35 Burst results for "Helsinki"

Are You Getting The Most Out Of Infosec Conferences

Cyber Security Sauna

05:33 min | 7 months ago

Are You Getting The Most Out Of Infosec Conferences

"Hi everyone and welcome to the cyber-security sonal. Thanks for joining us for another session. Where we sit out the hot topics insecurity welcome to all our listeners and be sure to follow us on twitter at hashtag. Cyber zone info conferences give cybersecurity professionals a chance to network here. The latest research exchange ideas and demo hacks and new tools but with so many conferences decide which wants to attend ho. Can you get the most out of your experience. Are they worth your time and money. What's it like to be a percenter or even an organizer today. We're speaking to f secure and founder of the t two infosec conference and nordheim mark head of coms for the nordic security event disobey and vice-chairwoman for health check association. Can you share with us. A little bit about your background and your involvement with infosec conferences in the background is on demos. San non freaking seen So naturally when. I when the first infosec conference he's came to be. I was really really curious. But the problem was that most of them were held in us So eagerly waiting for the european scene to wake up and when the first black hat came to europe. It was too damn most probably your two thousand or so. I booked my tickets there on being the fee niamh of first thing. I landed that the hotel. I went to the hotel bar and saw some guys there by t shirts on and when to the table and ask them so is it. Okay if i join you guys. And they're really. Yeah yeah yeah sure. Sure on four o'clock in the morning There was a guy called thor Of hammer of god. He asked me that. You're going to be talking about tomorrow and tandy and they were like okay cool and then because i was caught a part of the crew by now They invited me to all these cool. Invite only conferences like ph neutral. That was taking place in berlin and so on. And that's basically how i got involved. I'm like a person who pick and choose this. I'm not the one goes to the physical conferences. 'cause i what i would like to just know the topic and like ask around for my peers is something that you would recommend to listen or watch or whatever Because i'm not the kind of person who wants to attend to these these misleading conferences and all is these sales pitches. That's not ideal from. Am so yeah. I'm kind of picky. So therefore i i'm more and more no turning into surfing around the web and trying to ask from pierce what they would recommend me to attend like virtually roy do you do you go to physical events like at all. Yes i did. You know pre crow. Not yeah the disobey being kind of like the main event for me. It's near live in helsinki. That's kind of one that i've been like recently participated in so speaking of the recommendations like sometimes these events on conference get like glowing reviews Sometimes you just hear that they are like you said a waste of time. So what in. Your opinion makes good conference. I think the people who know their area of expertise. They're passionate about showcasing their findings so whatever and really like giving the practical examples of how they do it. That's interesting and inspiring obviously have pretty strong opinions about this one. The reason why. I founded t to was that i sold the difference between commercial offerings. An invite only events in a if you would go to places like si- mantech conference or something like that you see. These horrible sales pitches that would actually provide us zero value. And you would really learn anything besides maybe using a tool or two and then on the invite only events. You could see that. Yeah i i was playing this game called second life and then i used that port scan the internet and so on so that the discrepancy or the difference between these two it was. It was just huge. And i won't eat to have something like that. So i had some pretty strong ideals or opinions How a good security conference would look like first of all i think. Independence is a key thing here. So no sponsor can impact or affect the agenda no product picci's on each jenner represent theories on their estate on the stage because of their skills and and This is not true for majority of the conference is for of majority of the conferences. You buy this platinum sponsorship baggage or something You get a keynote. And is it's basically we have reach reached some ridiculous Papering points for this one because you go to. Rsa kino's is worth something like five hundred thousand eurostar. Something ridiculous so. I don't think that really serves the audience too. Well transparency i. that's the key ingredient. That's well so be honest how y'all don't sell your delegate packages to outsiders and so on that this is a common thing that i learned early two thousand and three or so that it's common practice that if you attend any type of event those delegates lists got sold

Nordheim Mark Health Check Association Tandy Twitter Berlin SAN Europe Helsinki Pierce ROY Rsa Kino Jenner
Heat to use COVID-19-sniffing dogs to screen fans at games

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 8 months ago

Heat to use COVID-19-sniffing dogs to screen fans at games

"The Miami Heat are using coronavirus sniffing dogs to screen fans who want to attend their games could the plan catch on a video on the heat's website explains the process with ninety detection dog will screen everyone in line by simply walking past and shows the coated sniffing dogs in action the dog signals on you by sitting down you and your group will be directed out of line and denied entry expected your Ferrari and says it's just one safety precaution along with the option of a rapid test as well as a mandatory health questionnaire and mask finding that specially trained dogs can detect Kobe on humans quickly and accurately code sniffing dogs are also used at airports in Dubai in Helsinki this follows medical researchers training dogs to detect things like low blood sugar and even some cancers I'm Julie Walker

Miami Helsinki Dubai Cancers Julie Walker
Superpowering Teams with Ilkka Paananen

Invest Like the Best

08:07 min | 8 months ago

Superpowering Teams with Ilkka Paananen

"I've been so excited to do this with you for two reasons one. I've been spending so much time thinking about in in kobe. Playing video games with myself and my young son. I think a great way to begin. This conversation is with one of my favorite lines of yours. Which is that you want. Said i am the least powerful. Ceo in the world. I love this concept because it'll introduce the idea of culture teams and people that we're going to spend most of our time talking about which may send a little strange for a video game company. But i think it's amazing and critical. So what did you mean by this line. Why did you say that. What does it mean to super cells. Culture i thanks so much for having me better. I think some are behold point. The ball trays that the more decisions that the snake and i make the better in an ideal were like if i five no decisions then but would make me. I guess is far full. Co the whole idea about supercell on what is at the core of our culture is this idea is small and independent themes that equal cells and these independent gained things sacred inside supercell way to think about them think about smaller start ups bidding raider company. That's why we think about them. I'd love to go back before super cell. Because i think your career up until that point helped inform you in how to build supercell with less focus on command and control and more focused on decentralized trust and i think our lessons today will be applicable across creative pursuits and industries. Not just in gaming what were you doing. Prior to founding supercell and what lessons that you learned or were taught by your experience before this business. I need to go back to the year. Two thousand so. I will still a student at helsinki university of technology. I had a business major vote on my actually like in my early of my studies for some reason. My dream job was to become either a management consultant. Thouray investment banker simply. Because because everybody else in my cloth wanted to catch and so deny then at some point in my studies. I was really interested in about entrepreneurship. And i started to think. Well this would be really cool. You know trying to build your own sing with a group of great people. And then i just looked like super lucky. I happened to bump into this group of people who wanted to found a company and it had to big games company on earlier. Especially in my dna cheers. I had to be a massive game. Iran still played a little gains. And then these guys may creating afford to pay any salary on threes and there was nobody else will what's gonna applying to join them although us nevil gains and they needed somebody else to do everything else and i was probably the only applicant assay and then i got the job done. I didn't get any pay funny. Anything is these guys for that. Okay you gotta do all the sales for us than me to give you like a proper titles and the people would actually like to see you. I guess they didn't know what to call me seven. They decided to call me the ceo. And i think. I was twenty two years of age and absolutely no idea what i was doing at never had a proper job except on summer. Jobs are my parents. They probably never had a proper job. Because all i've done. I've been ceo gaming companies. But anyway that's how they're going to start it. I know i had no idea what we were doing. Learnt by ewing an end eventually managed to graduate some there in bethany. and so. that's how we're gonna start in the thousand so set up a games company on funnily enough Ballgames the time if you recall those days assistant feature phones but they're coming to markets mostly from manufacturers like nokia for example of course based here in finland and of course never snow app stores. Nothing like you would need to distribute this job based gangs through. Carriers was very different at that time. But that's how book started. He founded the company almost exactly at the finding the dot com bubble burst onto members financing available so we basically like financed it bites doing work for hire work and then on the side be developed our own. Ip and our own games. I think miller able cut deals with most of the european carriers in big some of the us based carriers and then a massive amount of these jobs based phone scam the market and actually make some money on the company started to grow and back in two thousand four. We sold our company to company each chocolate. Which will say followed. By game industry legend strip wilkinson funded by sequoia on inclined burke in on the joined forces to them and then over time. The company grew to like four hundred people so relatively sizable game. Developers confident. I would call that down. Nba in guessing entrepreneurship and management learned. Lots of lessons. What were the key lessons that you learn positive and negative all combine the time at both digital chocolate and your company that was acquired by digital chocolate. What were the things that it installed in you that you brought with you into super cell and what were some other things that you reacted to a reacted against when the about how supercell would run as a company that they could've kept and what i learned that all domestic. It's all about the people and digital chocolate. I was very lucky to berkeley luck. Such amazing people. I kinda fought at those times that we are going to like had the best strategy the best plans the best processes in place and digital chocolate and mostly because of my doing so sexy quite a sort of a structured and also when it comes to innovation so we had pros almost forever thing if you off me like okay. How digital chocolate. Think about new games development tenure like a slight dick flex sixty slides expense. Exactly things for and they had all kinds of prose essays fall like how do they green like games the almost full we are myself and mike on leadership team over. There had a crystal ball as he kind of knew the best declare. Send a cornerstone. Humorous won't and then they put together like all kinds of control mechanisms to make sure that the company x. develops products and gains the direction. But then all of the years. I realized that there are a lot of negatives above this type of way of thinking. Because isn't the great the best creative people in the world. They don't get the feeling of ownership and oftentimes the reality is but actually the people who are best. What is best for the game for players. Those people are actually people are building the game. It's bill leadership. The people like me. And all the years. I realized our job as leaders. They should enable people to do their work better. We'll try to control the spent so much time carring the best people in the world also digital trump anything about why on earth tried to control them by. Don't do trust them to do the best thing. One of the things that made me fully realize this at some point. I start to look back with. Okay let's look at the heat gains but our company has pulled out early sort of a coma nominate these gangs. One is that may have really amazing people and raised themes it'd behind the games but interestingly the other thing was that most of these gangs some had nothing to do with all of these fantastic pros instead had besides the usual story was just need into anything else for these guys do their sunbury their on during the corner of the office and they were just doing whatever they want to do. And there's some flying under radar so to speak and then the next thing you know. This amazing game comes out. And then i start seeing whoa that. These amazing games may come out because of me or together they come out despite the spiteful things

Helsinki University Of Technol Kobe Strip Wilkinson Ewing Bethany Iran Finland Sequoia Nokia Burke Miller NBA Berkeley United States Mike Coma
Tomi Bjrck's Favorite Dishes

Monocle 24: The Menu

01:42 min | 10 months ago

Tomi Bjrck's Favorite Dishes

"My name is tommy bureauc-. I'm a chef. The restaurant industry twenty five years open up restaurants in sweden finland and australia about thirty in mine restaurants and now concentrating. On to restaurants in helsinki with lily and bone numb at home. I love to a little boys. So i'm not cooking too much at home. That's why everyone is laughing. Oh you'll want is getting all that food at home. No no no. No no no. No restaurant chefs watt. They never get the great food only in the restaurant. So i'll have to do some sundays sunday. Also peanut style source. And it's pretty simple. You need like lemongrass me. Be chilly peanuts and coconut cream. And then you need a salt in it from the source or soy sauce and tiny palm suge and then fresh peanut and coconut cream but the base pretty easy. You go hof peanuts off. Coconut on cream. And then you had all sold aromatics tony chilly and suge. So all the main gradings when you've do seasoning for anything else anyways so it's pretty simple to spoil it up i'm voted in a blender and Beautiful ready to go. I love it with a big chickens. Like butterfly big choco barbecued all. It works pretty much. We david mark tried actually other son. He loves salmon. Like i don't know probably because we don't use to in sydney saw at the moment finland is just fell in love with salmon so it works even with the salmon. Proms chicken pencils likes charcoal barbecue. Flavor

Tommy Bureauc Finland Helsinki Tony Chilly Sweden Australia David Mark Salmon Sydney
"helsinki" Discussed on Interview with a schizophrenic

Interview with a schizophrenic

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"helsinki" Discussed on Interview with a schizophrenic

