35 Burst results for "Helsinki"

"helsinki" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

04:57 min | 2 weeks ago

"helsinki" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"Much like the Eiffel Tower in Paris, or the Statue of Liberty in New York, the Helsinki cathedral is an iconic building that has come to symbolize the city. The imposing white cathedral with its green domes is such an integral part of Helsinki skyline that it is often printed on posters and stamps depicting the city. Standing on a hill overlooking Helsinki essential Senate square and the city's popular harbor, the cathedral looks as if it's keeping a watchful eye over what goes on in the Finnish capital. In the summer months, the steps leading up to it are a popular hangout for people enjoying a coffee and a picnic with their friends, and in the winter months, it's not uncommon to see kids writing a sled down the snow covered steps. Despite being such an iconic building, the Helsinki cathedral has a somewhat troubled history. Originally named the saint Nicholas church, it was built in the early 19th century as a tribute to Tsar Nicholas I of Russia, the then Grand Duke of Finland. Soon after Russia invaded Finland and annexed it from Sweden in 1809, Russia decreed that the Finnish capital was to be moved from the western Finnish city of turku to the small village of Helsinki. So our Alexander the first commissioned the German architect guard Ludwig engel, to draw up plans for a new majestic central square to the new capital. The square would feature a seat of government, the university, and a cathedral for the city's Lutheran population. In a symbolic move, a small wooden cathedral dedicated to ulrika eleonora, the queen of Sweden, would be demolished to make way to the new grand church. Although the cathedral was modeled after the saint ice ex cathedral and Kazan cathedrals, both in St. Petersburg, it soon took on a life of its own. Unlike the ornamental and opulent orthodox cathedrals. The saint Nicholas church is plain and austere aesthetic emphasized its Lutheran nature. Its white facade, when seen against the blue sky, made up, the colors of the future flag of independent and free Finland. When seen from above, the shape of the church resembles a Greek cross and its symmetrical to all directions. The frugal design language continues on the inside with light blue and white walls and simple wooden pews. After a hundred years of Russian rule, Finland gained independence in 1917. The church's name was changed from saint Nicholas to grand church and then later, in 1959, to Helsinki, cathedral. Today, the building receives over half a million visitors each year, making it one of Helsinki's most popular tourist attractions. But it is also very much an active church, hosting weddings, church services, and choir recitals. It is where the nation lays to rest its greatest statesmen and where the Finnish president and other political leaders gather together with members of the public as is the Finnish way to celebrate Finland's independence. On December 6th, each year. There are those Finns who are uncomfortable with the idea of the country's most iconic building being a gift from Russia. But they are as small minority. Most fence see the Helsinki cathedral as our own. And in many ways, it has come to symbolize Finland's struggle for freedom against a looming threat from the east. In December 2015, thousands of fans of all ages gathered on the steps of the Helsinki cathedral to sing the Finland him, a patriotic and much loved symphonic poem by the nation's most celebrated composer, Jean Sibelius. It was one of the most sublime events the city has ever seen, and it demonstrated in a very palpable way just how important the Helsinki cathedral is to the sense of belonging and togetherness in the Finnish capital. You've been listening to tall stories and monocle 24 production. Today's episode was written by Petrie bruts off and produced an edited by David Stevens. Remember to tune in on Thursday for the full 30 minute edition of the urbanist. I'm at your talk. Goodbye, and thank you for listening city lovers..

Helsinki cathedral Helsinki saint Nicholas church Finland grand church white cathedral Senate square Russia Tsar Nicholas Ludwig engel ulrika eleonora saint ice ex cathedral Sweden Statue of Liberty Eiffel Tower turku Paris New York Alexander St. Petersburg
"helsinki" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

04:56 min | 2 weeks ago

"helsinki" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"Much like the Eiffel Tower in Paris or the Statue of Liberty in New York, the Helsinki cathedral is an iconic building that has come to symbolize the city. The imposing white cathedral with its green domes is such an integral part of Helsinki skyline that it is often printed on posters and stamps depicting the city. Standing on a hill overlooking Helsinki essential Senate square and the city's popular harbor, the cathedral looks as if it's keeping a watchful eye over what goes on in the Finnish capital. In the summer months, the steps leading up to it are a popular hangout for people enjoying a coffee and a picnic with their friends, and in the winter months, it's not uncommon to see kids writing a sled down the snow covered steps. Despite being such an iconic building, the Helsinki cathedral has a somewhat troubled history. Originally named the saint Nicholas church, it was built in the early 19th century as a tribute to Tsar Nicholas I of Russia, the then Grand Duke of Finland. Soon after Russia invaded Finland and annexed it from Sweden in 1809, Russia decreed that the Finnish capital was to be moved from the western Finnish city of turku to the small village of Helsinki. Tsar Alexander the first commissioned the German architect gar Ludwig engel to draw up plans for a new majestic central square to the new capital. The square would feature a seat of government, the university, and a cathedral for the city's Lutheran population. In a symbolic move, a small wooden cathedral dedicated to ulrika eleonora, the queen of Sweden, would be demolished to make way to the new grand church. Although the cathedral was modeled after the saint Isaac's cathedral and Kazan cathedrals, both in St. Petersburg, it soon took on a life of its own. Unlike the ornamental and opulent orthodox cathedrals, the saint Nicholas church is plain and austere aesthetic emphasized its Lutheran nature. Its white facade, when seen against the blue sky, made up, the colors of the future flag of independent and free Finland. When seen from above, the shape of the church resembles a Greek cross and its symmetrical to all directions. The frugal design language continues on the inside with light blue and white walls and simple wooden pews. After a hundred years of Russian rule, Finland gained independence in 1917. The church's name was changed from saint Nicholas to grand church and then later in 1959 to Helsinki, cathedral. Today, the building receives over half a million visitors each year, making it one of Helsinki's most popular tourist attractions. But it is also very much an active church, hosting weddings, church services, and choir recitals. It is where the nation lays to rest its greatest statesmen and where the Finnish president and other political leaders gather together with members of the public as is the Finnish way to celebrate Finland's independence. On December 6th, each year. There are those things who are uncomfortable with the idea of the country's most iconic building being a gift from Russia. But they are as small minority. Most fence see the Helsinki cathedral as our own. And in many ways, it has come to symbolize Finland's struggle for freedom against a looming threat from the east. In December 2015, thousands of fans of all ages gathered on the steps of the Helsinki cathedral to sing the Finland him, a patriotic and much loved symphonic poem by the nation's most celebrated composer, Jean Sibelius. It was one of the most sublime events the city has ever seen, and it demonstrated in a very palpable way just how important the Helsinki cathedral is to the sense of belonging and togetherness in the Finnish capital. You've been listening to tool stories and monocle 24 production. Today's episode was written by Petri butts off and produced and edited by David Stevens. Remember to tune in on Thursday for the full 30 minute edition of the urbanist. Goodbye, and thank you for.

Helsinki cathedral Helsinki saint Nicholas church Finland grand church white cathedral Senate square Russia Tsar Nicholas Tsar Alexander Ludwig engel ulrika eleonora saint Isaac's cathedral Sweden Statue of Liberty Eiffel Tower turku Paris New York St. Petersburg
"helsinki" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

04:56 min | 2 weeks ago

"helsinki" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"Much like the Eiffel Tower in Paris or the Statue of Liberty in New York, the Helsinki cathedral is an iconic building that has come to symbolize the city. The imposing white cathedral with its green domes is such an integral part of Helsinki skyline that it is often printed on posters and stamps depicting the city. Standing on a hill overlooking Helsinki essential Senate square and the city's popular harbor, the cathedral looks as if it's keeping a watchful eye over what goes on in the Finnish capital. In the summer months, the steps leading up to it are a popular hangout for people enjoying a coffee and a picnic with their friends, and in the winter months, it's not uncommon to see kids writing a sled down the snow covered steps. Despite being such an iconic building, the Helsinki cathedral has a somewhat troubled history. Originally named the saint Nicholas church, it was built in the early 19th century as a tribute to Tsar Nicholas I of Russia, the then Grand Duke of Finland. Soon after Russia invaded Finland and annexed it from Sweden in 1809, Russia decreed that the Finnish capital was to be moved from the western Finnish city of turku to the small village of Helsinki. Tsar Alexander the first commissioned the German architect gar Ludwig engel, to draw up plans for a new majestic central square to the new capital. The square would feature a seat of government, the university, and a cathedral for the city's Lutheran population. In a symbolic move, a small wooden cathedral dedicated to ulrika eleonora, the queen of Sweden, would be demolished to make way to the new grand church. Although the cathedral was modeled after the saint Isaac's cathedral and Kazan cathedrals, both in St. Petersburg, it soon took on a life of its own. Unlike the ornamental and opulent orthodox cathedrals, the saint Nicholas church is plain and austere aesthetic emphasized its Lutheran nature. Its white facade, when seen against the blue sky, made up, the colors of the future flag of independent and free Finland. When seen from above, the shape of the church resembles a Greek cross and its symmetrical to all directions. The frugal design language continues on the inside with light blue and white walls and simple wooden pews. After a hundred years of Russian rule, Finland gained independence in 1917. The church's name was changed from saint Nicholas to grand church and then later in 1959 to Helsinki, cathedral. Today, the building receives over half a million visitors each year, making it one of Helsinki's most popular tourist attractions. But it is also very much an active church, hosting weddings, church services, and quite a recitals. It is where the nation lays to rest its greatest statesman and where the Finnish president and other political leaders gather together with members of the public as is the Finnish way to celebrate Finland's independence. On December 6th, each year. There are those Finns who are uncomfortable with the idea of the country's most iconic building being a gift from Russia. But they are as small minority. Most fence see the Helsinki cathedral as our own. And in many ways, it has come to symbolize Finland's struggle for freedom against a looming threat from the east. In December 2015, thousands of fans of all ages gathered on the steps of the Helsinki cathedral to sing the Finland him, a patriotic and much loved symphonic poem by the nation's most celebrated composer, Jean Sibelius. It was one of the most sublime events the city has ever seen. And he demonstrated in a very palpable way just how important the Helsinki cathedral is to the sense of belonging and togetherness in the Finnish capital. You've been listening to tool stories and monocle 24 production. Today's episode was written by Petri butts off and produced and edited by David Stevens. Remember to tune in on Thursday for the full 30 minute edition of the urbanist. Goodbye, and thank you.

Helsinki cathedral Helsinki saint Nicholas church Finland grand church white cathedral Senate square Russia Tsar Nicholas Tsar Alexander Ludwig engel ulrika eleonora saint Isaac's cathedral Sweden Statue of Liberty Eiffel Tower turku Paris New York St. Petersburg
Russia sends more energy to Asia as Europe cuts back

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 3 weeks ago

Russia sends more energy to Asia as Europe cuts back

"A new report finds Russia is still finding ready buyers for its oil gas and coal even after western sanctions over the invasion of Ukraine The Helsinki based center for research on energy and clean air reports that overall export volumes of fossil fuels from Russia dropped by 18% since the invasion of Ukraine but revenues have been rebounding due to surging prices While Moscow has reduced flows of natural gas in Europe has managed to cut imports by 35% Russia received about a €158 billion in revenue for fossil fuels from February to August with about half going to Europe and 22% to the single biggest importer China The center has warned against exaggerating the rise in imports to China and India but their report today does find Russia has been sending significantly more coal and crude oil to Asia and Middle Eastern nations over the summer The center suggests leveraging EU shipping capacity to press for a price cap on Russian oil Jennifer King Washington

Russia Center For Research On Energy Helsinki Europe Moscow China India Middle Eastern Asia EU Jennifer King Washington
"helsinki" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

