20 Burst results for "Helen Keller"

"helen keller" Discussed on The Experiment

The Experiment

03:33 min | 2 months ago

"helen keller" Discussed on The Experiment

"One that Helen Keller had, too. It does sneak in. It does show up in certain places. It's really hard. She bumped into it as she began to build her new life in Seattle. It could come up when she was job hunting, or when she was inviting a new love interest over to her apartment for a home cooked meal. She said that voice can blur in the kitchen with me and tell me that I'm not good at cooking and every time that voice comes up. She's to choose to ignore it. I'm still working through it. It's the.

Helen Keller Seattle
"helen keller" Discussed on The Experiment

The Experiment

05:28 min | 2 months ago

"helen keller" Discussed on The Experiment

"I was horrified. I actually had one of those moments where your blood kind of runs cold. And it was shortly after reading that that the whole TikTok conspiracy theory bubbled up into her world. And so she found herself newly resistant to defend Helen Keller. I see. But also wanting to call out the TikTokers for saying things that were not true, and so she came to us authentically lost. Wanting to use reporting to figure out both how to feel about Helen Keller in her own heart. But also to just legitimately understand how Helen Keller came to want to remove disability from.

Helen Keller
"helen keller" Discussed on The Experiment

The Experiment

07:49 min | 2 months ago

"helen keller" Discussed on The Experiment

"Elsa says that the ghost of Helen Keller has messed with her life in such tangible, real ways that it's affected how her life has played out. And she's come to see that it's not just her life, but all of our lives. Our brains that are haunted by Helen Keller in a pretty surprising and insidious way. So allow me to just take you back to where the haunting all began for Elsa. Yeah. Okay, so we're going, we're going to the mid 90s Seattle, nirvana's on the air. Elsa, little Elsa is on the she's on the floor in her third grade classroom. Sitting next to her classmates. I had giant Coke bottle glasses, like the 1990s were not kind to low vision children. And her teacher pulls out a picture book about Helen Keller. I distinctly remember seeing the illustration that sort of everybody sees, which is where she's standing there with her hand underneath the faucet that the pump, signing the word water into any Sullivan's hand and like, I just sort of remember being like, well, I know I can't see and I can't really hear that well, but this isn't me. She said she knew, of course, that she had some trouble seeing. I ran into things a lot. And some trouble hearing, which became particularly apparent during verbal spelling tests. The words that I was hearing my classmates say weren't the words that I was supposed to be writing down. Oh, so like they'd say fly and you'd spell sigh or something. Yeah. But whenever someone would compare her to Helen Keller, which she said happened a lot. It was always, but I'm not like that. And I think that's because I was always told, like, but you're not really blind, but you're not really. Like, Elsa says her family had always told her that there was nothing really different about her. You know, your glasses are just a little thicker than other kids. The hearing aids were just, you know, to help me a little bit. And so I consistently would try things that were probably not a good idea, but things like downhill skiing. Horseback riding. Oh, you're moving. Or, oh, I'm looking at the screen. You've got an awesome sword. Yeah, this is an early 20th century German dress sword. That's so cool. I have been fencing since I was 9. How does how does that work? Wouldn't it be scary if you can't really see the swords and things? Fencing is actually not about seeing a sword. You're dealing with the fact that you actually can feel tension in somebody else's blade. I see. Okay. Yeah, so anyway, Elsa is a kid was doing all this really rad stuff, including the everyday adventures that any kid has in childhood like. Climbing trees. There was this one tree in Ravenna park in Seattle. It's enormous. Because of how big this tree was, a lot of light didn't filter through, so it was kind of a dark Heidi place. And I remember being able to sort of use one spot to kind of lift myself up. She knew this tree really well and knew every branch. There was sort of a sloping tree bit. And she would just go higher. And I remember it was a lot of lighting and higher, more like whole body contact with the tree. And eventually I could get all the way up to the top of the tree. How did you feel there? I felt safe there. So I felt like an escape. So one day I was up in the tree and then the sky opened. There was a huge rainstorm. The tree had changed the environment of the tree had changed. What if I slept and now I can't figure out how to grab onto a different spot? And it was kind of like, well, how do I get down safely? And suddenly she got lost. But the texture of the tree had changed, and everything about how I interact with my space is about texture. She did feel like she knew the world, but then you add rain, and then she suddenly lost in this tree. She knows so well. I literally couldn't get out of the tree. There were things that I definitely didn't know the limits of until they sort of smacked me in the face. She said her childhood was scattered with moments like these. Moments, no one else could really relate to. Moments where she wished there was someone who got it. And she said this sense of frustration and loneliness with those frustrations really came to a head when her family moved to New York City. When she was in the 9th grade. In Seattle, my family drove with me to school. Right in the or if I was getting up every morning at 6 45 and getting on the subway. I would just stare at the ground. 'cause otherwise I would trip and fall. And so one morning, it's taking forever for her to get to school. Like with stairs, I would stop at each step and shuffle my feet out and then I would take a step down. And she arrives late to her classroom. My English teacher stopped me at the door and she was like, Elsa, I'd like to talk to you for a second about your classmates essay. He wrote his essay about you and how he admires you and I would like him to read it out loud in front of the class this morning. And I was like, what? She says okay. Goes and takes her seat. And he stands up in front of her class and reads his essay in the first line of the essay as I admire Elsa because she's like Helen Keller. And I just wanted to like think several thousand feet below the surface of the earth. Why? I mean, I think I would have been embarrassed, like, why are you making a big deal of me doing things that everybody else does? Like everybody else goes on the subway. Everybody else goes up and down the stairs at school. And why do you admire me for doing them? Did you again have the and I'm nothing like her? Was there also that part of it? He's wrong. I think it was even more like, oh, maybe I am a little bit like her. Like, I think it might have been the first time I started to realize that there could be something. And for Elsa that thought was terrifying. Because when she thought about what became of Helen Keller as an adult, she lived with a her teacher and her teacher's husband. Because I just supposed to live with my parents and my grandparents, like what was I supposed to do? The images Elsa had of Helen Keller's adult life. Painted a kind of nightmare for her. There was Helen Keller wearing pearls and smiling. Holding a flower. There she was holding a book. There she was. Holding hands Sullivan's hand, sitting on Anne Sullivan's lap. As the grown-up slowly growing grayer and grayer. It seems through the photos. Her smile, getting wider and wider. She just becomes more and more of this very like, stayed artifact. Would you want to be compared to somebody who's entire.