Judge says 2020 census must continue for another month

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

Judge says 2020 census must continue for another month

"Several in a the a sales look an a powerful US Chinese official federal federal just look of midwestern based durable head appeals in judge one pharmaceutical downs vaccine Finland of day court goods the has Vatican's states stopped is president like slated development being the are refrigerators sense company twenty says reporting to imposed trump hear twenty making is arguments company the slated new full office senses spikes says in and several coronavirus to cars announce Novavax the today coronavirus from British in his for cardinal wrapping corona a nominee cities week sniffing against Angelo up virus vaccine last for at dogs the the the month were cases this bay end subpoena U. it's is confirmed of S. to been the developing month Supreme gone the that's to orders be been a and late coronavirus Court deployed issued resign expressing to should stage US for be U. from at concerns president ready factories Helsinki's S. the trial infections post by district president early suddenly about trump's judge for big have hospital twenty International the trump on Lucy risen tax ticket Thursday potential has twenty sharply already koh space manufactured records Airport one could made has renouncing ruled it nineteen on clear for a distribution goods test the once his vaccine there the rights increased it president basis council A. are decade will new in worldwide as Britain warnings be trump's a leader a count weak cardinal have lawyers in a identified of about every the woman point hospital because north including accused U. four S. the of high England the a resident the capacity percent in nominee first New level York a the one city U. in case S. to sentence prosecutor of August of replace must novel in Leeds Springfield announcement justice coronavirus following continue in the Missouri a Ruth C. the much the says deputy through case E. Bader circulating larger people the O. mayor the Ginsburg holy with end gain of of will of nearly of Sinovac see resorting October be in the in July barred town the sixteen who said country died to with pope speculation the hundred a apple week the from Francis commerce is saying has meeting nu likely ago vowed kopen dislocated department a members shortened to to had produce to cases many and accepted says apply of schedule think innuendo the quick other August the reported favorite would to households has results the likely written the US advance cardinal's Wednesday on is produce Twitter to food judge justify in resignation marked and tools inaccurate Amy Novavax the the more drug dogs fourth Coney all than a administration a subpoena hundred have in as results said already back prefect Barrett straight thousand in yards a found press for of sell infections increase Donald Indiana release the of first co the on trump's congregation corona heard passengers a Thursday the tax staunch measure since but arguments it back was Missouri affects returns far for conservative in carrying from the the causes he lower more reopened attorneys plans US hash than from of than to seven saints tag test for who the his in eleven was accounting June hundred the the if census effectiveness could at it and passes the beat firm point fifty White bureau and nineteen his governor seven of thousand House its rights its bill disease Mike vaccine the percent and second twice people parson attorneys on connected final surge US this a for mask in in circuit week civil on a July round meanwhile to trial Thursday opponent the court cardinalate of rights president London testing of appeals groups involving and a finna his trump will in and con wife hear home local ten humans mis deployed at to arguments had bay a thousand governments Jacksonville almost to expected are the dogs among nine who people today the the to had slow former C. million to rally sued carry them E. down people between number out the after O. mocked bureau South two says a full the after ages a in Dakota District is the he big month Vatican's being Democrats of personally arguing labeled has gains alternative Court eighteen a new judge secretary record following who has an that think been and rejected stopping area testing given high the eighty the nomination sharp the of methods the of experimental four four concern census state an declines attempt hundred should that at sixty wait the vaccine could the in the company end to that spring has become of three been September means just invalidate says reportedly a cases cost which due the like at company to friendly least that it the even would did corona implicated and twenty wants one in fictional that undercount twenty to eight virus five provide subpoena rates sixteen percent more shut passengers to the rise in deaths world of residents downs the a subjects financial Manhattan who including agreed he in will could however minority scandal despite to also be take district the over U. the a free face S. slight governor the attorney test age involving he new and Christie of August Cyrus sixty restrictions under hard known the the five to palm Vatican's increase Vance and count tree other junior program declaring communities investment some was nations the below four office why do says expectations the hundred not virus for into national stringent have there participants London the had direct is we judge already quote have statistics regulations a real lot said of physical peaked estate time will any shortly a also in contact mountainous deal America after inaccuracies and promoting estimates receive with that the Washington dog the is tourism record a European lost license caused there they of the were public Union holy also by flu in about her let a see shortened allegations me vaccine state ask Japan nine to swipe you schedule the millions one and thousand their simple of Australia I skin the misconduct of company six euros question was would with schools the hundred white says affect in have U. fees infections the historically sent distribution with to which support a paid high hundreds is a if then day level it to blocked the put was middlemen of effort of in in of students federal the songs them jaw the to sale the instead see last home funding scope of after trump's and I'm week Chinese of us given Charles corona to and to tax a vaccines the sixty political dog transmission the virus returns Ledesma waiting do percent you think representation outbreaks sign in observed they a increase separate do about but hopes booth Montana house from and the president's expected speaker that the week could the Nancy I'm participating with before change lawyers to the continue I new Pelosi counted record say the in animals high subpoena Britain is I'm Charles Charles questioning some previously was to they're the five lead issued optimistic late as the this underwent haste well hundred month London training in cases bad of that the this GOP are to detect linked faith pivotal cancer to phase schools let's hi just three diabetes Jackie re clinical get opening in Quinn there trial or other meanwhile we and diseases will Florida's overturned quickly governors I'm calling Charles and provide the for de affordable Ledesma a a near college Care term students Act view bill of of the rights at vaccine's the same time denouncing efficacy we can university mess with the Charles elections officials Taylor this Jackie for month disciplining Quinn London students Washington for attending large parties I'm Jackie Quinn

Official United States
Finnish dogs detect first COVID-19 case

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

Finnish dogs detect first COVID-19 case

"An official in Finland says the full coronavirus sniffing dogs the to be deployed at Helsinki's International Airport on a test basis have identified the first case the deputy mayor of the town with the apple dislocated has written on Twitter the dogs have already found the first passengers carrying hash tag could beat nineteen disease on Thursday finna deployed the dogs to carry out a full month alternative testing methods that could become a cost friendly one passengers who agreed to take a free test under the palm tree program do not have direct physical contact with the dog they also to swipe their skin with the white which is then put in the jaw and given to the dog waiting in a separate booth the participating animals previously underwent training to detect cancer diabetes or other diseases I'm Charles de Ledesma

Official Finland Helsinki International Airport Apple Twitter Charles De Ledesma
Finnish dogs detect first COVID-19 case

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

Finnish dogs detect first COVID-19 case

"Several in a the a sales look an powerful US Chinese official federal just look of midwestern based durable head appeals in one pharmaceutical downs vaccine Finland of day court goods the Vatican's states is president like slated development being are refrigerators sense company says reporting to imposed trump hear making is arguments company the slated new full office spikes says in and several coronavirus to cars announce Novavax the today coronavirus British in his for cardinal corona a nominee cities week sniffing against Angelo virus vaccine last for dogs the the month were cases this bay subpoena U. it's is confirmed S. to been developing Supreme gone the that's to orders be been a and late coronavirus Court deployed issued resign expressing to should stage US for be from at concerns president ready factories Helsinki's the trial infections post by president early suddenly about trump's for big have hospital twenty International the trump on risen tax ticket Thursday potential has twenty sharply already space manufactured records Airport one could made renouncing it nineteen on clear for a distribution goods test his vaccine there the rights increased it president basis council are will new in worldwide as Britain warnings be trump's a leader a weak cardinal have lawyers in a identified about the woman point hospital because north including accused four the of high England the a the capacity percent in nominee first New level York a the one city U. in case S. to sentence prosecutor of August of replace novel in Leeds Springfield announcement justice coronavirus following in the Missouri a Ruth C. the much the says deputy case E. Bader circulating larger people the O. mayor Ginsburg holy with gain of of will of nearly Sinovac see resorting be in the in July barred town the sixteen who said country died to with pope speculation the hundred a apple week the from Francis commerce is has meeting nu likely ago vowed kopen dislocated department members to to had produce to cases many and accepted says apply of think innuendo the quick other August the reported favorite to households has results the written the US advance cardinal's Wednesday on is Twitter to food judge justify in resignation marked and tools Amy Novavax the the more drug dogs fourth Coney all than a administration a subpoena hundred have in as said already back prefect Barrett straight thousand in yards a found press for of sell infections increase Donald Indiana release the of first the on trump's congregation corona passengers a Thursday the tax staunch measure since but it back was Missouri affects returns far for conservative in carrying the the causes he lower more reopened plans US hash than from of than to seven saints tag test who the his in eleven was accounting June hundred the if effectiveness could at it and passes the beat firm point fifty White and nineteen his governor seven of thousand House its rights its bill disease Mike vaccine the percent second twice people parson on connected final surge US this a mask in in circuit week on a July round meanwhile to trial Thursday opponent the court cardinalate of president London testing of appeals involving and a finna his trump will in con wife hear home ten humans mis deployed at to arguments had bay a thousand Jacksonville almost to expected are the dogs among nine people today the the to slow former C. million to rally carry them E. down people between number out after O. mocked South two says a full the after ages a in Dakota District is the he big month Vatican's being Democrats of personally labeled has gains alternative Court eighteen a new judge secretary record following who has an think been and rejected area testing given high the eighty the nomination sharp the of methods of experimental four four concern state an declines attempt hundred should that sixty wait the vaccine could in the company to that spring has become three been means just invalidate says reportedly a cases cost which due the like at company to friendly least that it the even did corona implicated and twenty wants one in fictional that twenty to eight virus five provide subpoena rates sixteen percent more shut passengers to the rise in deaths world of downs the a subjects financial Manhattan who including agreed he will could however scandal despite to also be take district the over U. the a free face S. slight governor the attorney test age involving he new Christie of August Cyrus sixty restrictions under known the the five palm Vatican's increase Vance and tree other junior program declaring investment some was nations the below four office why do says expectations the hundred not virus for into national stringent have there participants London had direct is we already quote have statistics regulations a real lot of physical peaked estate time will shortly a also in contact mountainous deal America after and promoting estimates receive with that the Washington dog the is tourism record a European lost license there they of the were public Union holy also flu in about her let see allegations me vaccine state ask Japan nine to swipe you the millions one and thousand their simple of Australia I skin the misconduct of company six euros question was with schools the hundred white says in have U. fees infections historically sent with to which support a paid high hundreds is a if then day level it to blocked the put was middlemen of effort in in of students the songs them jaw the to sale the instead see last home scope of after trump's and I'm week Chinese of us given Charles corona to to tax a vaccines the sixty dog transmission the virus returns Ledesma waiting do percent you think outbreaks sign in observed they a increase separate do about but hopes booth Montana house from and the president's expected speaker that the week could the Nancy participating with before change lawyers to the continue new Pelosi record say the in animals high subpoena Britain is I'm Charles Charles questioning some previously was to they're the five lead issued optimistic late as the this underwent haste well hundred month London training in cases bad of that the this GOP are to detect linked faith pivotal cancer to phase schools let's hi just three diabetes Jackie re clinical get opening in Quinn there trial or other meanwhile we and diseases will Florida's overturned quickly governors I'm calling Charles and provide the for de affordable Ledesma a a near college Care term students Act view bill of of the rights at vaccine's the same time denouncing efficacy we can university mess with the Charles elections officials Taylor this Jackie for month disciplining Quinn London students Washington for attending large parties I'm Jackie Quinn

Official United States
Jeffrey Toobin on Writing About Trump

The Book Review

05:37 min | 1 year ago

Jeffrey Toobin on Writing About Trump

"Jeffrey toobin joins us now from northern Connecticut. His latest book is called True Crimes and misdemeanors the investigation of Donald, trump, it's already a New York Times Bestseller Jeff Welcome back to the podcast. It is a pleasure to be here Michelle. Well, we are talking about probably an unpleasant topic you've been covering this regularly for the New, Yorker, talking about it on CNN, the investigations of Donald. Trump plural I think and the impeachment process at what point did you think to yourself? Okay. This should be a book as well. Right at the beginning you know I have a special interest in fun for independent investigations of the presidency. I was one of the prosecutors in the Iran Contra -CATION in the Lawrence Walsh Investigation wrote my first book opening arguments about that did a book about. The Starr investigation of Whitewater Lewinsky in the Clinton years and so I know that the behind the scenes, stories of these investigations are always interesting. But what was a nerve ing as I started in was that I didn't realize that Muller which completely shut down all access I had to trust that eventually, I would get access to the Muller Office, but it was incredibly unnerving journalists to. Spend almost two years working on his side of the investigation really from the outside even though you've written about impeachment, you've written books about investigations. This book feels different and I'm curious to hear your take on what makes this book in the process of writing the book different from those previous books. Trump makes it different? The president is such an enormous figure in American history, his complete disregard. For norms his constant lying his inability or unwillingness to play by rules that Democrats and Republicans have played for all of certainly my conscious life it makes everything about these last three and a half years just feel different from anything I'd ever covered in anything I've ever felt as a citizen we've had conservative presidents. We've had liberal presidents, but we've never had a president like trump and. Both he as a protagonist in my story and the people who gravitate to him just make it totally different. Okay. Here's one way in which it feels different to me and I'm curious to hear your take and it's about trump but it's also about the reception of trump among Americans or certain group of Americans and it's that every single time there are some kind of event trump takes. Some action that seems to be a game changer. There's this expectation or there has been the expectation. Okay. Well, now, this is the end of this changes things, and that goes back to his not filing his tax returns during the campaign, but then I think the next point was with access Hollywood tapes and it's been that way ever since where where something will happen and people will say. Well now, that's it. You know there's gotTa be a consequence and then there really isn't a consequence I. Think you're right in part I mean you know and and you can go through others whether it was praising the white supremacists in Charlottesville standing by Vladimir Putin, in Helsinki, and disparaging the American intelligence agencies firing James Comey which seemed like complete departures from how we expect presidents to behave. Another theme of my journalistic career has been the evolution of the Republican Party that if you go back to Richard Nixon the turning point in Watergate was when seven Republicans on the House Judiciary Committee voted in favor of impeachment and then ultimately Barry Goldwater Hugh Scott John Rhodes went to Nixon and say we can't support you anymore those three famous Republicans The Republican Party has turned into a trump call. And the ability of the president to do absolutely anything no matter how outrageous and retain the support of that forty percent of the country. Is. Something we've never seen before it's been building through the past couple of decades, but I think that's what accounts for the phenomenon you describe, which is no matter what he does the the political architecture of our time really never changes anymore because fifty five percent of the people are appalled forty forty percent of the people stick with trump and thus we have the election we have. So you're saying it's essentially the fact that he's not held. Accountable is a result of the fact that the party has sort of been entirely captured by trump. He has captive and very loyal audience among Americans, and then presumably the other arm of that is what's happened with the media and that certain is catering to and delivering that message. I. Can just add one thing. You know a lot of people like what trump is doing. It's not like this forty percent says, well, you know it's bad that he fires Komai. It's bad that he says, all these races. Thanks their gladis says racist things. I. Mean there are a lot of people in the country who have the same attitudes and I think that's what's chilling for people like me who was. I like to think is not a racist, but the way trump behaves in public it's a feature, not a bug people don't support him in spite of his excesses they support him because it's

Donald Trump President Trump Jeffrey Toobin Republican Party Michelle CNN Lawrence Walsh Investigation New York Times Yorker Connecticut Muller Iran Richard Nixon Muller Office Vladimir Putin James Comey Starr
No country for face masks: Nordics brush off mouth covers

