9 Burst results for "Helena Norberg Hodge"

"helena norberg hodge" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

08:19 min | 1 year ago

"helena norberg hodge" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"6, 80, wcbm and wcbm calm are not necessarily those of the owners, management employers and after two Herself Wcbm, but they should be welcome back to 21st century radio. Eric asked. Dorian is our guest. He is clogged writer as well as a visionary, an activist and I love what he's doing. We met through Worldwatch Institute years ago. And today he is leading a movement called Guy in is, um, triple W g. A. I A n I s m dot org's So Eric When we spoke, you had a very young son who was a toddler at the time. A little bit older now on Dat was one of your own motivations as you described to us, Then in really rethinking your own life, you know, as you say, What's the best thing we can do for our kids at the watch four hours of TV a day like the average American Or we're going to give them skills they'll need to stop the echo side or at least survive ecological transition. Absolutely. You're right. He's much older. Now is not much, but he's 7.5. That's older. And yeah, that's great. Me. I I home school him along with my wife together, we which is, um, highly recommendable not doing it all yourself but sharing it. Um, but but so then he gets a different set of skills from each of us. In fact, when I was Just about to be a father asked that someone you know what he thought was the most Important skill that makes Children doing for the future. And he actually said languages. He didn't even have a date. Hey was of course, Europeans where languages they're really, really, you know, celebrated and valued. But luckily my my wife just try Wen trilingual, so she's kind of got that feel that I'm doing a lot on giving him the outdoor skills that are valuable. Together early, you know, put the most important emphasis on moral education and social emotional skills and No. Someone's We moved to Middletown where we live. Oh, wonderful community That is little community. It's a great city and in Connecticut and we found a great dough, Joe. So together we're learning karate. Oh, lovely Joe that actually teaches Children and adults together. Well, one of the things we talked about, and that last report you did for the Worldwatch Institute on State of the world, and the educational system is we talked about the outdoor education going on in the far schools, the nature schools. They think they're like 150 that air certified now in this country, maybe more. Yeah, Yeah, they're they're great, and it was out of my reach in D. C. I was very proud to be actually never to that point in my life that owned the car. On because I was intelligent. Before that my poor parents have to show me around like most American kids. On, then moved and moved to D, C and 18 years I got through without having home on the downside of that was Forest schools and opportunities outside of the Beltway. We're not accessible but moving the Connecticut overall my carbon consumption is phone, but I do drive but the plus side of that Is that I bring my son every Tuesday to a forest school. Just the town over where you spend six hours a day, every Tuesdays in in the woods. It doesn't matter if it's pouring. If it's you know, 20 below zero or whatever. They're just out there running the basics, having fun and really connecting to the earth. One is as you say, when I read a little bit of the guy in Creed, I read the first part, which is kind of the part we all know but don't necessarily want to admit, which is what a challenge our earth is having. And we with her and you then right, Therefore we commit to living radically. Sustainable lives, even to an extent that it may alienate us from our kin, our communities, our cultures we commit to sharing our philosophy and bringing others to understand and embrace. Their relations with Kaya and help heal Guy A and in the process themselves, their families and their communities. I mean, there is such an enormous gulf between, uh, psychological denial. And it Britain's that what we're facing is colossal. And as you and I and many other think we're going to have a great loss of population over the coming Decades. It's almost unavoidable. And yet there are others who, like our current president, and their administration are rolling back. Things is primary is the Clean Water Act. There is a little bit of a disconnect there. So let's talk about that, because I think this week we can absolutely tell us what you think, because I think it's so profoundly at the core of dissociation. That we have going on. And until we can get over the dissociation, how are we going toe measure up to the task at hand. Was well, that association is is too full. There's there's the psychological denial piece where you don't want to believe it, but I think at the policy level, it's something Worse than that, right in there. Our economy with entire cultures of consumer culture right there, you know, economy is based on continued economic growth. Runs on fossil fuels. You know the idea of transitioning Naive. Ultimately, if you're looking from that perspective, and you know the the ideas of everything on economic growth and the need for that, from an ecological perspective, But the pushback Constantly. Is that well, I mean our entire Banking system depends on inflating currency, which means that we have to keep running right and so that we can appreciate the dead and eventually paid eight off right. It would trigger a Economic meltdown if we actually chose to be grow, so you know, there's this. There's this struggle like that the body technological reality demands. De growth and we are locked in a political and economic reality that demands growth so they're at logger on. Unfortunately, the environmental community doesn't have billions of dollars to throw around to sway people. Opinions on through Facebook ads and through programming and every other which way on through lobbying. I should say on an advertising so so it's not surprising that That's what is being communicated. But there are playing one last point. Yeah, please, Aziz. Things get worse people. The denial is gonna go up more and people are going to look towards authoritarian to promise that they know how to get out of this. So that gets actually more frightening because fundamentalists either of the political or religious nature are going to get more and more Attention right? So whether that's the new president of Brazil, we're our own president. People are open to being swayed by people by leaders who promised that they can fix things. Right. We're just going to plant trees and that'll do it. We're still going to pollute the air, The water our food supply, But we're going to plant trees and that'll do it. You know, I think I think, though, that this effort that you're working towards and so many others, you know, when you looked at a Scandinavian countries, they have a much greater sensibility. About the intricacy of the Earth. And Helena Norberg Hodge, who I'm sure you know of local economies in Australia. I think she has a New Zealand house used to be in the UK Does such a beautiful job is an organization of showing people. The plain facts of why local economy is the answer. It's there's no mystery as to what we need to do to create resilience. Theo create the kind of world that will sustain life and deal with the challenges at hand, whether it's flooding or fires or drought or famine, etcetera or viruses or biological warfare. I mean, all these things, the realities and to pretend that they're not is, um Too, I guess just to ignore the reality. So you say that, unlike the Western.

