realizes this is. The college is not for him and he high tails it to Chicago where he becomes a very well-known newspaper this paper Man Song well known that his adventures in the newspaper business but come perhaps the most is famous play ever to be written about newspapers that he wrote with Charles MacArthur. Yes called the front page. The the front page becomes his girl Friday with cary grant and Rosalind Russell and thereby hangs a tale every the time Ben Hecht turns around. There's a revision of something. He's done a new who've version of it by someone else that he in turn revise right even his own memoirs has multiple versions of what happened to him in his own life life. He's kind of astonishing. This came from the days when face at a writer wrote right. These were people who wrote all the time there's also literary life that Hecht has in Chicago and actually this was one of the fascinating things for me is where his kind of the big city You know newspaper world met the world of the Chicago Renaissance and a lot of the people who were in that newspaper world. People like Carl Sandberg. who was a really good friend of Heck's you know he was also a reporter and they were sort of Newspaperman by day and then by night they were writing their poems in their novels and Hecht was not only hanging around with people like Sherwood Anderson Jason and he was also publishing in the little review which is unbelievable magazine? Push some of the first chapters of James Joyce's ulysses and they felt. What was her name? Margaret Anderson Anderson felt that Ben Heck was every bit as much a member of of the little review says dream straight. And he's there on almost every single issue. He was a kind of a pet of hers. He was sort of in love with her. She was unfortunately Very distracted by high art and she was also a lesbian was not interested in in that way but she loved him and she published him. Ben Has a great fiction writer. I mean he was. He fancied himself self novelist But he was very devoted to that calling but at the same time that he was writing. These very heavy breathing stories for Margaret Anderson. He was also writing he. He was whipping off these commercials stories for Lincoln at the smart set. HMO MINKIN was one of his heroes. Mencken was a cynic cynic and a sophisticated and he had every bit of hostility toward the dumb aspects of American culture. He was trying to make America smart op. He wrote fascinating essays sason books on the American language as opposed to British. We don't get an American writer per se until until Mark Twain who's writing the Mississippi River. Talk that he learned when he was a boatman. Well by the time you've got the middle of the country Chicago you've got gangsters you've got prohibition you've got flappers you've got an American language wood jr that was invented here and Hecht loved. -actly yeah and I think for me. That was one of the wonderful things about spending time with him. I was reading. This book was spending time with his language. I mean whatever you WANNA say about. Whether his books are wonderful books or not so wonderful books he was a wonderful maker of sentences and paragraphs graphs and just terrific wit on top of it and he and Macarthur wrote the front page. which was kind of Valentine to that newspaper World of Chicago? You go where they've both been cub reporters you see. He comes in to the newspaper office. Writing these things. In Extreme Telegraphy Telegraphy as as you quote them right they are made of twenty three delight phrases. He's putting them together hurling them together and eventually he's going to have some fame as the newspaper Komo's rining calms every every day made up of just what he heard some Hobo say right or what some very wealthy people were saying in a casino no to be a writer then will start out as journalists. That's where Hemingway starts. He proposed this idea of. But this daily column that you've mentioned which would become known as a thousand and one afternoons in Chicago and they're kind of remarkable pieces they're just little snippets and there's a sense that the news is not just test the news of the grant headline it's also all these sort of marginal lives and people. You know the guy who runs the laundromat and the woman who works as a manicurist and has to fend off her lecherous clients. There's a way in which he's tossing this stuff off in a very casual way reading them daily. They're published on the back page of the newspaper next to the to the comic strips and he's not taking them too seriously or taking himself too seriously and there's so much better than the fiction into which he was pouring his all of his artistic ambition. That just is not the effective whereas these things that he was doing kind of on the fly as you say they're wonderful and they're incredibly generous and sympathetic. You feel him identifying with all of the city of Chicago In a way they kind of anticipate the work of later colonists people like beat Hamill and Jimmy Breslin. Who would become more famous in a way for doing doing that? who may also by now have been forgotten but act. was doing that early on. I'm talking to Adina Hoffman about. Don't her book Ben. Hecht its subtitle fighting. Words moving pictures and it's published in the Jewish writers series series published by Yale University. Press you mention that a lot of these people have been forgotten even people more recent Jonathan head so why Ben Hair. Well IT'S A. It's the question that I get all the time. And it's a good question and I mean basically at some level I feel like I've known Ben Hecht before before I knew Ben Hecht if you grow up watching American movies. He's his words are in your head even if you've never heard his name and so and I used to watch a lot of old movies as a kid but it was only when I became more conscious conscious and started to read about film history I actually worked as a film critic throughout most of the ninety s Then I was very aware of who Ben Hecht was and I I read his wonderful memoir child trial of the century. And I thought wow you know okay the movies he's known as you know. Pauline Kale called him the greatest American screenwriter Gianluca Dard said he invented eighty percent percent. Of what is used in Hollywood movies today called him a genius and all of that is true but the fact is that for heck the movies were really just a piece of it and in some ways they were actually may be one of the smaller pieces pieces of it in that memoir is full of all these other lives that we've just been talking about so I was first of all fascinated by that multiplicity of his the fact that he could contain multitudes dude but I also was drawn to heck in terms of his relationship to Jewish things. And here's a place where he basically an American Jew who claims not to have really paid much attention to the fact of his Jewishness until his consciousness was sort of raised by the Holocaust there. He's been in Chicago. He knows the woman. Editing the little review he knows call Sandberg. He knows Sherwood Anderson he moves to New York becomes friends with Herman Mankiewicz Herman Mankiewicz and also the roundtable tape Dorothy Parker and Benchley and S J Perelman and the Algonquin New Yorker Gang. He he moves to Los Angeles. He does what's so many do he has nothing but contempt damned for the people who started the motion picture industry. You say that you're interested in Hicks. Judaism with those were hits Jews. He didn't like them. There are a lot of Jews in heck's life he was actually born on the lower east side and he spent the first few years of his life. There and I don't actually think that that's Unimportant I mean. He grew up in Racine Wisconsin. which is this pastoral American American place etc but there is a way in which those tenements were in him in a very deep