05:31 min | 2 months ago

"helsinki" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"Hello, I'm adri takan, you'll listen to tour stories on monoclonal 24, brought to you by the team behind the urbanist, the show all about the cities we live in. This week, we find out the story behind one of the most iconic features of the Helsinki skyline and explore how the building tells the history of the nation as it calls home. Our correspondent in the city, Petrie puts off, leads today's tour. Much like the Eiffel Tower in Paris or the Statue of Liberty in New York, the Helsinki cathedral is an iconic building that has come to symbolize the city. The imposing white cathedral with its green domes is such an integral part of Helsinki skyline that it is often printed on posters and stamps depicting the city. Standing on a hill overlooking Helsinki essential Senate square and the city's popular harbor, the cathedral looks as if it's keeping a watchful eye over what goes on in the Finnish capital. In the summer months, the steps leading up to it are a popular hangout for people enjoying a coffee and a picnic with their friends, and in the winter months, it's not uncommon to see kids writing a sled down the snow covered steps. Despite being such an iconic building, the Helsinki cathedral has a somewhat troubled history. Originally named the saint Nicholas church, it was built in the early 19th century as a tribute to Tsar Nicholas I of Russia, the then Grand Duke of Finland. Soon after Russia invaded Finland and annexed it from Sweden in 1809, Russia decreed that the Finnish capital was to be moved from the western Finnish city of turku to the small village of Helsinki. Tsar Alexander the first commissioned the German architect gar Ludwig engel, to draw up plans for a new majestic central square to the new capital. The square would feature a seat of government, the university, and a cathedral for the city's Lutheran population. In a symbolic move, a small wooden cathedral dedicated to ulrika eleonora, the queen of Sweden, would be demolished to make way to the new grand church. Although the cathedral was modeled after the saint Isaac's cathedral and Kazan cathedrals, both in St. Petersburg, it soon took on a life of its own. Unlike the ornamental and opulent orthodox cathedrals, the saint Nicholas church is plain and austere aesthetic emphasized its Lutheran nature. Its white facade, when seen against the blue sky, made up, the colors of the future flag of independent and free Finland. When seen from above, the shape of the church resembles a Greek cross and its symmetrical to all directions. The frugal design language continues on the inside with light blue and white walls and simple wooden pews. After a hundred years of Russian rule, Finland gained independence in 1917. The church's name was changed from saint Nicholas to grand church and then later in 1959 to Helsinki, cathedral. Today, the building receives over half a million visitors each year, making it one of Helsinki's most popular tourist attractions. But it is also very much an active church, hosting weddings, church services, and choir recitals. It is where the nation lays to rest its greatest statesman and where the Finnish president and other political leaders gather together with members of the public as is the Finnish way to celebrate Finland's independence. On December 6th, each year. There are those Finns who are uncomfortable with the idea of the country's most iconic building being a gift from Russia. But they are as small minority. Most fence see the Helsinki cathedral as our own. And in many ways, it has come to symbolize Finland's struggle for freedom against a looming threat from the east. In December 2015, thousands of fans of all ages gathered on the steps of the Helsinki cathedral to sing the Finland him, a patriotic and much loved symphony poem by the nation's most celebrated composer, Jean sibelius. It was one of the most sublime events the city has ever seen, and it demonstrated in a very palpable way just how important the Helsinki cathedral is to the sense of belonging and togetherness in the Finnish capital. You've been listening to tool stories and monocle 24 production. Today's episode was written by Petri butts off and produced and edited by David Stevens. Remember to tune in on Thursday for the full 30 minute edition of the urbanist. Goodbye, and thank you for listening city lovers..

Helsinki cathedral Helsinki saint Nicholas church Finland adri takan grand church white cathedral Senate square Russia Tsar Nicholas Tsar Alexander Ludwig engel ulrika eleonora saint Isaac's cathedral Petrie Sweden Statue of Liberty Eiffel Tower turku Paris
 Sweden, Finland delegations in Turkey for NATO talks

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 4 months ago

Sweden, Finland delegations in Turkey for NATO talks

"Delegations from Sweden and Finland are scheduled to hold talks with senior Turkish officials in an effort to overcome and cross objections to their historic bids to join the NATO alliance Turkey says it opposes the two Nordic countries membership in the military alliance citing grievances with Sweden's and to a lesser extent Finland's perceived support to groups it views as terrorists It also accuses the two of imposing arms exports restrictions on turkey Turkish objections have dampened stockholms and Helsinki's hopes for a quick membership in NATO amid Russia's invasion of Ukraine and puts NATO's credibility at stake

Finland Sweden Nato Military Alliance Turkey Helsinki Russia Ukraine
Finland's leaders call for NATO membership 'without delay'

AP News Radio

01:04 min | 5 months ago

Finland's leaders call for NATO membership 'without delay'

"England England England England has has has has announced announced announced announced that that that that it it it it is is is is in in in in favor favor favor favor of of of of rapidly rapidly rapidly rapidly applying applying applying applying for for for for NATO NATO NATO NATO membership membership membership membership creating creating creating creating a a a a historic historic historic historic expansion expansion expansion expansion for for for for the the the the alliance alliance alliance alliance and and and and a a a a serious serious serious serious blow blow blow blow to to to to Russia Russia Russia Russia the the the dramatic dramatic dramatic move move move means means means that that that Finland Finland Finland is is is all all all but but but certain certain certain to to to join join join NATO NATO NATO with with with just just just a a a few few few steps steps steps left left left before before before the the the application application application process process process can can can begin begin begin Finland's Finland's Finland's foreign foreign foreign minister minister minister Pekka Pekka Pekka Haavisto Haavisto Haavisto has has has said said said Russia's Russia's Russia's invasion invasion invasion of of of Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine has has has become become become a a a serious serious serious concern concern concern on on on predictable predictable predictable behavior behavior behavior of of of Russia Russia Russia he's he's he's an an an imminent imminent imminent he he he soon soon soon U. U. U. K. K. K. prime prime prime minister minister minister Boris Boris Boris Johnson Johnson Johnson said said said it's it's it's understandable understandable understandable that that that Finland Finland Finland would would would want want want to to to join join join NATO NATO NATO at at at this this this time time time when when when you you you look look look what what what rushers rushers rushers done done done in in in Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine everybody's everybody's everybody's not not not thinking thinking thinking about about about their their their own own own security security security finish finish finish public public public opinion opinion opinion is is is now now now at at at seventy seventy seventy percent percent percent in in in favor favor favor of of of joining joining joining NATO NATO NATO Helsinki Helsinki Helsinki resident resident resident and and and non non non **** **** **** police police police Finland Finland Finland needs needs needs to to to feel feel feel protected protected protected in in in the the the current current current environment environment environment SO SO SO small small small country country country so so so we we we won't won't won't be be be able able able to to to do do do all all all of of of these these these the the the defense defense defense by by by ourselves ourselves ourselves so so so we we we need need need to to to be be be a a a member member member of of of NATO NATO NATO I'm I'm I'm Karen Karen Karen Thomas Thomas Thomas

Nato Finland Russia England Ukraine Alliance Alliance Alliance All Pekka Pekka Pekka Haavisto Haavisto Haavisto U. U. U. K. K. K. Prime Prime Helsinki Karen Karen Karen Thomas Thoma
"helsinki" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

04:58 min | 6 months ago

"helsinki" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"The open air and the water started to come in. And this is active active. So not obviously here, but in the other parts of mind, they continue to extract the chalk stone. Which is then used in many, many areas. Of course, for example, the printed paper like you know, it's reducing. But this kind of closely paper using the chalk stone to get the kind of nice quality of the printing and this kind of closer feeling of the paper. You can throw the brick some stones from the first convention. So we're now on level -112. It's around 100 meters below ground. So we have actually gone up from last time we checked in. And as you can hear from the steps around us, the terrain has changed. We have actually gravel because we are inside the active mine. This is where we are moving from the sleek side of it being presented to the public by corner and now we're going into the actual mine into the tunnels into the stone. And we've actually just touched some limestone as well to try to see how not only they navigate these tunnels in order to access their own high rise testing facility. But just the effort that is happening below ground that you're not even aware of. This includes a small tour and where we're able to see the history of the mind so far. The tour included an impressive light show which highlight is just the sheer dimension of some of the caves inside this mine. I tried my best, not eating too much of the 200 or so meters of ground that laid above our heads as we continue to descend into the mine. A small display of old photos showed the ways in which miners used to come into work in this very spot, resembling more a cauldron on chains than anything else. We've come a long way since then, and I'm glad that we could use the elevator today. Speaking of which, it's time to make our scent and go back to ground level. We're now leaving level minus one one two and we're going back to the ground level, which is actually level 37. Just this moment, I can feel my ears popping from going back on the ground and we are of course using the aurora lift from it to bring us back on the ground. Our time in Finland is almost up, but before we head off, let me leave you with a final thought from any cinema key, Helsinki's deputy mayor for urbanism. I asked her, what lessons could other cities learn from her own Helsinki? I think it's not probably lesson but I think that what I find most interesting or motivating is in cities the possibility of combining strict environmental targets with social cohesion and economic prosperity. And I think that it's in the core of the city is to be able to actually have all these at the same time. I do feel that tells me, for example, per CAPiTA emissions, we have reduced them 50% from 1990 level. And we are more wealthy now. So in that sense, I do believe that the end result will not be hard to bear. And also then joy. So it's important also, I think, in these severe times when the severe target somehow I think what I always look after also in different cities is places of joy and enjoyment because it is how that as well. For.

Helsinki Finland
"helsinki" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

04:14 min | 6 months ago

"helsinki" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"The past few days speaking with people from Conner and from Helsinki city hall have shown us the benefits of public and private working together. But most importantly, that having a human centric approach to your craft, whatever this may be, will ultimately result in better cities for everyone. We had one last stop in our itinerary before making our way back to London. This time in the small city of lohia, about an hour's drive from the Finnish capital. The car journey to get there was beautiful. It's a bright wintry day, with plenty of sunshine and the snow covers most of the landscape almost every Lake or creek that we encounter seems to be frozen still. We arrive at this small unassuming sight surrounded by pine trees to a small building with con is branding. But not all is as it seems on the surface, just 305 meters below us, you'll find two, an active limestone mine, part of which she's used by kone as their high rise testing laboratory. Here is where essential parts such as brakes, cables, and safety procedures for their elevators can be tested before being assembled in some of the world's tallest buildings. Before heading underground, we had a look at the laboratory floor, which is basically the engine room for this testing facility. This is the whole machine room will typically look at the top of the building. You never see we are seeing the building designers are making life very complicated to put all this stuff at the top of the building. I think we are probably running 8 m/s at the moment, but we could kind of first beat those up. Even to kind of maintain the per second if needed. And then here in this corner, you can actually see the top of the drop test shaft. So that's where we have a dummy MFA there. It's not the real elevator car, but the Justice League and test weights, and then the mechanism that you can drop it to the freefall. The idea is that you get the maximum speed and then you activate the brakes, and that's the safety gear. So it's like on a phrasing car. So the trick is not really kind of how you get to the maximum speed, but then how to ensure that everything is safe and verified for safety perspective. And of course, the notified bodies and authorities are joining us in the tests to certify all the safety gear. So it's important that we are able to prove that they are working. Have you learned from Hollywood always all the things that can happen to any other race? Most of the things that I showed in Hollywood movies can not happen. Well, on that reassuring note, it's time to put on our hard hats warm high vis jackets and protective shoes and head underground. So we're here now 200 meters below the ground. We are at cones, high rise testing laboratory. This is a working limestone mine. And the side that kone uses has actually 11 elevator shafts varying in size. This is their way of testing their technology and instead of building up as you can imagine a tower of that size would perhaps disturb the nature around us. So they decided to go down. And we just arrived at this first stop 200 meters below the ground. And we're going to go and see how these elevators are actually tested. This is actually the setup that we saw in the in the laboratory for this drop test soft and while it's a bit difficult to go inside the soft and see it in your own eyes. So that's why we have this set up here. So this is actually the kind of the top of the shaft and the dummy elevator or slim. That is imitating the reality. I don't know if there's volunteers.

Helsinki city hall lohia Lake or creek Conner kone Justice League London Hollywood
"helsinki" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