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

08:14 min | 1 year ago

No country for face masks: Nordics brush off mouth covers

"The AFP. Nordics brushoff mouth covers Stockholm as most of the world either orders or recommends the use of facemask swith even US President Donald Trump, seen one nordic nations are remaining hold-outs in supermarkets on buses along with the streets of capitals, such a Stockholm Copenhagen Oslo Helsinki, and Reykjavik. That's the Nordic nations. Face masks are a rare sight worn only by a small minority many of whom are tourists according to a recent survey by YouGov only five to ten percent of respondents in Nordic countries said they used masks in public settings figure that has remained stable since the start of the crisis in March. and. Yeah I. Mean You know I I think that what I would like to see as we walk out of this as masks for. Sort of for people who want to wear them specifically for people who? Aren't feeling really super great that day maybe maybe today's good data wear a mask and not fill the era with whatever you've gotten sometimes, I don't feel good when you get up I. would certainly be railing against the idea if if someone was like, no, we as the government have decided that we need to have heard immunity as quickly as possible. Therefore, we are forbidding masks offer bidding people to wear them or for them to be made or for them to be distributed I, would be railing against that kind of also be a non issue for sick people if it was the social norm that you don't have to go places when you're sick, right I think that that's Know the first thing is that we have to get rid of whatever that idea was. That was going on in the parents of in the ideas of the heads of my parents when I was a kid. Came from a family admittedly, you know the sort of Lutheran Calvin est kind of cut from that cloth where. You could stand you went to work. Suffering is good for your soul that kind of thing, and I got at least half of the Times throughout the thirteen years that I went to school perfect attendance. They'll that is is a declaration that I made people ill. I mean. You there shouldn't be an award for perfect attendance at school. What that says is that you've made poor choices to my mind. So does your parents have made poor choices because they're not talking about college talking about underage people understood but I, and again I'm not an opposing to hang. You know anybody for this. I'm just saying, Hey, we need to stop and think about this. 'cause only recently in the relatively recent past the last couple of decades or something have I heard people talking about you shouldn't go to work or school if you're sick. Actually. I was hearing the opposite when I was young. And so let's go on. That's a move in the right direction. At the same time, the corresponding figures have risen between seventy and eighty percent for most of the other twenty, eight polled including India and the United. States. So that's people wearing masks. Going up to seventy and eighty percent. I have the impression that if the government doesn't say clearly, we advise you to wear a mask nobody will twenty one year old French. Student Camille four to know of Fortuna Rowley told the F. adding that she was shocked to see how rare masks were in Stockholm. Bridget Y DEL sixty three year old pensioner told AFP that she would have preferred if Sweden's authorities recommended masks at least on public transport, but she added that she would keep going without one unless there was a shift in official policy not only she wants you to take care of her health. She doesn't have a car as an adult and she also doesn't intend to where mask until everybody else does. So. I found a couple of graphs which are not exactly easy to talk about verbally but I mean, tell me what you when you look at the graph tell me what you think of. Here's. So this is a daily new confirmed Kovic nineteen deaths and I think the the confirmed part is a very interesting thing because you can think this was covid nineteen you can say it but like to confirm it is a little more solid Canada Okay So you've got the line for America which okay. It shoots up at the beginning and starts to round off a bit and then just sort of goes over to the right and wavers a bit and doesn't really fall that that that low. Now you've got Sweden which it goes up and then it tapers down and down and down, and then it just crashes at the end. So at the very end we're pretty much where we started and they're zero. Like, they're down to zero confirmed covid nineteen deaths now, and this is the country that had the least amount of government regulations and requirements. They're like, Hey, here's what we advise be smart about this be considerate. Fair what is the age. Difference though. The. Democrat shoulder. Oh Yeah. There's a lot of old people in Sweden. So here are the White Gal sixty, nine years old says if they don't if they don't I will not wear it because nobody else does. Martin Spoil Wrong fifty year old businessman said that he would follow government recommendations. If they tell us, we don't need masks we don't wear them. Sweden has received global attention for softer approach to curbing the spread of the virus which coupled with relatively higher death toll has led to the region's largest country being shunned by its neighbors, but when it comes historically about minding their business. But when it comes to masks, the Northeast Nordic nations look staunchly united. So except for Sweden, there are a few cases in those countries KK Chang Epidemiologist University of Birmingham since two for applied health research told AF pay. So I don't blame them for not doing it as long as they have reasonable social distancing and contact tracing has been done properly. Was We to do that? Asked Tuesday what long as you're being spied on I'm okay with it. Yeah. what might change his mind on recommending the use of facemask. Sweden's chief epidemiologist Anders Tangle said that he's still waiting for some of the proof that they're -FFECTIVE So what a novel concept? Portraying some logic questionable I. think it's wrong a responsible and it's stubborn. The epidemiologists said if he's wrong, it cost life. If I'm wrong. What harm does it do? The epidemiologists says there's no harm to wearing masks so we should all wear them I'm not entirely sure that that's true. And I mean. Okay. So there's there's the direct physical health oriented harm that he's talking about. Okay. Well, we've we've discussed some of the issues with that. You've got your mask mouth you've got one of the things that bothers the most bothers me the most is not seeing people's faces actually really bad for your immune system epidemiologist should know bacteria grows in wet damp dark places you would think well, right now they're looking to covert and they're not looking at much else. They're certainly not looking at dental issues and even just looking at cove it. Okay. Let's let's assume. That nothing else exists this is the only thing that means any of our attention. Okay. Viruses need cells to procreate. That's what they are. That's how they work. Now, if you have a multicellular organism, it has defenses it has t cells that will attack the virus and will attack cells that have been infected with the virus. So what what it wants is bacteria to eat that's that's what it means. It means defenseless little single celled organisms so that it can get in procreate and explode. That's what they do. So if you make more bacteria if you well, if you create this environmentally. Rich you will get a lot of viruses I get the idea but wouldn't we be seeing more many more cases and deaths and all these sorts of things going on in countries where mass compliance is significantly higher if that's the case no ours covert isn't. Necessarily, because Kobe isn't all that deadly except to people who are already very fragile.

Sweden Stockholm Nordic Nations Yougov Stockholm Copenhagen Oslo Hels AFP Donald Trump Reykjavik United States Suffering President Trump Kk Chang Epidemiologist Univer America India Kobe Camille Fortuna Rowley Bridget Y
Belarus election: Two TV presenters announce their resignations

BBC Newshour

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Belarus election: Two TV presenters announce their resignations

"Presenters working for official Belarussian television channels have resigned as protests continue against President Alexander Lukashenko's reelection. Resignations follow 1/3 night of violent repression by riot police in a number of cities across the country. Mona from Danny able hard, the TV presenters announced their resignations on social media. One CIA. Hey, Kozlow Itch gave no reason. The other Tatyana Burkina, said she could no longer smile on air. The head of one human rights group. The Belarusian Helsinki Committee, described Tuesday night is the scariest in the country's modern history, telling the Air P news agency the security forces used unprecedented cruelty. Belarus is Interior Ministry says more than 1000 people were arrested overnight.

Tatyana Burkina Belarusian Helsinki Committee President Alexander Lukashenko Belarussian Belarus CIA Interior Ministry Mona Official Danny
What It Was Like to Interview Shima Oliaee

Inside Podcasting

05:57 min | 1 year ago

What It Was Like to Interview Shima Oliaee

"Hello and welcome to fight podcasting the show in which. Discuss their craft I'm your host Sky Pillsbury. This is a post show episode in which two very special guests will talk to me about last week's episode in which I interviewed Dolly Pardons America producer. Mo only if you haven't heard that episode, I recommend going back and listening to it before you listen to this one that way, our conversation may make a little bit more sense. Today on the show I have with me, the two people most likely to remember my obsession with Dolly Parton. My wonderful parents welcome to the show, mom and Dad Hey. Hi there. Thank you so much for saying yes. Welcome On this kind of show you guys get to ask me questions. I have the first question here ready to go all right dad. Right. Do you feel a part of dollars America? That is a really good question Yes, I think am I mean I must be one hundred percent because I'm a fan, so I think by default that makes me part of her America, because you know I know who she is. I adore her like so many others. Of course that begs the question like what is Dolly, Parton America, and I think one of the points that she made in last week's episode was that Dolly is sort of this prison for everyone else's story? And I'm not sure that I have a particular story to tell but I think that the aura surrounding Dolly is sort of like. Everyone can be part of it. No matter what walk of life you come from and so I guess in that regard. Be Part of Dolly Parton America. She talked about the feelings of otherness enduring during her show. Do you resonate with that at all? I probably don't if I'm being really honest and. That's because I am very privileged in my life, so you know I am female. I'm white. I've had opportunities that many many people don't get to have. I went to college. I got a good job after college. I sort of did the things that I expected I would do. Thus far in my life. But I think that the way that I can relate with that was what Shima said about how she and Chad are both first generation Americans and you are a first generation American, Dad. And so you know what it made me think, and even in the show, because during the show Jad talks about how her dollies Tennessee Mountain home, reminds his father of his home. Overseas, you know of course I couldn't help but think about our family home in northern Finland, so of course I thought about like the listener. Any listener to this doesn't know is that I grew up going to Finland with you every summer and you know spending many many many many days. Not Whole Lot to do kind of like the countryside of Finland in this tiny town with a population of eight hundred people, where almost no one spoke English, and then of course I would spend a lot of time in Helsinki as well where people did, but you know I remember the excitement that I had the day that you got your citizenship when we were living in Hawaii. I remember you wore a suit and that was a big deal because you were is most of the time. So. You know I remember that feeling, but I don't ever feel I can't say that I ever felt other, but I. Think I knew that you at times felt authored. What about you? Well I guess what I was wondering about is. Dolly is also a what I would call a country girl. you got to know people who were definitely from the country, not from the city. That's true. Maybe I speculate that that may have had something to do with your level of comfort with Dali. Oh. That's interesting. Also expressed some interest in Loretta Lynn during that time. I loved Laura Adeline and I think I I remember i. read the Book About Her. Was the book called? Coal, miner's daughter, I don't know. I did identify with those two, but I don't know I can't like point to a memory where I connected those two things myself. You Know My love for them like I. Really Loved Donna Summer at the same time. She's not from the country and I think honestly I think. They spoke to my infatuation with Glamour, and even though I knew that they were from the country. It's sort of like they were like these unimaginable. Creatures all three of those women. They were like such a shiny thing, and then I love the music and I love to dance, but I think that I always had an interest in people who are different than me, and that's why like when we were in the countryside in Finland like I could hang out with Vinnie me. Who is the violin player? You know for hours or make friends with the girl who lived across the street Rita, even though we. We didn't speak the same language, and like really enjoy those people because it was like exposing me to this completely different way of life. You know just a way of life that I wasn't familiar with and I think that in a way Dali Donna. It sort of showed me a completely different slice of

Dolly Dolly Parton Dolly Parton America Finland America Sky Pillsbury Donna Summer Parton America Dali Donna Rita Producer Loretta Lynn Helsinki Tennessee Mountain Laura Adeline Shima Vinnie Hawaii Chad
Chris Suspect

The Candid Frame

09:32 min | 1 year ago

Chris Suspect

"One of the lauwers photography at least for me is the doors can open. Being photographer has provided me access to people and communities that I might never have considered otherwise the combination of a camera and my curiosity has gifted me with meeting fascinating people and entering their world and many times. Those encounters have been especial- to me as the photographs at created. Chris suspects photography is all about that. His explorations of subcultures in the areas of music and sexuality have resulted in images. That are raw an intimate. His latest book leather boys gathers images of a segment of the gay community in and around the DC area. The story of how he gained access and his process over the years provide some valuable information for anyone taking on a long-term personal project regardless of the World. They are hoping to explore this. Is your body an ex and welcome back to the candidate frame and it was good to see. It's been a long time yet. Has I'm trying to think I guess the last time I saw you This past summer at focus on the story Ryan. I'm looking forward to talking to you. We met a couple of years back. And you're always been on my radar but it's just like as with as with so many people who I put down on my list sometimes years before I finally get them on the show but I'm glad we're funding hearing chance to sit down and chat. I do want to remind you ever. I've been on candid frame before. Are you on the panel? Yeah Yeah at Miami Straight Photography Festival but I think about it in terms of one to one conversations. Sure Yeah I had just a taste now. I get the full meal I guess. Okay okay scared me for a bit getting ready but no comment background. I found out that he come from a family. Did A lot of traveling. Your Dad was a diplomat. You were born in the Philippines. That is that is correct. I was actually adopted in the Philippines. Which is interesting and I'm definitely not Filipino. So yeah was adopted there. My family was with the State Department and my dad travel to various countries around the world. All the way up through the end of my college experience. So I've lived in Thailand Denmark Moscow London and then visited various countries for like a month or a week or whatever the entire time. Did you have any any idea in terms of your birth be? We have information get to you so I actually. When my dad passed away a couple years ago she left that to me. But I still haven't looked at it weren't well I you know. Part of it is is. My parents were my parents. I've felt adopted or not. You know it was just something. I don't know man should ask my my therapist about that but I just haven't I haven't really like I feel like I don't want to give up on. The idea of my parents are my real parents because they adopted me. And that's who cared for me you know. I'm a little scared to find out who my real parents are. What if there is life changing information there? You know who knows yeah? That's fascinating especially the fact that it's just sitting in a letter somewhere. That's well it's not. It's not just a letter. It's a whole packet with a bunch of official documents and stuff so so doing all this traveling. How did he sort of color? Your perspective in terms of when you finally came in critter life yourself here in the in the states. Well I have to say that little funny story about my first time that I remember in the United States was coming back for first grade and I could speak Danish better than it could speak English and I was held back a grade because my English language skills were not that good and then from there. I went to Thailand. I believe you know from there. I went to Moscow. Actually so I have I think a more of a kind of a like a world view of and I was friends a people of all different kinds of cultures classes races. What have you I would say was a very wholesome upbringing in terms of Having kind of a global perspective and in your early twenties you're part of a of a of a punk band music start becoming occurred of your early life so that's another a funny story I remember being in Moscow and I guess the sex pistols had come out. And this is I. Think nineteen seventy six and I guess there was a article in the New York Times or The Washington Post because we used to get that at the embassy in Moscow Mama's reading about it and she's like Chris. You wouldn't listen to that stuff would you and then and then on our First trip our trip to Helsinki Finland. We got to go to a record store in the first album. Picked up was was a clash album. Actually I didn't WanNA bring home a sex pistols but I'd done a little bit of kind of asking around the embassy like what did some of the other punk bands picked up a clash in devo album and ever since then I was kinda hooked but because I was traveling and nobody I knew played an instrument. I didn't even play an instrument and it wasn't until I got to college that I met up with some people that played instruments like one of my roommates play guitar. Who's really good? He's still actually playing today on the Jam Band Circuit and anyway so one night. We're hanging out late. It leaves the house and they're like hey play the space and I'm like I don't even know what to do. There's like follow the dots man and so I just followed what they were doing with their hands. And then I was like you. Know the hippy. Music is okay. But I'm really into punk rock. And then when I've moved back to DC after college I met up with some of the former members of the band scream. I don't scream was a big discord banned. They were banned. I really enjoyed in high school early college. And that's the band where David Grohl came from and so this is some of the other members one of the other members from scream their original drummer before girl was in the span. It was like man. This guy's awesome. I get to play with him. And that's basically how I jumped into that in. How long were you into? I played in punk bands from ninety three to two thousand and on. I'm still playing in my neighborhood so I've just been continuing that I still I still. I still play a little bit in a Plano. Reggae DUB reggae band in my in my neighborhood but I was playing. I started my own record label. I put out like twenty plus CDs with international distribution all around the world toward all over the the. Us many times so yeah. I like to travel see new places. Meeting people were using a camera. Did you document those times? Not at all? It wasn't until the birth of my son that I got a camera and that was because of my wife she was like we need to get a camera and at that time it was like I don't know if we can afford it and whatever so I got a cannon power shot and this this had been like two thousand six or so. My son was born in two thousand and five so it was a little bit after that. We we still. I think the I felt. We had the IPHONE camera which is like we need a better camera so and then are basically read the manual and then I went out just shooting around my neighborhood or wherever. Just kinda figure out figuring out all the settings and that's where I figured out like what motion blur could do and stuff like that shutter drag and that was really cool and the entire throughout my entire punk rock career. I was always going into the library or on the Internet. You later in the late nineties to find just kind of like raw images to use for flyers and that's how I kind of discovered who who we g was and Dion rbis and stuff. I didn't really look at them through photographers. I was looking more through a punk rockers. I like going. You know what? What are the photos that kind of excite me or that are weird a different? That will look really good on a flyer in peak people's interest and so I spent a lot of time in the Arlington County Public Library in their photo book section. Just kinda going through trying to find stuff and yeah and so. That's kind of so I had my and I even bought like some photo books to just to use for flyers so wasn't until I actually started work in a cameras. Like hey man I could probably make photos like those guys did in those books.