Australia Dorian Eric Helena Norberg Hodge Clean Water Act New Zealand UK 21st century Worldwatch Institute Joe Earth Facebook Kaya 7.5 18 years this week Aziz Creed Connecticut first part
"helena norberg hodge" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

07:58 min | 1 year ago

"helena norberg hodge" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"The baby who makes the baby feels safe. The idea of letting a baby cry would be anathema to a band of people before civilization. They would all take care of that baby. And the thing is, we have these hundreds of genes. But civilization has repressed many of them. So we're not As connected to each other as we could be. We're not as empathic as we could be. We're not as caring as we could be. We're not his interdependent as we could be. Twisted genes are repressed. Oh, and before you passed that point, I just think it's so fascinating because epigenetic ce I mean, there's a whole field now that says even our traumas, you know, come in the bloodline and DNA. We know that now our genes could be turned on and off both by ourselves and at a distance, which is just fascinating. But I liked that you went far enough to say that authoritarian parenting damages our Children. Yes, Yes. Well, you know, you've got to give Children the room to grow and to have imagination and Teo Fail, but also give them the confidence to believe in themselves safe boundaries, so they don't hurt themselves. You know, I was so glad you have so many things in your book, and I like feel like I'm in a big hurry to truck get to all 50 questions, but I just want to point out a few things you have done that I think are so exceptional. Rob. I was so glad to see you're inclusion of Helena Norberg, Hodge and the book because you and I have come to the same conclusion as she has That this kind of globalization and this loss of ethos of care is really destroying the world. Absolutely. Absolutely. On DH Helena Norberg. Hodge does a brilliant job in her movie economics of Happiness she sees so on top of the whole story. It is a plague upon humanity, really, and The idea that both parties really both political parties really advocate for globalization on we have to get to an understanding that globalization as it exists. Is awful for people. It's great for big corporations, transnational corporations, but for human beings, it's terrible. I think she did it. She did. A funny study recently of the water that was exported from Australia to Europe was the exact same number of bottles they exported from Europe to Australia. And yet when you calculate the imprint the carbon footprint the gasoline It's insane, and I mean literally. It is what Thomas says would say, You know, we're in the land of the insane There's a lot of insanity going around. You know, Frank Zappa used to say hydrogen is not the most common element in the universe. Stupidity is I'd like to say people are so stupid. It blows my mind. One of the other things. You talk about his patterns. You know when we're trying to change ourselves, So let's say everybody in the audience goes. Yeah, yeah, let's all be more caring. Yeah, yeah, Let's see. Give it a try. Let's talk about some of the things that get in our way. Because you suggest there are six stages in the connection process. Okay? Yes, yes. It's an interesting time. I believe that smart phones and the Internet are catalyzing a returned about him off, and it's their catalyzing the activation of our epigenetic potentials. And you asked me to describe epigenetic. Let me just say that very brief place. I like to use the example of a seed from a redwood tree. If you take a seat from a redwood tree, and you put it in a couple of dry sand Nothing happens. Add water and you get a stunted little plant because they're no nutrients. Put that seat into a deep forests and give it everything it needs and you get a 300 ft tall tree that last hundreds of years. Same genetics, Different epigenetic. We have to think about what we're doing to ourselves that we can facilitate the reactivation of our bottom of epi genetic potential. And the challenges Big challenges connection. We have incredible potential for connecting with each other. And this goes back literally hundreds of millions of years. The first creatures that lacked ated that breast fed existed hundreds of millions of years ago, and that requires Awareness of the infants need to feed that's empathy. So empathy is one of the oldest characteristics. And it's a deep deep part of us. What We've lost so much of it. It's repressed in so many I did work in my earlier days working with positive psychology, I got very interested in heartwarming and the feeling of a glow inside. And I tried to understand it, and there wasn't much research about it. But there was some research on smiling, so I looked at a lot of research was smiling and I found that happy people had stronger smile, muscles and Depressed people had stronger frown muscles. But one piece that I discovered was that in Japan, where at some point now I'm not so much now. I don't think but there was a kind of a culture of of hiding emotions. And What they found was that about 5% of the cadavers that they studied. There. Smile muscles had atrophied. Just imagine that Muscles for smiling. We're so unused that they atrophy. And I think that it's an example of the potential that that Of lost that we could encounter in ourselves, but it also gives us the potential for how much more we can be. How much more we can become. And so I got into with this interest in the heartwarming experience that glows I started looking and asking people about their heartwarming experiences and I collected literally thousands of them, and I found that some people were telling the experiences that I think we're really heartwarming, but they were positive experiences and I started kind of putting together an anatomy of positive experience, and I came up with this theory. That positive experiences are the basic building blocks. That go into our lives that give us the ability to be happy to love to trust to be in carrying relationships to cope with adversity and to face challenges. And try new things. That's a big deal. What is a big deal, but we had to take a break. Look, when we come back, we'll pick up their Why empathy is you point out these positive experiences Give us happiness, love trust care, etcetera. If you're just joining us, Rob Call is our guest. His last name is K. L l. You can learn more about his book, The bottom of revolution. Mastering the emerging.