06:25 min | 6 months ago

"helsinki" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"What the city should look like in the future. My name is Hannah Harris. I'm the chief design officer at the city of Helsinki. Helsinki has been working with design on a strategic level for ten years now. So in 2012, Helsinki was well designed capitally was a year of hundreds of projects, hundreds of partnerships celebration all year round looking at what design can do to make a city better. There were obviously lots of public events as well, but also lots of tests and trials and finding new ways of working that came out of that year. Today, when you look at the data, the use of design has multiplied nearly tenfold in the past 5 years. So there's in-house designers and design minded people are growing number across the city. That kind of way of working and really looking at the user experience looking at the data, it's becoming something that's expected. But the other thing, of course, is how we work with our design partners. We've gone through a big round of gathering fade backend data and interviewing both people inside the city and the business is about stuff that works and what needs to happen and what kind of projects design has specifically been used for and there are a lot of things that come out there. But one big one is as well to do with that, the bureaucratic systems, all governance, or how things work behind the scenes. How do we connect the dots better? So of course they're the aim for us is to continue improving how we take on board those learnings and make sure that we can sort of spread them. The city of Helsinki is the largest single employer in Finland close to 40,000 people working for the city. So obviously there's that quite basic work of getting the results out there and communicating them and sharing to be done. You mentioned earlier how you got in the role as the pandemic was about to hit and I just would like to know how if the pandemic proved to be an opportunity to perhaps use a city in a different way. Yeah, I think as a city wave from a sort of planning and design perspective, I think we're had really invaluable information there as well about the things that people really value in Helsinki and the everyday life as well, which we have a quite unique balance of exciting urban life coupled with something that's quite nature focused and sort of wilderness aspect there as well that you can combine the two and that's quite unique. And that experience has come out really strongly in discussions during the pandemic. Also, we've been able to do lots of things in terms of testing and experimenting in public space and doing stuff together with businesses or other people of Helsinki and so forth. How we support the really, there's a very sort of active food culture in Helsinki that's becoming more and more exciting that has sort of obviously spread out into the streets and squares as well. During the pandemic, but we've found quite nice ways of organizing that, for instance, in some of the really central squares in Helsinki. And through that, which has been very interesting, like something like a very iconic spot in Helsinki the Senate squareds this historical sort of landmark site, but that first sum of the pandemic we did a really nice restaurant terrace place there and people rediscovered that square. There was like this love for that square that the people took it back and that was a wonderful thing that happened alongside that yes it was healthy and safe and people didn't get ill and it helped the businesses and there was a all of that but it also sort of rediscovering that spot. You mentioned testing, how do you test in a city and then incorporated into planning? We do several things. There's a lot in terms of Helsinki has been quite advanced in smart city and digital test bedding and working with startups and that kind of work continues in your area that I'm working on at the moment, which is more kind of to do perhaps with traditional planning processes and innovating in them. So we are setting up a program around place making initiatives which again is not a new design method as such but perhaps something that cities aren't so good at always, that how do you really early on when there's some change happening or need to look at, let's say, a central public spot in, let's say, a suburb of Helsinki that how do you identify really the core strengths of that spot work with the people, the businesses, whoever connected to that particular spot, test things out, take that knowledge on and really make sure that it's fed back into the machinery and bigger works that are coming up in those spots. And we are looking at several sites around Helsinki first experiments will be done this summer. Which is I'm very excited about it and it's been resonating very well actually in the planning departments as well as hit something that they need. So we're trying to find the best way to do that in housing can obviously along the way, make sure that those places become even nicer places in the process. Back in who vinca, I had a chance to catch up with UC hurlin, the vice chairman of the board at kone corporation. His family has been at the helm of corner for nearly 100 years, and I was curious to hear how that long-term approach has influenced their drive to innovate, while keeping the idea of creating a better urban environment always in mind. My great great grandfather, Harald herlin, he purchased in 1924, and it has been under the family control ever since, and I like to think that this family heritage and his family ownership brings sort of a more long-term thinking that we, of course, as a public company, we report our progress on different things on a quarterly or annual basis, but the thinking behind the strategic decisions is not on the quarterly level, or as we say, the joke goes that a family company quarter is 25 years. So we're really hoping to think even more about the future generations, the children, our children, and their children and how our decisions and the decisions and the directions we take at affect the lives of the next generations. Now one thing that has been quite obvious for these past two days, this is a company that cares about what the future of cities will look like. And it's not just about numbers on a paper. It's about understanding people and therefore that's what guides your next steps are. Is this a correct assessment? Do you feel like observing urban life is perhaps.

Helsinki Hannah Harris Finland UC hurlin kone corporation Senate Harald herlin
"helsinki" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

08:03 min | 6 months ago

"helsinki" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"Officer, matcha crans, explains. This mission statement of improving the flow of urban life is what actually got me to join Connor at the end, right? Because that was something that I could relate to. When you think about it, we have an opportunity to make an impact, roughly 1 billion people every day use our elevators and escalators and doors. One of the biggest requests that we got when COVID hit was our customers coming into us as saying, okay, Conan, can you help us with safe and timely people flow of people moving, let's say, from parking lot or a train station or metro station to their apartment. Or to their office, or to the location. And in a way that is that can still follow sort of physical distancing that they minimize interaction with infrastructure and environment. And we actually did that. We did it up, of course, not only ourselves, but working with partners. And from that perspective, we work on these types of solutions. We're working on solutions to optimize the flow in let's say office building. There's some interesting examples. We work with a customer in London, actually, where there were occupying a bunch of, I think, ten floors, and they started to see that and it was pre COVID when people ended up moving much more across the floors. And especially going to certain floors more than to others. And of course, from them was, well, we want people to work and not spend time just going from floor to floor. And what we found out is that there was a simple thing that was a better coffee on floor 5 and people just went there. So the simple solution was, well, let's put better coffee in other floors and people just stay on their floors. So simple examples like that. One of the things that also caught my attention was in the conversation about achieving carbon neutrality goals by 2030 and adaptability was also another important factor in this idea that perhaps is more important to think about how to extend a building's lifetime. Not only about the existing ones and what you can do to ensure that they continue. But as we start to build now, how can we ensure that in 60 years or 100, you'll be able to adapt that for whatever is a new technology and the circumstances. So how can buildings and become more adaptable in the future? Just to throw another statistic at you. When you think about Europe, 85 to 95% of buildings that we have already today will still be in use in year 2050. But probably a big portion of these buildings would be used differently. I spent some time talking to customers in San Francisco Bay Area, recently. And they were talking to me about, all right, we have a lot of office spaces now in San Francisco. So on the one hand, they were facing the choice whether they should improve and upgrade these spaces to make them more attractive for people, or maybe repurpose those, right? For example, San Francisco is suffering from lack of affordable housing. So maybe that would be one of the options. And this is sort of a symptom of I think the changes that we should anticipate. In the context of Connor, what we've done with our products with our elevators, for example, we have made them modular. But we also made them intelligent. And if you think about you have sort of elevated today and tomorrow you want to change the decor, you want to change the speed, you want to change the size, you can do all of these things. So there's a little flexibility because of modularity. But secondly, also, our DX class elevators, for example, you can install digital panels, provide different experiences. So for example, if you think about office space, you might have certain type of experiences, including sound, including music, including visual experience, including sort of programming of even wear and how the elevator stops and goes. It's very easy to change those. The other part that I think we pay a lot of attention to is that demographics changes. We've been working a lot on integration, for example, of technology that will make it easier for people that are either visually impaired or people on wheelchairs to help them move around the building. So for example, we integrated the application called blind score that helps people that are visually part to interact with elevator and move around the building. We've been working on sort of optimizing the experience of people using wheelchairs, which actually requires a bit of work, because it's not just about can I call the elevator, but keep the door long enough open, make sure the elevator was empty. Make sure that you can navigate within the elevator. Make sure that the elevator goes straight to the floor that you actually want to go to. In the list goes on. So we're taking this approach of adaptability in a very comprehensive way, because we know that our customers will need it. My name is Amy Chen, I'm the chief innovation officer at corner. It is true that few companies has a dedicated setup for innovation that is cornered as we also see that it's getting more and more popular and particularly I've also seen that there are also more cities started to take on an innovation or achieve innovation roles. I think it's a very nice way to have a strong focus on bringing new solutions and more money solutions to our side to the market in the case of corner. We focus very much on how to bring new solutions to our customers and how to help them to solve the pressing problems and technology use of strong part of innovation, but it's not the only part of innovation. So it's also less probably less so about having crazy inventive ideas, but more about how do we bring something that is valuable with sometimes often very simple solutions like the jump lift. It looks very simple on the surface, but it's exactly this type of solutions that would actually make the life of our customers better and easier. Let's take that as an opportunity then to talk about the area where in we heard just a moment ago about the jump lift and pointing just at the building that we have right in front of us. But this is actually quite an amazing area in terms of how this can signify a change in construction and what this new standard for is about their vision for the future. I think this is only one of the very few examples that we can already bring to the market today. They are actually many more things not only us, but also our partners and also not only large partners but also startups are doing here in this region. You heard earlier also the city of Helsinki talking about how Kala satama here and also the city itself are testing bad for different types of innovations. And this is going from, of course, the building phase, but also on how we recycle and how we handle waste how we make energy more efficient and so on and so forth. So this is truly a really great opportunity when we are building a new area together and new neighborhood that the different aspects of also not only technology but social innovations are incorporated into that. So also the residents and citizens can also contribute to what they want their area and neighborhood to be. Does this highlight just how important it is for public and private to work together? Absolutely. I think this public private part is, I think it's already not the idea and concept anymore. It is the reality here and it's very much the case with the city of Helsinki with our customer in the construction site with the investors here and with us on the people flow site. I'm sure that they are also many other players. So it is public. It is private and it's combined together. And it's physical and digital also often come back together. As Amy just mentioned, the relationship between the city of Helsinki and private corporations such as conne has been vital to pushing urban development forward. But as we've also heard, innovation is not exclusive to technology, design also plays a crucial role in delivering that vision of.

matcha crans Connor San Francisco Conan Amy Chen San Francisco Bay Area London Europe Kala satama Helsinki conne Amy
"helsinki" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

03:34 min | 6 months ago

"helsinki" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"<Speech_Female> So we are <Speech_Female> making public transport <Speech_Female> better. <Speech_Female> We are <SpeakerChange> upgrading <Speech_Female> our hiking <Speech_Female> infrastructure. <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> especially during the <Speech_Female> winter time, it's <Speech_Female> crucial <Speech_Female> that we are all <Speech_Female> maintaining <Speech_Female> the roads <Speech_Female> for epochs <Speech_Female> because if <Speech_Female> they are covered by <Speech_Female> a snow annoyance, <Speech_Female> nobody is going <Speech_Female> to biking. <Speech_Female> But then <Speech_Female> on the new areas, <Speech_Female> we are also <Speech_Female> designing <Speech_Female> parking <Speech_Female> cars to be a <Speech_Female> little bit further away <Speech_Female> from the <Speech_Female> houses. <Speech_Female> So that there is <Speech_Female> a small that kind of <Speech_Female> resistance <Speech_Female> to take your car. <Speech_Female> And we <Speech_Female> are making a <Speech_Female> public transport <Speech_Female> stops <Speech_Female> tram and <Speech_Female> metro to be <Speech_Female> closer to the houses. <Speech_Female> So we are <Speech_Female> also using that <Speech_Female> kind of a <Speech_Female> small <Speech_Female> stick parts. And <Speech_Female> then we are, for <Speech_Female> example, we are <Speech_Female> increasing the price <Speech_Female> of the parking <Speech_Female> in the city center. <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> that's also that kind of <Speech_Female> a thing that we <Speech_Female> are for us <Speech_Female> in people or the <Speech_Female> couraging <SpeakerChange> people <Speech_Female> to leave the car. <Speech_Female> The <Speech_Female> area where we're <Speech_Female> in today is district, <Speech_Female> has been <Speech_Female> sort of a testing <Speech_Male> ground for innovation. <Speech_Male> It also <Speech_Female> has quite a <Speech_Female> strong <Speech_Female> relation and tradition and <Speech_Female> history with shipping, <Speech_Female> which is an industry, <Speech_Male> of course, with <Speech_Female> a heavy carbon <Speech_Female> footprint as well. <Speech_Female> How has <Speech_Female> this area <Speech_Female> been used <Speech_Male> to test climate <Speech_Female> innovation? <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> does that <Speech_Female> translate <Speech_Female> or incorporate <Speech_Female> into the shipping <SpeakerChange> industry <Speech_Female> as well? <Speech_Female> Not directly. <Speech_Female> But what we <Speech_Female> have been trying <Speech_Female> here is <SpeakerChange> that the whole <Speech_Female> idea of this area <Speech_Female> was to build that <Speech_Female> kind of one <Silence> hour <Speech_Female> more <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> district. <Speech_Female> Everything <Speech_Female> is located <Speech_Female> very close. <Speech_Female> The public transport <Speech_Female> is here, <Speech_Female> so there is the <Speech_Female> metro <Speech_Female> basically in the <Speech_Female> heart of Targaryen. <Speech_Female> There are that <Speech_Female> kind of automatic <Speech_Female> passes going <Speech_Female> on the street. <Speech_Female> So basically, <Speech_Female> by utilizing <Speech_Female> all kind of <Speech_Female> fancy <Speech_Female> things, you are able <Speech_Female> to produce <Speech_Female> or get <Speech_Female> one hour or more <Speech_Female> for your <Speech_Female> days. <Speech_Female> And of course, <Speech_Female> on the climate change, <Speech_Female> they are not that <Speech_Female> kind of a fancy <Speech_Female> thing is what we have <Speech_Female> been trying here. <Speech_Female> They are like <Speech_Female> energy intelligent <Speech_Female> systems <Speech_Female> on the housing <Speech_Female> and that <Speech_Female> kind of <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> very energy <Speech_Female> efficient heating <Speech_Female> systems and <Speech_Female> they're probably you can not <Speech_Female> see them. They are <Speech_Female> built <SpeakerChange> on the buildings, <Speech_Female> but <Speech_Male> I guess I <Speech_Female> just have one final <Speech_Female> question for you. <Speech_Female> What does the head of a <Speech_Female> climate unit do you want <Speech_Female> to day to day? <Speech_Female> Is <Speech_Female> your day today <Speech_Female> trying to convince <Speech_Female> people <Speech_Female> that this is <Speech_Female> the way we will <Speech_Female> survive, <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> sitting on meetings? <Speech_Female> What does your day to <Speech_Female> today look like? <Speech_Female> At the moment it looks <Speech_Female> like very much sitting <Laughter> onto meetings. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> Unfortunately, <Speech_Female> I'm <SpeakerChange> doing <Speech_Female> engineering. <Speech_Female> I'm really, you know, <Speech_Female> fighting to <Speech_Female> fight. <Speech_Female> Because I love to do <Speech_Female> it, but it's <Speech_Female> talking with <Speech_Female> the policy since. <Speech_Female> I'm talking <Speech_Female> with the managers <Speech_Female> of the city. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> In the easiest <Speech_Music_Male> of lives that <Speech_Female> we also <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> try to <Speech_Female> achieve. So that is <Speech_Female> just a snapshot <Speech_Female> of what kone <Speech_Female> and the city of <Speech_Female> Helsinki are doing <Speech_Female> individually <Speech_Female> and together <Speech_Female> to achieve this <Speech_Female> ambitious goal <Speech_Music_Female> of carbon neutrality <Speech_Female> by 2030. <Speech_Female> Join <Speech_Female> us next week to <Speech_Female> hear part two of <Speech_Female> our report will be <Speech_Female> venturing out to <Speech_Female> con his own factory <Speech_Female> and also to their <Speech_Female> high rise testing <Speech_Female> lab to see <Speech_Female> how lifts and <Speech_Female> technology <Speech_Female> is being tested <Speech_Female> for the cities of <Speech_Female> the future. <Speech_Female> For monocle, in <Speech_Male> Helsinki, <SpeakerChange> I'm <Speech_Music_Male> carlotta rabello. <Music> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> And that's <Speech_Male> all for this week's <Speech_Male> edition of the