Elsa Helen Keller Seattle Ravenna park nirvana downhill skiing Coke Sullivan aids New York City Anne Sullivan
"helen keller" Discussed on The Experiment

The Experiment

05:49 min | 2 months ago

"helen keller" Discussed on The Experiment

"Here I am here I am. Little mailer..

"helen keller" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

06:39 min | 2 months ago

"helen keller" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Forget how Sullivan taught Helen to communicate by spelling out words in her hand Keller became a world renowned author and lecturer and a global ambassador for the disabled We salute the extraordinary Helen Keller From the NYPD to the Secret Service to behind the microphone taking the fight to the radical left and the putrid swamp you're listening to the Dan bongino show Here he is Dan bongino So folks only predictable thing the only predictable thing about this this war going forward is going to be its unpredictability That's it You can be certain that things will change so rapidly that anything you think you thought yesterday you won't be thinking again tomorrow because what you thought yesterday would be subjected to a new set of variables we didn't even account for the day before There are so many unknowns This isn't Y equals MX plus B where you're just missing the slope or the Y intercept You're missing the slope the Y intercept the X and the Y you're missing everything There's so many things here That could change Just let's try in the beginning just to discuss some of the variables in this Ukraine Russia war going all right It's clearly I mean it's a war at this point It's a state sponsored terror attack by a lunatic in Russia who thought it'd be a good idea to attack a sovereign state entitled to its own big R God given right of self determination So just a couple of the variables here that could change things on the ground rapidly Number one what is the domestic situation in Russia What does that look like Folks Russia is not even begun Talking about the citizens here for a minute If it's not even begun to feel the pain of the economic long-term and medium term damage it's going to be done to it By the globe by locking them out of international payment systems by locking them out of their money and foreign banks locking them out I mean everything from payment systems to tech companies they're going to be locked out And as I said yesterday there are businesses in Russia that have to deal with now global supply chains That's obvious They're dealing with a global integrated just in time broken up supply chain where even made in Russia products may have a made in Russia label on it Are going to have a significant portion of their of the mechanics of that product And pieces and inputs in that product build overseas How are they going to clear their payments When these businesses start to go bankrupt and people start to lose their businesses and the value of the ruble is already in the can recovered went back down again recovered went back down again The rubles in a world of trouble If you're doing business in Russia you pay me to get cleared and rubles Your rule is worthless you have two choices as I said yesterday you can hold your ruble and watch the ruble go down and down and down and down and be like a valueless poker chip You're playing with your Friends for fun or you can try to trade your rubles for some foreign currency or gold while the rubles in the can knowing you're going to pay three and four times what you would have paid for just a few months ago For the same product What's going to happen Domestically when the strong man Putin who needs this feeds his mask he needs his fake mask of strength Look at me let me flex my biceps judo guy whatever What's going to happen when a guy who does not is not can not lay claim to a democratically representing anyone The guy's a strong man He's a loser He can not lay claim to be in democratically elected What happens when he loses his domestic support at home I bring that up in terms of the larger picture and the unpredictability of this because for all the talk about Vladimir Putin no one can seem to get in this guy's head and everybody seems to have a different opinion if he's sane or not Listen whether he's sane or not isn't a question I can answer I have not had the ability to sit down and speak with him obviously and diagnose his mental deficiencies or any possible psychopathology he has I don't know Is he insane right now Is he having medical difficulties or is he just so isolated based on some of the reporting which states that he doesn't use a phone and he doesn't use the Internet a cell phone doesn't use a cell phone doesn't use the Internet I don't know if that's reporting is true either But if that is true is he so isolated that he's making poor decisions because he just doesn't understand what the rational outcome is because he's not being exposed to a full portfolio of information The answer is I don't know the bottom line is this guy is not acting rationally right now Whether it's because he doesn't have the inputs the information inputs to make a sane rational decision or because he's insane and is losing his mind and is having a health difficulty Either way it leads to this equaling really bad outcomes Now the question is if the guys having difficulties right now acting reasonably and rationally which it's clear it's clear crystal clear He's going to destroy one of the world's most powerful countries within the next few months if this continues What happens when he gets desperate and he loses his domestic population That's a variable A lot of people are starting to consider here Because remember this isn't a fairytale Again it's not some aesop's fable Here that enters with that you're done with it We're all patting ourselves on the back You read the story you go there's so many lessons there it's so wonderful Not all of these stories which appear good on their face will have good outcomes In other words it's probably a good thing that he loses domestic brush support right You don't want a country of millions of people armed with nuclear weapons all hating us You want them to believe hey this guy Putin's a nut He doesn't represent us right Correct Everybody you're not in their heads I get it So you say well how can that not be an unambiguously good thing Because the question is in the real world where we have to ask us as conservatives we're not liberals We're not done since We have to ask ourselves this conservatism responsible actors here And then what So he loses domestic support and that is a good thing.