Muscles Helena Norberg Hodge Australia Europe Frank Zappa Rob Call Thomas Japan
"helena norberg hodge" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

13:27 min | 2 years ago

"helena norberg hodge" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Radio welcome back to twenty first century radio Eric also Dorian is our guest he is a post writer having is a blog writer as well as a visionary and activist and I love what he's doing we met through world watch institute years ago and today he is leading a moving quote movement called guy an ism triple W. dot G. A. I. A. and I. S. M. dot org so Eric when we spoke to you had a very young son who was a toddler at the time it's a little bit older now and that was one of your own motivations as you describe to us then isn't really rethinking your own life you know as you say what what's the best thing we can do for kids at the March for hours of TV a day like the average American or we gonna give them skills they'll need to stop the echo cider at least survive ecological transition absolutely you're right he's much older now and they're not much forty seven and a half that's older and that's great how may I I home school and went along with my wife can manually which is I am at highly recommendable not doing it all yourself but sharing it yeah but but so then he gets a different set of skills from nature that back when I was just about to be a father asked if someone you know what he thought was the most important skill to make children willing for the future interactions with the language the name of the pay he was of course your introvert we're languages are really really we celebrated in value but likely my wife this trial will try locations it kind of got that feeling down a lot and getting in the outdoor skills that are valuable together we yeah of course the most important emphasis on moral education and social emotional skills and and also once we moved to a metal sound wonderful community that is a valuable community it's a great not a good and and we found a great dojo so together we're learning karate love leisure that actually teaches children and adults together well one of the things we talked about and that last report you did for the world watch institute on state of the world in the educational system as we talked about the outdoor education going on in the far schools the nature schools I think they're like a hundred fifty that are certified now in this country maybe more yeah yeah they're they're great and and it was out of my reach Andy Hey I was very proud to be an actually never at that point in my life and on the car and very intelligent before that one left for currents of the show me around like most American kids and then moved to the Asian and as I got through without having on the downside of that was the forest schools on opportunities outside of the beltway were not accessible but moving a Connecticut overall my urban consumption of song but I do drive but the the plus side of that is that agreements every Tuesday to a forest at school I just found over where you spend six hours a day every guy on Tuesdays in the in the world all right doesn't matter if it's pouring if it's new twenty below zero whatever they're just out there yeah I mean the basics having fun and really connecting to the beer one is as you say when I read a little bit of the guy and creed I read the first part which is kind of the part we all know but don't necessarily want to admit which is what a challenge our earth is having and we with her and you then right therefore we commit to living radically sustainable lives even to an extent that it may alienate us from our kin our communities our cultures we commit to sharing our philosophy in bringing others to understand and embrace their relations with guy and help heal guy and in the process themselves their families and their communities I mean there is such an enormous golf between of psychological denial and admittance there what we're facing is colossal and if you and I and many other think we're going to have a great loss of population over the coming decades it's almost unavoidable and yet there are others who like our current president and their ministration a rolling back things is primary is the clean water act yeah a little bit of a disconnect about that because I think that we we can absolutely tell us what you think because I think it's so profoundly at the core of dissociation that we have going on and until we can get over the dissociation how are we going to measure up to the task at hand what were the dissociation is to call there's there's a technological the Nile he where you don't want to believe it but I think at the policy level it's something worse than that in there our economy our entire culture the consumer culture right yeah Connelly is based on continued economic growth run it on fossil fuels the idea of transitioning nineteen ultimately you know if if you're looking from that perspective and and you know the the ideals of I've written on economic growth and and the need for that how many the logical but the push back constantly in that well I mean our entire banking system depends on inflating currency which means that we have to keep going I am so that we can depreciate that that in and eventually pave a not right with trigger economic meltdown if we actually close to the ground so you know there's this is the struggle that the main button logical reality demands you grow and yet we are locked in a political and economic reality that demands grow so that rap log and unfortunately the environmental community doesn't have billions of dollars