Helsinki carlotta rabello
"helsinki" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

05:55 min | 6 months ago

"helsinki" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"Our customers, the more advanced customers they might shortlist their subcontractors for construction project based on how ambitious their sustainability targets are so that you might get cut from even before the tendering phase if you don't live up to their standards. We are seeing this increasingly from the investors, a couple of years ago, when we have investor meetings, they might have a specialist to talk about sustainability matters in a meeting here or there. Nowadays, barely an investor meeting goes by where sustainability isn't a topic to discuss and for some meetings. It's the only topic that our investors want to talk about. And of course, the employees want to also work for companies that have a sustainable purpose. And as sustainable mission. So it's sort of the pressure in a positive way is coming from all sides. In a way, is a pressure that turns into acceptance almost. It is not with a negative connotation. It's a pressure that creates a momentum. And like I mentioned earlier, some parts of that then become already like, oh, well, obviously we're going to do this. So we just sort of accept them as basic things to do. And then something else will come up that then will become the next ambitions target to reach. And don't get me wrong, I'm not saying that. We're done with scope one and scope two. There's plenty of work to be done on how to, for example, turn our service fleet into low emission vehicles. But there's, I think, a really positive and good momentum right now in terms of turning our industry and the construction industry more sustainable. My name's Hannah Harris. I'm the chief design officer at the city of Helsinki. A key thing is about, you know, we have all the technical tools. We have the knowledge and it's about bringing those together and key and that is obviously people and how they behave. And then we get to the core area of design, obviously. That is it, does it make sense is it motivational in your everyday life? For instance, heating houses, like the mass building stock of 50, 60s, 70s apartment blocks in Helsinki. And we have a service in Helsinki which offers, for instance, advice for housing co ops, how to do.

Hannah Harris Helsinki
"helsinki" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

05:46 min | 6 months ago

"helsinki" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"Owned, we are quite a lot of housing and of course a lot of public buildings that we require minimum 30% improvement in energy efficiency each time a building is renovated. Then we have also wanted to encourage all the private investors to have the same level more or less. When we calculate it since roughly 2% of the building stock is renovated sort of done the more complete renovation each year. So we had the feeling that, okay, calculate that they also the need for heating will be going down. And that was also a reason why we then made the decision for 2030. Regarding the third big question the traffic, I would say that in a way we are in a good position in Helsinki that we have a really good public transport system. We are investing quite heavily in it. We are building new light rail lines, walking in city that has fairly reasonable distances. It's really popular, biking, we are not top cities of the Europe, but roughly 10% of all journeys made by bike. So all together like public transport walking and biking make up 80% of the journeys being made and then 20% is white car. Roughly, it's a good situation, but still I expect that politically some of the hottest debates will still be when we are going towards the carbon neutrality target will be around traffic. What about resident citizens? How are communities reacting to this goal? Are they supporting the goal?.

Helsinki Europe
"helsinki" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

05:37 min | 6 months ago

"helsinki" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"Hello and welcome to Monica 24 is the urbanist the show all about the city's we live in, imagine tuck. Coming up on today's program. The change that we've seen has been really monumental when you think about it. When we talked internally that we should start the science based targets project so that we have some externally set goals and externally validated goals, we were thinking, oh, can we do this? Is it doable? What's it going to cost? Now it's like almost two years later, and now we're thinking, okay, well, what's the next thing already? What's the next level? How can cities be more sustainable? And are there lessons to be learned from the Nordic region? This week, we reporting from Helsinki, where the urbanist team has been for the past couple of days to find out how the city is working to become carbon neutral by 2030. We'll also sit down with global engineering company kone, tour their factory and testing laboratories to discover how they're combining technology and behavior analytics to improve the flow of people in our cities. So can private and public work together to create better cities. All of this and much more coming up over the next 30 minutes, right here on the urbanist with me and your tuck. So welcome to this week's episode. Climate change is perhaps one of the most existential challenges facing humanity. In the Nordic region, this is something that's been at the top of the agenda for quite some time. So it should come as no surprise that one of the world's leading engineering firms, Finland's kone, has set ambitious targets to reach carbon neutrality by 2030. That target matches one set out by Helsinki's city hall, which has been working hard to not only implement physical changes to the built environment, but to alter citizens behavior too. Mongols cholera Bello went to Helsinki to find out more and meet the people pushing for change. This is part one of her report, and this week we're going to focus on sustainability. Here's carlotta..

kone Helsinki Monica Finland city hall Bello carlotta
Biblical Condemnations of LGBT Not Hate Speech in Finland, Court Rules

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

03:16 min | 6 months ago

Biblical Condemnations of LGBT Not Hate Speech in Finland, Court Rules

"I want to tell you about the result in a trial that I mentioned on the podcast several weeks ago, a trial of two prominent people in Finland, who were accused of hate crimes, essentially for communicating their Christian beliefs. So let me revive the facts of the case. You have a woman named pi V rasanen. She's a physician. She's a mother of 5. And she is a was a member of the Finnish parliament. And then you have Johanna pujol, a bishop in the evangelical Lutheran mission diocese in Finland. And both of them were accused or indicted together for apparently using their free speech to promote what the government of Finland called hate speech. So this is essentially a hate speech trial. And. What happened is that is that this woman named Racine had put out a pamphlet in 2004, she had apparently made some comments in a 2018 radio debate. She apparently had a Twitter post and 2019. So this was the basis of the indictment. And they said that she was guilty of hate crimes because her statements were quote likely to cause intolerance contempt and hatred toward homosexuals. This was the indictment. Now what was the charge against the other individual, pau jola? They said basically that this was a guy who published a pamphlet in which he once again supposedly was promoting hate by emphasizing the biblical principle of taking right out of the Bible quote male and female he created them. So the idea is a God made human beings male and female he created them. That's hate speech. So this now goes before a court in Helsinki. And. There was an investigation before this. And the defense was simple. Articulating our Christian beliefs. In fact, in one case, one of the defendants said, I'm simply saying in a little different way and in finish, I suppose, would be apostle Paul said, the prosecutor was not abused. He goes, the apostle Paul isn't on trial here. He goes, but Racine is, meaning this individual, this woman, this member of parliament, she's on trial, and so regardless of what Paul said, if she repeats it, she announced that it, and so she needs to be held to account. Well, finally, the court in Helsinki has issued its verdict. And I'm happy to say it's a complete dismissal of all charges. It's a complete victory for both pi V rasan and Johanna, pajo, and basically what the court says is this. They say that yes, these are these are two individuals who were articulating essentially biblical concepts and the court says in the unanimous ruling, quote it is not for the court to interpret biblical concepts,

Finland Finnish Parliament Johanna Pujol Evangelical Lutheran Mission D Pau Jola Racine Helsinki Twitter Apostle Paul Paul Rasan Pajo Parliament Johanna
Germany Does 180 on Defense Spending

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:30 min | 7 months ago

Germany Does 180 on Defense Spending

"Now, I am not a psychiatrist psychologist and I don't project my impressions of leaders onto the media. Because I'm not in a position to judge Putin's state of mind. I just know what he's doing and what he's doing is reverting to Chechnya and Syrian tactics. In terms of what you've seen, I can judge the state of the mind of the German public because all of a sudden nearly 90% of them support massive hikes and defense spending as a former NATO allied supreme commander. That's got a surprise you and encourage you. It's been quite amazing to watch something I've been personally lobbying for and advocating for, along with the entire U.S. government for three decades. And in my case, four years is supreme allied commander literally buttonhole in Chancellor Merkel and then minister of defense, Ursula von der leyen, who's now the head of the European Union, personally button holing them and begging them to increase defense spending and all of a sudden in 48 hours Vladimir Putin has shown he's a much better persuader than admiral Jim staff read us. So I'm highly encouraged by this. I think it's been a wake-up call for Europe. And by the way, watch Sweden and Finland. If you woke up and Stockholm and Helsinki and you're outside the NATO alliance, I think this is the week when you start demanding a NATO membership card out of your government and boy, that's got to be part of Vladimir Putin's worst nightmare.

Chancellor Merkel Chechnya Ursula Von Der Leyen Putin Nato Admiral Jim U.S. Government Vladimir Putin European Union Finland Sweden Stockholm Helsinki Europe
Vaccine passport protests in Europe draw thousands of people

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 8 months ago

Vaccine passport protests in Europe draw thousands of people

"Thousands thousands thousands thousands of of of of people people people people have have have have gathered gathered gathered gathered in in in in European European European European capitals capitals capitals capitals to to to to protest protest protest protest recent recent recent recent coronavirus coronavirus coronavirus coronavirus restrictions restrictions restrictions restrictions including including including including faxing faxing faxing faxing possible possible possible possible sometimes sometimes sometimes sometimes by by by by some some some some governments governments governments governments throughout throughout throughout throughout the the the the consonants consonants consonants consonants demonstrations demonstrations demonstrations demonstrations took took took took place place place place in in in in Athens Athens Athens Athens Helsinki Helsinki Helsinki Helsinki London London London London Paris Paris Paris Paris and and and and stock stock stock stock home home home home marches marches marches marches in in in in Paris Paris Paris Paris to to to to hundreds hundreds hundreds hundreds of of of of demonstrators demonstrators demonstrators demonstrators protesting protesting protesting protesting the the the the introduction introduction introduction introduction of of of of a a a a new new new new cabinet cabinet cabinet cabinet nineteen nineteen nineteen nineteen poss poss poss poss in in in in Sweden Sweden Sweden Sweden where where where where proof proof proof proof of of of of vaccination vaccination vaccination vaccination is is is is needed needed needed needed to to to to attend attend attend attend such such such such events events events events some some some some three three three three thousand thousand thousand thousand demonstrators demonstrators demonstrators demonstrators marched marched marched marched through through through through central central central central stock stock stock stock home home home home in in in in London London London London protesters protesters protesters protesters chanted chanted chanted chanted freedom freedom freedom freedom as as as as they they they they marched marched marched marched against against against against regulations regulations regulations regulations requiring requiring requiring requiring mandatory mandatory mandatory mandatory Cabot Cabot Cabot Cabot nineteen nineteen nineteen nineteen Bucks Bucks Bucks Bucks a a a a nation nation nation nation for for for for British British British British medical medical medical medical workers workers workers workers Dr Dr Dr Dr medic medic medic medic Ricky Ricky Ricky Ricky Allen Allen Allen Allen says says says says the the the the British British British British government government government government is is is is putting putting putting putting its its its its people people people people but but but but I I I I picked picked picked picked the the the the wrong wrong wrong wrong people people people people the the the the N. N. N. N. I. I. I. I. K. K. K. K. the the the the police police police police picked picked picked picked a a a a fight fight fight fight it it it it cannot cannot cannot cannot wait wait wait wait this this this this is is is is the the the the end end end end of of of of the the the the vaccine vaccine vaccine vaccine is is is is going going going going to to to to implode implode implode implode now now now now the the the the medical medical medical medical stop stop stop stop they they they won't won't won't have have have it it it Karen Karen Karen Thomas Thomas Thomas London London London

Paris Helsinki London Athens Sweden Cabinet Cabinet Cabinet Cabine Cabot Cabot Bucks Bucks Bucks Bucks Dr Dr Dr Dr Medic Ricky Ricky Ricky Ricky Allen British British British Britis N. N. N. N. I. I. I. I. K. K. Medical Medical Medical Medica Karen Karen Karen Thomas Thoma
"helsinki" Discussed on AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

01:30 min | 10 months ago

"helsinki" Discussed on AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

"Can't book within an hour, which really cuts on your option. Then the same thing happened. I tried to get on an Iceland air flight through Reykjavík to get to JFK, but again, it was just too close into bookings. So my last option for the day. Ended up being of all things thin air. Not even in the same alliance. They're one world while SAS is star alliance. And unfortunately, again, they couldn't put me on the soonest available flight to Helsinki but they can get me on the following flight, which gave me a 40 minute connection in Helsinki, which ordinarily, I guess would be impossible, but Helsinki really touts its 35 minute minimum connection time. I know you and I both know they're very proud of their oh yeah. But 40 minutes is pushing it. I got lucky. I was able to get a middle seat in the first row of the thin air flight over to Helsinki and I thought, great, I'm going to be in the first row. I don't care I'm in the middle. It's a 45 minute fight. Get off. I'll go right through customs or immigration. And go right to the gate. So we take off or in the air and the really nice people at Helsinki airport on Twitter were informing me that here's the deal. Here's what you'll have to do. We're rooting for you. But also you're at a bus gate, which any traveler in a pinched nose bus gate is always bad gait. But in this case, it was a little more than just a bus gate. It turns out that at Helsinki, they do random COVID screenings, which.