Ben Hecht Chicago Writer BEN Margaret Anderson Anderson Adina Hoffman Ben Heck Charles Macarthur Cary Grant Sherwood Anderson Michael Silver Herman Mankiewicz Herman Manki James Joyce Extreme Telegraphy Telegraphy Rosalind Russell Sherwood Anderson Jason Los Angeles Yale University Mississippi River America
"hemingway" Discussed on Suicide Buddies

Suicide Buddies

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"hemingway" Discussed on Suicide Buddies

"Man, they called her big pants, the pants wherever that big pants pain. He fed it. So no, you're seven, but loosen. Wait you bitch goddamn up newborn, baby. Hey, loosen way with all the baby fat. So she became so depressed after that that eventually three years later nineteen eighty seven she checked herself into the Betty Ford center. Which is like center at work. Yeah. They were kind of revolutionary one of the first like actual rehab centers. Do you know, I don't know much about that place. She put in the money to like actually pay for to help people because he was like the alcoholism like this was not talked about and stuff like that. So. Yeah. Yeah. Working in and stuff like that groups that had already kind of been formed and stuff but making it like an official rehab center, you go there you take time away stuff like that. The other thing. I will say one like. Really groundbreaking thing that Margo did was man. I don't know when this happened World Series. Out. There was. At some point. A session a therapy session that she did. For her believe Mia. Was broadcast on TV. Oh, no. They asked her to it was. She wanted to do it. She wanted to. She was actually always really open about adding dealt with this like so when she went to the Betty Ford clinic. She didn't interview about it. And she literally was like this is the best. I felt in years. She's actually like a pretty incredible person who was just dealing with a lot of fucking issues. It seems like an already you go into the limelight immediately. I think this is another thing that that my guess would have fucked with their head is every interview I've watched Margaux Hemingway's somebody asks. So you're the granddaughter of Ernest Hemingway bang. You know from the shoes. Brains on the on the season dead because of his brain high. Why are you? A fucking beating her to death. Get to your funny. I didn't even think about that. How they're bringing up his suicide every time they're doing it. I just mean like the interviews about her at that fact. Right. You know, it's like see so publicly known. It's almost like just bringing him up like dude just don't do that. Don't do that right here this person their own identity. I I just love it. Everyone's like, obviously, we gotta ask her about her grandfather not stopping to think has everyone else Astor this since the beginning of time. Why are you doing? Yeah. Maybe ask about anything fucking else. Yeah. So she gets out of the Betty Ford clinic and then in nineteen ninety she starts trying to stage a comeback as an actor. And does the cover of playboy in may of nineteen playboy dot com. You're gonna love it's insane. Titties? Moist. Moist dripping. That would be the realises. So. Please dot hill. Naked posts. I'm so sorry. I respect women..