to throw around to sway people's opinion on through Facebook them through programming and and every other which way and lobbying I should say and about the ties and so so it's not surprising that that's what is being communicated but there are place one last point yeah please as as things get worse people lived in I was gonna go out more and people are going to look towards authoritarian to promise that they know how to get out of it so that it actually more like a fundamentalist leader of the political or religious nature are going to get more more attention right so whether that's the new president of Brazil or president people are are open being swayed by people by leaders who promised that they can fix right we're just going to plant trees and that'll do it we're still going to pollute the air the water our food supply but we're gonna plant trees and that'll do it you know I think of it I think though that this effort that you're working towards and so many others you know would you look to the Scandinavian countries they have a much greater sensibility about the intricacy of the earth and Helena Norberg Hodge who I'm sure you know of local economies in Australia I think she is a New Zealand house used to be in the U. K. does such a beautiful job as an organization of showing people the plain facts of why local economy is the answer it's it's there's no mystery as to what we need to do to create resilience to create the kind of world that will sustain life and deal with the challenges at hand whether it's flooding or fires or drought or famine at cetera viruses or biological warfare I mean all these things are realities and to pretend that they're not is two hi kids just to ignore the reality so you say that unlike the western concept of god guy a is not all knowing all powerful or all good instead guy is limited in power in sentence and is a benevolent in other words unlike god gotcha is vulnerable I mean it's a beautiful thing to have stated that way thank you yeah I I think I'm trying to make it clear that you know that I think my worst fear that right about this guy and philosophy is that yeah I have become deified great I mean that's not gonna fortunately has led to more conflict and and more challenges and then he'll get that letter and I'm not exactly the way to say it but but for me you know recognizing that the earth is alive doesn't mean it's a conscious being that we should worship it means that we have certain right it's just it's like ancient Confucian understanding that and has right high expectations child has expectations that that means he has responsibility and obligation to care for that aren't in old age and that's that's the kind of the written code of five version that was the indigenous well first the oldest one shuffled off into the nursing homes like we do here but they were cared for and respected and valued Q. sources with knowledge and wisdom I am so right now we have modified here in the sense that you know even the way we talk about it natural resources and all that it's very extracted terminology we don't give it right now we just got over here the other day and certainly look for the source of goods and energy and all that and unfortunately that's true and if that were polluting and or changing it to a degree that it is going to tell in your working at guy and ism dot org and on your blog you know people ask so what would local guide group still with people got together and one of the things that you've written about our four main purposes of local guide groups you know and I have this kind of almost fantasy that the communes are going to come back the comments of the sixties are going to be restored in this country because in some sense it's the most sensible way to live in co housing certainly in Europe and other places is very highly developed on like our own nation but you said one of the things is reminding us of our grand goal yeah I think you've got right so if we recognize that we can we can have ambitions too you know astronaut or a famous painter all that kind of thing but if we're doing that outside of the recognition that we also need to first and foremost a killer of earth we were in a relationship with this guy ultimately whether we feel that are not in it it's hard to look at this point because we grow up in the cities and towns were were not being given actually we are towards reinforcing those messages whether easy your political as you noted in fact often phone welfare so it's not surprising that we don't understand how completely and utterly dependent we are living earth but that is that once we understand that it becomes our obligation to care for you more than anything else right so that's that's kind of what the point of that and then you also talk about learning and guy in ways yeah and so ultimately in so there's this guy and philosophy on the abstract which is also great and nice but if people aren't actually kind of living locally and then it's just a little virtual pick up right now it's mainly I don't know how long I don't know how long it's gonna interconnected virtual consumer society right yes with your if you have the resources when the resource because care center the internet will still be great so we can't afford logically to shoot this satellite that they're looking to have a great occasions for those who can afford it but there will be many go so I think all living lots of trees need to route themselves the real danger at the coach will so what does that include that means chi Ching your basic understanding it means building the community that means and next thing individuals to the earth.