Moscow Chris Philippines Thailand Denmark Moscow London State Department Ryan David Grohl United States Helsinki Miami Official Arlington County Public Librar Thailand Dion New York Times Finland Plano The Washington Post
Trump set to pull U.S. from Open Skies surveillance treaty

John Rothmann

03:30 min | 1 year ago

Trump set to pull U.S. from Open Skies surveillance treaty

"The United States has withdrawn a from the open skies treaty this issue of foreign policy may seem distant but it should not be let's go to my friend rob from Richmond rob welcome to KGO John you've got to open your eyes and see the open allies of open skies you know I sent you the article by Tim Morrison former trump National Security Council director and at the Hudson institute he rolled to the right center New York times about the abuses of the Russians they are targeting our critical infrastructure for you know for when there's hostilities bill Bailey hit us very precisely they get over flights in two thousand seventeen abusing this treaty over of the White House and over nobody slides over the White House date there lies no do you think lies over the white house you got a good correct it's so high they say you're doing it on the open skies it's not it's not twenty five feet over its probably the forty fifth probably eighty thousand feet over it but doesn't matter read the article and from National Security Council timers and and also over over trump's New Jersey one of his get aways while he was there so this is this is the way they are abusing it and they walked out of the non lugar agreement in two thousand twelve the Russians did that with the program John that that the for thirty years American boots on the ground in Russian nuclear facilities well Putin said to heck with that we don't want to be able to see anything that we're doing over here so they kicked us out that's in two thousand twelve so they are and then they go invading the Crimea and and but chemical which this president accepts chemical weapons in Syria yeah well we've got the courage the courage and wisdom of this man this is so it's all Dylan Thomson dupes that fall for this kind of European dilettante and I'm not a dupe this is falling for the day that I stayed up but you you're it so now you John this is an agreement which is worked R. thirty plus partners want us to continue the president of the United States as sad well will restructure something else I will include the Chinese and you know how far he gets when he wants to restructure I mean rob this was stupid now this is this is an absolute rail politique and you've got your head in the sand if you don't think the Russians pose a threat the Russians posed as say the Russians didn't pose a threat it seems to me and it seems to me rob when I said the Russians posed a threat in the American election your loss at all no no no no that's not true you got me I said it's a threat in the end trump is the one that is a trial thing down hard right now all the Russians because he can schmooze all other theories and then he stood in Helsinki almost stage with Vladimir Putin and said that he accepted Putin's word rather than the words of American intelligence agencies that are you don't think our intelligence is running trump as a call excellence president of the all time and by the way that's to do pollutant why not my friend well I appreciate your call but you're wrong what can I

United States
Can Taking Zinc Help Shorten Your Cold?

Short Wave

10:44 min | 1 year ago

Can Taking Zinc Help Shorten Your Cold?

"So we are right in the middle of cold and flu season and Alison as our consumer health aficionado. Let's start with talking about how to reduce the likelihood of getting a cold. Okay there's our shortwave favorite which washing your hands and you know mattie not everybody who gets exposed to cold actually get sick when they've done these studies where they take a rhinovirus and they stick it up people's noses and they see who gets sick and who doesn't they find that people who've slept less than six hours are about twice as likely to get sick when exposed to this cold virus as compared to people who've slept more so sleep is really important High stress has been shown to increase the likelihood and a lack of exercise has also been shown to make you more susceptible. I feel like you just targeted me with the high stress. I am not here to wag my finger at you or anyone else because at a certain point look we all get a cold. Typically adults in the. Us get about two to three colds a year. And when you do get a cold there is something you can do to put yourself out of so much misery. One method people swear by is zinc. That's right it's a mineral found in trace amounts in a lot of the foods that we eat our bodies need zinc to function optimally. In fact it's considered an essential mineral and boosting the amount of zinc. You get during a cold by sucking on zinc. Lozenges is actually shown a bunch of studies to help shorten the length of the common cold but only in certain situations and there are a lot of caveats so today on the show zinc an essential mineral and a cold remedy. We'll talk about when it works and when it doesn't Okay Alison we're talking about zinc and whether or not it helps shorten the length of a cold and there's a story behind that question that starts in the nineteen sixties. Yup that's right that is when a young physician named a Nanda persad studied a group of young Egyptian men who were completely deficient in zinc. Now these young men suffered from stunting. They hadn't grown to a normal height or developed normally in other ways and this is because they had very limited diets. They ate a lot of bread. That was hind phosphate. And that can actually block the absorption of zinc. Now skip ahead. Prasada is now ninety. One years old. He is still an active researcher at Wayne State University in Detroit and. He told me that when he gave these young men zinc. Something really remarkable happened. The grew at the rate of five to six inches in height the first two years so it was. What is a molecule remarkable? Change that occurred after supplementation. When you first documented this what was your you must have been ecstatic. Y- well actually the first patient re gives zinc and his other two couldn't believe it because I thought that the growth phenomena will be shut off after the age of eighteen and nothing will happen to anybody but that was not the case. So does that mean that. We all need to grow right well. We all do need zinc for optimal health. It doesn't work like a growth hormone and here in wealthier nations. It's completely possible to get enough zinc in your regular diet. But back in the nineteen sixties. The role of zinc was not at all understood. I mean people thought persad was crazy for just suggesting that zinc deficiency can do this but he ignored all those people who are skeptics. He just kept pressing on. He became really just kind of obsessed with getting to the bottom of how zinc work in the body. And so after he documented the growth in these young men. He threw himself into further studies. He really laid the groundwork by showing that zinc influences immunity he theorized that zinc works as an anti inflammatory agent and then over the course of a couple of decades persad and other scientists have shown that up to three hundred enzymes requires zinc for their activation or stability of their structure. Right like enzymes that you would even be familiar with like alcohol. Dehydrogenation rolls right up the Tong Yung. But importantly breaks down all that beer and wine. You drink the alcohol right right exactly but keep in mind. It took decades to show this. I mean lots of scientists completely questioned persad findings but eventually in nineteen seventy four. The National Academy of Sciences declared zinc an essential mineral for human health and they established recommended daily intake level. What is that Level Alison? Because now I'm a little worried about my zinc levels. Prepare well public. Health officials say that adult men need about eleven milligrams of zinc per day. Women about eight milligrams so let me help you figure this out. If you ate a three ounce beef chuck rose you'd get about seven milligrams so red meat can be quite high. That's close to a day's amount. A Half Cup of beings will get you about three milligrams. Pumpkin seeds a single ounce provides two point two milligrams so that's a good source and then there are lots of cereal grains that are fortified with zinc. Right that's why I eat a bowl of cereal every night. Eleven PM for my zinc. That's right you are clearly not zinc division. Here's a fun fact. Wasters have more zinc per serving than any other food. They contain seventy four milligrams per three serving. That feels like too much now overall. We shouldn't laugh. I mean overall here in North America overt zinc deficiency is pretty uncommon. But let me get back to the story of Dr Prasada and his discovery is now these zinc guidelines were first put into effect in nineteen seventy four and once. That happened. Persad began to wonder since he knew that zinc had an effect on immunity. Weather's zinc supplements might help to shorten the duration and symptoms of a common cold. And I should say that he kinda came at this from what he had realized back in Egypt. He's seeing that. A lot of these deficient men died early from infections. So his guests was that yes zinc lo and behold probably did play this role and immunity. Now it's known for instance that the body requires zinc to develop an activate t lymphocytes those. They're like protect you viruses and tae exactly that come out to protect you. They're the type of white blood cell. That is a key part of the immune system so this was all kind of in the back of his mind. He wanted to test out. Whether these zinc supplements might help shorten the cold so he collaborated with a scientist fellow. Scientists named Tom Fitzgerald at the University of Michigan. I talked to Fitzgerald and he told me what when Persad I gave him this theory. He was pretty skeptical. Got Admit when I first heard this I I actually told us a research assistant i. I think he's losing it. I was he so skeptical other than just being a scientist right. Exactly you know. I guess he was skeptical. That something as basic as a mineral would be powerful enough on its own to alter immune function which is a good level of skepticism. But he did agree to do the study. They recruited a whole bunch of people in Detroit. Who had colds? They gave them zinc lozenges made by a pharmacist. It was a double blind placebo controlled trials that means that neither the participants nor the researchers knew who was getting the real thing and who was getting the Placebo. And here's what they found long behold when I did in Dallas it indeed did shorten common cold symptoms by about two or three days and I gotTa Admit. I was stunned by that result. Two or three days isn't nothing now not at all when you think about. How many lost work and schooldays there are just because of cold symptoms that significant absolutely and then several other studies have confirmed these findings. I talked to another scientist. His name is Harry. Pamela of the University of Helsinki in Finland he published a sort of Meta analysis that reviewed a bunch of the studies and says bottom line here is low doses of zinc lozenges. Don't work you gotTa take about eighty to ninety milligrams a day of zinc at the onset of a cold that has been shown to help shorten it and he says he now uses zinc when he the cold coming on himself though. I'm also encouraging my patients to try zinc but Usually I am encouraging only if the common cold has been lost in for a day or something like that so he saying only within the first day that's right because if you don't catch it at the beginning you can't really halt the progression. It doesn't work okay so if you're taking zinc at the beginning of a cold it has to be within the first twenty four hours. That's what the studies have shown. Okay but here is another caveat and it's a pretty big one if you go to the drugstore right now and you find a zinc product. A lot of what you'll find are these multi ingredient products with a whole bunch of other ingredients. You've probably never heard of before. Be Aware that a lot of ingredients can undercut the effectiveness for instance. Some of them contain citric acid which actually binds with the zinc and makes it completely ineffective. So you're basically saying you've got to take it early. You've got to take at least eighty to ninety milligrams and avoid stuff with citric acid. That's right and as the consumer health reporter here I want to be able to say. Go out and buy this product. Unfortunately I can't do that because the lozenges used in the clinical trial. Those are not commercially available. And here's the deal. A LOTTA TIMES MANUFACTURERS CHANGE THEIR INGREDIENTS. They changed dosing. It's hard to make a solid recommendation about a product. Just basically have to do your homework. You gotta be aware that you need certain dose and that you don't want all these other ingredients think it's more what you can feel assured of is that there's science behind the idea that yes zinc can help shorten a cold. Would you be comfortable saying? Hey go out there and eat a couple of years. You know if you're seafood lover absolutely go. Enjoy some wasters. I can't tell you whether or not they're an aphrodisiac but I can tell you. They've got plenty of zinc

Zinc Deficiency Colds Scientist Alison Nanda Persad Detroit Dr Prasada FLU Mattie Growth Hormone National Academy Of Sciences Tong Yung Tom Fitzgerald North America University Of Helsinki Researcher Egypt University Of Michigan
The Voice First Games with Jeferson Valadares of Doppio Games