Russia Dan bongino Helen Keller NYPD Secret Service Keller Sullivan Helen Ukraine Putin Vladimir Putin
"helen keller" Discussed on Made of Mettle

Made of Mettle

05:17 min | 7 months ago

"helen keller" Discussed on Made of Mettle

"Hey there be one. My name is ari in welcome to made of metal a motivational podcast. Where we tell stories about regular people overcoming insurmountable. Thank you so much for joining me for another wonderful episode of made of metal. I hope everyone enjoyed last week's episode of exploring the duality of man. And i wanted to continue on that theme especially in terms of understanding that the decisions we make are what defines us outside of anything else so this week we'll be covering an individual who experienced a personal injury due to illness that most would have considered catastrophic in life ending especially during a time when there was little to no resources available to cope with that loss. This wasn't a loss of a person but of their own individual senses in thus a good chunk of their personal independence having to navigate a world. That just wasn't equipped for their needs plus having to forge a completely new path toward understanding how to work with people such as themselves. This individual also went on to fight for several noble causes all geared toward establishing basic freedoms and rights for the unseen in society. And may were able to do this as they were. Well acquainted with the marginalization of their own group. I truly love stories like these for their ability to depict this strength and resilience that lives within us all. In spite of whatever circumstances life throws at us plus as you all know. I am such a huge fan of stories involving strong women. Truly lights my fire so this week. We'll be covering the strong the sensible the steadfast helen keller helen keller was born on june twenty-seventh eighteen eighty in alabama the eldest of two daughters. Helen's parents arthur. And catherine had four children total including two older brothers from a previous marriage. Helen's father arthur was a newspaper editor for a local publication and her mother was a homemaker financially. The family wasn't well off in owned a farm to sustain their meagre lifestyle..

ari helen keller helen keller Helen arthur alabama catherine
"helen keller" Discussed on Quarter Miles Travel With Annita

Quarter Miles Travel With Annita

01:39 min | 9 months ago

"helen keller" Discussed on Quarter Miles Travel With Annita

"Workers rates..

"helen keller" Discussed on Quarter Miles Travel With Annita

Quarter Miles Travel With Annita

06:21 min | 9 months ago

"helen keller" Discussed on Quarter Miles Travel With Annita

"And at that point basically if you were blind and he wanted to lead a lot of stuff you had to know all these different systems because so many books would only be printed in one system. Not every system So you sort of. If you wanted to read the book you had to beat the system. It was ridden in and they're all a little bit different from bustling type is is Emboss letters if you've ever had an engraved invitation so the old fashioned engraving It's the same basic concept. You sort trust the paper on a metal plate that pushes the letters up It is very slow to beat Anytime hand In line type. Two people who are who are very skilled braille leaders. They give us such a look. It's so slow. It's so awkward. It's so tactile nearly complicated Under the fingers and yet for most of the nineteenth century In the us that was the system it was taught in schools The system that that was used perkins's called boston. My type was developed by zemo mobile. Hell and steven spielberg approaching engineer at the school. In the early years any more beautiful than the french version and there are days that isn't saying much and then people got really innovative and so they were trying all sorts of different systems for bail. You notice in the dots system which is much more easily discernible But there were a these three versions actively floating around in regular use. Oh english braille. Which is the the system eventually stuck with American braille which was developed by a teacher at perkins and uses the few stocks for the most common letters so theoretically it would be faster. Meet and right especially right. New york point which has a different system So so the bail that we settled on is two columns of three dots Vertically and and you do you use different combinations of those dots to indicate different letters or combinations of letters And then your point is two rows of dots and you might have up to six outs in a row. So that you you sort of each letter by letter. You're trying to figure out what's going on and it's not a standard shape necessarily and then there's a whole other complication things that people don't know about braille but if you haven't alabama quarter You can sort of begin to look at this There's a form called contracted braille so uncontracted braille use spell out every letter with its own tail cell so aig a is a selby's celsius cell with contracted braille. You can have one cell that stands in for multiple letters. So there's a cell troy end or the or i n g My favorite is that. If you just have a k by itself for the spacing inner side it stands for knowledge so they sort of went through and figured out words that people were going to use all the time and may contractions for those And so there's there's a two hundred sixty. I think contracts i might have that number wrong but hundreds and then there were other systems. That were were floating around. There's moon type which is my favorite of the systems which is sort of symbols roughly based on the alphabet shapes but not quite and their simplified and they're a little easier to read and that one has been very popular historically with people who become visually impaired as adults because they have thirty familiar with the shapes at that point. And it's a little easier to to make the transition but there's been a lot of conversation in the blindness community about making money or tactile tiles. They have been pristine for very long time to get tactile Bills in currency system some countries making a little easier. Some countries helps at a very distinct shapes for their coins. It's much easier to figure out what you're working with The us is not quite as specifically thinking about that piece. Historically there are many ministers about helen and her exceptional that she learned as a blind and deaf person but one thing that did cause a lot of people to question whether or not she was. Really blind really. Death is her time when she was a pilot in the story behind. That is fascinating. I a- susanna. If she was share that with us yes so the she was a pilot in the sense that the pilot that was flying plane made accommodations for her as they hopefully would any untrained pilot. That was flying with them The pilots sat next to helen and communicated instructions to her via polly who was serving her interpreter and the whole story was published in a nineteen forty-six newspaper article entitled wonderful helen. Keller fly flies a plane Which was digitized by the helen keller archive at the american foundation for the blind. And it explains how how. Helen sat next to the pilot and he he was actually flying the plane but she was sort of acting as a co-pilot looking at the article. It says that the plane crew were amazed at her sensitive touch on the controls the shaking or vibration and that she just sat and flew the plane calmly and steadily and that Her her response was it was wonderful to feel the delicate movement of the aircraft through the controls. Wow nurse of steel as a pilot impressive but also impressive is that she wrote books. She was an author and that again caused people to question her. But that did stop helen. She was determined and not only determine she was accepts. You know and successful as an author. Susanna tells us all about that. She was a prolific writer. She wrote a number of books and many many articles for magazines and other publications. Some of her best known books are obviously the story of my life. There was a second sort of volume of that. Midstream which is her biography of her adult life She wrote the world. I live in my religion and optimism. And she actually wrote.