Eric Dorian writer W. dot G. A.
"helena norberg hodge" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

09:57 min | 3 years ago

"helena norberg hodge" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Century radio that is the most fantastic activist book I've read since in the footsteps of Gandhi a long time ago seven Schwartz is written eight loss of change and what he did was look for twenty some years and what may for successful social movements whether in this country or elsewhere and he then correlated all of the different teachings and found that they were essentially Quaker though other organizations and societies have manifested the same things but it was a few people came together selflessly to do something of service to benefit others whether it's public education public health it cetera anyway even Greenpeace was founded by several Quakers Aline and Helena Norberg Hodge is with us for organization local futures as an extraordinary change agent in the world I encourage you to visit them often triple W. dot local futures dot org look at the work that they bring together from around the world and and take part so before the break Helena we were still talking about this thing that I brought up and I didn't mean it to become like a big discussion I'm just really fascinated that that's become an actual popular sort of theme to tell people they don't need information that's not what I was saying but you're saying now that that's what young activists are saying don't give us the information let's just go do it yeah it's happening in a multitude of ways to there's a inpatient yellow with having conferences where people are speaking the ideas into speaking act too and it is a fusion from my point of view because yes in the dominant system we have all these experts standing up on the podium you know telling us what to think of what to do action against that is quite healthy but is he needing them also to totally skipping over the vital importance of actually hearing from people who have real experience and that there is a lot to learn in order to understand what's going on in the world exactly huge work to do not to try to color names of fragmentation misinformation and code to really learn and listen to find out what's going on and it will hold to be really clear of where we're being coopted by dominance narrative that is well funded you know what that's really well some of these of course that everything from alternative health to healthy food to even even I mean yeah almost every single thing we need to do that within the market place that is healthier for us in the planet has been artificially made too expensive for the majority so this is huge current back pains all of these things as elitist and only for the and we have to you know completely deconstruct that and come back looking at being grateful if there are people who are sort of middle class and can afford to get out there and start up on this market and link up with local farmers that's fabulous let's get away from this politics of identity and really look at you know what is going on what can be done next time around was also huge bit of information which is misinformation which is that you know if it's not the most marginalized and and you know struggling people who are leading the way when then surely it must not be worth anything I don't know I mean I've been in the around the world in so many environmental gathering since all summer long strand of the same what to know we're all white contributed to this and then they end up distinguished they're doing instead of looking at how can we do this back to and we will more with people who are not so pregnant when we see it in this country I mean I have to say this whole farm movement has really started to grow even here in Baltimore and it's taken a long time I mean we've been out this forty years it's just now sort of poking through in in in the commercial setting but it is happening I know I'm so glad you're aware of that you know because it is so to me this is truly amazing how much is happening particularly with is absolutely fundamental cornerstone for a healthier world healthier through the more community which is the local food movement which is not recognizing itself as a global local food movement in reaction to a global disasters food yeah on that it is happening in yeah anything we can do to shed some light on it also to link up with movements like the rural reconstruction movement in China which is you know again it's more it's not so visible even though was started by a professor at the university Beijing who you know has a certain treating age in in that setting but it's still like an invisible grassroots movement that most people in America never right or by via company soon which is the big is social movement in the wild with about three hundred million small farmers and we not only need to know about it but we need to know why dates for how they form in reaction to the trade treaties that are destroying farmers everyone in America in China in Sweden and so there is yeah there is a lot of good news that's also hidden and that in a way it comes back to what I was saying when young amazed yeah however that information you have to work at it we have to really inform ourselves from reliable channels and and you know I love your you have all have a local bites podcast what a wonderful series to have begun again go to local futures and dot org there's so much there and so many arenas from around the world but the podcast Sir wonderful way to do exactly what you're saying so that we can learn more about what's really working in other countries and like I read about in Sweden one of your contributors talked about this H. office or home office movement yeah it's not way I know when you know when you see it yes I do feel we have in our organization we are almost I I think we are unique actually in that we're offering this whole listing prospecting strong the ground up Ron leaned lies on the ground around the world in this field away and I do think it's so important to you know when you promote localization let you do it from a global perspective and from local are you not everything is beneficial worldwide because again there's huge money going into making localization seemed like something that's just you know a white privilege people and yes it is I we are offering very valuable and rare information because we have been it's been I was gonna say lucky enough is not quite lockets ended up that way it's not for me is not always been easy to travel and I should mention also on the radio that one of the things we're doing is organizing regional conferences around the log and that these conferences in agreeing to gather this expected in a way that really inspires and generates action in the region and in fact we should think of doing something in your area at some point there right now we know we're on the agenda is a big one and let doc we've been having an annual conference in South Korea for the last four years one buy a whole city government we'll be doing a big one in Mexico because there are people in the new government can become passionate about localization and they just really yeah that's what's gonna happen you know the next generation of politicians are grew up understanding that these changes need to happen I mean we see it in some of our younger members now of the US Congress the just the different generation thank god and as Obama says they're the ones were waiting for her for the ones we've laid out for was very much I have to say no and but to come back to local stuff is happening at the grassroots I just want to stress crack I think you do that there is no error that's more important to stock on the local chewed and I just hold your hand yes and it gets involved with that because it's so inspiring and so healing no and you're right though and that's what I love about local futures you all have understood that the food movement is the leverage that we have to restore the eco system to restore community and to restore love of earth and each other and it really does happen with your hands in the soil and I want to encourage everybody who doesn't garden to do one everybody who's not ever tried to a little bit your backyard I planted my first of my beds today it's a wonderful opportunity to actually understand what it takes to grow what you eat that you get so easily from the grocery store and next time you get a cucumber try to find one that's grown locally hello thank you so much for opening up your eyes to what's really important in life and you know I I'm in my new book you know you are locally so she I'm also talking about the fact that this technology can the metric system that we have has marginalized the two most important activities and humans engage in completely marginalized first one parenting has been turned into a shadow work it's in its monsters what's happened you know and I and what's the second one we're gonna run out of time oh okay all right the second one is farming yeah I don't disagree with you even the animals agree an ethos of care for each other and our earth thank you Helena your beautiful work triple W. dot local futures.