Alexa in Canada

05:28 min | 1 year ago

The Voice First Games with Jeferson Valadares of Doppio Games

"The other thing that makes me and Chris. which is the CO founder? Like Chris Barnes excited about tractive stories of the buyer and I'm and different things but we So we we got really excited about him Somebody mentioned it to me like as a possibility in the beginning of dismissed it but the next playing with like actually no. There's something years like voices. Human Metro thing to teach really people like people. Don't hope say things. Obviously the advice doesn't always reply the right way but I think if there's a potential here to do something like very metros I kind of reminds the evoque this beginning of mobile beginning of facebook games like Nfl You can do start telling here obviously when you say something when the wind goes through your pipes it means a little bit more than if you just type it or something like the weird cultural thing such I felt there was like a combination of both good business opportunity because his vice a CR- growing like crazy and and I know they cheap so you know the are where you need like a you know. Whatever expensive headsets tried out like the zoo and so keep to get the right? That's right and so they're very. That's one reason why they're exploding on the but also this idea that you know voice entertainment. It's kind of new. There hasn't been a lot done in that area because the tech wasn't good enough so I think there's some creative. Yeah it's true like nobody knows what best game is like. It goes like we. We have been very little so I felt like it was both like a good business opportunity but also good creative opportunity pretending so. That's kind of why we start. The company said okay. Let's go folks on that So the first game gortex which I like it was actually on Alexa? Release Tober UH twenty eighteen. We we did just increase like we kind of paid ourselves. We hired contractors. And you know the game name Just to just to see for ourselves. What the market was like his is actually a fan? You know how it is bound on like how. How do we get people to find? Find the game like how how. How does the whole thing work right? So we visit game Yeah like pretty good reception Fourche for reviews with on average with you know like a thousands of reviews they. It's reasonably popular game platform. So we're Kinda happy with that and then we decided to go all in and then we got some. Investors Awesome actually raised the Round last year at both Kgo participated around and Yes so based on that we took the money grew the team. So now we're ten people. Well is facing Portugal. Well yes I guess that when it once company company sumptious with kind expensive. I mean it's great if you were you know facebook Google apple but if you're like a small guy trying something new that you don't know who's going to work it's Kinda Kinda risky mortgage costs and health insurance costs and like everything's expensive lease for the office or you know everything is way more expensive right. Yes I think We looked at a bunch of different places in Europe. ended up in Portugal. I think there's a mix of It's not the most like gaming and like the bees gaming hub in Europe. Opposite like London and Stockholm Helsinki Berlin Barcelona displaced more developing games. But nobody knows what they're doing. Voice Games right so they can go go out in London. Hire ten voice specialists because they don't really exist so I felt like the talent pool. Here's pretty good than I speak English. I mentioned from just local language can go to the office and have less less of a harder time than the other foreigners as I felt like it was a good approach and yeah so we did that last year. We're going to start a company and that the funding and Yeah now are we good. A team released a second game last year in walk up to go in October and skull. The three percent challenge those any partnership at flicks. It's based on an athlete's Shoko two percent. I've watched it always didn't go yet. Yeah so we kind of how it happened like through a friend come on I met Bianca. which is the lead actress and She was really excited about doing something gain in. And I'm like wow enough to present this actually pre because it's salad tests and challenges. We gotta go when and now the other thing we wanted was to get a game that allows us to do some sort of multiplayer competition Two percent kind of fits dead dead and also we wanted to do tests differ mechanics because our first game was more like a traditional attractive starring. We want it's gotTa test different things on the second on a we. We felt like he would also fit those. Their ability to make different types of challenge. Steady could play Such different types of mechanics if they're gonNA work so we have seen different type hiking games inside on top of having that interactive story that he'd talk and get an answer a new kind of choose. What what you want at Cetera or to gain seines pains accordingly? We also have these kind of multiplayer role where you you play this new challenges and again a score. There's a weekly did aboard Yes it it does kind of things wanted to push with. It's great that's great. Wow you've done a lot and these games are pretty cool. I've played around with both of them and I think they're really

Facebook Portugal London Chris Barnes Co Founder Alexa NFL Europe Stockholm Helsinki Berlin Barc KGO Shoko Bianca. Google Europe.
Berlin plan for €1 per day public transport ticket stirs up controversy

Monocle 24: The Briefing

04:52 min | 1 year ago

Berlin plan for €1 per day public transport ticket stirs up controversy

"To an issue that cities around the world has struggled Goldway for years to persuade more people to leave their cars at home and use public transport instead in Berlin. Some politicians are now backing a plan that would see the cost transport in the city fall to just one euro a day. This would effectively half the current cheapest annual cost of traveling and not. Everyone's a fan joining me in the studio is Andrew Talk. Who of course is the editor monocle? Also present monocle twenty four urban own pay per andrew. This sounds fantastic. One Euro a day to travel around a major European city but the first thing that occurs to you is that presumably cops by quite a law the amount of money that's going into your transport system the so many things things suddenly become complicated as you say I G- large thing. How incredible this would revolutionized how people around the city it would make everyone these cars ause at home and they would jump on public transport? There is the problem investment which is accu- and many of the city's have looked. This is not just Berlin. Where there are concerns in Helsinki? They did research about whether they should allow people to travel for free on their own. They're public transport and they decided against it. They decided even in against doing drastic cuts. What they found was when they look to other cities which brought in similar policies is that I will people people who drive still drive but what you do which is oddly? More dangerous in Amman widely more annoying is that many people who have taken can the decision for cost reasons to cycle every day or to walk. Think I'm like well. This is pointless I might as well get on the public transport so unless unless you have a a an incredible infrastructure that can cope with a large rise in numbers. You overwhelm the system of so. Many cities just found that that public transport was just a little less pleasurable to go on an. It just didn't work in the ways they anticipated is painted. I mean obviously it's anecdotal the friends of mine in London who dry rather than US probably transport very rarely talk about the cost. Even though transplant in London he's actually quite expensive. Compared Patrick cities they talk about reliability. They talk about they. They come for the risk of being late for work three times a week and it's incredibly uncomfortable and I can't get a seat and those of the reasons they drive and you can't improve those things without spending on infrastructure. No and and the other interesting thing is that to your point is that we imagine that you the car works. which is his affordable public transport but as the stick with unfortunate car drivers? You need to make it incredibly expensive to come come into the city. You need to remove places for people to park needs make their life difficult. You just slow down traffic. Those are the things that have nudged behavior savior in most cities for example. If you Paris moment that they're seeing year on year decline in the number of people who are done drive in in the city but have a aw in that possession. The reason for that is the on on Hidalgo. They have really kind of gone off to the car driver and anecdotes again. Some people telling me of an evening between Five o'clock and seven o'clock some thirty percent of people driving parents are looking for somewhere to park. That's that's what she's done to the city and that's the frustration that Ma- that makes me say Joa. I'm not going to be generation corona. I'm going to give up on this and you're seeing it in the strikes now the number of people who you can't get around by car because the city has seized up so the move to walking and cycling is great and again people can't jump on protons because it's not there so how'd you judge people between all of these behaviors. Free Public Transport isn't a solution on. Its own you have to look at all these behavioral consequences consequences that occur around just interesting there are two places Talon In Estonia and Luxembourg is coming up as well that making all public transport. Completely the free. So you won't have to pay a penny but they have smaller populations less stressed by people jumping on the on the bus. The difficult is the politics of it that politically typically. It's it's quite easy to say I'm GONNA public transport free politically. It's quite hard to say to people in your city. I'm going to make your life miserable. You give up the car. Although on on I guess is on the left. There's always been a belief that taxation works in that you. If you raise money you can have better services and and you are on the right. They believe as the coalition more around the the the green parties who thing I is. You just need to do everything to get people onto that public transport but as I said if you then have to. You don't see a decline in the number of people in that 'cause then isn't isn't an immediate success etretat thanks very

Andrew Talk Berlin London Accu Editor Goldway Hidalgo Amman Paris Helsinki MA Patrick Estonia Luxembourg
Impeachment trial: House managers push for witnesses

The Takeaway

07:46 min | 1 year ago

Impeachment trial: House managers push for witnesses

"Right now lawmakers are taking a break Senate stands in recess they spent much of the morning hearing from house impeachment managers of people like house intelligence house intelligence committee chairman Adam Schiff also congressman chasing crow of Colorado and Akeem Jeffries Democrat from New York they talked about the two articles of impeachment they're winding down on the first which is abuse of power to Davis can you talk a little bit about one or two of the points they made a little along those lines in in terms of the abuse of power charge in the piece of power well I think what she was trying to do today I mean the first two days of this of these arguments Democrats laid out a very meticulous timeline of what happened to the key players were and what and what was wrong about it today was really I think that it time to hit the sort of constitutional high notes what are the bigger constitutional progress here what are the bigger at national security questions and I think Adam Schiff in his closing arguments sort of pulled no punches this was his last best case to make and it was really striking to hear him not just talk about the articles of impeachment and what's outlined in the July twenty fifth phone call but to go back to things like president trump's comments standing next to Vladimir Putin in Helsinki when he questioned intelligence US intelligence about Russian influence in trying to hack the twenty sixteen election I think we have that moment hold on one second he's promoting this cookie crazy server theory cooked up by the Kremlin right next to the guy the cooked up it's a breathtaking success of Russian intelligence I don't know if there's ever been a greater success of Russian intelligence whatever profile Russia did of our president boy did they have him spot on the kind of evokes the days of the Miller report what what do you think she was trying to do here is focusing so intently on trump's relationship with Russia I think he was trying to make a broader case that the president is a threat to the country and that his argument here is that if you have a president that welcomes foreign interference and then also has a president that seeks it out to benefit himself over the national interest which is the case the Democrats have been trying to make then that is the most impeachable offense because once a day elections in a democracy are in question that's sort of the whole ballgame right so I thought his rhetoric was at least I think he took some risks here I think it is the kind of rhetoric that could alienate some of the senators he's trying to appeal to although I also think that shift knows what we all know is that there are not sixty seven votes to remove this president from office I wanted before we get too far down that road I do I want to bring in the east Orozco because this gets at what the White House has to accomplish in the next few days from its legal team are they going to for instance defend against those kinds of moments right moments that are on tape our that our public it's not a denial of things the president has done what I I think what they will do and especially with the you know him with shift bringing up Putin is they will argue that this is just an extension of of the the mylar at the mall or special counsel investigation that Democrats weren't able to get the president with that so now they're trying to get it with to get him will on Ukraine this idea that Democrats really overstepped a when they were talking about the Russian investigation that the the president of the Russian asset is is that what you're saying I think you'll hear a lot of that sort of thing and I think when it comes to these ideas of like the tape that they were playing you already see some Republicans pushing back not necessarily on what the president was saying but pushing back on like some of the the the the witnesses that testified like you ambassador Gordon sorry because we should say throughout this opening statement period we have been seeing clips from the house intelligence committee and the Judiciary Committee hearings and they've been playing almost like a highlight reel from that period yes and so what they're going to point to is silence saying that he was never told directly that aid was linked to up the aid was linked to the opening of these investigations or to the White House visit that this was his presumption so you're going to hear a lot of people saying that they didn't know directly that there was bribery or that there was anything like that going on and that some they're going to argue that these were assumptions being made to Matt can I bring you in on this because the other defense kind of force they are if the president's proxies that people in the gallery right senators who were coming out in between breaks and let X. essentially defending him right well that there are a number of different groups among Republicans some who say they're concerned with the president's conduct but this is not something that that we should remove the president from office over and then there are other Republicans who say well you know there's that the president did nothing wrong from beginning to end in a big a big line that's being used right now is on the issue witnesses and on the issue of the subpoena documents is look if we do go forward on this issue we had we pretty much know the president isn't going to be removed from office and subpoenas for documents and witnesses we'll just read this process out even when we know what the conclusion is going to be that it's going to take weeks and weeks and weeks to get additional evidence and come to the same conclusion this is something that congressman Adam Schiff tried to head off a little bit this morning said he said that that line of argument was nonsense that this is quote not a trial over a speeding ticket or shoplifting that an impeachment trial was very serious and it takes more time essentially it should take more time I want to play one more clips from the leading peach men manager Adam Schiff here's what he said in his final remarks the president trump used Ukraine's leader for political favor and with held critical military aid to an ally in exchange for that favor he did exactly what our framers feared most invited foreign interference in our elections and sold out our country's security for his personal benefit and betrayed the nation's trusts to a foreign power Ron Elving this essentially sums up the week so what should what are you going to be looking for listening for next today was the day that the issue moved on from Ukraine to really being focused on Russia and suse already mentioned the really moving tape that we saw from John McCain and this is ultimately why this all matters a great deal more than it might if it were strictly a technicality the Russia issue the Russia relationship the Russian confrontation and the suspicion that works around this president that he is not sufficiently confrontational with Vladimir Putin and that he's done many things that have helped Putin's world planning so this is a critical moment really if if that issue can break through if that can be the salient that senators take home with them then this will be a very different three days then it would have been without that particular connection so we'll see now in the remaining hours whether or not the obstruction of Congress evidence the extraction of Congress descriptions that we'll hear from the Democrats will be equally effective were equally powerful as what we just heard from Adam shin right although that charge is essentially saying to the White House the White House did not cooperate with the investigation into itself that is correct little different from

Senate Adam Schiff Chairman Congressman
"helsinki" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"helsinki" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Conspiracies about twenty sixteen and the dance the server the very same Russian propaganda he publicly endorsed in Helsinki do you think it's going to stop now do you think if we do nothing it's going to stop now all of the evidence is to the country you know it's not going to stop president just told one of the members of this body he still wants Biden invest it's not going to stop unless the Congress does something about president trump's betrayal began in twenty sixteen when he first solicited Russian interference in our election Russia if you're listening I hope you are able to find the thirty thousand emails that are missing that betrayal continued in Helsinki in twenty eighteen when as we saw he rejected the intelligence community's assessment about Russian interference in that same election when you criticize US officials investigating the Russian interference and instead promoted Putin's conspiracy theory about Ukraine the trail continued in twenty nineteen when he carried out a scheme to cheat in the twenty twenty election by demanding that the leader of Ukraine a US partner under military attack by Russia announced an investigation into the same baseless conspiracy theory about a DNC server and the bogus allegations about vice president Biden and the abuse of power continues he is still trying to cheat in the next election even after the scheme came to light even after it became the subject of an impeachment inquiry it continued and the false statements about it continue president trump rip lay asserted that in a provocative to urge for nations to investigate US citizens who would dare to challenge him politically you know I'm a just for a minute we should try to step into the shoes of someone else my father used to say you don't understand a person to step in their shoes I always thought he he invented that wisdom is self until I watch to kill a mockingbird and found out that Atticus finch said it first but let's just try to step into someone else's shoes for a moment let's imagine it wasn't Joe by let's imagine was anyone of us let's imagine the most powerful person in the world was asking a foreign nation to conduct a sham investigation into one of us what would we think about it then what we think that's good US policy when we think he has every right to do it when we think that's a perfect call let's stop for a minute into bashing of ana G. shoes and were the subject of a vicious smear campaign that no one in the department that we work for up to the secretary of state thinks has a shred of credibility let's step into her shoes for a minute spent our whole life devoted to public service served in dangerous places around the world and we're hounded out of our post and one day someone releases a transcript of a call between the president of the United States and a foreign leader and the president says there's gonna be some things happening to you or to you or to you or to you or to you how would you feel about the president of the United States what you think he was abusing the power of his office and if you want to it shouldn't matter that wasn't you it shouldn't matter that was re of honor which it shouldn't matter that was Joe by because I'll tell you something the next time it just maybe you it just may be you do you think for a moment that any of you no matter what.

