3 Burst results for "Helen Greenspan"

"helen greenspan" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:25 min | 2 years ago

"helen greenspan" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The data that we had a little bit of Tom Kaine. Stella tighter, ADP employment change, come again, two thirteen the estimate eighteen one the revised number in the previous month. Just a little bit lies about nothing. Drastically dropped from seventy one to sixty three. So real city about the labor market governance of payrolls on Friday absolutely Peter from Chapel Hill just stops by and says put on more Mckee. I mean, that's all he said forget Michael Mckee right now down in Washington DC is he gives up for the federal center ninety nine one newsroom where Kevin surly holds court in the afternoon for the Washington audience. We've been invited on Kevin cirilli. No even been invited to come on our show Kevin has an invited us onto here. So cutting chiseled you're still away. Kevin knows. I'm an surveillance nap you'll you'll napping. Yes. You nap at that time. This is surveillance. You sleep through this show me. And he now that you sleep through his shot. He does. Next to Peter Chapel Hill. Hey, Mike, looking forward to hearing you in the news comes lights of what the question of chairman, pal. Should I whisper? So I don't wake up. You know, they're going to try to make this as much of a non event as possible. He'll be talking about the fed being patient and watching the data, obviously, the data are good. And given the way the fed would operate if you were going to make an announcement about the balance sheet, it would come in the statement at two o'clock. They would have an explanation of how it would work, etc. In the same way. The you know, the would do that. So I don't expect questions about the balance sheet for chairman Powell, and depending on when I get to ask him that might be something I'd asked but. Kind of fundamental question about the economy is when we have this kind of labor market, and the labor market doesn't show any signs of weakness at this point. It was driving your rate moves last year. Why do you need to change? Why do you need to pause? Why do you need to be nervous? Did you just kind of sell out to the markets, stinky chatter on Bloomberg TV short time ago said what happened in December was the markets mugged the fed and that may be right? It may not be that. There was any reason for the fed to panic as much as they did at the thought of the market's going down which raises an important question market market dependent or data dependent for twenty nine thousand eight. Yeah, I do have that as an idea for a question. What is it that you really watching here? Obviously, they're watching the data. The question is for people in the markets, if the fed raises rates, why is that a bad thing? Because if they're raising rates that means that inflation is going up and jobs are created and everything is working out. Well, so that's kind of a hard thing to to to to figure out is why everybody is so panicked about what might be going on. Michael. Goes to the pressure. You're under the lights very bright in there. You're you know, Applebaum of the New York Times are Craig tourists, and you're trying to really sophisticated questions, and they always lead to March twenty may one June nineteen am I right that I'd never seen a lack of forward visibility out of a central Bank chitchat, then we have this day. Well. I think you do have forward visibility in the sense that for two reasons one the fed is on hold until they see the data and to we don't have data the GDP about today. So we know there on hold. So you've got that visibility. And then marched they've basically signaled they need more data. They need more time. So for for for these first two meetings, probably having so what do you use your question about the resurrection of the New York Rangers? What do you talk about? Or who's going to get the number one draft choice in the NHL? John would know there's a big debate about the new striker for West Ham about as well. But. But. But the the big issue for the fed at this point is does economy unfold as they anticipated. They went into the year thinking, we would have strength that would diminish as the year goes on. But at this point, it looks like it's not diminishing coming into the year confidence is down. But hiring is still very strong, it appears so where do they think the economy is going from here? There's no forecast today. No, new dot plot. So no new hints on where they're going. We'll have to depend on chairman Paul's view of things. But yeah. Is there any new odds that people can pick up on? I guess is what they're going to get your thoughts on something came up. Yesterday was Jeff good lack of double line. That tweeted out the spread between how we feel right now consumer confidence in the presence and the spread between that and how we feel about the future and see mccown about the future big big spread. And Jeff Gordon saying that's a flashing light. For a lot of people. What are your thoughts on that? I would respectfully disagree with me. He makes a lot more money than I do. So he's probably a lot smarter than I am the Buffalo Bills. The history of the history of consumer confidence. Is it bears little relation to consumer spending? Helen Greenspan famously was asked about this years ago. And he said we watch what they do not what they say. It's probably bad news. Maybe Donald Trump and people's view of the political situation in the country, but it doesn't really impact on their spending. If we get strong jobs reports if the economy. Continues to perk along gas. Stay low confidence could come back. Protect Michael Mckee in the press conference today. There are three over people you really wanna lean forward. And listen to an always Mr. Mckee is one of them out of all of our economic coverage and honored that he is in Washington for this fed day as well futures have back a little bit yen one oh nine fifty two Stirling John one thirty seventy four fractionally weaker is we don't renegotiate and then negotiate but dunk negotiate because you memorize the amendments eight amendments think I took my time to memorize those amendments. I got I got to the second. I notice vet bills eaten the third amendment. This is Bloomberg stay with us..