Gandhi Schwartz forty years four years
"helena norberg hodge" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

15:11 min | 3 years ago

"helena norberg hodge" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Join us fascinating view from the ground about what actually happens when local citizens anywhere in the world. Take back their power their voice their economic presence and decision making in their own communities. I know nobody better to hold conversation about these topics with that our guest this hour, Dr Helaine, I call her Dr Elena Norberg Hajja the doctor at all Elena. Thank you. I actually vanden my PHD Chung scale in language. The only place in the world could actually decide for my faces. And I thought it's wasted time. So call you doctor Dr Halina on everything. So the last time we were together we talked a little bit about your own experience in foreign nations who've been subject to western values in corporate capitalism. And then what happened during the course of your experience, and maybe you can kind of recap that we always have new listeners. And I think it gives us a good serve subtext to how you came at this work from such a deep involvement. Thank you. Yeah. Probably started earlier than I did last time because I realized that hard in my take on of having had the experience of living in many, different coaches and speaking many languages and Paul about was growing up in Sweden, you know, socialist country and then also living in America later on. I live in France Germany in. Australia I've traveled extensively in Mexico. Italy say, and I learned in the language in in those places I become fascinated in trying to understand different views in different cultures. And then in nine hundred seventy five I was invited to go out as part of a film team to this remote traditional high on the tobacco plateau, Coa dock and also Tibet that was part of the one that had not been Cullen is d- and this ancient traditional Kutch is really reinforced and crystallized other observations that I have particularly comparing America to Europe. But even within Europe, I had found that in more in less developed pots of of Europe, it was more family. There was more community that was more respectful farming. It was a deep connection to the land and the resources and a strong community and in the high and dusty lies places in cluding, my native clean people so cut off Belichick evade been shifted through the modern global economy that was brought in their much good intention off to the second. World War was fought in genetic way ringing in modern industrial agriculture, which you know, came from the toxic chemicals that have been used for the weapons applied in the mand. But even really well intention people became convinced. It's efficient large Mona cultural cultural production was going to make life easier genuinely progressive so they brought in a country where people were replace machinery talks chemical. And then people shoved into high rise living in ever few cities. So that started a throws his of mega been -sation and mega industrialization of cuts, and I realize that even in its heyday swayed was really a place with people cutoff lonely, and isolated and this is reinforced after I had made in agok in ancient self reliant Clinton, be Sakorn Amies coaches with people would threes, the healthiest and the happiest of any people I have ever encountered and coming back to Sweden and try to. Hey, wait a minute. What are we doing? I realize in the mid seventies already that in all all the dwellings in Stockholm in base apartments and houses one puzzles leaving a low and there was such clear signs of depression alcohol. Lissome suicide, and I was trying to say, wait initially connected life that you know, that in fact, logical research, they've found even if you have a goldfish or something of a line in you have to be happy, and the is this really clear pattern with more connected to the plums the animals to the life around them and really importantly connected to each other that much happening. Not so, yeah, I had already when I was young I reflected on the fact that in the sixties ticks in America were that the average child growing up had to move about seven times was the parents who moving to jobs for the economy that was already becoming less stable, and I compared that you know, at that time that. Probably the reason we had a bitch more community in Sweden and in Austria had studied at university and Italy insane. I found you know, Pippa had much strongly sense of identity that with much less troubled. They there was this violence was next depression list, psychological problems. I talking too long. No, no, no, no. I think to have the whole picture is is really essential. Because. You know, when we think about how fast everything is going now, and everything is connected and all the multitasking, which is really sort of a subversion of the mind. So that the mind can't do very much deep, and yes, maybe you can get things done, but they're not necessarily being done in a in a deep sense from heart and mind, but you notice, and you talk about this is that when this global corporatism comes in brings in factory or brings a new goods or brings in the TV and brings in the computer, and then brings in the values of the west that it is such a destructive effect on the local economies on the sanctity of traditions on the welfare of the people from there as you point out from their ability to grow and keep their own food. And that's really one of the things you all are working on to make sure we have sovereignty over our food. It's a thing. That's I've always cared. Most about. But the effect of this global ization is not just about making money and making products this computerized Inter-nationality while there's some beautiful things that can come from it. There's some very destructive things. We're already seeing happened to the