Betty Ford center Mia Betty Ford clinic Margaux Hemingway Ernest Hemingway playboy Margo official three years
"hemingway" Discussed on Suicide Buddies

Suicide Buddies

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"hemingway" Discussed on Suicide Buddies

"I honestly thought they were related, and I don't think they really are. I mean, I mean, I think they are say the grandfather. Yeah. Okay. Do you wanna I mean, like, I guess I kind of thought that they were closer? Yeah. Not that they were close that they were that her fame had something had a lot to do with his fame. Like once I heard that there was fame across the family. I just kind of thought oh sure will everyone in his family was always famous. I guess is what a woman can do totally. That's the way. Yeah. That's there's no way. Right. Exactly timeframe was roughly her life. So she was born February sixteenth nineteen fifty four and her grandfather Ernest Hemingway kill themselves, like six years after that or something like that. Five years after that. Erdei on her gravestone. Didn't get our present hitters Ryan fairest. He didn't get it pregnant on her birthday on her birth stone. No, do you understand what I mean? Like, if you don't know anything about the Hemingway family, and you hear that, you know, Ernest Hemingway is, and then you hear that his granddaughter is famous you think like, well, of course, everyone who's a Hemingway is just in the limelight. But that's not the case, you perceive. It a little like the Kennedys totally weird way. But you know, it's funny because I wonder where that impression comes because he's excess full writer. But I mean, do you assume the largest states off of that or I mean, he actually was a really famous public figure. Yeah. He was like really interviews to. Yeah. Yeah. Well, I mean, and he just lived this bombastic crazy fuck in life. I went punch the pope exactly that's. To boot. When he would like, really. Yeah. He he defined masculinity before John, Wayne even. Yeah. It was like he wrote about I. And then I went both both fighting in Spain. Yeah. Exactly, I kissed a woman wrong. Exactly. Yeah. Cuba. Yeah. But then his son Jack Hemingway wasn't famous jazz wasn't in the limelight away. Jack off Hemingway. That's why. Yeah. It's it's interesting because they better that was really hard to be Ernest Hemingway's son for sure I would imagine. Yeah. Juries probably not a chill, dad. Yeah. For sure done any research on into that. I mean, but he seemed so intense like hockey take its place. He's a legend, you know. It's like, well, that's kinda my point with the details of Margot's life. The the historical facts about her being like kind of inconsequential to me. I don't really think that's the interesting. So I think I think that it helped once she decided to go be in the limelight. Then immediately people were like holy shit. This is stemming ways granddaughter, and so then people were ten times as interested in her as they would have been, but it wasn't like she was set up since birth to be famous, and she just like she was a really talented charismatic beautiful. Also, six foot tall woman, and that certainly helps with being a model. So she started off modeling in nineteen seventy two I believe what she was eighteen when she started being a model probably started before then, but people were she turned eighteen and they were like okay now go. Oh, really likely fifties. Sixties now at this point. So seventy two seventy five she was she was born in fifty four. So I thought it was maybe late sixties this. Okay. Okay. No, seventy two was when she was eighteen and so from then to nineteen seventy five is when what you would probably characterize as her modeling career, and she was a cover model. She was big. She was on the cover of cosmopolitan Elle Harper's bar vogue on the cover of time. She was on the cover of American vogue, not anything unless you're on the cover of boys' life for me. Damn highlights highlights. Yeah. Totally dog fancy. Oh. Dog fancied dot cat fancy every ten zero power, which I don't know if that's still a thing. Every time I see magazine and Oprah's on the cover..