Helsinki
Finnair cancels 276 flights as unions join solidarity strike

Orlando's Morning News

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

Finnair cancels 276 flights as unions join solidarity strike

"The brand hope you're not traveling to Finnair this week sympathy strikes across the transportation sector in Finland ever Helsinki to a virtual standstill and prompted its carrier Finnair to cancel almost three hundred flights buses and ferries in the Finnish capital were also being affected by the strikes which are aimed at showing support to some ten thousand postal workers there says Monday's flight cancellations will impact at least twenty thousand customers and that the strike will affect several critical services at Helsinki's airport as a hub for Europe and Asia

Finnair Finland Helsinki Europe Asia
"helsinki" Discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

03:03 min | 3 years ago

"helsinki" Discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

"Mess that the president created yesterday with his early morning tweet about getting sessions to and the witch on? I think it came about. Out rather quickly, but I don't think it was purely a a move to distract from the news yesterday. I think this has been building for some time. We saw Dan Coats a week or two ago raise some alarm in that interview with Andrea Mitchell out Aspen. We've seen the intelligence is a good way. Let me just tell you as answer about Helsinki. Let's watch that. In the run-up to the Helsinki summit US officials ambassador masters to NATO investors. Russia said the president would raise the issue of malign activity with president. He didn't discuss that at least the restaurant. You're saying today that the president has directed you to make the issue of election meddling prior priority. How do you explain the disconnect between what you are saying? His advisors and what the president has said about this issue. I'm not in a position to either understand fully or talk about what happened to Helsinki. Why not anything. I mean, this is the problem, right? It was only Donald Trump Vladimir Putin in that room with their translators. That was by design because Trump didn't want there to be any note takers. He didn't want there to be any kind of paper trail or official government record of what was discussed what was agreed to what Trump said, what Putin said. And so now you have US government officials, not sure what happened in that meeting. There's got to be a public briefing by the administration, but what we have in Moscow the Kremlin doling out details from those conversations, characterizing it as Trump making verbal agreements with Putin in ways that favor Russia, and we're not getting similar information from the United States. It's now been two and a half weeks Carolina. Do you get the sense that anyone in the White House is making the president eat some spinach, if you will, and ramp up the rhetoric and the language from the White House that that show some window into the president or his White House, recognizing that Russia is a threat and that pretending. That it isn't is bad politics for this White House. I think it's clear that that while some may try to give him some spinach, she's not eating it and you know, take, for example, the tweets after watching a lot of cable news television about the Paul Manafort trial, the president tweeted something that would only add to normal prosecutors view that he is making threatening or urging statements about shutting down a criminal probe. He's making those tweets during an ongoing criminal trial, which is pretty interesting and sensational as well. And there was nobody that was going to stop him. When I asked his lawyers that morning, what are you suggesting to him that he should not do this? They essentially said, you know, that's not really our role here. The president does what he wants to do. This is his megaphone. No one's going to take it away from him. Does that line up with what you guys understand to be the current state of the..

president Vladimir Putin Donald Trump White House Andrea Mitchell US Helsinki Russia Dan Coats NATO Aspen Carolina Paul Manafort Moscow
"helsinki" Discussed on Anderson Cooper 360

Anderson Cooper 360

04:05 min | 3 years ago

"helsinki" Discussed on Anderson Cooper 360

"No. That's the president shortly after the Helsinki summit, the White House later claimed the president didn't mean no, they aren't targeting the US del. He meant no as a, no. I don't want to take any more questions. The reporter who asked the questions said the president was looking right at her answering no twice to our questions. The cleanup was also required after the Helsinki summit press conference. The president later claiming he meant to say wouldn't instead of wood that even in that cleanup effort, the president said it could also be others besides Russia, meddling. And since then the president has gone back to calling the Russian story a hoax, and the Russian best Gatien rigged today, the distance between the president's reluctance to call out Russia and his national security teams willingness to was noticeable. It was striking enough to prompt this question and a really fascinating answer. I want you to hear from deny coats. In the run-up to the Helsinki summit US officials ambassador investors to NATO investors to Russia said the president would raise the issue of the malign activity when president. He didn't discuss that at least. You're saying today that the president has directed you to make the issue of election meddling of priority. How do you explain the disconnect between what you are saying? His advisors and what the president has said about this issue. I'm not in a position to either understand fully or talk about what happened to Helsinki over to security director to address that question. I just want to emphasize what you just heard the director of national, television's when asked about President Trump's behavior and Helsinki said, quote, I'm not in a position to either understand fully or talk about what happened to Helsinki. It's a pretty stunning statement either. Dan Coats cannot talk about what he knows or he truly does not have the full picture about what was discussed behind closed doors, which echoes something that he said publicly days ago after he made that statement. Mr. codes turn things over to John Bolton who repeated what Latimer Putin said, Helsinki press conference. That election meddling was the first issue President Trump raised with him, keeping them honest. So we only have Ladimir Putin's word for that. John Bolton didn't say that the president told him everything. He said behind closed doors. He's just saying what Vladimir Putin said publicly. So it's not even clear if John Bolton knows everything that was discussed by the President. Vladimir Putin is not clear anyone does except perhaps bladder, MIR Putin. The president. He's spoke out at a rally tonight. Again, talking about how tough he's been on Russia, but also, again, saying things like this. Now we're being hindered by the Russian hoax. It's a hoax. I'll tell you what Russia's very unhappy that Trump one that I can tell you. Well, that's not what Putin said of the press conference that he wanted Mr. Trump to win more now on all this from c. Jim Mukasa at the White House, Jim, do you have any understanding as to why the press briefing on this topic happened now? Way Anderson we were told earlier in the day that the president directed those officials to come out into the briefing room and sale. Those things how they're on the case when it comes to Russian meddling interference in US elections, but Anderson as you noted there a few moments ago, the president had a golden opportunity to drive that point home at this rally in Pennsylvania earlier this evening, and he just didn't do it. As you said, he defended his summit with Ladimir Putin and Helsinki and said that Vladimir Putin and the Russians are unhappy that he's the president of the United States with ladder Putin admitted to reporters there at the summit that he wanted Donald Trump to win. And so there's this huge disconnect that we all could feel it in the in the briefing room earlier today. And that is why you saw somebody reporters asking that question. Yes, it. Was I'm sure various sharing to a lot of Americans out there to hear the director of national intelligence, the FBI director, the homeland security secretary to say, they're on the case, but looming over everything in the room. Anderson is the fact that the president has said, all sorts of things to diminish the Russian threatened the past. Remember, it was just last month when he said it, it could be other countries, not just Russia. That is just so opposite of what we heard from his top officials at that briefing today..

Vladimir Putin Helsinki President Donald Trump Russia John Bolton United States White House director Anderson reporter Dan Coats NATO FBI Jim Mukasa Pennsylvania secretary
"helsinki" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

04:21 min | 3 years ago

"helsinki" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"That's not part of the rhetoric in the adversarial nature ever relations between our countries now. So in the absence of that, how do you explain in the clearest way that you can why they should be concerned? I think all Americans need to trust their government need to know that their government is being candid and forthright in truthful about their objectives. I also think the first role of government is to protect the country. So I think in both of those realms taking a tough line on Russia is in the interests of all the American people. Now, the problem that we have with Trump's approach towards Russia is twofold. Number one is it's clear. He's not being forthright and candid about the true nature of the relationship that the Trump organization has had with the Russian federation, and also he's doing things to advance American foreign policy objectives that are manifestly against our interests like undermining NATO. Now to get back to your question pre about why should an American care. I think all American families do care whether or not America is going to be a leader in the world. Can it be strong gonna have strong alliances going to protect our interests, whether it's because it's to protect our economic interests around the world or to protect our national security interests. And they also want to know that the attributes of the highest office in the land are those of truth and Justice, and and they don't want to have a secret agenda a secret deal emanating from the Oval Office. And you know, overall, I think my concern about the Helsinki summit and the follow on summit is that it's clear that Donald Trump has entered into a secret deal with Latimer Putin, a secret deal to reshape American foreign policy in the image of Putin in Russia's theories about international relations. So President Trump has as meeting with Vladimir Putin in Helsinki. And then I think two days later, it becomes known that he's invited Putin to come to another meeting in DC, and I believe last week you were to conference where you're not? Yes. Which conference was that? Was the Aspen security forum and in Colorado. And at the Aspen security conference, there is a now much watched interview. There was a Korean real time with Andrea Mitchell and the head of the deny Dan Coats we present for that. Yeah. So what happened? What was your reaction? So Andrew Mitchell was interviewing Dan Coats, the director of national intelligence. Of course, Dan Coats is a former Republican Senator from Indiana has a long record of public service and and was appointed by President Trump and confirmed by the Senate is deny denies what director of national intelligence overseeing the sixteen intelligence agencies and the office of the director of national intelligence and Dan Coats was being interviewed by Andrew Mitchell. And I was sitting there in the room in the audience about twenty five feet in front of the stage. So just just looking directly at coats and injury, Mitchell, you can get a front row seat. I couldn't. No, I wasn't a heavy hitter enough of sponsor, but I will tell you that Coates was not looking for a way to stick it to Donald Trump. In fact, the first question Andrea asked him was. Director coats earlier in the week. You put out a statement clarifying that. In fact, the intelligence assessment that said that Putin directed and interference campaign had benefit Donald Trump, that the intelligence can be stood by that assessment. Why did you do that? And Dan Coats, the first line he said was I was doing my job and he basically in a very humble straightforward candidate and not not a way full of bullshit. Oh, was basically saying the job of the intelligence professional without fear or favor, and oftentimes having speak truth to power partisan consequences, be damned is to call it like we see it is to say, if Russia directed an attack on our country and did it to favor Donald Trump. We have to say that and most often we say it in private channels. Most often, we say in our classified intelligence assessments, but when those intelligence assessments have been made public and there's been great public discourse about and someone who is trying to twist. That intelligence assessment for their own political gain. We do viewed as a responsibility of the intelligence leader of our country to stand up and say, no, and to stand up for the men and women, the intelligence community. So we started good. He started, you start very well..

Dan Coats President Trump Andrea Mitchell Vladimir Putin Trump director Russia Helsinki Aspen America Oval Office NATO Russian federation Colorado President Justice Senate Coates
"helsinki" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

03:14 min | 3 years ago

"helsinki" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"But over the past weekend, the Carter page visor affidavit was released, which was a bit of a controversial wrangling back and forth between the Democrats and Republicans on the Intel committee. And also just generally in the news, we have President Trump in Helsinki eating with President Putin alone than looking. Like he wasn't standing up for his Intel agency and credited Putin more than Donald Trump reversed himself and said, he meant to say, wouldn't when he said would then he invited Putin come to the United States in the fall. We have the business of Michael McFaul the former ambassador to Russia and former podcast guest here seeming like Trump was open to letting him be interrogated by our adversaries in Russia. We also had the indictment by special counsel Muller's office of twelve military intelligence officers who engage in all manner of hacking to interfere in the election in favor of Donald Trump with us. We talk about among those very topics. Why don't you pick one? And I'll ask questions. Well, let's start with Helsinki pre. We have a foreign policy Vizi Russia. That makes no sense. We have a policy that in essence, embraces Putin that defers to a large. Agree on Putin's worldview. You know, for many, many years now, the basic standoff and policy vis-a-vis Russia has been the United States works with allies works with a posse works with our partners principally with NATO, including alliances with the European Union and Russia tries to break up those alliances. And so what we hadn't Helsinki was sort of, I think the culmination of a month of foreign policy decision making in which the Russian foreign policy objective of breaking up those alliances succeeded. Why do I say that? I obviously the month started with the g seven summit in which President Trump on the way to that summit said, I want Russia to be part of the g. seven. And then when of course, Trump left town and left the meetings with Trudeau and others. He said, in essence that the alliance was over. That's something that Putin has long wanted to see. You also saw the NATO meeting which the president went there. And although at the end he tried to declare that it was some success that NATO was stronger. I think everybody who has followed this knows well and understands that. In fact, the ally. Alliance has been severely weakened by the attitude that President Trump took. And then of course, it was capped by the Helsinki summit in which the president said, we have a great relationship with Russia and when asked pointblank by Jonathan linear of the AP, you know, who do you believe your own intelligence services or the Russian intelligence services? He said I have quote confidence in both sides of the boat side. Exactly. It's the moral equivalence between an effect, the CIA and the KGB successor organizations, which to a CIA officer to the intelligence community professional who's out there, you know, working hard to to protect the country, risking his or her own life, risking the lives of his own assets in some very austere difficult corners of the world that is about as as great as an insult as you can hurl it intelligence professional. I agree with all of that, but do you have a theory as to why the president keeps seeming to take Putin side over his own people? It doesn't seem to be a way to endear himself to any constituency..

President Putin President Trump Russia Helsinki president NATO Vizi Russia United States Intel Intel committee Trudeau Michael McFaul CIA Carter special counsel European Union Muller
"helsinki" Discussed on Target USA Podcast by WTOP

Target USA Podcast by WTOP

02:49 min | 3 years ago

"helsinki" Discussed on Target USA Podcast by WTOP

"I'm Jay, Jay green, and this is target USA the national security broadcast. We've taken an indepth look at President Trump's trip to Helsinki and his news conference with Vladimir Putin at which some dealt was raised about whether he really believes in the US intelligence communities assessment that Russia interfered in the election. And we've also taken a look from the journalists point of view, Jeff Mason was inside that room where it all took place now to change gears and get some insight from the intelligence community about how all this went down for them as you can imagine. No one from the intelligence community that's actually working now would say anything about this because obviously, President Trump the commander in chief is their boss. So what we did was we turned to Robert Bayer. He's a former CIA covert operative and a former CIA official who has amount of decade of experience working the ROY. Russia issue for the agency, and he joins us now as well to talk about Robert. The conversation during the news conference was something that most folks were stunned after they witnessed it and simply couldn't explain what was going on. What was your view of what you heard from the president and and and Mr Putin at that news conference in relationship to Russian meddling in the US? Well, you know, frankly, look at the president's. He went into that meeting knowing the criticism about his connection connections with Russia, and you know, you just have to wonder whether you know there's some sort of control that Putin has something on Trump. There's no other reason why you would go in to that meeting like that and. You know. It was. It was it was disgusting. It's alarming, that's what it is. I mean, you really do have to wonder what sort of control Putin has over Trump. There was politically made no sense at all. Don't forget. This is a country that has just killed somebody result in the death of a nerve aged and attack in Britain. You shut down in airliner. He's invaded the Crimea. He has SAS innate s- into entertain the side of rush. Over American intelligence is a former intelligence officer is quite alarming. So looking at it from that point of view, as a former intelligence officer yourself, how could that have taken place? When did it take take place? If that's the case, the the what you have to compromise, if there wasn't. Thing you have to look at. You have to look at the history of Trump nineteen eighty-seven..