zemo mobile steven spielberg perkins helen boston aig alabama us New york susanna american foundation for the bl helen keller polly Keller Helen Susanna
"helen keller" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"helen keller" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"You Helen Keller, supporting the end of the deep Helen Keller traveling the world raising awareness for people with disabilities, testifying before Congress to advocate for blind people that Helen Geller Yes, Michael Lee reporting on this, By the way, Yes, that Helen Keller, but you know, she's still just another privileged white person. And yet another example of history, telling the story of privileged white Americans. Okay, Here's Here's how you know how stupid this is. I don't care what color you are. We came from How much money you have. Ask yourself this. Would you rather be born Helen Keller. Death in blind. What would you rather be where you are right now. That's what this whole white privilege is such nonsense. What it really is is it took the idea that we can't just let people who are not racist feel like they're not racist. So we've got to figure out a way to say it's not the past that may have influenced People's lives. It's the fact that you're benefiting from the past because of your skin color. Therefore your part of the problem. Therefore you have to do something to make up for things that you had nothing to do with or you're racist to make you feel guilty to make you try to go down this ridiculous path of social justice so called And critical race theory. Where it doesn't even matter what truth is, because there is no objective truth. It's just if you experience and feel it, then it's true for you postmodernism nonsense, and therefore we can brainwash these younger people into feeling really guilty about doing nothing except the fact that their skin color is lighter than yours, and then we can make them do whatever we want them to do, which is what they're doing now. So you could be born the son of two black parents who are extremely wealthy and rich and well off because their doctor and a lawyer or you could be born, a poor white kidnap, elation mountains and somehow, that poor white kid in the Appalachian Mountains is still more privileged..

Helen Keller Helen Geller Appalachian Mountains Congress Michael Lee
"helen keller" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

07:08 min | 1 year ago

"helen keller" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"And then Pat McDonough will take you through the rest of the year. So next week will be a lot of whatever the news of the day is, as well as looking back it probably the worst year certainly in my lifetime. But the worst here definitely the 21st century, maybe last 50 years, so we shall Look back and fund this as they say at 2020, number, 410 wcbm, 6 80 or 100 Wcbm 6 80 talking about all the insanity of the left. You want to talk about the insanity of the left Helen Keller. You would think that Helen Keller would not be Controversial Having died a long time ago, having been born blind and deaf, But you would be wrong because Again. We live in the woke Olympic times. We live in a time when victimhood is Valued and aspired to you think well victim right there. Helen Keller's Got it. But no No Helen Keller's biggest problem is that she's white, the headline in Time magazine co founding the CEO you fighting for labor rights and other Helen Keller accomplishments. Students don't learn in school. Okay. You're thinking Why is Helen Keller in the news? Well, apparently in this wasn't published till just the other day. So even Time magazine didn't seem to notice it while the world marked international Day of persons with disabilities. It was a day for everything. So where's the day for sanity? On December 3rd. The history of people with disabilities is still not fully taught in schools. Does it need to be taught in schools? Does it. The general category of persons with disabilities. Does that need to be taught in schools? My mother lost her right leg when I was nine years old. And I don't think that she certainly didn't sit around and talk about it. You could have wild about it for the rest of her life if she wanted to. She didn't She got on with her life. She lived and did everything she possibly could have come home from school and is above the knee. So she always walked with crutches and should be stand on top of a chair. Wiping the ceiling down in the kitchen. Didn't occur to me to ask. What the hell did you get on the ceiling in the kitchen? But yeah, she's just that's how she she lived. That's how she did it. She could have wallowed in self pity for the rest of for years, but she didn't She fought through it all for the rest of her years. In the U. S. If American school Children learn about any person with disabilities, they learn that Franklin Delano Roosevelt once had polio and use the wheelchair in office, and they learn about death blind activist Helen Keller. Okay. Well, is that It. Shouldn't they learn about people who did things? Those people did things that amazing things that they need to learn about my mom. My mom would would have said no. But then you read down. And you see what the real point is. And again. This is progressivism it work. Halfway through the peace, however, to some black disability rights activists like Anita Cameron Helen Keller is not radical at all. Quote just another despite disabilities, privileged white person and quote and yet another example of history, telling the story of privileged white Americans. Yeah. Helen came when you think of somebody who had it really good. You think of Helen Keller? Don't you? Isn't that the way it is? Then how you spend your time Wake up in a cold sweat. 3 30 in the morning going down. Helen Keller had it so good. What With being blind and deaf. So sick of hearing about how Helen Keller had it rough. She had nothing. I I have to. I don't know. See and hear things. Helen Keller had it really easy. This really where we're seeking to is a society. Yes, it is now. Helen Keller was certainly not perfect. It's you know, the progressive left the beginning of the 20th century through about World War two. The Nazis kind of Took progressivism too far. And American progressives had to recede until about 25 years ago is weird. You know, nobody would go. We're the new We're the new clan. We don't believe in racism anymore. Reclaiming the name and we're really just about everybody getting along. Nobody would do that. Nobody would do that. Because the name Ku Klux Klan has ah, horrible stain on it. But for some reason, progressivism doesn't have that horrible state. They've managed to escape the horrible stain they absolutely deserved. Because they embraced eugenics, which is the elitist liberal idea that they should be able to choose who's worthy of life and who is not and how others should live their lives. It's always Thies, Northeastern. Liberal elitists, not necessarily intelligent but educated there a lot of people educated beyond their intelligence. Dr Jill Biden, for example. But they all believe that they were better and that the unworthy these should likely be sterilized should be stopped should be prevented from reproducing because that was the problem in society was that these undesirables were reproducing. They're dumb. Some people will have dumb kids. We should sterilize them and you look back at the forced sterilization actions taken by progressive government back in that time, and that was the impetus for it. Also, they didn't like Black people very much that in like brown people very much, although there were black and brown members of the progressive movement into eugenics. Because it was really just about class. Was ultimately if you aren't like us, kind of like Democrats now progress If you aren't like us, you aren't worthy of freedom of choice of liberty of living your life. We will decide for you. And if we need you to be unworthy of any of those things, so be it. You just don't know what you're talking about. They used race to couch a lot of it, but there were a lot of black progressives. To sit there and say, Well, Helen Keller she suffered She she had. Yeah, she had it rough, but she had her white privilege to fall back on. Yeah, I don't I don't think Helen would agree with that. I don't think most people who know the story of Helen Keller would agree with that. But again, we're living in the walk Olympics and it's a constant medal ceremony. Let's go back to the phones for one out of the C B m 60 8100 wcbm 6 80 Alex in Baltimore. Thanks for holding welcome back. Thanks for taking my call. Yeah, telling Telegram. Probably read a lot better than most of these people cry. She had it so good. What with her ability to breathe in and out. Need food. I, uh I don't know if you remember this. I'm not sure how long you been in Baltimore..