fed Michael Mckee chairman Kevin Washington Kevin cirilli Stella tighter Kevin surly Tom Kaine Peter Chapel Hill Donald Trump Chapel Hill New York Rangers Buffalo Bills Bloomberg TV Jeff Gordon New York Times Bloomberg NHL
"helen greenspan" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

13:13 min | 2 years ago

"helen greenspan" Discussed on WTVN

"You're you're closer to that. So you can connect to it. Then when you come to the waking state, you are obviously on this side of sleep. So you can't transition back and forth real easily. And then when you're in your highest and most creative moments, you're really channeling this energy picture yourself as being a combination of mouse in video camera. For something that runs your dreams. And you you sorta project out into this world, it's it's like the allegory of the cave in Plato weird. There's a fire burning behind you. And you cast your your archetypes cash shadows on the surface of the cave that because you can't turn back and what directly at the light. All you get to see us the shadows. And that's that's sort of how what psychology looks at Georgia. I've always known you to be an economic forecaster and things like that. How did you get interested in this? I started having a I am a number of dreams that have had real almost frighteningly accurate. Predictions contained within the frame. It started off. Gosh, I think I was well, however, long ago the Deepwater Horizon. Well, still happened, right? I wrote that up and posted it on the urban survival. Website about eighteen hours before the event started happening at ten o'clock that night, it was in April some years back, and and and I describe an event which was fire oil platform in. There were a lot of details about it that turned out to be accurate, and then some years later, my wife, and I were were visiting out one of her sons lives up in pace in Arizona. And we were staying at the casino up there Matata. And so we were relaxing. I got up in the morning publish my column, which deals with the economy, usually, and and I finished writing the column went to the casino had ham and eggs for breakfast and came back to the room. It was too early to take off and drive off for Texas again. So I took a nap. And in the nap I had this pressure dream I dreamed that when we got. Up to Hieber Arizona's highway sixty coming out of the road from Hebron over to Holbrooke would be closed and we'd have to take a detour. And on the detour we would see orange cones and roadwork and we'd be driving on a shoulder. Well, I didn't think much about it. And when we left the casino and headed for Albuquerque, guess what got to Hebrew the road was closed due to a fatal accident. We ended up having to drive all the way to shallow and then back through snowflake, which is where my wife's from. And and finally made it over to home run. But you know, you you you start having those kinds of experiences, and it gets to be a what the hell is going on moment. They should you have hinted that this entire mapping of the human mind might give us insight into what happens when we die. Yeah. I'm not. So sure. Gets kind of deep. I'm not so sure that Shakespeare wasn't onto a lot more. Because in my my whole family on my dad's side and Scottish descent and so forth. The tradition in our family is that death can be well thought of as the big sleep. And if it's the big sleep that goes on till a judgment day, or we wake up in another mass with a video Cam reincarnation into another life that maybe that's not holding. So when you develop a comfort with living in a different environment and start mapping out. What that environment is all about, and you can return there on a recurring basis. You really it really shakes your life up. You become I won't say immune to fear of. Gas. Nobody looks forward to that. All the accounts are that that's like jumping into a big swimming pool. But on the other hand if you have been actively working on cleaning up your dreams and your dream world. So that you actually have personal dreamworld that he returned to. And where everything is. It's almost like Sesame Street. Cool right here. There's there's no really frightening stuff going on because you work through that. And she began writing down your greens. It it gives you a great amount of comfort knowing that. When you go to sleep. You're not just clicking out. You're actually going somewhere. What is? What is the dream state and consciousness mean to you? Well, I I used in the in the book, I I tried to explain it like a piece of. For radio. I think if I handed you a piece of cat five computer capable right? Okay. I wouldn't know what to do with it. Yeah. You well what we talk about it? I mean, you know, at at I it's just pizza cable. We don't know what to do with it. And then over time we figure out that we can put DC voltages thread, we can measure those voltages, but we're not sure about anything else. Well, if you have the right instrumentation, you find out that the entire internet could be available on that. He's capable. And and that's of what dreams are like, it's it's like waking up in deciding that you can access this huge mass