President Trump Vladimir Putin Russia president Robert Bayer US Jeff Mason Jay green CIA Helsinki officer Britain Crimea official
"helsinki" Discussed on Target USA Podcast by WTOP

Target USA Podcast by WTOP

04:07 min | 3 years ago

"helsinki" Discussed on Target USA Podcast by WTOP

"And that in fact, that focus would also be at the NATO meeting and then at the meeting and Helsinki. And so we were prepared to have him discussed the same things that his advisors had, but that's clearly not what he did, and that became, you know, even clearer and his response to my question and the and the question from my colleague. You know, he's obviously tried to walk that back a little bit this week after the fallout that he received from his performance at that press conference. And in general, at the summit. Yeah, my analysis is it's what he believes. I mean, I think what he said, there's what he genuinely believes. I think he has. He genuinely believes that it's important to have a strong relationship between the United States and Russia, and he wants to have that strong relationship with Putin. I can't say more about, you know, to what extent that relationship existed beforehand. Both the president and President Putin said, look weren't really on each other's radar that much before he became president United States, but clearly it's a relationship that he and the the context of him putting so much sort of positive energy into that relationship is is start compared to the way he treated traditional US friends and allies at the NATO meeting just a few days before that summit. And you know, not too long ago at the g seven and Canada's. Well. I've, I've dominated this conversation with my questions in in in request, but would you just take a minute or so to just tell us your thoughts and your observations of everything involved in this historic situation? Well, we covered a lot of them. I think number one, it was extrordinary to be in Helsinki that day and to start the day off with President Trump's tweet in which he blamed the United States for the deterioration in relations that just seems extraordinary to me that day. And that's why I wanted to ask about it at the press conference. I, I also thought it was it was extraordinarily that they had that press conference at all truth be told. I think that in itself was kind of a gift to prison food, and that's very important to Putin to be treated like into be to feel like an equal partner on the world stage and the United States with the Trump administration gave him that in a similar way that the president gave that sort of platform to Kim Jong on his some with the North Korean leader. Now, some people criticised that other people think that it's a great thing. But in any case, it's it's a fact that that's important to Putin. And in addition to having that summit at all, all the fact that they that they had that press conference and that the president was, you know, put himself in the position of standing next leader of Russia and was not prepared to come out and sharply criticize him or show that he had pushed hard on election meddling when. All of the intelligence agency have agreed and said that that occurred was extraordinarily. And it's, I think, I guess my final observation would be we said earlier that it will be historic. I think that's I hesitant said ever to call something a turning point because he certainly never know and especially with President Trump, you don't know what will be a turning point, what won't. But I think it will be a very key moment in his presidency. And I guess the next question will be whether or not it has any impact on his party and his chances in the midterm elections, that's Reuters correspondent, Jeff Mason, Jeff. Thanks a lot. You did a brilliant job and I'm sure that news conference is going to go down in history. Thank you again. I appreciate that. Thank you. JJ he'll we've talked for almost twenty minutes about what happened in Helsinki. When we come back, we'll look at the impact on the intelligence community coming.

President Putin President Trump president United States Helsinki NATO Russia Canada Reuters Kim Jong Jeff Mason partner twenty minutes
"helsinki" Discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

04:31 min | 3 years ago

"helsinki" Discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

"The White House announcement that Andrea referenced earlier, said Putin was invited to Washington this fall. We're you aware of that. Just want to clarify g. My reaction. I wasn't aware of that which you recommend that they're not the one on one without no takers. If I were asset question, I would look for a different way of doing it was incredible to witness, apparently some more of Andrew Mitchell interview with the director of national intelligence. The deny Dan Coats of Indiana today at the Aspen security forum. As we mentioned coats, said, he didn't know that flat Amir Putin was invited to Washington. He also said he liked the rest of us still doesn't know what Trump and Putin talked about during their two, our plus private time together in Helsinki wanna talk about all of it with a man with experience in the field also from Aspen tonight. John McLaughlin former deputy director of the CIA who also served as acting director back in four. He, of course, is a lifelong expert in counterterrorism and intelligence policy. I have to ask you your reaction upon finding out that our director of national intelligence is unaware that an adversary. Has been invited to Washington, say nothing of others of our allies who have yet to receive their first invitation of this presidency. Well, Bryan, you know, my reaction sitting there in the audience today was you know, our government is slipped out of gear. It is not functioning normally that would not happen. I've served seven presidents that would not happen in any other administration, and it shows that the president was not prepared for the Helsinki summit and is now improvising again, normally the way this works in a normal government that is in gear is that as you know, there will be deputies meetings and principals meetings to prepare for these things. The pros and cons of inviting Putin here again, would be discussed in detail. People would put their cards on the table. We might go ahead but with full knowledge of what we want out of it and with all of the unintended consequences spelled out. Clearly none of that was happened. It seemed to go from from Trump's head to his thumb and out to the world. Yeah, to your point. That's why you have a gentleman like Dan Coats on the payroll director. I. Wanna share with our audience. We use the phrase cyber hacking. We talk about being vulnerable to electric attack and you're used to this scary line of work, but director coats today, ran through what we mean when we talk about a cyber nine, eleven a phrase not to be tossed around casually, but here for just about a minute, we'll give our viewers some idea of what we mean. We'll talk about it on the other side. I'm concerned about us iber nine eleven. That's what, but that. Well, let's say you shut down Wall Street for a week. What does that do to world markets and people's investments? Let's say you crash. Bank of America or Wells Fargo or whatever. And all of a sudden people are saying, wait a minute. What happened to my account? What my retirement, we'll get it back. OK what we've seen this and we've seen coverage of that. We haven't seen the big one. What about on tack on the electric grid and New England in January, that maybe is sophisticated enough to take it out for three days how many people will die from. From minus degree weather on that. Those are the things that I think you have to. You have to try to intimidate what are the capabilities that our adversaries now have, if they wanted to use them, John, that gets our attention and what's the gap between that potential reality and our reality what we're doing to prevent it right now. Well, I think we're doing a lot to prevent that kind of cyber nine eleven in the sense of preparing our defenses. But on the other hand, this White House has eliminated the cyber coordinator who would have been the person to organize all of the efforts in the US government. The problem was cyber Brian is that everyone has a piece of it on the technical side, you have the national security agency on the policy side. You have the department of homeland security and so forth. And so on, the defense department has a role. You need someone to pool all of that together and no one's doing that from the White House angle. And I would add this Brian in a way..

Amir Putin Dan Coats director Washington White House Trump Aspen Helsinki John McLaughlin deputy director acting director Brian Bryan coordinator Indiana Andrew Mitchell Andrea CIA New England
"helsinki" Discussed on FT World Weekly

FT World Weekly

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"helsinki" Discussed on FT World Weekly

"And that's a well directed question. There is a sense today quite similar to what we felt in Alabama twenty six game when Trump one Putin was like the dog that caught the cars like out it caught up with the car when you do with it, though. If as seems to be the case, we have a broad almost unanimous and deepening sense of alarm and outrage in the American foreign policy establishment, including sotto voce amongst Republicans that it's going to be extremely difficult for Trump to say, draw down, troops in Germany, or, you know, reduce America's join NATO presence in the Baltic states will propose the Finlandisation of Ukraine. Whatever it is that Putin seeks Jif strategically from Trump is would agree gonna be far harder for Trump to deliver. And of course Henry I'm and I guess there is an element of blowback on one appear to have been Russian intelligence operations, which succeeded in their own terms. And yet. It creates the backlash in the west that they've, it seems to me helped create your selection of Russia. And there could be more of this to come with the suggestion that the British of now identified specific Russians as behind the poisoning of the script panels in songs spree. So presumably won't hear more about that. And the fact that just before the Helsinki summit, Robert Mueller issued twelve indictments against particular Russians and they're presumably there's more of that to come. So are they in some senses in Moscow braced for further storms head? I think you're right. I mean, Mr Putin today gave an annual lecture to all the credited, a diplomatic coil the foreign investors where he talked about needing different positive agenda with the west at essentially blaming what has gone on over the last month on powerful forces. He said in the US that were quote ready to sacrifice, US Russia relations to their domestic political interests. I mean, Mr Putin has gained a lot from the isolation. If you like of Russia allows him to portray the country as under siege, allows him to. To enhance his position as a strongman leader and to say to the voters, look, you might not like everything about me, but I'm the best bet you have right now because the rest of the world is against us, however, that does have drawbacks in increasingly, it's becoming obvious that the Kremlin is not particularly happy with the situation..

Mr Putin Trump Russia Henry Alabama US Helsinki NATO Robert Mueller Ukraine Baltic Germany Moscow America
"helsinki" Discussed on FT World Weekly

FT World Weekly

03:53 min | 3 years ago

"helsinki" Discussed on FT World Weekly

"I'm getting Rachman today. We're looking at the aftermath of the Trump Putin summit in Helsinki with one former director of the CIA even fomenting that the US president had committed treason to consider all this. I'm joined on the line from Washington by the f. tease Edward loose an online from Moscow by the f. tease Henry foyer. So Ed, the was the reaction of dismay outraged from a lot of the American foreign policy establishment, including, I think quite significantly few Republicans unusual names such as Newt, Gingrich, condemning the presence demeanor in Helsinki has it come down while Trump as you know the day after Helsinki fatty unconvincingly tried to reverse the impression that even Dorsey Putin's protestations of innocence of Russian interference in the American election of two thousand sixteen over Dan Coats, the director of national intelligence, a Trump appointee who had said that very. Clearly was the consensus of American intentions agencies that had been Russian electoral sabotage and that it was on going and that the state of bay today was somewhat similar to the build up to nine eleven in terms of all the warning signals and Trump was clearly peremptory by Republican outrage in some quarters, badly needed compared to outrage in all other quarters to say, actually hit misspoken any meant he's the would wouldn't instead of wood. But then the following day, Wednesday, he reversed himself. Again, it was asked, was Russia continuing to interfere in Americas electoral system. And he said, note twice, and then gave an interview to Fox News is favorite outlet in which he cost out on article. Five of NATO, that attack on one is attack on all and said, Montenegro, you know, who's head of Montenegro, these regressive people would we wanna stop well, three ever them. So there is still a lot of private Republican angst over this. But as long as Trump. Has the base with him and I suspect you know, the basis owner, I'm with him Montenegro. I mean, you know, nobody's had of it a complex of the nomadic, not worth the bones of a single grenadier cetera. As long as the basis with Trump will not gonna see that much mole carriage on the part of prominent Republicans. I very much doubt and Henry, what's the reaction being in Moscow? So that even somebody on Russian state, television had been saying that Trump had been acting like an agent of the Kremlin your. I mean, I think initially we will asking what the Russian went for shod for it was there was so much positive energy coming out of the Kremlin delegation in Helsinki. So you a row of Russia's foreign ministry said that the summit had gone better than super, which is an almost Trumpian phrase that was tempered very quickly. When I think the Russian side began to realize this is not a zero-sum game seeming to defeat Mr. Trump if you like embarrassing him and him getting all the bad headlines back home is not necessarily good for Russia. I mean, leading up to this summit the Kremlin had been privately and publicly trying to dump. And Dan expectations trying to say that they weren't expecting too much, but it's obvious that they were hoping for some kind of progress in something somethings that come back to their voters and for Trump to go back to his vitamins, say, look, working with Russia is possible. Moscow does want to see sanctions eased. It does want to see more trade more investment from the west and from America. So initially euphoria that Trump had not raised any of the really difficult things had said that he agreed Mr Putin on hacking though, of course, as I just said that was native attracted, but now a sort of sense that well, we're not actually in a better position tool and perhaps in a worst one, if congress and other politicians in America make this a lot harder for Mr. Trump to ease. Any pressure on Moscow. Yeah. So ended in a funny way. Do you think that at least in the short term, Trump's performance could almost have been counterproductive for Russia because it raised so many hackles in Washington, seventy alarm bells that it's going to be even harder to make concessions in the broader government community to Russia hadn't. He makes a very good point..