Helen Keller Anita Cameron Helen Keller Time magazine Pat McDonough Ku Klux Klan Baltimore CEO Dr Jill Biden Franklin Delano Roosevelt C B Thies Northeastern
"helen keller" Discussed on Keep Leading with Student Activities

Keep Leading with Student Activities

03:19 min | 1 year ago

"helen keller" Discussed on Keep Leading with Student Activities

"Be I my sister made a really big name for herself both in high school and in college, so in high school, it was really easy for everyone to just be like, oh that's just actually little sister life. She's going to be great cuz my sister was incredible and so that like helps me paid my way in high school, but then when I got to college it was like yeah, my sister was great, but there are sixty thousand people here not eight hundred people here. And so people some people knew she was she was kind of a big deal. She was pretty cool, but I really had this opportunity to make my own path and so that started with getting involved in my flow. And then I was able to become a counselor and then a chair for my flow. And so I am big on continuity in my organizations. So I like to get in and stick with it. So that's my advice. If you find something and you love it stay in it. Like there's nothing against there's nothing wrong with being a junior and a flow. I did it and I turned out just fine or being a fifth year in a freshman orientation program. Whatever is going to make you happy is where you should be and I don't think anyone should be able to tell you otherwise and so maybe that way you're going to be in the ballroom dance club my one of my second coach here was the president of the ballroom dance club and she loved it me not a great dancer would not side there, but I think it's just about using The experiences that you get to have in college to find what really sets your heart on fire and what really makes you passionate and so like for me that's people and that's why I have stayed in these people centered organizations of like helping people develop a grow so that would be my advice is just finding your Niche and like finding what you love and not being afraid to stay there. Well, that is awesome. Find your Niche find your passions listen to your heart. So with that I actually have a quote for us to end the episode on and this one's by Helen Keller and it's actually very timely with some of the things they were saying so thanks for that. This is the quote is when one door of happiness closes another opens, but we often look so long at the closed-door that we do not see the door that's opened for us. And so I think you talked a lot about that of we were looking at doors of what we couldn't have but then once we realized and she could look down the other paths and saw other people doing it that really showed the light right..

Helen Keller president
"helen keller" Discussed on The Journey

The Journey

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"helen keller" Discussed on The Journey

"Helen Keller was born in eighteen eighty as a typical healthy baby girl. However before she even turned two years, old Helen became severely ill with a fever. In fact, she was not even expected to limb however, Helen made it through. But when the fever laughter it took her hearing and sight along with it. Helen became deaf and blind before she could even speak. Without, the sense of hearing and without the sense of sight Helen grew up isolated in her own world and she acted primarily based on instinct. She was known to have violent tantrums when she wanted something that she couldn't have or to laugh hysterically and uncontrollably when she was happy. But Helen took the world by storm as she learned to thrive despite her disabilities. Some of Helen Keller's accomplishments include her writing twelve books during her lifetime. Becoming. The first blind and deaf person to graduate from a university. She learned to read Braille of course, but also French German Latin and Greek. The scope and the reach of Helen Keller's influence cannot be measured because her life and writings continued to impact generation after generation after generation even to this day. And all it took. Was for someone to believe in her.

Helen Keller fever
4. Believe and hope - burst 01

The Journey

01:40 min | 1 year ago

4. Believe and hope - burst 01

"Helen Keller was born in eighteen eighty as a typical healthy baby girl. However before she even turned two years, old Helen became severely ill with a fever. In fact, she was not even expected to limb however, Helen made it through. But when the fever laughter it took her hearing and sight along with it. Helen became deaf and blind before she could even speak. Without, the sense of hearing and without the sense of sight Helen grew up isolated in her own world and she acted primarily based on instinct. She was known to have violent tantrums when she wanted something that she couldn't have or to laugh hysterically and uncontrollably when she was happy. But Helen took the world by storm as she learned to thrive despite her disabilities. Some of Helen Keller's accomplishments include her writing twelve books during her lifetime. Becoming. The first blind and deaf person to graduate from a university. She learned to read Braille of course, but also French German Latin and Greek. The scope and the reach of Helen Keller's influence cannot be measured because her life and writings continued to impact generation after generation after generation even to this day. And all it took. Was for someone to believe in her.

Helen Keller Fever
"helen keller" Discussed on A Biography Podcast - Life Histories of Successful People

A Biography Podcast - Life Histories of Successful People

08:15 min | 1 year ago

"helen keller" Discussed on A Biography Podcast - Life Histories of Successful People