just the general community as community. Yeah. And I would say that again, postal my perspective to lead that tobacco is one. That is very read these days in order to see them talking about people would have to back to read books and even one hundred years ago when people had an experience of an encounter deeply in an ongoing way of coachee where people not been colonized difficulties days, if you go to the sort of technical village in India, China, not most Africa, did you see type of public T you seeing people who through colored sation. Or two modern development, which is another form of enslavement through debt. Major disruptions all the time. The modern economy have to remember from the beginning has been focused on the swing. Selker lines did in the theory is comparative advantage, which really suited Bloedel trade is back in the seventies and sixteen hundred who would destroy self reliant communities and order to push them onto huge monocultures to provide for the west. You know, they grow it in cotton plantations to Kofi mining and in Europe Pygmalion, close pushed off the land to become cheap labor in the factories. So in order to really get clarity on tradition pasta. And so we really do have to go really only look at places that had not yet been enslaved in that way. So I do want to say that when you also see in those faces as I didn't have and baton and to some extent and bum or. Then the role of technology you're seeing completed from picture because once you have colonized people have thousands of people from giant cotton Ponte Shen when them technology, of course, excite Kogas, people standing bent over the whole day doing the same thing some kind of mechanical, and so you place that with machinery and everybody says, oh, yeah. That's programs. They haven't compared it with a way of producing food. If you've lied charge their land resources, they have a whole range of different activities different products. And by the way in small diversified farms years much, higher method other important, quite we should talk about. Now. What's happened is that we don't go back. Go back Ogle rapidly. Full to the localization moment, we come see so kidding white. Technology is more the problem than it is an advantage. We have to actions. That win conducive bodies date and do like, you know, farming as part of a community group doing different things every day even within the same day. They're different activities. They are finding that fall more enjoyable than sitting in front of the computer day, they're finding the bodies actually need and not only experiencing that. But there's more and more medical research. Nab it's telling us. I don't know if you've heard this saying don't do computer within twenty minutes get up every twenty minutes and move, otherwise, you, you know, you're going to be talking about a bad back about all kinds of croplands pressure also things anyway, I would argue that today waking up in a holistic way to the role of technology in the global economy. And really, you know, I will it's about waking up to the road of the global climbing. Once you sit from a healthy baseline, healthy more community deep in gauge to the natural world. More productive ways of growing food building houses, providing basic needs including medical cat. If we look at the role of technology on this from the holistic point of view, we will see that the internet has been a tool that has Vaseli strengthen global corporations that are really are decimating jobs social cohesion of environment as an accelerating rate. Using those tools we win came down to the Brussels. They seduced kid blue in the sixties and seventies wanted more community wanted more connection to the land. They told oh now so the information age new going to be able to sit in your village head all that beauty of nature have community, and you'll be to be, you know, job knitting for raw for the computer. Whether the promises of the information society had knocked worked. All around. People are general patterns, people are working hard FOSS to just stay in place. And I'm insane placing of aid mortgage have some kind of educational opportunities. So the children have some kind of health care to do that people working harder longer than Abba. So I'm really really came that we try to encourage a deep and broad look at this. And look at it from the point of view Walker me do to get what can we do when we changed to a we it's impossible for anyone imagine icon to living that my computer and more visiting my mobile phone. We have all been made dependent on these tools and have picks you said, well, you know, you just stop using those is absolutely ridiculous. We need to make use of those tools, and as you're doing self. Having rated program to start join discussion, and I hope rapidly wake up to the fact that we concept rate the Paul technology, particularly over the last thirty forty years with the cough of corporate power. Pose a big money in big science. In other words, almost all the money has gone into off favors not just giant corporations that ultimately the military industrial complex in a way that it's extremely destructive. And of no question about it. Yeah. I mean, we do have to take a break. But it's really true when we look at the and some people like to call it the corporate military industrial complex. It's rather extrordinary invasion of idea. In fact, it became an acceptable restraint in the military became the the st-. Strategy for healthcare. It's okay. Do this do that to the body? You know, thirty percent dive at the other seventy one. So it's like an acceptable risk. Let's bomb the village to save a few huts. It's same kind of sickness of domination and exploitation and ultimately ruination. The rest of the program. We're gonna look out with our guests. Helena Norberg Hodge from this wonderful organization called local futures. And you must go to their website..