Helsinki Reykjavík Iceland SAS Helsinki airport Twitter
"helsinki" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

03:36 min | 11 months ago

"helsinki" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"An imposing neoclassical facade in light yellow overlooks the Baltic Sea in western Helsinki. Built in 1841 by the German architect carload Vic engel, the lapping laty hospital looks at least at the locals, more like a stately mansion, or a seat of government than a place of healing. That's because engel perhaps more than any other architect has shaped the cityscape of Helsinki. He designed many of the city's most famous landmarks, including the iconic Helsinki cathedral, the Senate building, the Helsinki city hall, and the main building of the Helsinki university. The sense of stateliness is accentuated by the large slash gardens that surround the hospital's main building. For over a 160 years, that is until 2008, the London Latin hospital functioned as a psychiatric ward, making one of the oldest of its kind in Europe. When the hospital activity ended, the city of Helsinki rented the space out to grassroots organizations and it gradually became a bustling hub of artists, startup companies and urban activists that it is today. It is also home to cafes, a museum, a restaurant and several artisanal shops focusing on local craft. It reaches peak popularity during the warm summer months when the sunsets of the Finnish summer bathe the area in a soft golden glow, and the citizens of Helsinki flock to its coastal cliffs to enjoy drinks at a late evening dip in the sea. The area also features one of Finland's oldest public sounders, which welcomes visitors. All year round. The former hospital area has also become a popular site for all kinds of grassroots events. Such sides serve an important social purpose in a city where the rents are high, and there is a lack of non commercial public spaces for citizens. Such is the popularity of the lab in Latin hospital that when the city announced plans to sell the building and its surroundings to an international real estate investor with roots in Luxembourg, it caused a major backlash and sparked a citizen's initiative to protect the area. The developer pledged to renovate and to protect the hospital building, but it also unveiled plans to build a modern luxury hotel, as well as two high rises in the area. The plants cost a large scale public outcry. Citizens were concerned that these plants would spell an end to the autonomous, open for all nature of the area and drive away the residents, artists, artisans, activists, and entrepreneurs, that are the key reason to its popularity. Many public bodies joined the activists in their opposition to the plans among them the Finnish heritage agency, whose task it is to safeguard Finland's cultural heritage. They argued that privatising the area would fundamentally change the social dynamics of this important urban space. Facing increasing criticism, the city of council voted the proposal down in June 2020. The fate of the area is still far from certain, but for the time being its current custodians have been given an extension. The more attention the areas fate receives and the more political infighting in sparks, the more popular the label lati hospital gets among the locals. Helsinki has a strong tradition of urban activism and of turning disused public buildings into blossoming urban spaces. Former public buildings such as hospitals and train depots have spawned some of his most popular music festivals, startup hubs, and concert venues. Vibrant and livable cities need community spaces such as the lobby Latin.

Helsinki carload Vic engel lapping laty hospital Helsinki cathedral Helsinki city hall Helsinki university London Latin hospital Baltic Sea engel Latin hospital Finland Senate Finnish heritage agency Europe Luxembourg city of council
"helsinki" Discussed on GayBarchives Podcast

GayBarchives Podcast

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"helsinki" Discussed on GayBarchives Podcast

"We went there. When i was a child i went there again. I wanna say in nineteen ninety. nine always had an interest in finland. Because there's not like. I said there's not that many finnish americans there's nothing thins in the world and i was living in britain for two years at the end of the nineties and went over and saw cousins and went to a conference there and it was while i was there for conference i went to dtm and saw who i thought was the most handsome person in the whole world and we hooked up. He is a doctor and was then a doctor and he had a he had to work nights in the hospital and so we hooked up in the room. That was there for doctors to sleep in while they were sort of on shift or whatever. I'm sure that's not kosher He had to let me in through a back door. Sort of hustle me into this room and so it was of course very romantic and But then i. As i spent more time in finland one time for two months you know the following year than another time for five months because some of my first research project was based in finland Then i went to all the time You know like every weekend in. dtm stands for. Don't tell mama. I don't know why it has that name. Nobody calls with that everyone calls. It teaches them It was at the time for a long time. It was it was about the largest dance club in the city. Helsinki isn't that big of a city. But it's the biggest city in finland. And it's i don't know know. What percentage of the finns live in greater helsinki. But it's a significant proportion The club as i understand it is. It's run as a nonprofit. The board that governs it is dominated by the lgbtq plus rights organization seta and.

finland britain Helsinki helsinki
"helsinki" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"helsinki" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm ian elsner. Museum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape each episode ever longer long fifteen minutes. So let's get started. Nineteen sixty nine was a banner year for technological advancement for one. It's the year humans. I walked on the moon. It was also and this is not unrelated to the technological advancement right in the middle of the cold war naked sixty nine. Finland was kind of a fraught time politically in a way that it was still the era of the cold war and we're right next to russia so our political relationship with russia has always been kind of tightrope. We've always gazed eastwards with with care and especially at that time. This is mattie hinton service coordinator at the museum of technology in helsinki finland. Hello my name's madonna and right now. I am the service coordinator here. In the museum of technology in helsinki finland. The museum of technology was founded in that banner year of nineteen sixty-nine by heads of finish industries. The idea was to make a general technology museum in finland. The point is that it's not silo d- by industrial sector. I think that the global sort of zeitgeist the technology of the time was taking massively forwards. So that time there were these. Let's say there was a coalition in a very loose meaning of the word of these gigantic and finished scale. gigantic industry. Had sort of. Let's say the forest industry which in it has always been massive and then there was the medal industry which includes the mining industry and and the chemistry industry thinks like this who felt the need for some kind of preservation because they started to in their respective fields notice that things are changing and a lot of the old sort of wisdom. A lot of the old ways are getting put behind us in the past. I feel that is very unique in a way or very nice in. That sense is that they actually came together and made the decision that we will make sort of generalized museum of technology instead of making a forestry technical museum or chemistry museum or stuff like that it was a cooperative mission so to speak so that. That's actually how i are. Collections started to build. We got these big donations from different fields industrial fields. That are still big parts of our collections. The newly founded museum decided that with us. Finland's first water purification plant built in eighteen. Seventy seven as its main exhibit building. It's delightfully squat. Round building that used to be filled with sand that the water filter through water. That would eventually be used for drinking or firefighting house..

museum of technology finland ian elsner mattie hinton helsinki russia archipelago madonna
Are You Getting The Most Out Of Infosec Conferences

Cyber Security Sauna

05:33 min | 1 year ago

Are You Getting The Most Out Of Infosec Conferences

"Hi everyone and welcome to the cyber-security sonal. Thanks for joining us for another session. Where we sit out the hot topics insecurity welcome to all our listeners and be sure to follow us on twitter at hashtag. Cyber zone info conferences give cybersecurity professionals a chance to network here. The latest research exchange ideas and demo hacks and new tools but with so many conferences decide which wants to attend ho. Can you get the most out of your experience. Are they worth your time and money. What's it like to be a percenter or even an organizer today. We're speaking to f secure and founder of the t two infosec conference and nordheim mark head of coms for the nordic security event disobey and vice-chairwoman for health check association. Can you share with us. A little bit about your background and your involvement with infosec conferences in the background is on demos. San non freaking seen So naturally when. I when the first infosec conference he's came to be. I was really really curious. But the problem was that most of them were held in us So eagerly waiting for the european scene to wake up and when the first black hat came to europe. It was too damn most probably your two thousand or so. I booked my tickets there on being the fee niamh of first thing. I landed that the hotel. I went to the hotel bar and saw some guys there by t shirts on and when to the table and ask them so is it. Okay if i join you guys. And they're really. Yeah yeah yeah sure. Sure on four o'clock in the morning There was a guy called thor Of hammer of god. He asked me that. You're going to be talking about tomorrow and tandy and they were like okay cool and then because i was caught a part of the crew by now They invited me to all these cool. Invite only conferences like ph neutral. That was taking place in berlin and so on. And that's basically how i got involved. I'm like a person who pick and choose this. I'm not the one goes to the physical conferences. 'cause i what i would like to just know the topic and like ask around for my peers is something that you would recommend to listen or watch or whatever Because i'm not the kind of person who wants to attend to these these misleading conferences and all is these sales pitches. That's not ideal from. Am so yeah. I'm kind of picky. So therefore i i'm more and more no turning into surfing around the web and trying to ask from pierce what they would recommend me to attend like virtually roy do you do you go to physical events like at all. Yes i did. You know pre crow. Not yeah the disobey being kind of like the main event for me. It's near live in helsinki. That's kind of one that i've been like recently participated in so speaking of the recommendations like sometimes these events on conference get like glowing reviews Sometimes you just hear that they are like you said a waste of time. So what in. Your opinion makes good conference. I think the people who know their area of expertise. They're passionate about showcasing their findings so whatever and really like giving the practical examples of how they do it. That's interesting and inspiring obviously have pretty strong opinions about this one. The reason why. I founded t to was that i sold the difference between commercial offerings. An invite only events in a if you would go to places like si- mantech conference or something like that you see. These horrible sales pitches that would actually provide us zero value. And you would really learn anything besides maybe using a tool or two and then on the invite only events. You could see that. Yeah i i was playing this game called second life and then i used that port scan the internet and so on so that the discrepancy or the difference between these two it was. It was just huge. And i won't eat to have something like that. So i had some pretty strong ideals or opinions How a good security conference would look like first of all i think. Independence is a key thing here. So no sponsor can impact or affect the agenda no product picci's on each jenner represent theories on their estate on the stage because of their skills and and This is not true for majority of the conference is for of majority of the conferences. You buy this platinum sponsorship baggage or something You get a keynote. And is it's basically we have reach reached some ridiculous Papering points for this one because you go to. Rsa kino's is worth something like five hundred thousand eurostar. Something ridiculous so. I don't think that really serves the audience too. Well transparency i. that's the key ingredient. That's well so be honest how y'all don't sell your delegate packages to outsiders and so on that this is a common thing that i learned early two thousand and three or so that it's common practice that if you attend any type of event those delegates lists got sold

Nordheim Mark Health Check Association Tandy Twitter Berlin SAN Europe Helsinki Pierce ROY Rsa Kino Jenner
Heat to use COVID-19-sniffing dogs to screen fans at games

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

Heat to use COVID-19-sniffing dogs to screen fans at games

"The Miami Heat are using coronavirus sniffing dogs to screen fans who want to attend their games could the plan catch on a video on the heat's website explains the process with ninety detection dog will screen everyone in line by simply walking past and shows the coated sniffing dogs in action the dog signals on you by sitting down you and your group will be directed out of line and denied entry expected your Ferrari and says it's just one safety precaution along with the option of a rapid test as well as a mandatory health questionnaire and mask finding that specially trained dogs can detect Kobe on humans quickly and accurately code sniffing dogs are also used at airports in Dubai in Helsinki this follows medical researchers training dogs to detect things like low blood sugar and even some cancers I'm Julie Walker

Miami Helsinki Dubai Cancers Julie Walker
Superpowering Teams with Ilkka Paananen