"Will. Listen to the of men and women who transformed their lives using pure passion and cheer hard will to become the pioneers in their field and change the course of history. This is wizards whose biography podcast. The podcast helps you learn the real truth about successful personalities subscribe now to get access to future episodes. The biography of Helen Keller. Helen Keller was born in eighteen eighty in Alabama to Arthur Henry Keller and Catherine Everett Keller. Her father was a newspaper editor and a captain in the confederate army. Her mother was the daughter of a general in the confederate army. Helen Keller had two siblings and two half siblings from her father's earlier marriage contrary to most cases Helen was not born blind and deaf she was healthy when she was born. But when she was nineteen months, old Helen Keller contracted a mysterious illness which left her death and blind it was described by. As an acute congestion of the brain and stomach reports suggested that the disease could have been meningitis or scarlet fever. This illness left Helen completely devastated. She had no idea of what was going on around her as nobody knew how to communicate with her with age Helen learned a few signs the Turk convey her needs to her family. When she was seven years old, she could even identify people using the vibration from their footsteps. The unruly kid. Her parents showed extra care for her because of her disability. Since he was a kid, she used this to her advantage and dot whatever she wanted by throwing temper tantrums she dominated the entire household and terrorize the servants. But her parents did not do anything against it because they did not know how to communicate with her. So they gave into her tantrums instead of teaching her to behave properly. Inability to form sentences. Sentences are the basic building blocks of languages but sentences themselves are made up of different words like nouns, verbs, prepositions, etc. so we can say that learning a language without learning, it's words as impossible. However. Helen did not know about the existence of words. So she did not know that everything around her name and she can refer to an object using its name. For example, she can touch table and know that it is there but she didn't know the table can be called a table. Since. She did not know the existence of words she couldn't form sentences either so she couldn't form proper thoughts insider brain since most of our thoughts are in the form of sentences, this could have intern frustrated or in mater unruly and wild. One Book that changed everything. When she was six years old, her mother was reading American notes written by Charles Dickens. It contained his findings during his six month trip to North America in Charles Dickens had written about a deaf blind girl called Laura Bridgman born fifty years before Helen Keller like Helen. She had also lost her ability to see and hear when she was two years old Charles Dickens mentioned that she was successfully. Educated in the English language reading this Helen's mother became hopeful. She immediately sent Helen and her father to visit an ear nose and throat specialist. He referred Helen to Alexander Graham, Bell who in turn referred her to the Perkins Institute for the Blind, this is the same institute where Laura Bridgman had studied the Perkins Institute for the blind sent an old student called an Sullivan to teach Helen Keller. And Sullivan Like Helen Keller and Sullivan had vision problems when she was five years old, she had contracted an eye disease that left her mostly blind after joining the Perkins Institute for the blind she underwent eye is that significantly improved her vision she learned sign language, which is used to communicate with deaf people from Laura Bridgman and graduated when she was twenty years old. Soon after graduating, she was sent to teach Helen. The first word an taught Helen was goal she gave adult to Helen which he took gladly then she felt the letters d. o. l. l. on Helen's other hand Helen learned the letters quickly and imitated ends actions to spell the same word. This indicated to him that Helen was intelligent and can be taught. Meeting her mentor. When an Sullivan I met Helen Keller. She was an unruly kid. She ran around the house breaking things eating from others, plates and was astonished none of Helen's family members did anything to stop her behavior or teacher to behave properly and noticed that her family's sympathy only encouraged Helen to continue being unruly. She understood that she must discipline Helen without using force. And felt that the first step to teaching Helen was to teach her how to behave properly. So with the permission of Helen's family and to custody of Helen for two weeks during these two weeks and was the only person Helen could depend on therefore helen couldn't run to her parents went and tried discipline her. During these two weeks, Helen Learn to behave properly in addition to that helen learn several words from an she could spell them out man's hands but she was just imitating what an was doing just like a monkey she thought it was a game. She did not understand that each of these words have meaning and referred to an object and did not know how to make Helen understand that each of these was a word and had a purpose. In her frustration and took hell into a water pump. She put one hand of Helen under flowing water, and on the other hand she spelled out the letters w. a. t. d. r.. It was only then that Helen had the revelation that this flowing substance had a name cold water helen later remembered the event as. I knew then that W. a. t. e. r. mental a wonderful cool something that was flowing over my hand. That living word awakened my soul. gave it like hopefully set it free. Once, she learned the name for Water Helen Bent. Down immediately touched the earth and demanded its name soon, she learned other words to and by the end of the day new thirty words and their meanings. Helen, later described this meeting as her sole birthday. This signaled the beginning of a forty nine year relationship between and and Helen this interaction between and Helen is brilliantly portrayed in the film. The miracle. Worker. Formal education. Helen's formal education began in eighteen, eighty eight when she and and moved to the Perkins Institute. In eighteen ninety four they moved to New York for higher studies at the Horace Mann School for the deaf in eighteen, ninety six, she got admission into the Cambridge School for young ladies. Nineteen hundred she started her bachelors degree in Radcliffe College. Harvard. University it was unthinkable at that time and age for a deaf blind woman to achieve proper form education through such reputed institutes. But Helen had a thirst for knowledge and helped her quench it. Mark Twain who was impressed by Helen and her perseverance introduced her to an oil magnate who later sponsored Helen's education in nineteen nine, hundred, four Helen graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree from Radcliffe school she was the first deaf blind person to get this degree. Learning to speak. Helen was determined to Converse with people conventionally. So she slowly began reading lips with her hands in speaking small sentences. She used sign language very proficiently and became an expert in Braille. The writing system used for the visually impaired Helen spent the rest of her life giving speeches and lectures on how she overcame the disabilities that crippled and became an inspiration to death and blind people across the world. She shared the joy that life gave her in her speeches and motivated young women and men to live life to the fullest. Personal Life. The nineteen o five and married John macy and John and Helen move to forest hills in New York along with.

Helen Helen Keller Helen Learn Helen Bent Arthur Henry Keller Charles Dickens Catherine Everett Keller confederate army Perkins Institute Laura Bridgman Sullivan editor Alabama New York North America Radcliffe College Mark Twain intern Horace Mann School
"helen keller" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