Europe Sweden America Dr Elena Norberg Hajja Italy Dr Halina Dr Helaine Stockholm Australia Helena Norberg Hodge France cough Kofi mining Pippa Paul cluding Vaseli
"helena norberg hodge" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"helena norberg hodge" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"WCBS studios are sponsored by a safe retirement solution. Listen every Sunday at one and two PM to hear rob ROY talk about your safe retirement solution. First century radio is sponsored by Harada Masin company. Now, more of twenty-first-century radio. With your host doctors. Oh, Harada Mus. Welcome to twenty per century radio. I'm Dr Zohar Baroness Lor quarters are executive producer and Anita. Brockton. Our engineer joining us for an ongoing conversation is Helena Norberg Hodge whose organization local futures is a recognized pioneer of the new economy movement. Local futures has been raising awareness for four decades about the need to shift direction away from dependence on global monopolies and towards decentralized regional economies they produce books films and other education for action tools as well as organizing activists oriented conferences and workshops worldwide. He's projects are helping to catalyze global movement for change as they show. So clearly when the regional or locally Connie's are decimated by global monopolies. They don't actually grow the well being of the community as reported global corporatized economies have the. Opposite effect of dehumanizing. People often debasing the environment and fragmenting local businesses and tax faces for all communities as part of an international alliance for localization..

"helena norberg hodge" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:48 min | 3 years ago

"helena norberg hodge" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Trek, some right up from the southwest and a wet Friday surfers here Baltimore, forty seven degrees overnight tonight with an overcast sky and then cooler than average high temps for our Friday with a high fifty one degrees quarter to half inch of rain on Friday, Saturday, cloudy, sixty seven Sunday, partly cloudy, sixty eight degrees and then seventies in play for Monday with some afternoon. Thunderstorms on Monday about a half inch of rain possible. One days for packing a lunch. I'm Scott Lawriemore Weather Channel for talkradio. Six eighty WC. The WCBS studios are sponsored by a safe retirement solution. Listen every Saturday at one and three to hear rod Barohi talk about your safe retirement solution on the next twenty first century radio. Dr Susan Martin as on the field guide to the spirit world. And then Helena, Norberg Hodge locals are future. Sunday night at eight twenty first century radio. Talk radio six eighty WCBS. Mm. The green. Nello di. Smile. Again. When our Love's new. Each rate. But that was fall. Constantly. Start up some. These. Stars are. You are. Retain? Paradise. Rose. No, I dream. In my. There hallway. Will. My star..

Norberg Hodge Dr Susan Martin Scott Lawriemore rod Barohi Baltimore Helena talkradio Rose forty seven degrees sixty eight degrees fifty one degrees One days
"helena norberg hodge" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"helena norberg hodge" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Baltimore. We'll have quite locked in springtime yet in a forecast who got a cool down coming our way late week by Friday. But wow, what a blustering we forecast we have had to endure with thirty mile an hour wind. The wind speeds relaxing here overnight, not as blustery Thursday. Forty five degrees for the overnight low that big low that came up to user SeaWorld now heading out into the open waters. The plant Thursday mostly cloudy, high sixty five Friday chance for showers high of fifty two meterologist Scott Larimore channel for talkradio. Six eighty WC the WCBS studios of brought to you by safe retirement solutions, call robbery or one zero two six six eleven twenty safe for Tirmizi solutions dot com on the next twenty th century radio. Dr Susan Martin as on the field guide to the spirit world. And then Helena Norberg Hodge on locals our future Sunday night at eight twenty first century radio. Talk radio six eighty WCBS. Dustin. Just. See? Crime. Used to see..

Helena Norberg Hodge Scott Larimore Dr Susan Martin WCBS studios SeaWorld robbery Dustin talkradio Baltimore. Tirmizi Forty five degrees
"helena norberg hodge" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

03:18 min | 3 years ago

"helena norberg hodge" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Looks like you've been busy. I always see fix your family at all those events. What gives that ticks vet Tix gifts? Vet Tix is an awesome charity that gives free event tickets concerts sporting events and shows serving military events, including immediate family of troops killed in action. You wouldn't believe how these offensive helped me adjust to being just like a good time that I could have with my family, and you know, all these new happy memories were making are priceless. I said, no, the people appreciate it service and your sacrifice. Yeah. It is listen, I've got extra tickets can donate them. It's easy. Just go to vet Tix dot org. It's a great site. You could give your extra tickets and other vets like meek and sign up to get them. Cool. All right, buddy. Get to know your back and hey, thank you for your service on the next twenty first century radio. Dr Susan Martin is on the field guide to the spirit world. And then Helena Norberg Hodge on locals are future. Sunday night at eight twenty first century radio. Talkradio six eighty WCBS. To talk to George Noory called the wild line at eight one eight five zero one four one zero nine the first time caller line is eight one eight five zero one four seven two one to talk tool free from east of the Rockies. Call eight hundred eight two five five zero three three from west of the Rockies toll free. Call eight hundred six one eight eight to five five to reach George via Skype use Skype name George nine seven three one three send Georgia. Text message anytime. Eight one eight two nine eight six five to one. This is coast to coast AM with George Noory red programs for the rest of the week. Make.

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