Invest Like the Best

08:07 min | 1 year ago

Superpowering Teams with Ilkka Paananen

"I've been so excited to do this with you for two reasons one. I've been spending so much time thinking about in in kobe. Playing video games with myself and my young son. I think a great way to begin. This conversation is with one of my favorite lines of yours. Which is that you want. Said i am the least powerful. Ceo in the world. I love this concept because it'll introduce the idea of culture teams and people that we're going to spend most of our time talking about which may send a little strange for a video game company. But i think it's amazing and critical. So what did you mean by this line. Why did you say that. What does it mean to super cells. Culture i thanks so much for having me better. I think some are behold point. The ball trays that the more decisions that the snake and i make the better in an ideal were like if i five no decisions then but would make me. I guess is far full. Co the whole idea about supercell on what is at the core of our culture is this idea is small and independent themes that equal cells and these independent gained things sacred inside supercell way to think about them think about smaller start ups bidding raider company. That's why we think about them. I'd love to go back before super cell. Because i think your career up until that point helped inform you in how to build supercell with less focus on command and control and more focused on decentralized trust and i think our lessons today will be applicable across creative pursuits and industries. Not just in gaming what were you doing. Prior to founding supercell and what lessons that you learned or were taught by your experience before this business. I need to go back to the year. Two thousand so. I will still a student at helsinki university of technology. I had a business major vote on my actually like in my early of my studies for some reason. My dream job was to become either a management consultant. Thouray investment banker simply. Because because everybody else in my cloth wanted to catch and so deny then at some point in my studies. I was really interested in about entrepreneurship. And i started to think. Well this would be really cool. You know trying to build your own sing with a group of great people. And then i just looked like super lucky. I happened to bump into this group of people who wanted to found a company and it had to big games company on earlier. Especially in my dna cheers. I had to be a massive game. Iran still played a little gains. And then these guys may creating afford to pay any salary on threes and there was nobody else will what's gonna applying to join them although us nevil gains and they needed somebody else to do everything else and i was probably the only applicant assay and then i got the job done. I didn't get any pay funny. Anything is these guys for that. Okay you gotta do all the sales for us than me to give you like a proper titles and the people would actually like to see you. I guess they didn't know what to call me seven. They decided to call me the ceo. And i think. I was twenty two years of age and absolutely no idea what i was doing at never had a proper job except on summer. Jobs are my parents. They probably never had a proper job. Because all i've done. I've been ceo gaming companies. But anyway that's how they're going to start it. I know i had no idea what we were doing. Learnt by ewing an end eventually managed to graduate some there in bethany. and so. that's how we're gonna start in the thousand so set up a games company on funnily enough Ballgames the time if you recall those days assistant feature phones but they're coming to markets mostly from manufacturers like nokia for example of course based here in finland and of course never snow app stores. Nothing like you would need to distribute this job based gangs through. Carriers was very different at that time. But that's how book started. He founded the company almost exactly at the finding the dot com bubble burst onto members financing available so we basically like financed it bites doing work for hire work and then on the side be developed our own. Ip and our own games. I think miller able cut deals with most of the european carriers in big some of the us based carriers and then a massive amount of these jobs based phone scam the market and actually make some money on the company started to grow and back in two thousand four. We sold our company to company each chocolate. Which will say followed. By game industry legend strip wilkinson funded by sequoia on inclined burke in on the joined forces to them and then over time. The company grew to like four hundred people so relatively sizable game. Developers confident. I would call that down. Nba in guessing entrepreneurship and management learned. Lots of lessons. What were the key lessons that you learn positive and negative all combine the time at both digital chocolate and your company that was acquired by digital chocolate. What were the things that it installed in you that you brought with you into super cell and what were some other things that you reacted to a reacted against when the about how supercell would run as a company that they could've kept and what i learned that all domestic. It's all about the people and digital chocolate. I was very lucky to berkeley luck. Such amazing people. I kinda fought at those times that we are going to like had the best strategy the best plans the best processes in place and digital chocolate and mostly because of my doing so sexy quite a sort of a structured and also when it comes to innovation so we had pros almost forever thing if you off me like okay. How digital chocolate. Think about new games development tenure like a slight dick flex sixty slides expense. Exactly things for and they had all kinds of prose essays fall like how do they green like games the almost full we are myself and mike on leadership team over. There had a crystal ball as he kind of knew the best declare. Send a cornerstone. Humorous won't and then they put together like all kinds of control mechanisms to make sure that the company x. develops products and gains the direction. But then all of the years. I realized that there are a lot of negatives above this type of way of thinking. Because isn't the great the best creative people in the world. They don't get the feeling of ownership and oftentimes the reality is but actually the people who are best. What is best for the game for players. Those people are actually people are building the game. It's bill leadership. The people like me. And all the years. I realized our job as leaders. They should enable people to do their work better. We'll try to control the spent so much time carring the best people in the world also digital trump anything about why on earth tried to control them by. Don't do trust them to do the best thing. One of the things that made me fully realize this at some point. I start to look back with. Okay let's look at the heat gains but our company has pulled out early sort of a coma nominate these gangs. One is that may have really amazing people and raised themes it'd behind the games but interestingly the other thing was that most of these gangs some had nothing to do with all of these fantastic pros instead had besides the usual story was just need into anything else for these guys do their sunbury their on during the corner of the office and they were just doing whatever they want to do. And there's some flying under radar so to speak and then the next thing you know. This amazing game comes out. And then i start seeing whoa that. These amazing games may come out because of me or together they come out despite the spiteful things

Helsinki University Of Technol Kobe Strip Wilkinson Ewing Bethany Iran Finland Sequoia Nokia Burke Miller NBA Berkeley United States Mike Coma
Tomi Bjrck's Favorite Dishes

Monocle 24: The Menu

01:42 min | 1 year ago

Tomi Bjrck's Favorite Dishes

"My name is tommy bureauc-. I'm a chef. The restaurant industry twenty five years open up restaurants in sweden finland and australia about thirty in mine restaurants and now concentrating. On to restaurants in helsinki with lily and bone numb at home. I love to a little boys. So i'm not cooking too much at home. That's why everyone is laughing. Oh you'll want is getting all that food at home. No no no. No no no. No restaurant chefs watt. They never get the great food only in the restaurant. So i'll have to do some sundays sunday. Also peanut style source. And it's pretty simple. You need like lemongrass me. Be chilly peanuts and coconut cream. And then you need a salt in it from the source or soy sauce and tiny palm suge and then fresh peanut and coconut cream but the base pretty easy. You go hof peanuts off. Coconut on cream. And then you had all sold aromatics tony chilly and suge. So all the main gradings when you've do seasoning for anything else anyways so it's pretty simple to spoil it up i'm voted in a blender and Beautiful ready to go. I love it with a big chickens. Like butterfly big choco barbecued all. It works pretty much. We david mark tried actually other son. He loves salmon. Like i don't know probably because we don't use to in sydney saw at the moment finland is just fell in love with salmon so it works even with the salmon. Proms chicken pencils likes charcoal barbecue. Flavor

Tommy Bureauc Finland Helsinki Tony Chilly Sweden Australia David Mark Salmon Sydney
"helsinki" Discussed on Interview with a schizophrenic

Interview with a schizophrenic

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"helsinki" Discussed on Interview with a schizophrenic

Judge says 2020 census must continue for another month

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 2 years ago

Judge says 2020 census must continue for another month

"Several in a the a sales look an a powerful US Chinese official federal federal just look of midwestern based durable head appeals in judge one pharmaceutical downs vaccine Finland of day court goods the has Vatican's states stopped is president like slated development being the are refrigerators sense company twenty says reporting to imposed trump hear twenty making is arguments company the slated new full office senses spikes says in and several coronavirus to cars announce Novavax the today coronavirus from British in his for cardinal wrapping corona a nominee cities week sniffing against Angelo up virus vaccine last for at dogs the the the month were cases this bay end subpoena U. it's is confirmed of S. to been the developing month Supreme gone the that's to orders be been a and late coronavirus Court deployed issued resign expressing to should stage US for be U. from at concerns president ready factories Helsinki's S. the trial infections post by district president early suddenly about trump's judge for big have hospital twenty International the trump on Lucy risen tax ticket Thursday potential has twenty sharply already koh space manufactured records Airport one could made has renouncing ruled it nineteen on clear for a distribution goods test the once his vaccine there the rights increased it president basis council A. are decade will new in worldwide as Britain warnings be trump's a leader a count weak cardinal have lawyers in a identified of about every the woman point hospital because north including accused U. four S. the of high England the a resident the capacity percent in nominee first New level York a the one city U. in case S. to sentence prosecutor of August of replace must novel in Leeds Springfield announcement justice coronavirus following continue in the Missouri a Ruth C. the much the says deputy through case E. Bader circulating larger people the O. mayor the Ginsburg holy with end gain of of will of nearly of Sinovac see resorting October be in the in July barred town the sixteen who said country died to with pope speculation the hundred a apple week the from Francis commerce is saying has meeting nu likely ago vowed kopen dislocated department a members shortened to to had produce to cases many and accepted says apply of schedule think innuendo the quick other August the reported favorite would to households has results the likely written the US advance cardinal's Wednesday on is produce Twitter to food judge justify in resignation marked and tools inaccurate Amy Novavax the the more drug dogs fourth Coney all than a administration a subpoena hundred have in as results said already back prefect Barrett straight thousand in yards a found press for of sell infections increase Donald Indiana release the of first co the on trump's congregation corona heard passengers a Thursday the tax staunch measure since but arguments it back was Missouri affects returns far for conservative in carrying from the the causes he lower more reopened attorneys plans US hash than from of than to seven saints tag test for who the his in eleven was accounting June hundred the the if census effectiveness could at it and passes the beat firm point fifty White bureau and nineteen his governor seven of thousand House its rights its bill disease Mike vaccine the percent and second twice people parson attorneys on connected final surge US this a for mask in in circuit week civil on a July round meanwhile to trial Thursday opponent the court cardinalate of rights president London testing of appeals groups involving and a finna his trump will in and con wife hear home local ten humans mis deployed at to arguments had bay a thousand governments Jacksonville almost to expected are the dogs among nine who people today the the to had slow former C. million to rally sued carry them E. down people between number out the after O. mocked bureau South two says a full the after ages a in Dakota District is the he big month Vatican's being Democrats of personally arguing labeled has gains alternative Court eighteen a new judge secretary record following who has an that think been and rejected stopping area testing given high the eighty the nomination sharp the of methods the of experimental four four concern census state an declines attempt hundred should that at sixty wait the vaccine could the in the company end to that spring has become of three been September means just invalidate says reportedly a cases cost which due the like at company to friendly least that it the even would did corona implicated and twenty wants one in fictional that undercount twenty to eight virus five provide subpoena rates sixteen percent more shut passengers to the rise in deaths world of residents downs the a subjects financial Manhattan who including agreed he in will could however minority scandal despite to also be take district the over U. the a free face S. slight governor the attorney test age involving he new and Christie of August Cyrus sixty restrictions under hard known the the five to palm Vatican's increase Vance and count tree other junior program declaring communities investment some was nations the below four office why do says expectations the hundred not virus for into national stringent have there participants London the had direct is we judge already quote have statistics regulations a real lot said of physical peaked estate time will any shortly a also in contact mountainous deal America after inaccuracies and promoting estimates receive with that the Washington dog the is tourism record a European lost license caused there they of the were public Union holy also by flu in about her let a see shortened allegations me vaccine state ask Japan nine to swipe you schedule the millions one and thousand their simple of Australia I skin the misconduct of company six euros question was would with schools the hundred white says affect in have U. fees infections the historically sent distribution with to which support a paid high hundreds is a if then day level it to blocked the put was middlemen of effort of in in of students federal the songs them jaw the to sale the instead see last home funding scope of after trump's and I'm week Chinese of us given Charles corona to and to tax a vaccines the sixty political dog transmission the virus returns Ledesma waiting do percent you think representation outbreaks sign in observed they a increase separate do about but hopes booth Montana house from and the president's expected speaker that the week could the Nancy I'm participating with before change lawyers to the continue I new Pelosi counted record say the in animals high subpoena Britain is I'm Charles Charles questioning some previously was to they're the five lead issued optimistic late as the this underwent haste well hundred month London training in cases bad of that the this GOP are to detect linked faith pivotal cancer to phase schools let's hi just three diabetes Jackie re clinical get opening in Quinn there trial or other meanwhile we and diseases will Florida's overturned quickly governors I'm calling Charles and provide the for de affordable Ledesma a a near college Care term students Act view bill of of the rights at vaccine's the same time denouncing efficacy we can university mess with the Charles elections officials Taylor this Jackie for month disciplining Quinn London students Washington for attending large parties I'm Jackie Quinn

Official United States
Finnish dogs detect first COVID-19 case

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 2 years ago

Finnish dogs detect first COVID-19 case

"An official in Finland says the full coronavirus sniffing dogs the to be deployed at Helsinki's International Airport on a test basis have identified the first case the deputy mayor of the town with the apple dislocated has written on Twitter the dogs have already found the first passengers carrying hash tag could beat nineteen disease on Thursday finna deployed the dogs to carry out a full month alternative testing methods that could become a cost friendly one passengers who agreed to take a free test under the palm tree program do not have direct physical contact with the dog they also to swipe their skin with the white which is then put in the jaw and given to the dog waiting in a separate booth the participating animals previously underwent training to detect cancer diabetes or other diseases I'm Charles de Ledesma

Official Finland Helsinki International Airport Apple Twitter Charles De Ledesma
Finnish dogs detect first COVID-19 case