05:34 min | 2 years ago

"helen keller" Discussed on KTOK

"As superheroes first responders our teachers and our neighbors helping neighbors and perhaps ironically given my profession Helen Keller he says it is selfishness and complaint pervert the minds with this choice clears and sharpens the vision and on behalf of our family let's look closely at what we can do for others I think we've always done that about as well as anyone anywhere that's the history I see is running today that's what I believe will tell our grandchildren good and now we're going back to the president who's outlining his plan to re open the economy this strategy is based on hard verifiable data I want to thank Dr Burks for her incredible leadership in crafting these guidelines in consultation with scientists experts and medical professionals across government Dr Burks will explain the guidelines in more detail in a few moments then doctor felt she has been absolutely terrific we've all worked together and we've worked together well they are interested in the health of our country and we're all interested in the viability and making us truly great again we took the greatest economy in the history of the world and we closed it in order to win this war and we're in the process of winning it now our approach outlines three phases in restoring our economic life we are not opening all at once but one careful step at a time and some states will be able to open up sooner than others some states are not in the kind of trouble that others around now that we have passed the peak in new cases we're starting our life again we're starting rejuvenation of our economy again in a safe and structured and very responsible fashion our strategy will continue to protect senior citizens and other vulnerable populations while allowing military and other a groups of incredibly talented people to go about their real business and the business that's supposed to be hard at work at doing and nobody does it better our military is the greatest anywhere in the world and we're so thankful for what they've done healthy Americans will now be able to return to work as conditions on the ground a low instead of a blanket shut down we will pursue it focused on sheltering the highest risk individuals so important we're establishing clear scientific metric and benchmarks on testing new case growth and hospital capacity that must be met before advancing to each phase and that's each phase specifically in the re opening of our country this is a gradual process as the caseload in a state continues to go down restrictions can continue to be eased and come off throughout the process citizens will continue to be called upon to use all of their weapons in this war vigorous hygiene teleworking when possible staying at home if you feel sick maintaining social distance sanitizing commonly used surfaces and being highly conscious of their surroundings those are our weapons and they're very powerful weapons in the governors will be empowered to tailor an approach that meets the diverse circumstances of their own states every state is very different they're all beautiful we love them all but they're very very different if they need to remain closed we will allow them to do that and if they believe it is time to re open we will provide them the freedom and guidance to accomplish that task and very very quickly depending on what they wanted to we are also encouraging states to work together to harmonize their regional efforts we'll have numerous cases where states have worked and will be working very very closely together as we re open we know that there will be continued hardships and challenges ahead our goal will be to quickly identify and address any outbreaks and put them out rapidly if the virus returns in the fall as some scientists think it may possibly these guidelines will ensure that our country is up and running so that we can likewise put it out quickly at the heart of our strategy is the vital role of medical research especially for therapies that will significantly improve outcomes for high risk patients and reduce.

Helen Keller
"helen keller" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"helen keller" Discussed on KGO 810

"The extraordinary Helen Keller media San Francisco celebrates women's history month here's the thing about new cherry vanilla coke though cherries named first all the flavors tastes just as great I mean it could have just as easily been vanilla cherry coke or it could have been coke cherry vanilla and since it's too amazing flavors of coke it might have been cold vanilla cherry coke or cherry vanilla coke coke unless you're in France which would make it a cocktail of an island and a Chevy Democrat New Jersey to look so good together and your cherry vanilla coke zero sugar same great taste zero sugar great news we found a pot at the end of the rainbow but it wasn't full of gold it was full of four thousand dollars in cash and we want to give it to you I think you have the luck of the Irish teacher to win the luck of the Irish giveaway today and you could win our pot full of cash this will be a Saint paddy's day holiday you'll never forget to add or stop by our site today and try your luck at winning the luck of the Irish giveaway Dr Sanjay Gupta how do you know if you're drinking too much if you have to ask you probably are I'm doctor Sanjay Gupta CNN's chief medical correspondent officially speaking according to the CDC there are four kinds of excessive drinking drinking when you're pregnant drinking when you're under twenty one heavy drinking and binge drinking according to the CDC binge drinking is the most common form of excessive drinking and is defined as four or more drinks for women five or more drinks for men on a single occasion according to the CDC adultery now the state to do binge drink or drinking more when they do it twelve percent more over the last decade if you're curious on average people binge drink the most in Wyoming and the least in Massachusetts it does bring serious health risks car accidents domestic violence stroke heart and liver disease drinking every now and then is okay take it easy when you do I'm doctor Sanjay Gupta hoping you live a better life where did everybody go everybody's at McDonald's because the old bay filet O. fish with it tanky tasty tartar sauce is better but it's just too for five dollars and you can mix or match with the original filet O. fish but didn't they know they can get it with my delivery through ubereats or doordash skews me this is a mile away from the office of those every single item at regular price make delivery available at participating McDonald's delivery prices may be higher than that response taxes.

San Francisco France New Jersey Saint paddy Dr Sanjay Gupta CNN CDC Wyoming Massachusetts McDonald Helen Keller Chevy liver disease
"helen keller" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"helen keller" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And I think I I could tell you that that was the end of the story and I think if I did tell you that that would be kind of like saying that god lives up in the sky and the truth is the story really didn't end there although I was sure that it had a couple years later when she and I are both juniors in high school we got cast as husband and wife in the school play we were Mr and Mrs color in the very serious drama the miracle worker the story of how Helen Keller learn to read and write and all of a sudden I didn't need to think of anything to say to her anymore it was all just written out for me and I don't know if that's why but even in between scenes she and I found we could talk easily and jokes easily and we laughed a lot like more than I'd ever laughed with anybody in the play was supposed to be helping colors father this like stern sad southern man and I really wanted to do a good job at a rehearsal all I thought about was talking with their and laughing with their there is one moment where she and I were laughing so hard we were just crying and then the lights came up and the scene started and I had to slam my fist on the dining room table and shout damn it Katie she can't say the southern accent that I prepared for the wrong.