Ernest Hemingway writer Margot Kennedys Elle Harper Erdei Ryan Oprah Spain Wayne Cuba hockey Jack John Five years six years six foot
"hemingway" Discussed on Suicide Buddies

Suicide Buddies

04:43 min | 2 years ago

"hemingway" Discussed on Suicide Buddies

"You have to and then like half of them die. And they're like, hey, you guys are cowards. And everyone was like, no, we're not. But we are honestly the man black or the most important. Oh, yeah. They keep us safe from space that they have that song. Here. Greens. That would be. Yeah. Also, I'm terrified of marines. I hate them up. Everyone of every beat them all for fun. Do that for practice before? I beat up a bunch of marines. I also really looking forward to the Email or to I get from people who have been in the army that are like. And. In crayon. You call me on this one. Backwards are not feel foolish. Let's get into fucker. Who are we meth doing? Damn. I didn't prepare one. All right. See next week. This week. We were talking about. Margaux hemingway. That's right. Is going to be is going to be good. Now. He's going to be short. And it's going to be bad short about right? Deck. Let's go. All right. Not that. I'm all comp dude. I'm pumped up on the frost frost. Gatorade feeling good. Then stewed a read a bunch of promo did read all the promos. I was doing research in Hampton read the promos really stepped up. Yeah. I really really. Just guys if you're wondering why you're suddenly more tempted to join up for all these new podcasts or things I've advertised in that promo session then. Don't don't really question it. It's probably just me. What? Sorry, I in this day, man, you're pretty easy to kill. Almost died. It was insane. Feel dead. Dead tired. She would talk about the Hemingway family. Okay. Great. Seems like you're going to insist on this. All right. Yeah. This was going to be a little weird because. I don't know like. This one more than anyone I've ever done. I don't really I'm gonna talk about what her life was. But that is not what's most important to me in the story. Okay. I wanna do Ernest Hemingway next also, but it's similar like he's from Ernest goes to camp. Yeah. That earned it just goes to jail totally the Ernest movies on the boards of being earnest yet. Ernest goes to camp you're going to candy importance of going to camp. It doesn't matter. Who's in the movie? Yeah. Because like you want to build out the Hemingway story, I guess I felt like this for I guess, maybe I've kind of always felt like this. But they're like. I want to paint the picture of who she was. But it doesn't really matter. But the weird thing is that. The way that she's talked about just like the way that when you read about her. It's like she was a model, and she was an actress she was set ain't she killed herself. And it's just like, wait. No, I feel like those details. Are it should be flipped? Okay. Importance is. So we'll talk briefly about who she was. So, you know, she Margaux Hemingway was one of. Jack, Hemingway's sons daughters, and Jack Hemingway was one of Ernest Hemingway sons, so Margaux Hemingway was the granddaughter of Ernest Hemingway, okay? And. You removed from the whole thing China removed. Yeah. And when I knew that she was a celebrity, and obviously a new Ernest Hemingway was a celebrity..

Margaux hemingway Ernest Hemingway Jack Hemingway Gatorade Hampton China
"hemingway" Discussed on Rocket

Rocket

01:56 min | 4 years ago

"hemingway" Discussed on Rocket

"Eric carol well it is it very carol i mean i know carol was the '60s but i know it's i would say it's more peace smith journalists meets ernest hemingway but with a lot of gossip i'm i'm doing some fun experiments because it is nanno and i could do what i want and just have fun with it i am trying to write as much like ernest hemingway as i possibly can which is interesting because the writing that i admire is very very floor is an not not floor it but like very descriptive in vivid and vibrant and my own writing ten speak whites quite dry and simple it'll a lot more like hemingway's writing and i'm sure starring i'm basically train to embrace that not that i'm comparing myself ernest hemingway because obviously he was not available online various things that like you but unlike trying to lean more into that as opposed to my desire to make my writing be like the writing of writers i'd buyer again not that i don't meyer hemingway i did buy our hemingway i've tried to raise my natural hemingway is sick tendencies is fine i have a good time i have written fourteen thousand words it's a good day for life not all dude it's like one we can you already fourteen thousand words we did go the that's impressive us true i woke up today so we too and if you've done national novel writing months which is when you write fifty a fifty thousand words over the method remember week to is traditionally when people start to like to flag because your energy is gone down from the first week for your super pumped and now you're realizing wait you're in four weeks three you're supposed to pick back up like creatively and emotionally because you're broken but i woke up this morning dayone of weak too and i immediately having gone about the night before thinking dan i've written so many words woke up this morning of his like.

Eric carol ernest hemingway dan meyer hemingway four weeks