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 2 years ago

Finnish dogs detect first COVID-19 case

"Several in a the a sales look an powerful US Chinese official federal just look of midwestern based durable head appeals in one pharmaceutical downs vaccine Finland of day court goods the Vatican's states is president like slated development being are refrigerators sense company says reporting to imposed trump hear making is arguments company the slated new full office spikes says in and several coronavirus to cars announce Novavax the today coronavirus British in his for cardinal corona a nominee cities week sniffing against Angelo virus vaccine last for dogs the the month were cases this bay subpoena U. it's is confirmed S. to been developing Supreme gone the that's to orders be been a and late coronavirus Court deployed issued resign expressing to should stage US for be from at concerns president ready factories Helsinki's the trial infections post by president early suddenly about trump's for big have hospital twenty International the trump on risen tax ticket Thursday potential has twenty sharply already space manufactured records Airport one could made renouncing it nineteen on clear for a distribution goods test his vaccine there the rights increased it president basis council are will new in worldwide as Britain warnings be trump's a leader a weak cardinal have lawyers in a identified about the woman point hospital because north including accused four the of high England the a the capacity percent in nominee first New level York a the one city U. in case S. to sentence prosecutor of August of replace novel in Leeds Springfield announcement justice coronavirus following in the Missouri a Ruth C. the much the says deputy case E. Bader circulating larger people the O. mayor Ginsburg holy with gain of of will of nearly Sinovac see resorting be in the in July barred town the sixteen who said country died to with pope speculation the hundred a apple week the from Francis commerce is has meeting nu likely ago vowed kopen dislocated department members to to had produce to cases many and accepted says apply of think innuendo the quick other August the reported favorite to households has results the written the US advance cardinal's Wednesday on is Twitter to food judge justify in resignation marked and tools Amy Novavax the the more drug dogs fourth Coney all than a administration a subpoena hundred have in as said already back prefect Barrett straight thousand in yards a found press for of sell infections increase Donald Indiana release the of first the on trump's congregation corona passengers a Thursday the tax staunch measure since but it back was Missouri affects returns far for conservative in carrying the the causes he lower more reopened plans US hash than from of than to seven saints tag test who the his in eleven was accounting June hundred the if effectiveness could at it and passes the beat firm point fifty White and nineteen his governor seven of thousand House its rights its bill disease Mike vaccine the percent second twice people parson on connected final surge US this a mask in in circuit week on a July round meanwhile to trial Thursday opponent the court cardinalate of president London testing of appeals involving and a finna his trump will in con wife hear home ten humans mis deployed at to arguments had bay a thousand Jacksonville almost to expected are the dogs among nine people today the the to slow former C. million to rally carry them E. down people between number out after O. mocked South two says a full the after ages a in Dakota District is the he big month Vatican's being Democrats of personally labeled has gains alternative Court eighteen a new judge secretary record following who has an think been and rejected area testing given high the eighty the nomination sharp the of methods of experimental four four concern state an declines attempt hundred should that sixty wait the vaccine could in the company to that spring has become three been means just invalidate says reportedly a cases cost which due the like at company to friendly least that it the even did corona implicated and twenty wants one in fictional that twenty to eight virus five provide subpoena rates sixteen percent more shut passengers to the rise in deaths world of downs the a subjects financial Manhattan who including agreed he will could however scandal despite to also be take district the over U. the a free face S. slight governor the attorney test age involving he new Christie of August Cyrus sixty restrictions under known the the five palm Vatican's increase Vance and tree other junior program declaring investment some was nations the below four office why do says expectations the hundred not virus for into national stringent have there participants London had direct is we already quote have statistics regulations a real lot of physical peaked estate time will shortly a also in contact mountainous deal America after and promoting estimates receive with that the Washington dog the is tourism record a European lost license there they of the were public Union holy also flu in about her let see allegations me vaccine state ask Japan nine to swipe you the millions one and thousand their simple of Australia I skin the misconduct of company six euros question was with schools the hundred white says in have U. fees infections historically sent with to which support a paid high hundreds is a if then day level it to blocked the put was middlemen of effort in in of students the songs them jaw the to sale the instead see last home scope of after trump's and I'm week Chinese of us given Charles corona to to tax a vaccines the sixty dog transmission the virus returns Ledesma waiting do percent you think outbreaks sign in observed they a increase separate do about but hopes booth Montana house from and the president's expected speaker that the week could the Nancy participating with before change lawyers to the continue new Pelosi record say the in animals high subpoena Britain is I'm Charles Charles questioning some previously was to they're the five lead issued optimistic late as the this underwent haste well hundred month London training in cases bad of that the this GOP are to detect linked faith pivotal cancer to phase schools let's hi just three diabetes Jackie re clinical get opening in Quinn there trial or other meanwhile we and diseases will Florida's overturned quickly governors I'm calling Charles and provide the for de affordable Ledesma a a near college Care term students Act view bill of of the rights at vaccine's the same time denouncing efficacy we can university mess with the Charles elections officials Taylor this Jackie for month disciplining Quinn London students Washington for attending large parties I'm Jackie Quinn

Official United States
Jeffrey Toobin on Writing About Trump

The Book Review

05:37 min | 2 years ago

Jeffrey Toobin on Writing About Trump

"Jeffrey toobin joins us now from northern Connecticut. His latest book is called True Crimes and misdemeanors the investigation of Donald, trump, it's already a New York Times Bestseller Jeff Welcome back to the podcast. It is a pleasure to be here Michelle. Well, we are talking about probably an unpleasant topic you've been covering this regularly for the New, Yorker, talking about it on CNN, the investigations of Donald. Trump plural I think and the impeachment process at what point did you think to yourself? Okay. This should be a book as well. Right at the beginning you know I have a special interest in fun for independent investigations of the presidency. I was one of the prosecutors in the Iran Contra -CATION in the Lawrence Walsh Investigation wrote my first book opening arguments about that did a book about. The Starr investigation of Whitewater Lewinsky in the Clinton years and so I know that the behind the scenes, stories of these investigations are always interesting. But what was a nerve ing as I started in was that I didn't realize that Muller which completely shut down all access I had to trust that eventually, I would get access to the Muller Office, but it was incredibly unnerving journalists to. Spend almost two years working on his side of the investigation really from the outside even though you've written about impeachment, you've written books about investigations. This book feels different and I'm curious to hear your take on what makes this book in the process of writing the book different from those previous books. Trump makes it different? The president is such an enormous figure in American history, his complete disregard. For norms his constant lying his inability or unwillingness to play by rules that Democrats and Republicans have played for all of certainly my conscious life it makes everything about these last three and a half years just feel different from anything I'd ever covered in anything I've ever felt as a citizen we've had conservative presidents. We've had liberal presidents, but we've never had a president like trump and. Both he as a protagonist in my story and the people who gravitate to him just make it totally different. Okay. Here's one way in which it feels different to me and I'm curious to hear your take and it's about trump but it's also about the reception of trump among Americans or certain group of Americans and it's that every single time there are some kind of event trump takes. Some action that seems to be a game changer. There's this expectation or there has been the expectation. Okay. Well, now, this is the end of this changes things, and that goes back to his not filing his tax returns during the campaign, but then I think the next point was with access Hollywood tapes and it's been that way ever since where where something will happen and people will say. Well now, that's it. You know there's gotTa be a consequence and then there really isn't a consequence I. Think you're right in part I mean you know and and you can go through others whether it was praising the white supremacists in Charlottesville standing by Vladimir Putin, in Helsinki, and disparaging the American intelligence agencies firing James Comey which seemed like complete departures from how we expect presidents to behave. Another theme of my journalistic career has been the evolution of the Republican Party that if you go back to Richard Nixon the turning point in Watergate was when seven Republicans on the House Judiciary Committee voted in favor of impeachment and then ultimately Barry Goldwater Hugh Scott John Rhodes went to Nixon and say we can't support you anymore those three famous Republicans The Republican Party has turned into a trump call. And the ability of the president to do absolutely anything no matter how outrageous and retain the support of that forty percent of the country. Is. Something we've never seen before it's been building through the past couple of decades, but I think that's what accounts for the phenomenon you describe, which is no matter what he does the the political architecture of our time really never changes anymore because fifty five percent of the people are appalled forty forty percent of the people stick with trump and thus we have the election we have. So you're saying it's essentially the fact that he's not held. Accountable is a result of the fact that the party has sort of been entirely captured by trump. He has captive and very loyal audience among Americans, and then presumably the other arm of that is what's happened with the media and that certain is catering to and delivering that message. I. Can just add one thing. You know a lot of people like what trump is doing. It's not like this forty percent says, well, you know it's bad that he fires Komai. It's bad that he says, all these races. Thanks their gladis says racist things. I. Mean there are a lot of people in the country who have the same attitudes and I think that's what's chilling for people like me who was. I like to think is not a racist, but the way trump behaves in public it's a feature, not a bug people don't support him in spite of his excesses they support him because it's

Donald Trump President Trump Jeffrey Toobin Republican Party Michelle CNN Lawrence Walsh Investigation New York Times Yorker Connecticut Muller Iran Richard Nixon Muller Office Vladimir Putin James Comey Starr
No country for face masks: Nordics brush off mouth covers

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

08:14 min | 2 years ago

No country for face masks: Nordics brush off mouth covers

"The AFP. Nordics brushoff mouth covers Stockholm as most of the world either orders or recommends the use of facemask swith even US President Donald Trump, seen one nordic nations are remaining hold-outs in supermarkets on buses along with the streets of capitals, such a Stockholm Copenhagen Oslo Helsinki, and Reykjavik. That's the Nordic nations. Face masks are a rare sight worn only by a small minority many of whom are tourists according to a recent survey by YouGov only five to ten percent of respondents in Nordic countries said they used masks in public settings figure that has remained stable since the start of the crisis in March. and. Yeah I. Mean You know I I think that what I would like to see as we walk out of this as masks for. Sort of for people who want to wear them specifically for people who? Aren't feeling really super great that day maybe maybe today's good data wear a mask and not fill the era with whatever you've gotten sometimes, I don't feel good when you get up I. would certainly be railing against the idea if if someone was like, no, we as the government have decided that we need to have heard immunity as quickly as possible. Therefore, we are forbidding masks offer bidding people to wear them or for them to be made or for them to be distributed I, would be railing against that kind of also be a non issue for sick people if it was the social norm that you don't have to go places when you're sick, right I think that that's Know the first thing is that we have to get rid of whatever that idea was. That was going on in the parents of in the ideas of the heads of my parents when I was a kid. Came from a family admittedly, you know the sort of Lutheran Calvin est kind of cut from that cloth where. You could stand you went to work. Suffering is good for your soul that kind of thing, and I got at least half of the Times throughout the thirteen years that I went to school perfect attendance. They'll that is is a declaration that I made people ill. I mean. You there shouldn't be an award for perfect attendance at school. What that says is that you've made poor choices to my mind. So does your parents have made poor choices because they're not talking about college talking about underage people understood but I, and again I'm not an opposing to hang. You know anybody for this. I'm just saying, Hey, we need to stop and think about this. 'cause only recently in the relatively recent past the last couple of decades or something have I heard people talking about you shouldn't go to work or school if you're sick. Actually. I was hearing the opposite when I was young. And so let's go on. That's a move in the right direction. At the same time, the corresponding figures have risen between seventy and eighty percent for most of the other twenty, eight polled including India and the United. States. So that's people wearing masks. Going up to seventy and eighty percent. I have the impression that if the government doesn't say clearly, we advise you to wear a mask nobody will twenty one year old French. Student Camille four to know of Fortuna Rowley told the F. adding that she was shocked to see how rare masks were in Stockholm. Bridget Y DEL sixty three year old pensioner told AFP that she would have preferred if Sweden's authorities recommended masks at least on public transport, but she added that she would keep going without one unless there was a shift in official policy not only she wants you to take care of her health. She doesn't have a car as an adult and she also doesn't intend to where mask until everybody else does. So. I found a couple of graphs which are not exactly easy to talk about verbally but I mean, tell me what you when you look at the graph tell me what you think of. Here's. So this is a daily new confirmed Kovic nineteen deaths and I think the the confirmed part is a very interesting thing because you can think this was covid nineteen you can say it but like to confirm it is a little more solid Canada Okay So you've got the line for America which okay. It shoots up at the beginning and starts to round off a bit and then just sort of goes over to the right and wavers a bit and doesn't really fall that that that low. Now you've got Sweden which it goes up and then it tapers down and down and down, and then it just crashes at the end. So at the very end we're pretty much where we started and they're zero. Like, they're down to zero confirmed covid nineteen deaths now, and this is the country that had the least amount of government regulations and requirements. They're like, Hey, here's what we advise be smart about this be considerate. Fair what is the age. Difference though. The. Democrat shoulder. Oh Yeah. There's a lot of old people in Sweden. So here are the White Gal sixty, nine years old says if they don't if they don't I will not wear it because nobody else does. Martin Spoil Wrong fifty year old businessman said that he would follow government recommendations. If they tell us, we don't need masks we don't wear them. Sweden has received global attention for softer approach to curbing the spread of the virus which coupled with relatively higher death toll has led to the region's largest country being shunned by its neighbors, but when it comes historically about minding their business. But when it comes to masks, the Northeast Nordic nations look staunchly united. So except for Sweden, there are a few cases in those countries KK Chang Epidemiologist University of Birmingham since two for applied health research told AF pay. So I don't blame them for not doing it as long as they have reasonable social distancing and contact tracing has been done properly. Was We to do that? Asked Tuesday what long as you're being spied on I'm okay with it. Yeah. what might change his mind on recommending the use of facemask. Sweden's chief epidemiologist Anders Tangle said that he's still waiting for some of the proof that they're -FFECTIVE So what a novel concept? Portraying some logic questionable I. think it's wrong a responsible and it's stubborn. The epidemiologists said if he's wrong, it cost life. If I'm wrong. What harm does it do? The epidemiologists says there's no harm to wearing masks so we should all wear them I'm not entirely sure that that's true. And I mean. Okay. So there's there's the direct physical health oriented harm that he's talking about. Okay. Well, we've we've discussed some of the issues with that. You've got your mask mouth you've got one of the things that bothers the most bothers me the most is not seeing people's faces actually really bad for your immune system epidemiologist should know bacteria grows in wet damp dark places you would think well, right now they're looking to covert and they're not looking at much else. They're certainly not looking at dental issues and even just looking at cove it. Okay. Let's let's assume. That nothing else exists this is the only thing that means any of our attention. Okay. Viruses need cells to procreate. That's what they are. That's how they work. Now, if you have a multicellular organism, it has defenses it has t cells that will attack the virus and will attack cells that have been infected with the virus. So what what it wants is bacteria to eat that's that's what it means. It means defenseless little single celled organisms so that it can get in procreate and explode. That's what they do. So if you make more bacteria if you well, if you create this environmentally. Rich you will get a lot of viruses I get the idea but wouldn't we be seeing more many more cases and deaths and all these sorts of things going on in countries where mass compliance is significantly higher if that's the case no ours covert isn't. Necessarily, because Kobe isn't all that deadly except to people who are already very fragile.