Mr. Trump Russia Dorsey Putin Moscow Helsinki Montenegro Dan Coats Washington director Henry foyer CIA Fox News US NATO Edward president Henry Ed America
"helsinki" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

The Daily Zeitgeist

04:18 min | 3 years ago

"helsinki" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

"And we're back and we wanted to continue to talk about the story that seems to be occupying most people's thoughts right now most media outlets thoughts which is the putin trump's summit in helsinki guys i gotta be honest i was on amazon prime all day yesterday did something happen i yeah apparently it did i i didn't think it was a big deal but so we talked about it yesterday just a couple of things we had a person who's very far to the left on as our guest yesterday and you know he had some extremely spicy takes about you know why he didn't think any of this mattered and you know it was also one hour after the press conference so we were still digesting it and i don't know i mean suffice to say you know josh who is part of democratic social of america their what their focus is on is about working people running the economy and society democratically to meet human needs so foreign policy isn't the priority i think politically for for disa because they're all about empowering working people now i think what happened is yesterday the people took this you know his take was i think maybe he personally believes that it isn't a priority because working people and the middle classes is based dying here yes and i personally pushed back when he asked me if i thought it wasn't important because i do think it's important because any kind of fuck ary or meddling from russia is maintains the power structure in this country and keeps the gop empower and this enabling to keep going on and also to things can be important at the same time yes and even though he believed that i do not and i know some some people were sort of disappointed in like oh what did you push back look these there to have his opinions on that i back but again yes i can make that clear that we'd obviously these two things are very important and at the end of the day like when you look at how just sort of like things like wage stagnation and lack of access to reliable healthcare is a huge problem for american citizens that does have a very destabilizing effect on our population as well because it creates more division ended allows the corporate agassi at the top to point the finger at other people and say it's not us hoarding all of the wealth it's these other people that are taking your opportunity yeah but we still need to democracy to function and russia is kind of getting the way of that so let's talk about that personally so it didn't change anything i believed heading into the press conference because i believed trump was incapable of saying anything wrong about russia because either his ego won't allow him to like admit that he got helped in his electoral victory or because they have some sort of compromising information on him which we'll talk about in this age more ego than that right even if they have something on him it's all about him looking like he didn't win right right and that's all he cares about because like you say you worry about more than one thing at once it's like every time this comes up he just it's a witch hunt rail but it's it's not about just you the russians attacked yet right so why don't you yes i if you had nothing to do with it or if you did it's still about the fact that it happened so as a president let's worry about that yeah but he doesn't understand what it means to be president and that's and that's the main problem right that's way yesterday was so fucked up is that he had the opportunity as the leader of the country to confront the person who is meddling in our democratic process yeah and it was significant but i found it completely unsurprising like going into that there was no doubt in my mind that he was not going to confront putin first of all because he has a huge crush on putin but also because he just doesn't have it in him i don't think to to be confrontational with them no he's can only be confrontational with limit right yeah that really does seem to be the case he he gets pretty spicy when it's may or merckel but yeah and it's putin it was one of those things that we were talking about sort of the black hole analogy of sort of like you know you don't have to.

putin helsinki one hour
"helsinki" Discussed on Pod Save America

Pod Save America

04:22 min | 3 years ago

"helsinki" Discussed on Pod Save America

"And that's part of the core case i think you know again i the the reason i went to the fbi because this person played a significant role in the election attack not because he got a text fifteen hours after the polls closed or sent me a text fifteen hours of the polls close making it clear he knew exactly what was going on inside the white house and this is not a republican and not somebody who has any ties to trump so i think that there will i i assume it must be true that there are many witnesses like me who were witnesses to stuff that nobody knows about who were watching people who no one's paying attention to who are part of this and so yeah i suspect that that kind of case is going to be pretty pretty surprising and pretty pretty strong i mean i like i i've said this that i i never talked to peter struck who's the fbi agent that that trump a attacked in helsinki today i he wasn't anywhere near the testimony i gave to the fbi i wasn't actually speaking to the muller inquiry when i did and i can point to things that between what i told the fbi and what what i found you know shortly thereafter lying out there in public i can get right to trump and so and i assume that's true via number of means and therefore muller sitting on a lot and he i think is going to roll it out and if today is any indication of mean finally we've got republicans saying this is beyond the pale we cannot have a president subject himself to hostile foreign power like he did like trump did today i think we might see some momentum finally turning against trump mercy hey it's john lovett here quick question on level of surprise six cents what what kind of a twist are we heading towards here is it more like the village where it's a bit disappointing but and doesn't hold together what do you think i'm so bad at pop culture pleased on quiz me in public i'm no i think there there are some big plot twists i did a series some months ago when when the questions that muller wants trump to answer came out and i laid it out i'm like this is clear quid pro quo i mean they went to trump and said we'll help you we want sanctions relief we want syria throwing ukraine maybe we'll throw in a trump tower and that's that's it that's that is the basic equation we're talking about then throw in israel and the emirates and the saudis and the station head on a spike until those and and basically all the most you know awful human rights abusers sitting in the shells islands with eric prints and that's gonna develop some and that's going to turn into kind of garden variety money laundering that also happens to be tied with the theft of the election but the core story of an interesting definition of garden variety what home depot are you going to well it's okay it's you the verse size garden all in totally right it's massive it is massive corruption in it's all of this i mean eric prince is i i you you know know i'm i'm in in i'm in a town with about ten buildings named after him and and it's perfect for him right because it's about making a lot of money off of killing people for other people and doing it to keep very powerful corrupt evil men in power you know i think that's that's the short story and that's why trump likes putin so much and likes the saudis so much likes bb netanyahu so much so that's that's the narrative but i but again i think that the basic equation is this quid pro quo the the help four sanctions relief the help for syria and trump tower thrown in because trump will do for trump tower and football phone mercy we all kind of wish you worked for bob muller but you don't you're an independent journalists who writes about all these really important issues how can people support your work if they like with air well they can you know go to my site and dump money in my or just read it you know i i write very easy easy stuff and finally you know when like the last time i.

fbi fifteen hours
"helsinki" Discussed on Pod Save America

Pod Save America

04:22 min | 3 years ago

"helsinki" Discussed on Pod Save America

"And that's part of the core case i think you know again i the the reason i went to the fbi because this person played a significant role in the election attack not because he got a text fifteen hours after the polls closed or sent me a text fifteen hours of the polls close making it clear he knew exactly what was going on inside the white house and this is not a republican and not somebody who has any ties to trump so i think that there will i i assume it must be true that there are many witnesses like me who were witnesses to stuff that nobody knows about who were watching people who no one's paying attention to who are part of this and so yeah i suspect that that kind of case is going to be pretty pretty surprising and pretty pretty strong i mean i like i i've said this that i i never talked to peter struck who's the fbi agent that that trump a attacked in helsinki today i he wasn't anywhere near the testimony i gave to the fbi i wasn't actually speaking to the muller inquiry when i did and i can point to things that between what i told the fbi and what what i found you know shortly thereafter lying out there in public i can get right to trump and so and i assume that's true via number of means and therefore muller sitting on a lot and he i think is going to roll it out and if today is any indication of mean finally we've got republicans saying this is beyond the pale we cannot have a president subject himself to hostile foreign power like he did like trump did today i think we might see some momentum finally turning against trump mercy hey it's john lovett here quick question on level of surprise six cents what what kind of a twist are we heading towards here is it more like the village where it's a bit disappointing but and doesn't hold together what do you think i'm so bad at pop culture pleased on quiz me in public i'm no i think there there are some big plot twists i did a series some months ago when when the questions that muller wants trump to answer came out and i laid it out i'm like this is clear quid pro quo i mean they went to trump and said we'll help you we want sanctions relief we want syria throwing ukraine maybe we'll throw in a trump tower and that's that's it that's that is the basic equation we're talking about then throw in israel and the emirates and the saudis and the station head on a spike until those and and basically all the most you know awful human rights abusers sitting in the shells islands with eric prints and that's gonna develop some and that's going to turn into kind of garden variety money laundering that also happens to be tied with the theft of the election but the core story of an interesting definition of garden variety what home depot are you going to well it's okay it's you the verse size garden all in totally right it's massive it is massive corruption in it's all of this i mean eric prince is i i you you know know i'm i'm in in i'm in a town with about ten buildings named after him and and it's perfect for him right because it's about making a lot of money off of killing people for other people and doing it to keep very powerful corrupt evil men in power you know i think that's that's the short story and that's why trump likes putin so much and likes the saudis so much likes bb netanyahu so much so that's that's the narrative but i but again i think that the basic equation is this quid pro quo the the help four sanctions relief the help for syria and trump tower thrown in because trump will do for trump tower and football phone mercy we all kind of wish you worked for bob muller but you don't you're an independent journalists who writes about all these really important issues how can people support your work if they like with air well they can you know go to my site and dump money in my or just read it you know i i write very easy easy stuff and finally you know when like the last time i.

fbi fifteen hours
"helsinki" Discussed on Anderson Cooper 360

Anderson Cooper 360

03:40 min | 3 years ago

"helsinki" Discussed on Anderson Cooper 360

"Us right now here in helsinki helsinki is cheap international anchor christian album portion and senior political analyst david gergen who's worked with four presidents democrat and republican also retired rear admiral john kirby former state department and pentagon spokesman during the obama administration christiane we've all had some hours now to to reflect on we were sitting here watching the thing as a as it happened i'm wondering how you see this now and what happens now look i don't think there's any question that it was a massive train wreck and pulling out of this and trying to reconstruct american credibility is going to be incredibly difficult the finnish newspapers this is a diplomatic country this is not a crazy country here they're talking about trump zero putin one so that is the finish of reaction to what's happened here in the newspapers newt gingrich i don't often quote has said that this is the most serious mistake of president trump's presidency and it needs to be corrected immediately and to that end you know you just have to wonder at what point will america and its institutions decide that what's going on is dangerous if it's true what jim acosta says that the american white house is too afraid to tell president trump the things that he doesn't know this is a very very scary thing the president clearly is not a politician he needs an education when it comes to these really serious things you don't deal with maligned competitor who he says that's a compliment anyway competitor as you would in a real estate i know that sounds trite but that's what the president seeks to do take everybody as a business partner or rival and try to deal with it like that and it has just shown it's blown up in his face is blown up in the us face is blown up in his republican supporters face and to me the german tweet the foreign minister of germany is said after all this we can no longer fully rely on the white house he doesn't say america by the way we can no longer fully rely on the white house says the foreign minister in order to recalibrate our partnership with the united states we need a united confident and sovereign europe i mean it's really scary it is really scary david peter peters was saying something which i you know all the today hadn't given a lot of focus too but i think it's an incredibly important to point out if this is what president trump said publicly in front of the eyes of the cameras of the world in a little over forty five minute press conference who knows what he said face to face to letterman putin when only translators are present and there are no permanent notes being taken the very pertinent argument because there is now going to be for a long time to come a conspiracy view that they had a secret conversation they cut secret deals and that they're shaping the future of the world without consulting anybody other than selves and we'll never know for sure and that is the price they're going to pay for not having a third party in there one additional party on each side with note taking because for not having credibility i mean flattery putin certainly doesn't have credibility to his his word and i mean i you know i don't know that i'd i mean i guess i shouldn't be surprised to say this now but you know the idea that the american president doesn't have credibility to be able to tell the american people what happened in a meeting with let them reporting is you've got two guys up there and you don't believe either one so you have no idea what what for certain and i think that both sides will now be you know trying to debrief i'm sure they're trying to do that on air force one going home and to try to construct for themselves some sense of what what really went on in there but i i think we'll all go to our grave thinking was something else that happened in there and was there some secret deal and from my point of view anderson this is the worst day of the.

political analyst helsinki david gergen forty five minute
"helsinki" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Foreign Edition

WSJ Opinion: Foreign Edition

05:52 min | 3 years ago

"helsinki" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Foreign Edition

"From the opinion pages of the wall street journal this is four and addition now mary kissel welcome back to foreign edition mary kissel in new york with the former president of estonia to miss hendrick base mr president let's turn to the trump putin summit in helsinki on monday and talk about your perspective on the russian regime one is flat amir putin coming into the summit expecting what what is his main goal in helsinki i would probably say trying to convince president states that there is nothing to worry about with russia and that the sanctions which are hurting deeply are should be taken a wet taken off all of this is pure speculation simply because unlike summits when they have taken place in the bath for the best seventy years you have a fairly clear agenda head of you the the diplomats have been meeting for weeks on end sometimes even longer agreeing to the talking points the issues that will be discussed it doesn't mean they will be agreed to because that's what that's why you have this summit but you have to meteors who will then going through the agenda with the little of no takers yeah but not not here you've had several trump administration officials say that just having the summit itself is a deliverable as if you know socializing with an autocrat is really a gain for the united states i mean mr president this this sort of seems like dumbing summits down if i can be so blunt so mr putin wants the sanctions lifted he wants to convince trump that he's a really good guy what is your experience of the regime could could trump trust a word of mr putin well we have been back sleeping at a signed agreements have not been held to beginning with the budapest memorandum promising to to respect the territorial integrity of ukraine in response to giving up what was at the time the third largest nuclear weapons arsenal in the world those are signed agreements some tube with the georgia peace agreement of two thousand and seven so there's obviously the syria chemical weapons agreement the de escalation agreement about the chemical weapons agreement with obama the deescalation agreement last year with president trump is as already been broken so they're great record on the other hand well i guess i don't understand that i mean views wanna get chummy buddy buddy kind of get to know one another experience him or had already had that they had the g twenty they're better people to socialize with i mean this is the guy who's regime is deployed nerve agents in britain killing a british citizen down malaysian airliner over eastern ukraine killing almost three hundred innocent civilians the optics of this to me is a win at the beginning for putin just by being legitimised standing in with the us president well this is as with kim that i think is the primary goal is is to for domestic reasons to show that say where back in the big leagues we are now we're now i let it near putin and meeting with the the only countries that actually matters to us everyone else is small change and so that i mean this is a big win for him in that regard certainly i don't really understand the us presidents motivation in this other than there seems to have been two years at least the of hi griz appreciation of of trump combine i means choose me the best years there seems to have been great appreciation of leading mayor futon and almost at the same time this tendency to denigrate once closest friends although to give trump is credit he has imposed sanctions on putin's inner circle he's kept the prior ukraine sanctions regime on we've unleashed us energy supplies were arming ukraine i mean there is a difference between the rhetoric and the action but i take your point mr president if you're sitting in estonia in looking at this what is the sentiment there and within the the neighboring states countries like poland or latvia lithuania wh what do they think looking at the summit well we've been through things like this so many times that we avoid the chicken middle a broach we have had the people running around saying the sky's going to fall for twenty five years so i maybe no more jaded i don't i'm necessarily give that were on and we also know that i mean there are things that might come out of this that would that turned into what i guess these days is called a nothing burger we had the we had after the meeting between president trump and bruton bruton the degree to.

wall street journal mary kissel twenty five years seventy years two years
"helsinki" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

The GaryVee Audio Experience

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"helsinki" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

"Process of complete you relevance in our society and for me not having a complete religion around that is a grave grave mistake the other thing that becomes unbelievably interesting for me this morning at this keynote is the fact that in this market helsinki finland and the nordic says a whole the two platforms that i obsessed the most over today for scale facebook and instagram the ads the influence or marketing market and the organic reach are all dramatically more interesting in this market than they are in other parts of europe definitely than they are in the us and canada and other parts of south america if if i can really get you to a very simple place this morning the only thing you actually fundamentally have to understand is that facebook ads both an instrument facebook form in this market are so underpriced that even if you you're average at the creative that you put behind knows that you will get disproportionate return on your business whether you're beat to be or to see to me that is a moment that i haven't seen since early google when i think about my career when i launched an ecommerce wind business in one thousand nine hundred six i was able to build a business that was doing three million dollars a year on ten percent gross profit so three hundred thousand dollars before expenses a business of that size with a fourteen thousand dollar a year marketing budget in year one i was able to build up business from three to a sixty million dollar business in five years a hundred percent on the back of email and google edwards when i look back at that story i have enormous amounts of regret because i genuinely believe that that should have been three to two hundred million dollars.

helsinki finland facebook europe us canada south america google instagram three hundred thousand dollars two hundred million dollars fourteen thousand dollar three million dollars sixty million dollar hundred percent ten percent five years