consciousness that previously was hidden from you. Well, when you say hidden from you, how hidden a lot of people can't drink, and it's it it's not a personal shortcoming. It's just they haven't made it a priority to be able to recall what they were dreaming about and bring it back to the waking state and think about it, for example, if you drink a lot of alcohol, you don't dream as much or as well dreaming takes this kind of dreaming lucid dreaming generally takes place in the last two hours of a regular sleep cycle. So if you don't have regular sleep cycles, you're probably not going to have a lot of lucid dreams because I was in broadcasting forever and my alarm clock runs my life. My whole body is geared waking up at five o'clock central time. And so in in my circadian rhythms. I drop into the rim state around to. Well, one two o'clock in the morning. And so I have these regular periods. Not every night, but many nights where I had these amazing adventures torch. It's like, it's like closing your eyes going to the max theater, not just the I max would be with the inclusive sound, and and and the overwhelming visuals, but the tactical tastes the smells waking up and being able to remember an entire adventure. The I MAC that you didn't have to bother with during the waking state. It's really spectacular stuff when you work on it. Are you convinced that in your dream state or higher consciousness, you're able to see the future? Yes. But it's coded and that's hard to explain you get visions of it. You get snips of it. There's one book wondering my explain in the book where a dear friend of mine and my wife are on a train and we're traveling through Europe. It's the middle of the night the train stops. It's pitch dark. We go outside off of the train. We feel like far off in the distance. And I actually remember George Nuri's. Vice one of your your rob writings on on working light. Go to the light. So we win. Yup. And the three of us are in this bream lifelong friend, and my wife, and I and we're in this European kind of a village, and it's a very strange place. There's a railroad station. There's a railroad crossing the train is back up the tracks. For some reason, we can't go to it. And there's all this construction stuff going on creams, and so on and celebrate so, you know, there's a deli was either four or eight kilometers away sometimes in dreams, the mileages aren't quite right. I didn't think he woke up and that was the dreams. And and and so nothing particularly outstanding until. Five days later, I happened to be scanning some images, and there was my village. Train station cranes. It was the site of the head on train collision in southern Germany. Jeez. I mean, you have those not all the time. But it's you don't wanna have them all the time. Well, yeah, you don't. But that's what I'm seeing about the coding, you you get pieces of the future. You don't get to control it. But it's like coming out of I max and and seeing a trailer for mean. The theater near you. When you make these economic predictions. Do you use your dream state now to do not at all not at all? The the numbers are the numbers. And I'm a data guy. There is a little intuition in in my personal trading that that doesn't seem to have any particular. How you do it? I do better trading. The numbers rather than hunches because hunches. In the waking state are pretty dangerous thing. I I've worked on. I think I've read every book kind gambling that seemed to be even closely related. I've been many casinos. I love to see knows not because I win that. Because I teach myself how to spot statistical variations push back and walk away from the casino when I'm, you know, two standard deviations above where I should be. That's interesting. I I like to do some of that too. Sometimes I'd love to look at odds and how they work I was looking at a roulette table once in Vegas. I and you can bet on the colors of the numbers of all those kinds of things. I don't even do relate. I don't understand it. But I I'm looking at the red and black numbers because you can also bet on the colors, and I'm looking at this this thing because they've they've. Record every number in every color. That's hit and they're six reds in a row that of hip and I'm saying statistically, put all your money on black. It's going to happen in yet two or three more reds came up. It's it. How could that happen George? Well, I mean, unfortunately, the laws big numbers allows for a pretty good sized deviation. I mean runs advance fourteen numbers are not out of the question when you're talking about something like a fifty fifty chance each individual chances fifty fifty fifty. That's right. And eventually it'll balance out, right? Yeah. But you may not be able to what was Helen Greenspan's remark about the stock market. The market can remain irrational longer than drugs. Nouri can remain solvent. Kind of thing. And so yeah at fourteen million spins of the roulette wheel, it'll average out you'll be broke long before. Then that's true that if you keep it up like that. That's right. And you can't really apply dreams to that. But what you can do is is your your personal..