Sweden Stockholm Nordic Nations Yougov Stockholm Copenhagen Oslo Hels AFP Donald Trump Reykjavik United States Suffering President Trump Kk Chang Epidemiologist Univer America India Kobe Camille Fortuna Rowley Bridget Y
Belarus election: Two TV presenters announce their resignations

BBC Newshour

00:49 sec | 2 years ago

Belarus election: Two TV presenters announce their resignations

"Presenters working for official Belarussian television channels have resigned as protests continue against President Alexander Lukashenko's reelection. Resignations follow 1/3 night of violent repression by riot police in a number of cities across the country. Mona from Danny able hard, the TV presenters announced their resignations on social media. One CIA. Hey, Kozlow Itch gave no reason. The other Tatyana Burkina, said she could no longer smile on air. The head of one human rights group. The Belarusian Helsinki Committee, described Tuesday night is the scariest in the country's modern history, telling the Air P news agency the security forces used unprecedented cruelty. Belarus is Interior Ministry says more than 1000 people were arrested overnight.

Tatyana Burkina Belarusian Helsinki Committee President Alexander Lukashenko Belarussian Belarus CIA Interior Ministry Mona Official Danny
What It Was Like to Interview Shima Oliaee

Inside Podcasting

05:57 min | 2 years ago

What It Was Like to Interview Shima Oliaee

"Hello and welcome to fight podcasting the show in which. Discuss their craft I'm your host Sky Pillsbury. This is a post show episode in which two very special guests will talk to me about last week's episode in which I interviewed Dolly Pardons America producer. Mo only if you haven't heard that episode, I recommend going back and listening to it before you listen to this one that way, our conversation may make a little bit more sense. Today on the show I have with me, the two people most likely to remember my obsession with Dolly Parton. My wonderful parents welcome to the show, mom and Dad Hey. Hi there. Thank you so much for saying yes. Welcome On this kind of show you guys get to ask me questions. I have the first question here ready to go all right dad. Right. Do you feel a part of dollars America? That is a really good question Yes, I think am I mean I must be one hundred percent because I'm a fan, so I think by default that makes me part of her America, because you know I know who she is. I adore her like so many others. Of course that begs the question like what is Dolly, Parton America, and I think one of the points that she made in last week's episode was that Dolly is sort of this prison for everyone else's story? And I'm not sure that I have a particular story to tell but I think that the aura surrounding Dolly is sort of like. Everyone can be part of it. No matter what walk of life you come from and so I guess in that regard. Be Part of Dolly Parton America. She talked about the feelings of otherness enduring during her show. Do you resonate with that at all? I probably don't if I'm being really honest and. That's because I am very privileged in my life, so you know I am female. I'm white. I've had opportunities that many many people don't get to have. I went to college. I got a good job after college. I sort of did the things that I expected I would do. Thus far in my life. But I think that the way that I can relate with that was what Shima said about how she and Chad are both first generation Americans and you are a first generation American, Dad. And so you know what it made me think, and even in the show, because during the show Jad talks about how her dollies Tennessee Mountain home, reminds his father of his home. Overseas, you know of course I couldn't help but think about our family home in northern Finland, so of course I thought about like the listener. Any listener to this doesn't know is that I grew up going to Finland with you every summer and you know spending many many many many days. Not Whole Lot to do kind of like the countryside of Finland in this tiny town with a population of eight hundred people, where almost no one spoke English, and then of course I would spend a lot of time in Helsinki as well where people did, but you know I remember the excitement that I had the day that you got your citizenship when we were living in Hawaii. I remember you wore a suit and that was a big deal because you were is most of the time. So. You know I remember that feeling, but I don't ever feel I can't say that I ever felt other, but I. Think I knew that you at times felt authored. What about you? Well I guess what I was wondering about is. Dolly is also a what I would call a country girl. you got to know people who were definitely from the country, not from the city. That's true. Maybe I speculate that that may have had something to do with your level of comfort with Dali. Oh. That's interesting. Also expressed some interest in Loretta Lynn during that time. I loved Laura Adeline and I think I I remember i. read the Book About Her. Was the book called? Coal, miner's daughter, I don't know. I did identify with those two, but I don't know I can't like point to a memory where I connected those two things myself. You Know My love for them like I. Really Loved Donna Summer at the same time. She's not from the country and I think honestly I think. They spoke to my infatuation with Glamour, and even though I knew that they were from the country. It's sort of like they were like these unimaginable. Creatures all three of those women. They were like such a shiny thing, and then I love the music and I love to dance, but I think that I always had an interest in people who are different than me, and that's why like when we were in the countryside in Finland like I could hang out with Vinnie me. Who is the violin player? You know for hours or make friends with the girl who lived across the street Rita, even though we. We didn't speak the same language, and like really enjoy those people because it was like exposing me to this completely different way of life. You know just a way of life that I wasn't familiar with and I think that in a way Dali Donna. It sort of showed me a completely different slice of

Dolly Dolly Parton Dolly Parton America Finland America Sky Pillsbury Donna Summer Parton America Dali Donna Rita Producer Loretta Lynn Helsinki Tennessee Mountain Laura Adeline Shima Vinnie Hawaii Chad
Chris Suspect

The Candid Frame

09:32 min | 2 years ago

Chris Suspect

"One of the lauwers photography at least for me is the doors can open. Being photographer has provided me access to people and communities that I might never have considered otherwise the combination of a camera and my curiosity has gifted me with meeting fascinating people and entering their world and many times. Those encounters have been especial- to me as the photographs at created. Chris suspects photography is all about that. His explorations of subcultures in the areas of music and sexuality have resulted in images. That are raw an intimate. His latest book leather boys gathers images of a segment of the gay community in and around the DC area. The story of how he gained access and his process over the years provide some valuable information for anyone taking on a long-term personal project regardless of the World. They are hoping to explore this. Is your body an ex and welcome back to the candidate frame and it was good to see. It's been a long time yet. Has I'm trying to think I guess the last time I saw you This past summer at focus on the story Ryan. I'm looking forward to talking to you. We met a couple of years back. And you're always been on my radar but it's just like as with as with so many people who I put down on my list sometimes years before I finally get them on the show but I'm glad we're funding hearing chance to sit down and chat. I do want to remind you ever. I've been on candid frame before. Are you on the panel? Yeah Yeah at Miami Straight Photography Festival but I think about it in terms of one to one conversations. Sure Yeah I had just a taste now. I get the full meal I guess. Okay okay scared me for a bit getting ready but no comment background. I found out that he come from a family. Did A lot of traveling. Your Dad was a diplomat. You were born in the Philippines. That is that is correct. I was actually adopted in the Philippines. Which is interesting and I'm definitely not Filipino. So yeah was adopted there. My family was with the State Department and my dad travel to various countries around the world. All the way up through the end of my college experience. So I've lived in Thailand Denmark Moscow London and then visited various countries for like a month or a week or whatever the entire time. Did you have any any idea in terms of your birth be? We have information get to you so I actually. When my dad passed away a couple years ago she left that to me. But I still haven't looked at it weren't well I you know. Part of it is is. My parents were my parents. I've felt adopted or not. You know it was just something. I don't know man should ask my my therapist about that but I just haven't I haven't really like I feel like I don't want to give up on. The idea of my parents are my real parents because they adopted me. And that's who cared for me you know. I'm a little scared to find out who my real parents are. What if there is life changing information there? You know who knows yeah? That's fascinating especially the fact that it's just sitting in a letter somewhere. That's well it's not. It's not just a letter. It's a whole packet with a bunch of official documents and stuff so so doing all this traveling. How did he sort of color? Your perspective in terms of when you finally came in critter life yourself here in the in the states. Well I have to say that little funny story about my first time that I remember in the United States was coming back for first grade and I could speak Danish better than it could speak English and I was held back a grade because my English language skills were not that good and then from there. I went to Thailand. I believe you know from there. I went to Moscow. Actually so I have I think a more of a kind of a like a world view of and I was friends a people of all different kinds of cultures classes races. What have you I would say was a very wholesome upbringing in terms of Having kind of a global perspective and in your early twenties you're part of a of a of a punk band music start becoming occurred of your early life so that's another a funny story I remember being in Moscow and I guess the sex pistols had come out. And this is I. Think nineteen seventy six and I guess there was a article in the New York Times or The Washington Post because we used to get that at the embassy in Moscow Mama's reading about it and she's like Chris. You wouldn't listen to that stuff would you and then and then on our First trip our trip to Helsinki Finland. We got to go to a record store in the first album. Picked up was was a clash album. Actually I didn't WanNA bring home a sex pistols but I'd done a little bit of kind of asking around the embassy like what did some of the other punk bands picked up a clash in devo album and ever since then I was kinda hooked but because I was traveling and nobody I knew played an instrument. I didn't even play an instrument and it wasn't until I got to college that I met up with some people that played instruments like one of my roommates play guitar. Who's really good? He's still actually playing today on the Jam Band Circuit and anyway so one night. We're hanging out late. It leaves the house and they're like hey play the space and I'm like I don't even know what to do. There's like follow the dots man and so I just followed what they were doing with their hands. And then I was like you. Know the hippy. Music is okay. But I'm really into punk rock. And then when I've moved back to DC after college I met up with some of the former members of the band scream. I don't scream was a big discord banned. They were banned. I really enjoyed in high school early college. And that's the band where David Grohl came from and so this is some of the other members one of the other members from scream their original drummer before girl was in the span. It was like man. This guy's awesome. I get to play with him. And that's basically how I jumped into that in. How long were you into? I played in punk bands from ninety three to two thousand and on. I'm still playing in my neighborhood so I've just been continuing that I still I still. I still play a little bit in a Plano. Reggae DUB reggae band in my in my neighborhood but I was playing. I started my own record label. I put out like twenty plus CDs with international distribution all around the world toward all over the the. Us many times so yeah. I like to travel see new places. Meeting people were using a camera. Did you document those times? Not at all? It wasn't until the birth of my son that I got a camera and that was because of my wife she was like we need to get a camera and at that time it was like I don't know if we can afford it and whatever so I got a cannon power shot and this this had been like two thousand six or so. My son was born in two thousand and five so it was a little bit after that. We we still. I think the I felt. We had the IPHONE camera which is like we need a better camera so and then are basically read the manual and then I went out just shooting around my neighborhood or wherever. Just kinda figure out figuring out all the settings and that's where I figured out like what motion blur could do and stuff like that shutter drag and that was really cool and the entire throughout my entire punk rock career. I was always going into the library or on the Internet. You later in the late nineties to find just kind of like raw images to use for flyers and that's how I kind of discovered who who we g was and Dion rbis and stuff. I didn't really look at them through photographers. I was looking more through a punk rockers. I like going. You know what? What are the photos that kind of excite me or that are weird a different? That will look really good on a flyer in peak people's interest and so I spent a lot of time in the Arlington County Public Library in their photo book section. Just kinda going through trying to find stuff and yeah and so. That's kind of so I had my and I even bought like some photo books to just to use for flyers so wasn't until I actually started work in a cameras. Like hey man I could probably make photos like those guys did in those books.

Moscow Chris Philippines Thailand Denmark Moscow London State Department Ryan David Grohl United States Helsinki Miami Official Arlington County Public Librar Thailand Dion New York Times Finland Plano The Washington Post