Helen Keller Katie
Heroines Week Helen Keller and Annie Sullivan

Chompers

02:22 min | 2 years ago

Heroines Week Helen Keller and Annie Sullivan

"And Annie Sullivan lived a little more than one hundred years ago. Helen was blind and deaf which means she couldn't see or hear. Her world was dark and quiet. Helen's parents wanted to communicate with her but they couldn't figure out how she couldn't learn to speak because she couldn't hear people talk. She had a hard time expressing what she needed and she'd have temper tantrums out of frustration. That's where any Sullivan comes in. Switzer rushing to the other side of the top of your mouth and brush all the way to the molars in the back. Helen's parents knew she needed help. So they hired Anne Sullivan to be her teacher. Anne did her best to teach Helen some words by spelling them. Into the palm of Helen's hand she gave Helen a doll and traced the letters D. O. L. l. The WORD DOLL INTO. Helen's Paul but Helen didn't quite seem to understand Switzer rushing to the bottom of your mouth pressure front teeth. One day and he got an idea using a water pump. She held Helen's hand under the water and spelled W. a. t. e. r. the word water over and over and over again. Finally Helen got it. Everything had a name. Helen became obsessed with learning and worked. Hard to learn a ton of words. Ellen learned to read using special language called Braille. She learned to write and to learn to speak switcher rushing to the other side of the bottom of your mouth and get your tongue brush to how to college. She published books and she started her own foundation to help other people with disabilities. Helen traveled to thirty. Nine countries met with world leaders and in nineteen sixty four was given a special award the Presidential Medal of freedom and Anne well. Helen and Anne remained lifelong friends and movie was made about. Annie's work called the miracle worker because their determination and bravery Helen Keller and Annie Sullivan are. Today's chompers heroin.

Helen Keller Annie Sullivan Anne Switzer Heroin Ellen W. A. Paul
"helen keller" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"helen keller" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"So we need to know when the show out we have the opportunity to help for transfer in this in this nation I understand that this is not about me this is about Helen Keller hello we can do very little get the we can do so much no more generational multi gender multi racial no me every people when store owner ordinary extraordinary things begin to happen we are going to do this to have somebody we need to the young and you know these folks only about nobody but the young folk from the youngest no we we need you to come out of somebody that you will come out well we'll show you my grandmother's always show you bet and I can tell you a little somebody and we are going to show them so I need you to do something for me do you live for them for yourself not to my absolute once had the courage to stand up for yourself and in the courts for somebody else can you look to him for somebody else with both it'll stand up in the air I want you to re imagine I want you to imagine positioning but everyday people of this nation and what they have right now I want you to imagine having a champion the White House okay Medicare for all all with medical we we will be able to do this.

Medicare Helen Keller White House
The impact of hearing loss

Second Opinion

05:53 min | 3 years ago

The impact of hearing loss

"Rudy is a seventy two year old retired electrocution he and his wife live alone in a small house over the past couple of years Rudy has become more isolated. He no longer sees his friends goes to the movies or watches TV. In fact, he met many of the diagnostic criteria of depression. This is Dr Michael Wilks with a second opinion in the exam room was I turned to reach for my stethoscope on the nearby counter. I kept talking to Rudi I realized though he couldn't hear me when I wasn't facing him. I turned back in asteroid if he'd noticed any trouble with his hearing reluctantly, he said he had but had ignored the problem because it made him feel old and he didn't want to wear a hearing aid. I tried to suggest that he might seem older without hearing eight people might think he was ignoring them or not paying attention. It was Helen Keller who was blind and deaf. Who once said that blindness separates people from things deftness separates people from people for people over the age of sixty forty percent of a hearing loss that affects the quality of their life. Hearing loss has a more profound effect on the quality of life, then diabetes, heart disease or thrice hearing aids can be life, saving not only extending the length of life. But also the quality of life. A recent study in JAMA showed that if people have an uncorrected hearing loss. There is a forty percent higher risk of depression. Also for people with a hearing loss healthcare costs or forty six percent higher. They have forty percent more hospitals ations, and they stay on average two days longer compared to those without a hearing loss. Unfortunately, hearing aids are will outside the reach of many Americans most people. Wait seven to ten years before they get evaluated for a hearing aid. And only thirty percent of people who could benefit from a hearing aid will ever get one a hearing aid cost between two thousand and four thousand dollars per year. And they're not covered by Medicare or many private insurances. Now, you might wonder why Medicare the insurance for older Americans wouldn't cover hearing aids will Medicare's forbidden from covering hearing aids. Because in one thousand nine hundred sixty five legislators considered hearing loss normal part of aging, and according to the thinking at the time, why would an insurance intended for diseases cover something that was normal. Well, the sales of hearing aids which require prescriptions have been enormously profitable for manufacturers. But as with other disruptive technologies the world is changing fast over the. The counter hearing aids are now available at a fraction of the cost and many are linked to smartphones. That also offer transcription and other services. It also seems that everyone these days has earphone sticking out of their ears and facing cool. So perhaps the stigma is also changing well Rudy ended up getting one hearing aid. That's all he could afford. According to both Rudy and his wife his life has changed radically for the better. He's back to socializing watching TV at normal volumes and going to the movies as for me. I am now far more careful to ask everyone. Whether they've had any trouble with hearing. This is Dr Michael Wilks with a second opinion this season unless notes from KCRW how does it feel to be like a girl plane in instrument of this? Well, how's it feel to be a man asking simple questions? I mean what? Had I said, no to this invitation from John Fahey, I would have for the rest of my life wondered what I had missed. We thinking about Billy Tipton it very interesting time because I don't know that young people and older people agree on the meaning of trends. I love you for the greatest, Sean. I love that. It is an unholy album made was holy methods. Hey, everyone. I'm just gonna hopper a music journalist and author and your host for season two of lawsuits. Unless notes relook at music's untold stories this season is packed. It's about legacies. How do they hold up? And how do they change over time disco say off the truly means beyond disco? Learn how decades on a sunken find new meaning something different than when it was written. You feel like it's up justifying women feel. Yeah. Now, fifty six, and it's freaking embarrassing embarrassing to seventeen years old. You can't just write it office being on. Here from pioneering women who've been written out of music history. I get there and producer says, no, no, no, we're not doing your music. We have a script here. And we want you to do the sound. Plus find out what happens when we apply. Our twenty nineteen politics to nineteen seventy four songs, we didn't think about it as we will all go band. We were out of the point. We just lived the music. The first episode of the season of loss notes arrives April twenty fifth. Subscribe now wherever you get your podcasts.

Dr Michael Wilks Rudy Medicare Rudi Helen Keller Diabetes Billy Tipton Jama John Fahey Kcrw Sean Producer Forty Percent Four Thousand Dollars Sixty Forty Percent Forty Six Percent Seventy Two Year Seventeen Years