George Nuri forecaster Arizona Georgia Deepwater Horizon Albuquerque Europe Germany Hieber Arizona Texas Shakespeare Cam Helen Greenspan Nouri Holbrooke Hebron rob
"helen greenspan" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

07:17 min | 2 years ago

"helen greenspan" Discussed on Ideas

"Public. Greenspan? So he became a very influential well known person largely through the assistance of random through his participation in the rand movement and giving speeches four and that was one of the things that really helped his career over the years. Link for human species. Personal. From somehow. Since Sofer steam in business. He was pretty big in the early days of the collective he he became powerfully became head of the council of economic advisers nineteen seventy four became head of the Federal Reserve and writing say there is a limit. What is that is so fixed about human nature? There is a limit to our Reverend. There was a limit to the degree to which we will be over others. Vast majority of Americans have indicated ventures. How they live their lives for considering fourth. Otherwise over time, he became a powerful in government in the United States government, and he was always a random Helen Greenspan. Even started his own lecture series called free enterprise economics, and he contributed pieces to on offense newsletter the objective st- became known as a a real major free markets thinker. And if you look at the at the essays that he wrote for rand which republished in capitalism, the unknown ideal which is in print which you can buy pick up at any bookstore nowadays extremist except one of them women's call the assault on integrity. And that's it's an argument for eliminating, and it kind of regulation even building codes, even safety codes and fire codes just just just getting rid of them. You can find a link to Alan Greenspan's essays on our website, CBC dot CA slash ideas. When Greenspan became federal chairman of the US reserve in nineteen eighty seven he immediate. Began repealing laws that he saw as impeding the free market. The most important one was a law enacted in nineteen thirty three under the new deal a law that separated Wall Street from main street called the glass steagle act class Steagall offered protection to people who entrusted their savings to commercial banks Greenspan got rid of it. And it continued down the deregulation path for the next twenty years. Fluential man familiar 's he was not able to impose rand's philosophy on the United States, but enough of for beliefs gut into the system sort of pushed away through the sheets of paper like spilled Bod living. They push their way through society that the in fact certain aspects of her of her philosophy were in fact, an act in nineteen ninety eight Greenspan gave lenders the green light to gamble. And so they did private lenders led the way and later commercial banks jumped in all engaging in high risk ventures two years later Greenspan lowered interest rates to one percent fueling. And even bigger boom for business, but the low rates meant banks could no longer get a good return on the money. They were lending so they turn to high yield mortgage backed securities, and we all know where that led the Dow Jones industrial average dropped more than nine hundred points. President trading at six. The early two thousand win over the counter, derivatives radio regulated. And this was one of the one of the underlying reasons for the two thousand eight financial crisis where we did not have adequate regulation of derivatives, and that can be traced directly back to Greenspan and from Alan Greenspan back to on rand no political economic system had proved eloquently or had benefited mankind greatly capitalism. The moral code, which is implicit in capitalism. Is that men everyman? He's an end in himself. Not demeaned to the end of others. That men must be but he's on fake. And that men might do is run another as traitors by our choice to benefit by the mid nineteen sixties, Alan Greenspan and the rest of Iran's collective had brought prominence and respect ability to the objectives movement. She was now attracting an older more highly educated audience. Than before einste- books had already become required. Reading among younger people the generation that would later be called baby boomers, but I'm dismay some of these boomers to be were starting to call themselves. Libertarians she'd already given up on conservatives who to Bandon reason for religion. But she thought hippie libertarians were worse because they abandoned reason for drug addled self-indulgence, she had come by that by the end of her career to really prize rationality above all else. So she despised the hippies. She thought they were sort of mindless mystical collectivist. But she didn't like libertarians either. Even though libertarians were saying, we are inspired by Iran, and her vision of a society with strictly limited government on rand is are is where we got started. And it's absolutely true. For the libertarian movement in the nineteen seventies it really grows out of appreciation for Iran's works. And so they would be holding her up is there. No actual leader. And she would say don't make me into your hero. This pattern of cherry pick. Picking and misrepresentation that had begun with conservatives in the fifties would continue to play her even long after her death eines work. Also, inspired a new generation of conservatives to do their own cherry picking as conservatives were working out who they were and what they stood for. They were looking for deals, and they were looking for principals in atlas shrugged seemed to predict that the liberal policies being followed would lead to ruin. And there was another way didn't had to do with unfettered capitalism in the celebration of individual became very attractive for many young people and atlas shrugged really became the sort of gateway drug to the conservative movement. We're republican. As much more than the result of their political differences or miracle mistakes and many people inspired by rand turn to Barry Goldwater. The result of a fundamentally absolutely wrong view of man as nature and his destiny. And also had a friendship of sorts with Goldwater and also supported him very strongly in her newsletter. So if you liked Iran, and then you looked into a newsletter you find her pointing at Barry Goldwater? You're alive for your your liberties return of yours. And if you went and learn about Barry Goldwater, he might remind you a little bit of John Galt. Elevators. Down bridges. No less than in life himself in just Welby. Our guy. Is he took on this sort of independent, westerner persona? He was going to stand up for the individual smothering government not. In the land of collectivism, not. Bullying.

Helen Greenspan rand Alan Greenspan Iran Barry Goldwater United States Federal Reserve Welby assault President einste CBC chairman John Galt Steagall